Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 ORNLTM-2007147, Vol. 5 Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research...

2

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ... The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy enhance safety and security, and develop nuclear power as an energy source for industrial applications Information ... U.S. Department of Energy www.energy.gov DOE Office of Nuclear Energy www.nuclear

Kemner, Ken

3

Nuclear power eyed to generate industrial heat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power eyed to generate industrial heat ... The American Nuclear Society has called for "an aggresssive national policy aimed at demonstrating specific capabilities and providing incentives for the application of nuclear power to meeting industrial energy needs." ...

1983-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

4

California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

5

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: September 26, 2014 Data for: July 2014 Next Release: October 2014 Year Capacity and Generation by State and Reactor...

6

"1. Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois" Illinois" "1. Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330 "2. Byron Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2300 "3. LaSalle Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2238 "4. Baldwin Energy Complex","Coal","Dynegy Midwest Generation Inc",1785 "5. Quad Cities Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",1774 "6. Dresden Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",1734 "7. Powerton","Coal","Midwest Generations EME LLC",1538 "8. Elwood Energy LLC","Gas","Dominion Elwood Services Co",1350

7

THE BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY The first time that electricity was generated from nuclear energy occurred in an experimental breeder reactor in Idaho in 1951. The idea for a breeder reactor (a reactor that could produce more fuel than it uses) first occurred to scientists working on the nation's wartime atomic energy program in the early 1940's. Experimental evidence indicated that the breeding of nuclear fuel was possible in a properly designed reactor, but time and resources were not then available to pursue the idea After the war, the newly established Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy) assigned some of the nation's nuclear skills and resources to developing peaceful uses of the atom. The large bodies of uranium ore found in the 1950's were

8

The National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator Activities OAS-L-14-11 August 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and...

9

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of enhanced heat transfer in the primary heat exchanger. After blowdown, there will be a loss of the heat sink. < Leak into reactor primary system. The total gas inventory in the...

10

Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology September 29, 2014 - 11:06am Addthis Fostering the Next...

11

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

12

Electric generating prospects for nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the nuclear power plants in the U.S. today are of the light-water variety. In many parts of the U.S. these plants are competitive with plants burning coal, but the electricity that they generate will be more costly in the future as uranium supplies ...

Manson Benedict

1970-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 - Datasets...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Energy Information ... World Net Nuclear Electric ... Dataset Activity Stream World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 International data showing world net...

14

Microstructural Characterization of Next Generation Nuclear Graphites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

Karthik Chinnathambi; Joshua Kane; Darryl P. Butt; William E. Windes; Rick Ubic

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Future Trends in Nuclear Power Generation [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Future Trends in Nuclear Power Generation [and Discussion...the Calder Hall reactors were ordered...building and operating nuclear power stations...situations, a high nuclear share of new capacity...1980s. The fast reactor, prototypes of...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Suez SNC-Lavalin Nuclear to replace US steam generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SNC-Lavalin Nuclear (USA) has signed a contract with Xcel Energy to replace the Unit #2 steam generators at the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant (PINGP) in Welch, Minnesota.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor " "PlantReactor Name","Generator ID","State","Type","2009 Summer Capacity"," 2010 Annual...

18

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Radiation Control Program The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in Maine. The Legislature

19

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home ¬Ľ Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

20

NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative September 09, 2008 Washington, DC NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resources. However, the technology has not been demonstrated...nonrenewable natural gas), although various measures...energy. Outlook Nuclear technology is at a crossroads. The...International Forum, ďA Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems February 28, 2005 - 10:33am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC-The Bush Administration today took a major step in advancing international efforts to develop the next generation of clean, safe nuclear energy systems. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined representatives from Canada, France, Japan, and the United Kingdom to sign the first multilateral agreement in history aimed at the development of next generation nuclear energy systems. The work of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is essential to advancing an important component of the Bush Administration's comprehensive energy strategy in the development of next generation nuclear energy technologies.

25

Water generator replaces bottled water in nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WaterPure International Incorporated of Doylestown, Pennsylvania, USA, has announced that it has placed its atmospheric water generator (AWG) inside a selected nuclear power plant.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cost Savings of Nuclear Power with Total Fuel Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of fast reactor (FR) generated electricity with pyro-processing is estimated in this article. It compares favorably with other forms of energy and is shown to be less than that produced by light water reactors (LWR's). FR's use all the energy in natural uranium whereas LWR's utilize only 0.7% of it. Because of high radioactivity, pyro-processing is not open to weapon material diversion. This technology is ready now. Nuclear power has the same advantage as coal power in that it is not dependent upon a scarce foreign fuel and has the significant additional advantage of not contributing to global warming or air pollution. A jump start on new nuclear plants could rapidly allow electric furnaces to replace home heating oil furnaces and utilize high capacity batteries for hybrid automobiles: both would reduce US reliance on oil. If these were fast reactors fueled by reprocessed fuel, the spent fuel storage problem could also be solved. Costs are derived from assumptions on the LWR's and FR's five cost components: 1) Capital costs: LWR plants cost $106/MWe. FR's cost 25% more. Forty year amortization is used. 2) The annual O and M costs for both plants are 9% of the Capital Costs. 3) LWR fuel costs about 0.0035 $/kWh. Producing FR fuel from spent fuel by pyro-processing must be done in highly shielded hot cells which is costly. However, the five foot thick concrete walls have the advantage of prohibiting diversion. LWR spent fuel must be used as feedstock for the FR initial core load and first two reloads so this FR fuel costs more than LWR fuel. FR fuel costs much less for subsequent core reloads (< LWR fuel) if all spent fuel feedstock is from the fast reactor (i.e., Breeding Ratio =1). 4) Yucca Mountain storage of unprocessed LWR spent fuel is estimated as $360,000/MTHM. But this fuel can be processed to remove TRU for use as fast reactor fuel. The remaining fission products repository costs are only one fifth that of the original fuel. Storage of short half life fission products alone requires less storage time and long term integrity than LWR spent fuel (300 years storage versus 100,000 years.) 5) LWR decommissioning costs are estimated to be $0.3 x 10{sup 6}/MWe. The annual cost for a 40 year licensed plant would be 2.5 % of this or less if interest is taken into account. All plants will eventually have to replace those components which become radiation damaged. FR's should be designed to replace parts rather than decommission. The LWR costs are estimated to be 2.65 cents/kWh. FR costs are 2.99 cents/kWh for the first 7.5 years and 2.39 cents/kWh for the next 32.5 years. The average cost over forty years is 2.50 cents/kWh which is less than the LWR costs. These power costs are similar to coal power, are lower than gas, oil, and much lower than renewable power.(authors)

Solbrig, Charles W.; Benedict, Robert W. [Fuel Cycle Programs Division, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

60 Million to Train Next Generation 60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology September 20, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to continue America's leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure. The 91 awards announced today will help train and educate the next generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative

28

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology September 20, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to continue America's leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure. The 91 awards announced today will help train and educate the next generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative

29

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor prototype with the capability to produce process heat, electricity and/or hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor is based on research and development activities supported by DOE's Generation IV nuclear energy systems initiative.

30

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new installations in the short term. DOE needs to give those immediate objectives the highest priority and any additional support they require to assure their success. DOE is pursuing two initiatives to encourage a greater use of nuclear energy systems. The initiatives have been reviewed by NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning (GRNS) and they are: * A Near Term Development (NTD) Roadmap which is in the process of being

31

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

32

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

33

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

34

Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"

35

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

36

Generation IV (Gen IV) - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation IV (Gen Generation IV (Gen IV) Generation IV Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Major Programs Generation IV (Gen IV) Development of next generation nuclear systems featuring significant advances in sustainability, economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Bookmark and Share Generation IV Fact Sheet (73 KB) Overview Generation IV nuclear energy systems target significant advances over current-generation and evolutionary systems in the areas of sustainability, safety and reliability, and economics. These systems are to be deployable by 2030 in both industrialized and developing countries. Development of Generation IV systems is an international initiative. A

37

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo

38

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo

39

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

40

Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

teri.ehresman@inl.gov Bill Cabage (ORNL), 865-574-4399, cabagewh@ornl.gov Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident conditions IDAHO FALLS - A safer...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Total Quality Management and nuclear weapons: A historian`s perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total Quality Management (TQM) has become a significant management theme at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper discusses the historical roots of TQM at Los Alamos and how TQM has been used in the development of nuclear weapons.

Meade, R.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOEís project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

44

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

45

Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped charged jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

47

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inhomogeneously distributed fission gas bubbles and oxides, and noble metal precipitates...conventional ďislandĒ (the turbine and generator). At the end of its...coproduct of nonrenewable natural gas), although various measures such as cooling...International Forum, ďA Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

48

Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Flushing, NY); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven, NY); Todosow, Michael (Miller Place, NY)

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

50

An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated ďtoolkitĒ consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

Timothy J. Leahy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Table A15. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.3,1,1,0.9,1.2,1.2

52

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

53

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

54

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

55

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

56

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

57

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

58

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

59

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

60

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

62

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

63

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

64

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

65

Methane generation at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methane generation at Grand Gulf has been brought to light twice. The initial event occurred in February 1990 and the second in December 1993. Both events involved the receipt of a cask at Barnwell Waste Management Facility that when opened indicated a gas escaping. The gas was subsequently sampled and indicated a percentage of explosive gas. Both events involved powdered resin and indicated that the generation was from a bacterial attack of the organic materials (cellulose in the powdered resin mixture). The first event occurred and was believed to be isolated in a particular waste stream. The situation was handled and a biocide was found to be effective in treatment of liners until severe cross contamination of another waste stream occurred. This allowed the shipment of a liner that was required to be sampled for explosive gases. The biocide used by GGNS was allowed reintroduction into the floor drains and this allowed the buildup of immunity of the bacterial population to this particular biocide. The approval of a new biocide has currently allowed GGNS to treat liners and ship them offsite.

Carver, M.L. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Port Gibson, MS (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Small modular HTGR nuclear power plant concept to meet the total energy needs of the developing nations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a small modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is described that can support the total energy needs of the developing nations by supplying electrical power, process steam, low-grade heat for desalination, and hydrogen production. Major features of the nuclear power plant concept, currently under development by GA Technologies Inc. (GA), are discussed with emphasis on (1) plant simplicity, (2) inherent safety, (3) ease of operation, (4) design and licensing standardization, and (5) acceptable power generation economics.

McDonald, C.F.

1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

67

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...capacity of waste repositories for decommissioning waste in the second half of the century will...is returned to the manufacturer for decommissioning and disposal. Because fuel handling is avoided at the...International Forum, ďA Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...be refueled while remaining online (LWRs have...distributed fission gas bubbles and oxides, and...long-term storage. Life extension. This...16) (which have remaining design work to be...the fueled-for-life core, that is, a nuclear...islandĒ (the turbine and generator...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

69

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Innovative systems for sustainable nuclear energy generation and waste management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The limited amount of fossil resources, the impact of green-house gas emissions on the world climate, the rising demand of primary energy projected to 2050, lead to a potentially critical situation for the world energy supply. The need for alternative (to fossil energies) massive energy production is evaluated to 10 Gtoe. The potential of Nuclear Energy generation at the level of 5 Gtoe is examined. Such a sustainable production can only be met by a breeder reactor fleet for which a deployment scenario is described with the associated constraints. Waste management is discussed in connection with different nuclear energy development scenarios according to the point in time when breeder reactors are started. At the world level, it appears that the optimal handling of today's wastes rests on an early decision to develop tomorrow's breeder reactors.

Jm Loiseaux; S David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Alternative similarity renormalization group generators in nuclear structure calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The similarity renormalization group (SRG) has been successfully applied to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. In almost all practical applications in nuclear physics, an SRG generator with the kinetic energy operator is used. With this choice, a fast convergence of many-body calculations can be achieved, but at the same time substantial three-body interactions are induced even if one starts from a purely two-nucleon (NN) Hamiltonian. Three-nucleon (3N) interactions can be handled by modern many-body methods. However, it has been observed that when including initial chiral 3N forces in the Hamiltonian, the SRG transformations induce a non-negligible four-nucleon interaction that cannot be currently included in the calculations for technical reasons. Consequently, it is essential to investigate alternative SRG generators that might suppress the induction of many-body forces while at the same time might preserve the good convergence. In this work we test two alternative generators with oper...

Dicaire, Nuiok M; Navratil, Petr

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Alternative similarity renormalization group generators in nuclear structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The similarity renormalization group (SRG) has been successfully applied to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. In almost all practical applications in nuclear physics, an SRG generator with the kinetic energy operator is used. With this choice, a fast convergence of many-body calculations can be achieved, but at the same time substantial three-body interactions are induced even if one starts from a purely two-nucleon (NN) Hamiltonian. Three-nucleon (3N) interactions can be handled by modern many-body methods. However, it has been observed that when including initial chiral 3N forces in the Hamiltonian, the SRG transformations induce a non-negligible four-nucleon interaction that cannot be currently included in the calculations for technical reasons. Consequently, it is essential to investigate alternative SRG generators that might suppress the induction of many-body forces while at the same time might preserve the good convergence. In this work we test two alternative generators with operators of block structure in the harmonic oscillator basis. In the no-core shell model calculations for 3H, 4He, and 6Li with chiral NN force, we demonstrate that their performances appear quite promising.

Nuiok M. Dicaire; Conor Omand; Petr NavrŠtil

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

Alternative similarity renormalization group generators in nuclear structure calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The similarity renormalization group (SRG) has been successfully applied to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. In almost all practical applications in nuclear physics, an SRG generator with the kinetic energy operator is used. With this choice, a fast convergence of many-body calculations can be achieved, but at the same time substantial three-body interactions are induced even if one starts from a purely two-nucleon (NN) Hamiltonian. Three-nucleon (3N) interactions can be handled by modern many-body methods. However, it has been observed that when including initial chiral 3N forces in the Hamiltonian, the SRG transformations induce a non-negligible four-nucleon interaction that cannot be currently included in the calculations for technical reasons. Consequently, it is essential to investigate alternative SRG generators that might suppress the induction of many-body forces while at the same time might preserve the good convergence. In this work we test two alternative generators with operators of block structure in the harmonic oscillator basis. In the no-core shell model calculations for 3H, 4He and 6Li with chiral NN force, we demonstrate that their performances appear quite promising.

Nuiok M. Dicaire; Conor Omand; Petr Navratil

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

75

Removal of deposited copper from nuclear steam generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the copper-removal process implemented during the cleaning of the NPD nuclear steam generator in Ontario revealed that major shortcomings in the process were depletion of the strong ammonia solution and relatively poor copper removal. Tests have shown that the concentration of the ammonia solution can be preserved close to its initial value, and high concentrations of complexed copper obtained, by sparging the ammonia solution with oxygen recirculating through a gas recirculation loop. Using recirculating oxygen for sparging at ambient air temperature, approximately 11 g/l of copper were dissolved by 100 g/l ammonia solution while the gaseous ammonia content of the recirculating gas remained well below the lower flammability limit. The corrosion rates of mild steel and commonly used nuclear steam generator tube materials in oxygenated ammonia solution were less than 30 mil/yr and no intergranular attack of samples was observed during tests. A second technique studied for the removal of copper is to ammoniate the spent iron-removal solvent to approximately pH 9.5 and sparge with recirculating oxygen. Complexed ferric iron in the spent iron-removal solvent was found to be the major oxidizing agent for metallic copper. The ferric iron can be derived from oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron to the ferric state or from dissolved oxides of iron directly. To extract copper from the secondary sides of nuclear steam generators, strong ammonia solution sparged with recirculating oxygen is recommended as the first stage, while ammoniated spent iron-removal solvent sparged with recirculating oxygen may be used to remove the copper freshly exposed during the removal of iron.

McSweeney, P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Generating Unstructured Nuclear Reactor Core Meshes in Parallel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor core examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a ľ pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.

Rajeev Jain; Timothy J. Tautges

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ronald E. Hagen, John R. Moens, and Zdenek D. Nikodem Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy International Atomic Energy Agency Vienna, Austria November 6-9, 2001 iii Energy Information Administration/ Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contents Page I. The Electric Power Industry and the Greenhouse Gas Issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. The Current Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 III. The Future Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IV. Factors That Affect Nuclear Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 V. Conclusion

78

3822 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 51, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2004 High Total Dose Tolerance of Prototype Silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3822 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 51, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2004 High Total Dose Tolerance). Alternative technologies that are being developed for the general market are also under eval- uation

Atwater, Harry

79

NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 1  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

Mark Holbrook

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Event generator for nuclear collisions at intermediate energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An event generator, HIPSE (heavy-ion phase-space exploration), dedicated to the description of nuclear collisions in the intermediate energy range is presented. Based on the sudden approximation and on geometrical hypothesis, it can conveniently simulate heavy-ion interactions at all impact parameters and thus can constitute a valuable tool for the understanding of processes such as neck emission or multifragmentation in peripheral or?and central collisions. After a detailed description of the ingredients of the model, first comparisons with experimental data collected by the INDRA Collaboration are shown. Special emphasis is put on the kinematical characteristics of fragments and light particles observed at all impact parameters for Xe+Sn reactions at 25 and 50MeV?nucleon and Ni+Ni at 82MeV?nucleon.

Denis Lacroix; Aymeric Van Lauwe; Dominique Durand

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

84

Investing in the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders Investing in the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders August 9, 2011 - 5:12pm Addthis Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy As part of the Energy Department's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP) annual workshop, I met today with professors from across the country and announced awards of up to $39 million for research projects aimed at developing cutting-edge nuclear energy technologies. The awards will also help train and educate the next generation of nuclear industry leaders in the U.S. These projects, led by 31 universities in more than 20 states, will help to enable the safe, secure and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy in the United States.

85

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

86

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

87

Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high-temperature plasma systems. Fusion reactors will likely depend on lithium-based ceramics to produce tritium that fuels the fusion plasma, while high-temperature alloys or ceramics will contain and control the hot plasma. All the while, alloys, ceramics, and ceramic-related processes continue to find applications in the management of wastes and byproducts produced by these processes.

John Marra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes. The new evaluations are based on both experimental data and nuclear reaction theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, {sup 6}Li, {sup 10}B, Au and for {sup 235,238}U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced reactions up to an energy of 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; and (10) New methods developed to provide uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same, ENDF-6 format, as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched U thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The {sup 238}U, {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 9}Be reflector biases in fast systems are largely removed; (c) ENDF/B-VI.8 good agreement for simulations of highly enriched uranium assemblies is preserved; (d) The underprediction of fast criticality of {sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu assemblies is removed; and (e) The intermediate spectrum critical assemblies are predicted more accurately. We anticipate that the new library will play an important role in nuclear technology applications, including transport simulations supporting national security, nonproliferation, advanced reactor and fuel cycle concepts, criticality safety, medicine, space applications, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear physics facility design. The ENDF/B-VII.0 library is archived at the National Nuclear Data Center, BNL. The complete library, or any part of it, may be retrieved from www.nndc.bnl.gov.

Chadwick, M B; Oblozinsky, P; Herman, M; Greene, N M; McKnight, R D; Smith, D L; Young, P G; MacFarlane, R E; Hale, G M; Haight, R C; Frankle, S; Kahler, A C; Kawano, T; Little, R C; Madland, D G; Moller, P; Mosteller, R; Page, P; Talou, P; Trellue, H; White, M; Wilson, W B; Arcilla, R; Dunford, C L; Mughabghab, S F; Pritychenko, B; Rochman, D; Sonzogni, A A; Lubitz, C; Trumbull, T H; Weinman, J; Brown, D; Cullen, D E; Heinrichs, D; McNabb, D; Derrien, H; Dunn, M; Larson, N M; Leal, L C; Carlson, A D; Block, R C; Briggs, B; Cheng, E; Huria, H; Kozier, K; Courcelle, A; Pronyaev, V; der Marck, S

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

Applications of Extraction Chromatography in the Development of Radionuclide Generator Systems for Nuclear Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Applications of Extraction Chromatography in the Development of Radionuclide Generator Systems for Nuclear Medicine ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ...

Mark L. Dietz; E. Philip Horwitz

2000-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy May 6, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an international collaborative that is advancing new, safer nuclear energy systems. Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an international collaborative that is advancing new, safer nuclear energy systems. Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies Nuclear power reactors currently under construction worldwide boast modern safety and operational enhancements that were designed by the global nuclear energy industry and enhanced through research and development (R&D)

91

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs...

92

The Evolution of Nuclear Power Generation for Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Among the available energy alternatives nuclear power offers important advantages and in many cases is the only viable alternative given actual operation conditions on Mars. We know that nuclear is the most co...

Liviu Popa-Simil

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...system using battery energy storage. The widespread...intermittent renewable energies and might restore the cost benefits of nuclear energy in the 2030s. Nuclear...plant and appropriate grid infrastructure, economic considerations...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nuclear Proliferation And The Nuclear Deterrent: Will The Non-Proliferation Treaty Ever Achieve Total Nuclear Disarmament? Is The Nuclear Deterrent Worth Keeping?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In 2009 President Obama outlined his utopic vision of a nuclear-free world, admitting that this would†not be†possible within his lifetime he claimed that whileÖ (more)

Eckford, James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

96

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

97

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

98

Why the IBEW supports expanding nuclear power generation in the USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) represents workers, many who work in the utility and power generation industries. The IBEW has been and continues to be a vocal supporter of the expansion of nuclear power generation in the USA. Five years ago, there was a general expectation that nuclear capacity would expand greatly. It did not, and in part the absence of more new nuclear construction is the natural outcome of a misguided energy market regulation system. We close with a set of priorities for rebuilding the energy regulatory scheme that would benefit our members and ratepayers and would, at the same time, lead to and require an expansion of nuclear power. The article describes the state of nuclear power in the USA today, the IBEW's role in the utility industry and nuclear power generation; the IBEW's priorities for the US energy market and why those priorities lead the IBEW to call for the expansion of nuclear power in the USA.

William Bill Riley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was established under the Energy Policy Act in August 2005 (EPACT-2005). EPACT-2005 defined an overall plan and timetable for NGNP research, design, licensing, construction and operation by the end of FY 2021. At the time that EPACT-2005 was passed, it was envisioned that key aspects of the project included: NGNP is based on R&D activities supported by the Gen-IV Nuclear Energy initiative; Ôā∑ NGNP is to be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen or (to do) both; Ôā∑ The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be the lead national lab for the project; Ôā∑ NGNP will be sited at the INL in

100

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

102

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Salem Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Salem Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

103

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

104

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

194,1095428,1211897,1374523,1347985,1262403,1340639,1347577,1387346,15503218 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",840,,639800,598183,639443,403029,346066,489260,629320,629209,610996,637714,619...

105

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2889,1359120,1330655,1334646,1369191,1335231,1264610,725939,1043730,14168091 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",842,,640210,332640,639812,611739,611473,610763,626182,625966,612739,514485,-32...

106

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

049398,1385659,1329546,1365357,1364550,1315097,826104,724688,842506,13689571 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",836,,642446,580408,640573,616442,635753,607660,621404,622382,608955,74815,-336...

107

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0183,1370443,1333879,1333266,1232981,970683,1026829,1008188,1033852,14689416 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",840,,638732,576736,637898,614123,622312,611199,598045,569278,582588,637484,278...

108

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2613,979493,1330868,1372259,1363174,1328057,1383098,1348837,1393879,15486102 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",843,,642145,579996,631611,425625,233279,610804,629284,623738,610379,634652,620...

109

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy...

110

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw)...

111

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

112

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

113

DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it is seeking public and industry input on how to best achieve the goals and meet the requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) demonstration project work at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory. DOE today issued a Request for Information and Expressions of Interest from prospective participants and interested parties on utilizing cutting-edge high temperature gas reactor technology in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by enabling nuclear energy to replace fossil fuels used by industry for process heat. "This is an opportunity to advance the development of safe, reliable, and

114

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

115

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

116

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the 2030s. Nuclear power could also be widely used for desalination, another efficient way to use surplus power in an electricity...country of origin would have access to the spent fuel. The economics of small and fueled-for-life reactors versus large reactors...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

Program generator for experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a programmable pulse-train generator for experiments in relaxation analysis. The generator produces up to eight pulses, whose durations and spacings can be varied from 0.5 sec to 160 sec in 0.1-usec steps. The maximum number of pulse-train repetitions is 160. An individual program provides a Carr-Percell train. A clock pulse for the measuring and recording devices is established after any pulse of a compiled program or after the last 180 degree pulse in a Carr train. The generator is implemented by integrated circuits of series 155.

Babkin, A.F.; Kuznetsov, V.K.; Makarenko, V.L.; Rusanov, A.V.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project 2009 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the NGNP Project is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy technology to the United States and other economies by demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not served by light water reactors (LWRs). Those markets typically use fossil fuels to fulfill their energy needs, and high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) like the NGNP can reduce this dependence and the resulting carbon footprint.

Larry Demick; Jim Kinsey; Keith Perry; Dave Petti

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Next Generation CANDU Technology: Competitive Design for the Nuclear Renaissance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AECL has developed the design for a next generation of CANDU{sup R} plants by marrying a set of enabling technologies to well-established successful CANDU features. The basis for the design is to replicate or adapt existing CANDU components for a new core design. By adopting slightly enriched uranium fuel, a core design with light water coolant, heavy water moderator and reflector has been defined, based on the existing CANDU fuel channel module. This paper summarizes the main features and characteristics of the reference next-generation CANDU design. The progress of the next generation of CANDU design program in meeting challenging cost, schedule and performance targets is described. AECL's cost reduction methodology is summarized as an integral part of the design optimization process. Examples are given of cost reduction features together with enhancement of design margins. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Hedges, K.R.; Pakan, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B rapid cooldown test and validation of simulation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SOPHT code was assessed against Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B commissioning data from a heat transport system rapid cooldown. It was found that (a) under a rapid upstream depressurization, the steam relief valves, like orifices, had a lower discharge coefficient than the corresponding steadystate value and (b) the flashing of water in the steam generators during depressurization causes the at-power boiling heat transfer correlations to overpredict the steam generator heat transfer.

Chang, Y.F.; Langan, M.D.; Sermer, P.; Watson, P.C.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

TVA chooses nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TVA chooses nuclear power ... In giving the nod to a nuclear (over a coal) power generating station 10 days ago, TVA probably gave nuclear power its biggest boost to date. ... The $247 million nuclear power plantóa dual boiling-water reactor unit with a total capacity of 2.2 million kw(e).ówill ...

1966-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

123

High Energy Utilization, Co-Generation Nuclear power Plants With Static Energy Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to being cost effective, very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion could meet the needs and the energy mix in underdeveloped countries and remote communities, which may include electricity, residential and industrial space heating, seawater desalination, and/or high temperature process heat or steam for industrial uses. These plants are also an attractive option in naval, marine, and undersea applications, when the absence of a sound signature is highly desirable. An Analysis is performed of Gas Cooled Reactor (CGR) and Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (LMR), very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion, using a combination of options. These include Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converters (AMTECs) and both single segment and segmented thermoelectric converters. The total energy utilization of these plants exceeds 88%. It includes the fraction of the reactor's thermal power converted into electricity and delivered to the Grid at 6.6 kVA and those used for residential and industrial space heating at {approx}370 K, seawater desalination at 400 K, and/or high temperature process heat or steam at {approx}850 K. In addition to its inherently high reliability, modularity, low maintenance and redundancy, static energy conversion used in the present study could deliver electricity to the Grid at a net efficiency of 29.5%. A LMR plant delivers 2-3 times the fraction of the reactor thermal power converted into electricity in a GCR plant, but could not provide for both seawater desalination and high temperature process heat/steam concurrently, which is possible in GCR plants. The fraction of the reactor's thermal power used for non-electrical power generation in a GCR plant is {approx} 10 - 15% higher than in a LMR plant. (authors)

El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies and Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Informing the next nuclear generation - how does the Ginna plant branch do it?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of us are familiar with the latest advertising phrase, ``Our children are our future.`` This phrase has been used in so many instances - from concerns about waste, Social Security, and the federal deficit to drug abuse and violence. One more area can be added to the list and advertised nuclear power. Since the establishment of the Ginna plant branch (GPB) in 1992, our target audience has been the next nuclear generation (our children), but our vehicle for dissemination has been the current generation (the adults). Have you ever thought about how often your opinions affect the children you come in contact with? One of GPB`s goals is to provide as much information as possible to teachers, neighbors, and civic organizations of our community so that there is a nuclear future that can be carried on by the next generation.

Saavedra, A. [Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation, Ontario, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

Bowman, C.D.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

126

The B61-based "Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator:" Clever retrofit or headway towards fourth-generation nuclear weapons?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is scientifically and technically possible to build an earth penetrating device that could bury a B61-7 warhead 30 meters into concrete, or 150 meters into earth, before detonating it. The device (based on knowledge and technology that is available since 50 years) would however by large and cumbersome. Better penetrator materials, components able to withstand larger stresses, higher impact velocities, and/or high-explosive driven penetration aids, can only marginally improve the device. It is conclude that the robust nuclear earth penetrator (RNEP) program may be as much motivated by the development of new technology directly applicable to next generation nuclear weapons, and by the political necessity to periodically reasses the role and utility of nuclear weapons, then by the perceived military need of a weapon able to destroy deeply buried targets.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The costs of generating electricity and the competitiveness of nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides an analysis on the costs of generating electricity from nuclear and fossil sources (coal and natural gas) based on the most recent technical data available in literature. The aim is to discuss the competitiveness of nuclear power in a liberalized market context by considering the impact on the generating costs of the main factors affecting the viability of the nuclear option. Particular attention will be devoted to study the variability of the generating costs regarding the level of risk perceived by investors through a sensitivity analysis of the generating costs with respect to the cost of capital and the debt fraction of initial investment. The impact of environment policies is also considered by including a ďtaxĒ on carbon emissions. The analysis reveals that nuclear power could have ample potentiality also in a competitive market, particularly if the level of risk perceived by the investors keeps standing low. For low values of the cost of capital, nuclear power seems to be the most viable solution. Uncertainty about environmental policies and unpredictability of carbon emissions costs might offer further margins of competitiveness.

Carlo Mari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448.000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate. Of the estimated solids, the hazardous wastes (e.g., electrical vehicle batteries and light tubes) were about 2% of the total volumes. The generation of solid HE residues varied uniformly with the HE production rates and ranged from about 20% of the total solids volume for the 100 HE units/yr case to about 60% for the 2000 units/yr case. The HE machining operations generated 60 to 80% of the total solid HE residues, depending on the assumed production rate, and were also the sources of the most concentrated HE residues.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation.

Ralph E.H. Sims; Hans-Holger Rogner; Ken Gregory

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Nuclear power can reduce emissions and maintain a strong economy: Rating Australiaís optimal future electricity-generation mix by technologies and policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Legal barriers currently prohibit nuclear power for electricity generation in Australia. For this reason, published future electricity scenarios aimed at policy makers for this country have not seriously considered a full mix of energy options. Here we addressed this deficiency by comparing the life-cycle sustainability of published scenarios using multi-criteria decision-making analysis, and modeling the optimized future electricity mix using a genetic algorithm. The published ĎCSIRO e-futureí scenario under its default condition (excluding nuclear) has the largest aggregate negative environmental and economic outcomes (score†=†4.51 out of 8), followed by the Australian Energy Market Operatorís 100% renewable energy scenario (4.16) and the Greenpeace scenario (3.97). The e-future projection with maximum nuclear-power penetration allowed yields the lowest negative impacts (1.46). After modeling possible future electricity mixes including or excluding nuclear power, the weighted criteria recommended an optimized scenario mix where nuclear power generated >40% of total electricity. The life-cycle greenhouse-gas emissions of the optimization scenarios including nuclear power were nuclear power is an effective and logical option for the environmental and economic sustainability of a future electricity network in Australia.

Sanghyun Hong; Corey J.A. Bradshaw; Barry W. Brook

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

D.McNew/GettyIMaGes San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, California.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D.McNew/GettyIMaGes San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, California. CORRESPONDENCE Checklist be supplied by solar power plants covering about 36,000 square kilometres of land in the desert southwest,theycanberampedupquickly.Annualinstallationofwind- energy capacity in the United States has quadrupled from Counterpoint Not wanted, not needed J. Doyne

132

Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of sup 58 Ni and nuclear models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive experimental and theoretical study of the fast-neutron interaction with {sup 58}Ni was undertaken. The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 Mev intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to {approx} 4.8 Mev. The measured results, combined with lower-energy values previously obtained at this laboratory and with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical and coupled-channels models using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results and their interpretation are discussed. The considerations are being extended to collective vibrational nuclei generally, exploring the potential for utilizing electro-magnetic matrix elements, deduced from experiment or predicted by the shell model, to determine the strengths of the neutron interaction. Detailed aspects of this work are given in the Laboratory Report, ANL/NDM-120 (in press). 9 refs., 10 figs.

Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.; Lawson, R.D.; Chiba, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Michigan Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","3,947",13.2,"29,625",26.6 "Coal","11,531",38.7,"65,604",58.8 "Hydro and Pumped...

134

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,594",10.8,"13,478",25.1 "Coal","4,789",32.5,"28,083",52.3 "Hydro and Pumped...

135

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,584",8.9,"13,281",20.7 "Coal","8,063",45.2,"40,169",62.5 "Hydro and Pumped...

136

Washington Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,097",3.6,"9,241",8.9 "Coal","1,340",4.4,"8,527",8.2 "Hydro and Pumped...

137

Virginia Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","3,501",14.5,"26,572",36.4 "Coal","5,868",24.3,"25,459",34.9 "Hydro and Pumped...

138

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

Decommissioning of Large Components as an Example of Steam Generator from PWR Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the procedure for the qualification of large components (Steam Generators) as an IP-2 package, the ship transport abroad to Sweden and the external treatment of this components to disburden the Nuclear Power Plant from this task, to assure an accelerated the deconstruction phase and to minimize the amount of waste. In conclusion: The transport of large components to an external treatment facility is linked with many advantages for a Nuclear Power Plant: - Disburden of the Nuclear Power Plant from the treatment of such components, - no timely influence on the deconstruction phase of the power reactor and therewith an accelerated deconstruction phase and - minimization of the waste to be returned and therewith less demand of required waste storage capacity. (authors)

Beverungen, M. [GNS Gesellschaft fur Nuklear-Service mbH, Hollestrabe 7A (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) Nuclear electricity generation remains flat in the IEO99 reference case, representing a declining share of the world’s total electricity consumption. Net reductions in nuclear capacity are projected for most industrialized nations. In 1997, a total of 2,276 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated from nuclear power worldwide, providing 17 percent of the world’s electricity generation. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear power for electricity varies greatly (Figure 53). Ten countries met at least 40 percent of their total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of worldwide electricity generation are uncertain, despite projected growth of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

142

Survey of insulation used in nuclear power plants and the potential for debris generation. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of Unresolved Safety Issue A-43, 'Containment Emergency Sump Performance,' 11 nuclear power plants representative of different U.S. reactor manufacturers and architect-engineers were surveyed to identify and document the types and amounts of insulation used, location within containment, components insulated, material characteristics, and methods of installation and attachment. A preliminary assessment was made of the potential effects of insulation debris generated as the result of a loss-of-coolant accident (pipe break).

Reyer, R.; Gahan, E.; Riddington, J.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Locating hot and cold-legs in a nuclear powered steam generation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor steam generator includes a reactor vessel for heating water and a steam generator with a pump casing at the lowest point on the steam generator. A cold-leg pipe extends horizontally between the steam generator and the reactor vessel to return water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel. The bottom of the cold-leg pipe is at a first height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A hot-leg pipe with one end connected to the steam generator and a second end connected to the reactor vessel has a first pipe region extending downwardly from the steam generator to a location between the steam generator and the reactor vessel at which a bottom of the hot-leg pipe is at a second height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A second region extends from that location in a horizontal direction at the second height to the point at which the hot-leg pipe connects to the reactor vessel. A pump is attached to the casing at a location below the first and second heights and returns water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel over the cold-leg. The first height is greater than the second height and the bottom of the steam generator is at a height above the bottom of the reactor vessel that is greater than the first and second heights. A residual heat recovery pump is below the hot-leg and has an inlet line from the hot-leg that slopes down continuously to the pump inlet. 2 figures.

Ekeroth, D.E.; Corletti, M.M.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the operating envelope of both fission and fusion reactors. In advanced fission reactors composite materials are being designed in an effort to extend the life and improve the reliability of fuel rod cladding as well as structural materials. Composites are being considered for use as core internals in the next generation of gas-cooled reactors. Further, next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will rely on the capabilities of advanced composites to safely withstand extremely high neutron fluxes while providing superior thermal shock resistance.

Simos, N.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the selected thermochemical process and to define the selected reactor and process to the point that capital costs, operating costs and the resultant cost of hydrogen can be estimated. During original contract negotiation, it was necessary to reduce work scope to meet funding limits. As a result, the reactor interface and process will not be iterated to the point that only hydrogen is produced. Rather, hydrogen and electricity will be co-generated and the hydrogen cost will be stated as a function of the electricity sales price.

Brown, L.C.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Financial valuation of investments in future power generation technologies: nuclear fusion and CCS in an emissions trading system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper outlines a model approach for the financial valuation of future power generation technologies, such as nuclear fusion or carbon capture and storage (CCS) under an emissions trading regime. Since on imp...

Heinz Eckart KlingelhŲfer; Peter Kurz

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. We prepared volume estimates by applying this method to actual past Pantex plant HE production operations. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448,000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Automatic code generation enables nuclear gradient computations for fully internally contracted multireference theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical nuclear gradients for fully internally contracted complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) are reported. This implementation has been realized by an automated code generator that can handle spin-free formulas for the CASPT2 energy and its derivatives with respect to variations of molecular orbitals and reference coefficients. The underlying complete active space self-consistent field and the so-called Z-vector equations are solved using density fitting. With full internal contraction the size of first-order wave functions scales polynomially with the number of active orbitals. The CASPT2 gradient program and the code generator are both publicly available. This work enables the CASPT2 geometry optimization of molecules as complex as those investigated by respective single-point calculations.

MacLeod, Matthew K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Update report on the performance of 400 megawatt and larger nuclear and coal-fired generating units. Performance through 1977  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forty-seven nuclear generating units and 125 coal-fired generating plants that have had at least one full year of commercial operation are covered in this report. Their performances are evaluated using the capacity factor, availability factor, equivalent availability, and forced outage rate. The data are arranged by state and utility. (DLC)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Parametric study of the total system life cycle cost of an alternate nuclear waste management strategy using deep boreholes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Department of Energy recently submitted a license application for the Yucca Mountain repository to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, yet even the most optimistic timetable projects that the repository will not now ...

Moulton, Taylor Allen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

BARI, R.; ET AL.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

John Saurwein

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

New generation nuclear fuel structures: dense particles in selectively soluble matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a technology for dispersing sub-millimeter sized fuel particles within a bulk matrix that can be selectively dissolved. This may enable the generation of advanced nuclear fuels with easy separation of actinides and fission products. The large kinetic energy of the fission products results in most of them escaping from the sub-millimeter sized fuel particles and depositing in the matrix during burning of the fuel in the reactor. After the fuel is used and allowed to cool for a period of time, the matrix can be dissolved and the fission products removed for disposal while the fuel particles are collected by filtration for recycle. The success of such an approach would meet a major goal of the GNEP program to provide advanced recycle technology for nuclear energy production. The benefits of such an approach include (1) greatly reduced cost of the actinide/fission product separation process, (2) ease of recycle of the fuel particles, and (3) a radiation barrier to prevent theft or diversion of the recycled fuel particles during the time they are re-fabricated into new fuel. In this study we describe a method to make surrogate nuclear fuels of micrometer scale W (shell)/Mo (core) or HfO2 particles embedded in an MgO matrix that allows easy separation of the fission products and their embedded particles. In brief, the method consists of physically mixing W-Mo or hafnia particles with an MgO precursor. Heating the mixture, in air or argon, without agitation, to a temperature is required for complete decomposition of the precursor. The resulting material was examined using chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and micro X-ray computed tomography and found to consist of evenly dispersed particles in an MgO + matrix. We believe this methodology can be extended to actinides and other matrix materials.

Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pattillo, Steve G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A critical study on Kennedys Cost-Benefit-Analysis ĎNew nuclear power generation in the UKí.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The demand for energy is forever growing. The technology of extracting power from uranium through nuclear facilities is rather old. Core melting, nuclear bombs,Ö (more)

Stršng, Jonathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest Ė i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

From the first nuclear power plant to fourth-generation nuclear power installations [on the 60th anniversary of the Worldís First nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful commissioning in the 1954 of the Worldís First nuclear power plant constructed at the Institute for Physics ... center for training Soviet and foreign specialists on nuclear power plants, the personnel...

V. I. Rachkov; S. G. Kalyakin; O. F. Kukharchuk; Yu. I. OrlovÖ

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nuclear Physics A 772 (2006) 113Ė137 Total prompt energy release in the neutron-induced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study addresses, for the first time, the total prompt energy release and its components for the fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu as a function of the kinetic energy of the neutron inducing the fission. The components are extracted from experimental measurements, where they exist, together with model-dependent calculation, interpolation, and extrapolation. While the components display clear dependencies upon the incident neutron energy, their sums display only weak, yet definite, energy dependencies. Also addressed is the total prompt energy deposition in fission for the same three systems. Results are presented in equation form. New measurements are recommended as a consequence of this study.

D. G. Madland

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6...

163

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 90, 063412 (2014) Effect of nuclear vibration on high-order-harmonic generation of aligned H2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 90, 063412 (2014) Effect of nuclear vibration on high-order-harmonic generation of aligned H2 + molecules Dmitry A. Telnov,1,* John Heslar,2, and Shih-I Chu2,3, 1 Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504, Russia 2 Department of Physics, Center for Quantum

Chu, Shih-I

164

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900įC and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2ľCr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Property exempt from taxation: nuclear generation facility property: K.S.A. 79-230 (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation would exempt from state property taxes any property purchased, constructed or installed to expand capacity at an existing nuclear plant or to build a new nuclear plant. A...

166

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

167

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

168

Monitoring attosecond dynamics of coherent electron-nuclear wave packets by molecular high-order-harmonic generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pump-probe scheme for preparing and monitoring electron-nuclear motion in a dissociative coherent electron-nuclear wave packet is explored from numerical solutions of a non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A mid-ir intense few-cycle probe pulse is used to generate molecular high-order-harmonic generation (MHOHG) from a coherent superposition of two or more dissociative coherent electronic-nuclear wave packets, prepared by a femtosecond uv pump pulse. Varying the time delay between the intense ir probe pulse and the uv pump pulse by a few hundreds of attoseconds, the MHOHG signal intensity is shown to vary by orders of magnitude, thus showing the high sensitivity to electron-nuclear dynamics in coherent electron-nuclear wave packets. We relate this high sensitivity of MHOHG spectra to opposing electron velocities (fluxes) in the electron wave packets of the recombining (recolliding) ionized electron and of the bound electron in the initial coherent superposition of two electronic states.

Bredtmann, Timm [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Takustrasse 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, Andre D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

STARLIB: A NEXT-GENERATION REACTION-RATE LIBRARY FOR NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, {gamma}), (p, {alpha}), ({alpha}, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

Sallaska, A. L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8462 (United States); Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Goriely, S. [Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 226, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X., E-mail: anne.sallaska@nist.gov [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will use proton irradiation to further understand the microstructural stability of ceramics being considered as matrix material for advanced nuclear fuels.

Todd R. Allen

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Economic and environmental analysis of power generation expansion in Japan considering Fukushima nuclear accident using a multi-objective optimization model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power has long been a cornerstone of energy policy in Japan, a country with few natural resources of its own. However, following on from the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the Japanese government is now in the throes of reviewing its nuclear power policy. On the other hand, under continuing policies of greenhouse gas reduction, it is crucial to consider scenarios for the country to realize an economic, safe and low-carbon power generation system in the future. Therefore, in the present study, economic and environmental analysis was conducted on the power generation system in Japan up to 2030 using a multi-objective optimization methodology. Four nuclear power scenarios were proposed in light of the nuclear accident: (1) actively anti-nuclear; (2) passively negative towards nuclear; (3) conservative towards nuclear; and (4) active expansion of nuclear power. The obtained capacity mix, generation mix, generation cost, CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of the scenarios were compared and analysed. The obtained results show that the large scale penetration of PV (photovoltaic), wind and LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) power can partly replace nuclear power, however, removing nuclear power entirely was not suggested from economic, environmental and energy security perspectives.

Qi Zhang; Benjamin C. Mclellan; Tetsuo Tezuka; Keiichi N. Ishihara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Characterization of a Stochastic Procedure for the Generation and Transport of Fission Fragments within Nuclear Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the ever-increasing demands of the nuclear power community to extend fuel cycles and overall core-lifetimes in a safe and economic manner, it is becoming more necessary to extend the working knowledge of nuclear fuel performance. From...

Hackemack, Michael Wayne

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the world’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the world’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In 1998, a total of 2,291 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated by nuclear power worldwide, providing 16 percent of the world’s total generation[1]. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear energy for electricity varies greatly. Nine countries met at least 40 percent of total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. Figure 68. Nuclear Shares of National Electricity Generation, 1998 [Sources] The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of

174

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

175

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On other hand, accidents at nuclear facilities could nott ed expos ur e from a nuclear accident which would warrantresulting from accidents at nuclear facilities. Average

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Analysis of ground motions at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station April 9, 1968  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...concrete mat foundation. The turbine generator, the plant auxiliary...transferred to the secondary turbine steam system by the steam generators...has resulted in a bothersome maintenance problem which requires replacement...self-sustMned Wineharger wind-generator to charge the batteries...

G. W. Housner; P. J. West; C. G. Johnson

177

The state and prospects of coal and nuclear power generation in Russia (review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the modern state and development trends for coal and nuclear power engineering in Russia up to 2030 are generalized. It is emphasized that from the viewpoint of strategy, coal and uranium fuel will be ...

V. V. Salomatov

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Reactor Physics Parametric and Depletion Studies in Support of TRISO Particle Fuel Specification for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactor physics calculations were initiated to answer several major questions related to the proposed TRISO-coated particle fuel that is to be used in the prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) or the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These preliminary design evaluation calculations help ensure that the upcoming fuel irradiation tests will test appropriate size and type of fuel particles for a future NGNP reactor design. Conclusions from these calculations are expected to confirm and suggest possible modifications to the current particle fuel parameters specified in the evolving Fuel Specification. Calculated results dispel the need for a binary fuel particle system, which is proposed in the General Atomics GT-MHR concept. The GT-MHR binary system is composed of both a fissile and fertile particle with 350- and 500- micron kernel diameters, respectively. For the NGNP reactor, a single fissile particle system (single UCO kernel size) can meet the reactivity and power cycle length requirements demanded of the NGNP. At the same time, it will provide substantial programmatic cost savings by eliminating the need for dual particle fabrication process lines and dual fuel particle irradiation tests required of a binary system. Use of a larger 425-micron kernel diameter single fissile particle (proposed here), as opposed to the 350-micron GT-MHR fissile particle size, helps alleviate current compact particle packing fractions fabrication limitations (<35%), improves fuel block loading for higher n-batch reload options, and tracks the historical correlation between particle size and enrichment (10 and 14 wt% U-235 particle enrichments are proposed for the NGNP). Overall, the use of the slightly larger kernel significantly broadens the NGNP reactor core design envelope and provides increased design margin to accommodate the (as yet) unknown final NGNP reactor design. Maximum power-peaking factors are calculated for both the initial and equilibrium NGNP cores. Radial power-peaking can be fully controlled with particle packing fraction zoning (no enrichment zoning required) and discrete burnable poison rods. Optimally loaded NGNP cores can expect radial powerpeaking factors as low as 1.14 at beginning of cycle (BOC), increasing slowly to a value of 1.25 by end of cycle (EOC), an axial power-peaking value of 1.30 (BOC), and for individual fuel particles in the maximum compact <1.05 (BOC) and an approximate value of 1.20 (EOC) due to Pu-239 buildup in particles on the compact periphery. The NGNP peak particle powers, using a conservative total power-peaking factor (~2.1 factor), are expected to be <150 mW/particle (well below the 250 mW/particle limit, even with the larger 425-micron kernel size).

James W. Sterbentz; Bren Phillips; Robert L. Sant; Gray S. Chang; Paul D. Bayless

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Multi-Objective Optimization Analysis of Post-Fukushima Power Generation Planning in Japan with Considering Nuclear Powerís Risk Cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, multi-objective optimization analysis was conducted on the post-Fukushima power generation planning in Japan up to 2030 from economic and environmental perspectives with considering nuclear

Qi Zhang; Tetsuo Tezuka; Keiichi Ishihara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Restoration of the graphite memory of a reactor in the third power-generating unit of the Leningrad nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The restoration of the graphite masonry of cell 52-16 in the reactor in the third power-generating unit of the Leningrad nuclear power plant is described. The process reduces to moving...

V. I. Lebedev; Yu. V. Garusov; M. A. Pavlov; A. N. Peunov; E. P. Kozlov

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Acoustic monitoring and signature analysis in nuclear and fossil energy generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic monitoring and analysis in nuclear and fossil energy plants has been accompanied by transducer development for the hot environment. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires acoustic monitoring systems on nuclear reactors for detecting potential failures. Accelerometers are attached at critical points and their output is automatically analyzed to give warnings of loose parts or excessive vibration. In addition to providing a warning the system can monitor arrival time to be used for fault location. For use as a potential boiling detector of breeder reactors the acoustic signature of the sodium coolant boiling has been compared with background noise level. High temperature sodium?immersible microphones and waveguides for smooth energy transfer were developed for this investigation. High?temperature acoustic sensors have been used in a coal gasification plant. The presence of solids in a steam?char line has been automatically determined using passive monitoring of relative sound intensities of different frequency bands.

Henry B. Karplus

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the radiological burden due to the battle-field use of circa 400 tons of depleted-uranium munitions in Iraq (and of about 40 tons in Yugoslavia) is comparable to that arising from the hypothetical battle-field use of more than 600 kt (respectively 60 kt) of high-explosive equivalent pure-fusion fourth-generation nuclear weapons. Despite the limited knowledge openly available on existing and future nuclear weapons, there is sufficient published information on their physical principles and radiological effects to make such a comparison. In fact, it is shown that this comparison can be made with very simple and convincing arguments so that the main technical conclusions of the paper are undisputable -- although it would be worthwhile to supplement the hand calculations presented in the paper by more detailed computer simulations in order to consolidate the conclusions and refute any possible objections.

Gsponer, A; Vitale, B; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Vitale, Bruno

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Circuitry is described for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrument to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on. 1 figures.

Brown, R.A.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

185

Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Circuitry for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrut to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on.

Brown, Roger A. (Amsterdam, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Outlook on Generation IV Nuclear Systems and Related Materials R&D Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Preoccupations of energy security and concerns about of the role that future reactors should play for minimizing long-lived radioactive ... that gives first priority to developing a new generation of fast neutron...

F. Carrť; C. Renault; P. Anzieu; P. BrossardÖ

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health and Safety Aspects of Pro- posed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-FuelHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. NeroResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Los Alamos National Laboratory new generation standard nuclear material storage container - the SAVY4000 design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based standard involving storage of nuclear material (RD003). This RD003 requirements document has sense been updated to reflect requirements as identified with recently issued DOE M 441.1-1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual'. The new packaging manual was issued at the encouragement of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board with a clear directive for protecting the worker from exposure due to loss of containment of stored materials. The Manual specifies a detailed and all inclusive approach to achieve a high level of protection; from package design & performance requirements, design life determinations of limited life components, authorized contents evaluations, and surveillance/maintenance to ensure in use package integrity over time. Materials in scope involve those stored outside an approved engineered-contamination barrier that would result in a worker exposure of in excess of 5 rem Committed Effective Does Equivalent (CEDE). Key aspects of meeting the challenge as developed around the SAVY-3000 vented storage container design will be discussed. Design performance and acceptance criteria against the manual, bounding conditions as established that the user must ensure are met to authorize contents in the package (based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide), interface as a safety class system within the facility under the LANL plutonium facility DSA, design life determinations for limited life components, and a sense of design specific surveillance program implementation as LANL moves forward into production and use of the SAVY-3000 will all be addressed. The SAVY-3000 is intended as a work horse package for the DOE complex as a vented storage container primarily for plutonium in solid form.

Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

New technology for purging the steam generators of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technology for removal of undissolved impurities from a horizontal steam generator using purge water is developed on the basis of a theoretical analysis. A purge with a maximal flow rate is drawn off from the zone with the highest accumulation of sludge in the lower part of the steam generator after the main circulation pump of the corresponding loop is shut off and the temperatures of the heat transfer medium at the inlet and outlet of the steam generator have equilibrated. An improved purge configuration is used for this technology; it employs shutoff and regulator valves, periodic purge lines separated by a cutoff fixture, and a D{sub y} 100 drain union as a connector for the periodic purge. Field tests show that the efficiency of this technology for sludge removal by purge water is several times that for the standard method.

Budko, I. O.; Kutdjusov, Yu. F.; Gorburov, V. I. [Scientific-Research Center for Energy Technology 'NICE Centrenergo' (Russian Federation); Rjasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'The All-Rissia Nuklear Power Engineering Research and Development Institute' (VNIIAM) (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Transmutation of Nuclear Waste in the Two-Zone Subcritical System Driven by High- Intensity Neutron Generator - 12098  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main problems of transmutation of high-level radioactive waste (minor actinides and long-lived fission products) are considered in our work. The range of radioactive waste of nuclear power is analyzed. The conditions under which the transmutation of radioactive waste will be most effective are analyzed too. The modeling results of a transmutation of the main radioactive isotopes are presented and discussed. The transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products are modeled in our work (minor actinides - Np-237, Am-241, Am-242, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245; long-lived fission products - I-129, Tc-99). The two-zone subcritical system is calculated with help of different neutron-physical codes (MCNP, Scale, Montebarn, Origen). The ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library used in above calculations. Thus, radioactive wastes can be divided into two main groups that need to be transmuted. The minor actinides form the first group and the long-lived fission products form the second one. For the purpose of effective transmutation these isotopes must be extracted from the spent nuclear fuel with the help of either PUREX technology or pyrometallurgical technology. The two-zone reactor system with fast and thermal regions is more effective for nuclear waste transmutation than the one-zone reactor. Modeling results show that nearly all radioactive wastes can be transmuted in the two-zone subcritical system driven by a high-intensity neutron generator with the external neutron source strength of 1.10{sup 13} n/sec. Obviously, transmutation rate will increase with a rise of the external neutron source strength. From the results above we can also see that the initial loading of radioactive isotopes into the reactor system should exceed by mass those isotopes that are finally produced. (authors)

Babenko, V.O. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Metrolohichna str. 14-b, Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine); Gulik, V.I.; Pavlovych, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, pr. Nauky 47, Kyiv, 03680 (Ukraine)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Evaluation Metrics for Intermediate Heat Exchangers for Next Generation Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the United States with abundant, clean, and secure energy as initiated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct; Public Law 109-58,2005). The NGNP Project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and/or high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications.

Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Nolan Anderson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Nuclear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear Power Nuclear Power picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Nuclear power is projected to represent a growing share of the developing world’s electricity consumption from 1999 through 2020. New plant construction and license extensions for existing plants are expected to produce a net increase in world nuclear capacity. Nuclear power plants generated electricity in 29 countries in 1999. A total of 433 nuclear power reactors were in operation (Figure 61), including 104 in the United States, 59 in France, and 53 in Japan. The largest national share of electricity from nuclear power was in France, at 75 percent (Figure 62). Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Lithuania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Sweden, Ukraine, and South Korea depended on nuclear power for at least 40

195

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

196

Model of sludge behavior in nuclear plant steam generators. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulation of large amounts of sludge in pressurized water reactor steam generators is thought to be a cause of accelerated corrosion by trace impurities which concentrate in such deposits. Based on fundamental principles, this study develops a mathematical model for predicting the behavior (e.g., deposition and reentrainment) of sludge in steam generators. The calculated sludge behavior shows good agreement with the limited amount of experimental data available. The results suggest that the continued accumulation of sludge on the tubesheet might be preventable, and that if it could be, the incoming sludge would be removed by blowdown. An analysis of the uncertainties in the model led to suggested priorities for further analytical and experimental work to gain a better understanding of sludge behavior. 29 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

Beal, S.K.; Chen, J.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Temperature and thermal stress distributions for the HFIR permanent reflector generated by nuclear heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beryllium permanent reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor has the main functions for slowing down and reflecting the neutrons and housing the experimental facilities. The reflector is heated as a result of the nuclear reaction. Heat is removed mainly by the cooling water passing through the densely distributed coolant holes along the vertical or axial direction of the reflector. The reflector neutronic distribution and its heating rate are calculated by J.C. Gehin of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by applying the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. The heat transfer boundary conditions along several reflector interfaces are estimated to remove additional heat from the reflector. The present paper is to report the calculation results of the temperature and the thermal stress distributions of the permanent reflector by applying the computer aided design code I-DEAS and the finite element code ABAQUS. The present calculation is to estimate the high stress areas as a result of the new beam tube cutouts along the horizontal mid-plane of the reflector of the recent reactor upgrade project. These high stresses were not able to be calculated in the preliminary design analysis in earlier 60`s. The heat transfer boundary conditions are used in this redesigned calculation. The material constants and the acceptance criteria for the allowable stresses are mainly based on that assumed in the preliminary design report.

Chang, S.J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,251",8.0,"9,643",17.7 "Coal","2,526",16.1,"13,629",25.0 "Natural Gas","11,640",74.2,"29,619",54.4 "Other1",4,"*",10,"*" "Other Renewable1",235,1.5,"1,504",2.8 "Petroleum",35,0.2,81,0.1 "Total","15,691",100.0,"54,487",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

199

Iowa Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",601,4.1,"4,451",7.7 "Coal","6,956",47.7,"41,283",71.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",144,1.0,948,1.6 "Natural Gas","2,299",15.8,"1,312",2.3 "Other Renewable1","3,584",24.6,"9,360",16.3 "Petroleum","1,007",6.9,154,0.3 "Total","14,592",100.0,"57,509",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

200

Vermont Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",620,55.0,"4,782",72.2 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",324,28.7,"1,347",20.3 "Natural Gas","-","-",4,0.1 "Other Renewable1",84,7.5,482,7.3 "Petroleum",100,8.9,5,0.1 "Total","1,128",100.0,"6,620",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ohio Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","2,134",6.5,"15,805",11.0 "Coal","21,360",64.6,"117,828",82.1 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",101,0.3,429,0.3 "Natural Gas","8,203",24.8,"7,128",5.0 "Other1",123,0.4,266,0.2 "Other Renewable1",130,0.4,700,0.5 "Petroleum","1,019",3.1,"1,442",1.0 "Total","33,071",100.0,"143,598",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

202

Maryland Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,705",13.6,"13,994",32.1 "Coal","4,886",39.0,"23,668",54.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",590,4.7,"1,667",3.8 "Natural Gas","2,041",16.3,"2,897",6.6 "Other1",152,1.2,485,1.1 "Other Renewable1",209,1.7,574,1.3 "Petroleum","2,933",23.4,322,0.7 "Total","12,516",100.0,"43,607",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

203

Kansas Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,160",9.2,"9,556",19.9 "Coal","5,179",41.3,"32,505",67.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",3,"*",13,"*" "Natural Gas","4,573",36.5,"2,287",4.8 "Other Renewable1","1,079",8.6,"3,459",7.2 "Petroleum",550,4.4,103,0.2 "Total","12,543",100.0,"47,924",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

204

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","2,103",25.4,"16,750",50.2 "Coal",564,6.8,"2,604",7.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",151,1.8,400,1.2 "Natural Gas","2,292",27.7,"11,716",35.1 "Other1",27,0.3,730,2.2 "Other Renewable1",159,1.9,740,2.2 "Petroleum","2,989",36.1,409,1.2 "Total","8,284",100.0,"33,350",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

205

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,245",15.8,"11,054",30.2 "Coal","3,932",50.0,"23,363",63.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",278,3.5,"1,314",3.6 "Natural Gas","1,849",23.5,375,1.0 "Other Renewable1",165,2.1,493,1.3 "Petroleum",387,4.9,31,0.1 "Total","7,857",100.0,"36,630",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

206

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

Bud'ko, I. O. [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation)] [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. G. [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)] [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

208

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

209

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

210

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

211

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

212

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

213

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

214

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

215

Nuclear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Nuclear Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 82. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity Table 96. Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Table 97. Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, nuclear power capacity increases from 101.0 gigawatts in 2009 to 110.5 gigawatts in 2035 (Figure 82), including 3.8 gigawatts of expansion at existing plants and 6.3 gigawatts of new capacity. The new capacity includes completion of a second unit at the Watts Bar site, where construction on a partially completed plant has

216

Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

Michael W. Patterson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

he students, faculty, and research staff of the MIT Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering (NSE) generate, control, and apply nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T he students, faculty, and research staff of the MIT Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering and technology. Professor Richard K. Lester Head, Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering rklester contact Professor Richard K. Lester, Head Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering rklester

Polz, Martin

218

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers, Volumes 1, 2.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001 √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬? September 2004. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform

Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Hines, J. Wesley; Lu, Baofu; Huang, Xuedong; Penha, Rosani, L.; Perillo, Sergio, R.; Zhao, Ke

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

219

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001-September 2004. (1) Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. (2) Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. (3) Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. (4) Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. (5) Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. (6) Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform. (7) Implementation of a moving-window technique in the time domain for detecting and quantifying flaw types in tubular structures. A window zooming technique was also developed for flaw location in tubes. (8) Theoretical study of elastic wave propagation (longitudinal and shear waves) in metallic flat plates and tubing with and without flaws. (9) Simulation of the Lamb wave propagation using the finite-element code ABAQUS. This enabled the verification of the experimental results. The research tasks included both analytical research and experimental studies. The experimental results helped to enhance the robustness of fault monitoring methods and to provide a systematic verification of the analytical results. The results of this research were disseminated in scientific meetings. A journal manuscript was submitted for publication. The new findings of this research have potential applications in aerospace and civil structures. The report contains a complete bibliography that was developed during the course of the project.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

220

Monthly/Annual Energy Review - nuclear section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Monthly and latest annual statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

223

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality assurance Standard Review Plan totally dissolvedmore fully in the Standard Review Plan (see Stage 3). Seenuclear power plants: the Standard Review Plan The Nuclear

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Nuclear Energy-Depend On It Helping  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy-Depend On It Helping to Power America for More Than Five Decades Past, Present, and Future ... The United States introduced nuclear energy into our domestic electricity production in 1957 and now produces approximately 20 percent of our total electricity and 70 percent of our low-carbon electricity from nuclear energy, according to the Energy Information Administration. More than 100 U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors provide reliable, affordable electricity in 31 states. Nuclear energy can help meet our Nation's need for dependable electricity into the future. The use of nuclear power is increasing around the world: z 29 countries worldwide operate a total of 437 nuclear reactors for electricity generation, with 55 new nuclear reactors under construction in 14 countries.

225

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

226

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

227

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

228

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

229

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

230

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

231

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

232

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

233

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

234

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

235

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

236

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

237

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

238

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

239

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

240

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

242

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

243

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

244

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

245

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

246

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

247

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

248

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

249

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

250

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

251

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

252

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

253

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

254

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

255

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

256

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

257

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

258

Texas Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,966",4.6,"41,335",10.0 "Coal","22,335",20.6,"150,173",36.5 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",689,0.6,"1,262",0.3 "Natural Gas","69,291",64.0,"186,882",45.4 "Other1",477,0.4,"3,630",0.9 "Other Renewable1","10,295",9.5,"27,705",6.7 "Petroleum",204,0.2,708,0.2 "Total","108,258",100.0,"411,695",100.0

259

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","9,540",20.9,"77,828",33.9 "Coal","18,481",40.6,"110,369",48.0 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","2,268",5.0,"1,624",0.7 "Natural Gas","9,415",20.7,"33,718",14.7 "Other1",100,0.2,"1,396",0.6 "Other Renewable1","1,237",2.7,"4,245",1.8 "Petroleum","4,534",9.9,571,0.2 "Total","45,575",100.0,"229,752",100.0

260

California Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,390",6.5,"32,201",15.8 "Coal",374,0.6,"2,100",1.0 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","13,954",20.7,"33,260",16.3 "Natural Gas","41,370",61.4,"107,522",52.7 "Other1",220,0.3,"2,534",1.2 "Other Renewable1","6,319",9.4,"25,450",12.5 "Petroleum",701,1.0,"1,059",0.5 "Total","67,328",100.0,"204,126",100.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Arizona Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (nw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",3937,14.9,"31,200",27.9 "Coal","6,233",23.6,"43,644",39.1 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","2,937",11.1,"6,831",6.1 "Natural Gas","13,012",49.3,"29,676",26.6 "Other1","-","-",15,"*" "Other Renewable1",181,0.7,319,0.3 "Petroleum",93,0.4,66,0.1 "Total","26,392",100.0,"111,751",100.0

262

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","2,142",8.0,"18,639",18.1 "Coal","3,417",12.8,"23,924",23.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",192,0.7,"1,109",1.1 "Natural Gas","19,574",73.2,"51,344",49.9 "Other1",213,0.8,"2,120",2.1 "Other Renewable1",325,1.2,"2,468",2.4 "Petroleum",881,3.3,"3,281",3.2 "Total","26,744",100.0,"102,885",100.0

263

Illinois Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","11,441",25.9,"96,190",47.8 "Coal","15,551",35.2,"93,611",46.5 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",34,0.1,119,0.1 "Natural Gas","13,771",31.2,"5,724",2.8 "Other1",145,0.3,461,0.2 "Other Renewable1","2,078",4.7,"5,138",2.6 "Petroleum","1,106",2.5,110,0.1 "Total","44,127",100.0,"201,352",100.0

264

Alabama Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","5,043",15.6,"37,941",24.9 "Coal","11,441",35.3,"63,050",41.4 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","3,272",10.1,"8,704",5.7 "Natural Gas","11,936",36.8,"39,235",25.8 "Other1",100,0.3,643,0.4 "Other Renewable1",583,1.8,"2,377",1.6 "Petroleum",43,0.1,200,0.1 "Total","32,417",100.0,"152,151",100.0

265

Florida Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (nw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","3,924",6.6,"23,936",10.4 "Coal","9,975",16.9,"59,897",26.1 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",55,0.1,177,0.1 "Natural Gas","31,563",53.4,"128,634",56.1 "Other1",544,0.9,"2,842",1.2 "Other Renewable1","1,053",1.8,"4,487",2.0 "Petroleum","12,033",20.3,"9,122",4.0 "Total","59,147",100.0,"229,096",100.0

266

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,835",11.5,"15,023",24.6 "Coal","4,535",28.4,"28,152",46.2 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","1,369",8.6,"3,658",6.0 "Natural Gas","7,894",49.4,"12,469",20.4 "Other1","-","-",28,"*" "Other Renewable1",326,2.0,"1,624",2.7 "Petroleum",22,0.1,45,0.1 "Total","15,981",100.0,"61,000",100.0

267

Missouri Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,190",5.5,"8,996",9.7 "Coal","12,070",55.5,"75,047",81.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","1,221",5.6,"2,427",2.6 "Natural Gas","5,579",25.7,"4,690",5.1 "Other1","-","-",39,"*" "Other Renewable1",466,2.1,988,1.1 "Petroleum","1,212",5.6,126,0.1 "Total","21,739",100.0,"92,313",100.0

268

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, smmer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, smmer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",685,5.0,"5,918",13.8 "Coal","1,669",12.2,"8,306",19.4 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","1,942",14.2,659,1.5 "Natural Gas","6,063",44.3,"25,582",59.8 "Other1",3,"*",771,1.8 "Other Renewable1",304,2.2,"1,274",3.0 "Petroleum","3,031",22.1,296,0.7 "Total","13,697",100.0,"42,805",100.0

269

Georgia Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,061",11.1,"33,512",24.4 "Coal","13,230",36.1,"73,298",53.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","3,851",10.5,"3,044",2.2 "Natural Gas","12,668",34.6,"23,884",17.4 "Other1","-","-",18,"*" "Other Renewable1",637,1.7,"3,181",2.3 "Petroleum","2,189",6.0,641,0.5 "Total","36,636",100.0,"137,577",100.0

270

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","3,401",15.9,"27,739",33.7 "Coal","8,805",41.1,"43,670",53.0 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","4,277",20.0,"7,416",9.0 "Natural Gas","4,655",21.7,"2,302",2.8 "Other1","-","-",16,"*" "Other Renewable1",222,1.0,988,1.2 "Petroleum",58,0.3,217,0.3 "Total","21,417",100.0,"82,349",100.0

271

Does nuclear energy have a future in Europe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Half of the world's nuclear-generated electricity is consumed in Europe. If only Western Europe is considered, the figure is 36%. Obviously, nuclear energy is an important source of energy in Europe. However, this situation varies from one country to another. Using the percentage of nuclear energy in total electricity generation as an indicator, nuclear energy represents 75% of the total electricity generation in France and 61% in Belgium, but 0% in several countries such as Austria, Italy, and Poland. The reasons for this variance result from several different circumstances, including the economy, energy resources, politics, the decision-making process, the environment, and public opinion. These few considerations show that electrical utilities and all the parties concerned with nuclear energy have to support public relations campaigns on nuclear topics to help and favor the development of this source of energy, guaranteeing each country a greater energy independence and a reasonable impact on the environment.

Pollier, P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

273

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

274

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

275

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

276

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

277

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

278

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

279

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

280

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

282

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

283

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

284

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

285

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

286

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

287

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

288

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

289

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

290

Investing in the next generation: The Office of Nuclear Energy Issues Requests for Scholarship and Fellowship Applications.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) announced two new Requests for Applications (RFAs) for the Integrated University Program (IUP).

291

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

292

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

293

Solid radioactive waste management facility design for managing CANDU{sup R} 600 MW nuclear generating station re-tube/refurbishment Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main design features of the re-tube canisters, waste handling equipment and waste containers designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL{sup R}) and implemented in support of the re-tube/refurbishment activities for Candu 600 MW nuclear generating stations are described in this paper. The re-tube/refurbishment waste characterization and the waste management principles, which form the basis of the design activities, are also briefly outlined. (authors)

Pontikakis, N.; Hopkins, J.; Scott, D.; Bajaj, V.; Nosella, L. [AECL, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMERGENCY PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSINGEmergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination ofproposed nuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . ē . . . .

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

296

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

297

A preliminary user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation Nuclear Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in the awareness of a system status is an essential requirement to achieve safety in every kind of plant. In particular, in the case of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), a progress is crucial to enhance the Human Machine Interface (HMI) in order to optimize monitoring and analyzing processes of NPP operational states. Firstly, as old-fashioned plants are concerned, an upgrading of the whole console instrumentation is desirable in order to replace an analog visualization with a full-digital system. In this work, we present a novel instrument able to interface the control console of a nuclear reactor, developed by using CompactRio, a National Instruments embedded architecture and its dedicated programming language. This real-time industrial controller composed by a real-time processor and FPGA modules has been programmed to visualize the parameters coming from the reactor, and to storage and reproduce significant conditions anytime. This choice has been made on the basis of the FPGA properties: high reliability, determinism, true parallelism and re-configurability, achieved by a simple programming method, based on LabVIEW real-time environment. The system architecture exploits the FPGA capabilities of implementing custom timing and triggering, hardware-based analysis and co-processing, and highest performance control algorithms. Data stored during the supervisory phase can be reproduced by loading data from a measurement file, re-enacting worthwhile operations or conditions. The system has been thought to be used in three different modes, namely Log File Mode, Supervisory Mode and Simulation Mode. The proposed system can be considered as a first step to develop a more complete Decision Support System (DSS): indeed this work is part of a wider project that includes the elaboration of intelligent agents and meta-theory approaches. A synoptic has been created to monitor every kind of action on the plant through an intuitive sight. Furthermore, another important aim of this work is the possibility to have a front panel available on a web interface: CompactRio acts as a remote server and it is accessible on a dedicated LAN. This supervisory system has been tested and validated on the basis of the real control console for the 1-MW TRIGA reactor RC-1 at the ENEA, Casaccia Research Center. In this paper we show some results obtained by recording each variable as the reactor reaches its maximum level of power. The choice of a research reactor for testing the developed system relies on its training and didactic importance for the education of plant operators: in this context a digital instrument can offer a better user-friendly tool for learning and training. It is worthwhile to remark that such a system does not interfere with the console instrumentation, the latter continuing to preserve the total control. (authors)

Memmi, F.; Falconi, L.; Cappelli, M.; Palomba, M.; Santoro, E.; Bove, R.; Sepielli, M. [UTFISST, ENEA Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,247",29.8,"10,910",49.2 "Coal",546,13.1,"3,083",13.9 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",489,11.7,"1,478",6.7 "Natural Gas","1,215",29.1,"5,365",24.2 "Other1","-","-",57,0.3 "Other Renewable1",182,4.4,"1,232",5.6 "Petroleum",501,12.0,72,0.3 "Total","4,180",100.0,"22,196",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

299

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,108",22.3,"32,771",49.9 "Coal","2,036",11.1,"6,418",9.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",404,2.2,-176,-0.3 "Natural Gas","10,244",55.6,"24,902",37.9 "Other1",56,0.3,682,1.0 "Other Renewable1",226,1.2,850,1.3 "Petroleum","1,351",7.3,235,0.4 "Total","18,424",100.0,"65,682",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

300

Effect of Nuclear Motion on Molecular High-Order Harmonics and on Generation of Attosecond Pulses in Intense Laser Pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We calculate harmonic spectra and shapes of attosecond-pulse trains using numerical solutions of Non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Shroedinger equation for 1D H{sub 2} molecules in an intense laser pulse. A very strong signature of nuclear motion is seen in the time profiles of high-order harmonics. In general the nuclear motion shortens the part of the attosecond-pulse train originating from the first electron contribution, but it may enhance the second electron contribution for longer pulses. The shape of time profiles of harmonics can thus be used for monitoring the nuclear motion.

Bandrauk, Andre D.; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Kawai, Shinnosuke; Lu, Huizhong [Departement de Chimie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Qc, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Department Announces New Investments to Train Next Generation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to Train Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders, Advance University-Led Nuclear Innovation Energy Department Announces New Investments to Train Next Generation of Nuclear Energy...

302

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests 60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy...

303

Nuclear theory for high-energy nuclear reactions of biomedical relevance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Presentations Nuclear theory for high-energy nuclear reactions of biomedical relevance...Nuclear Data Needs for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems, April 5-7, 2005...2005. Nuclear theory for high-energy nuclear reactions of biomedical relevance......

A. J. Koning; M. C. Duijvestijn

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle (T-D Cycle{trademark}) application for nuclear and fossil-fueled power generating plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle is a combination of the best attributes of both nuclear power and combined cycle gas power plants. A technology patented in 1994 by Battelle Memorial Institute offers a synergistic approach to power generation. A typical combined cycle is defined as the combination of gas turbine Brayton Cycle, topping steam turbine Rankine Cycle. Exhaust from the gas turbine is used in heat recovery steam generators to produce steam for a steam turbine. In a standard combined cycle gas turbine-steam turbine application, the gas turbine generates about 65 to 70 percent of system power. The thermal efficiency for such an installation is typically about 45 to 50 percent. A T-D combined cycle takes a new, creative approach to combined cycle design by directly mixing high enthalpy steam from the heat recovery steam generator, involving the steam generator at more than one pressure. Direct mixing of superheated and saturated steam eliminates the requirement for a large heat exchanger, making plant modification simple and economical.

Tsiklauri, B.; Korolev, V.N.; Durst, B.M.; Shen, P.K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

306

Activation cross sections of $\\alpha$-particle induced nuclear reactions on hafnium and deuteron induced nuclear reaction on tantalum: production of $^{178}$W/$^{178m}$Ta generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of $^{178m}$Ta through $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,xn)$^{178}$W-$^{178m}$Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,x)$^{179,177,176,175}$W, $^{183,182,178g,177,176,175}$Ta, $^{179m,177m,175}$Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and $\\gamma$-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the $^{nat}$Ta(d,xn)$^{178}$W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ($^3$He,x)) production routes for $^{178}$W.

TŠrk'anyi, F; Ditrůi, F; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V; Uddin, M S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

308

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas profile Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

309

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

310

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

311

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

312

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California",and Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants", Lawrencejected lifetime for a nuclear power plant is 40 years, a

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

New York Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","5,271",13.4,"41,870",30.6 "Coal","2,781",7.1,"13,583",9.9 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","5,714",14.5,"24,942",18.2 "Natural Gas","17,407",44.2,"48,916",35.7 "Other1",45,0.1,832,0.6 "Other Renewable1","1,719",4.4,"4,815",3.5 "Petroleum","6,421",16.3,"2,005",1.5 "Total","39,357",100.0,"136,962",100.0

314

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","6,486",27.0,"51,988",49.9 "Coal","7,230",30.1,"37,671",36.2 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","4,006",16.7,"1,442",1.4 "Natural Gas","5,308",22.1,"10,927",10.5 "Other1","-","-",61,0.1 "Other Renewable1",284,1.2,"1,873",1.8 "Petroleum",670,2.8,191,0.2 "Total","23,982",100.0,"104,153",100.0

315

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,958",17.9,"40,740",31.7 "Coal","12,766",46.1,"71,951",55.9 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","2,042",7.4,"4,757",3.7 "Natural Gas","6,742",24.4,"8,447",6.6 "Other1",50,0.2,407,0.3 "Other Renewable1",543,2.0,"2,083",1.6 "Petroleum",573,2.1,293,0.2 "Total","27,674",100.0,"128,678",100.0

316

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

selection of on-site power generation with combined heat andTotal Electricity Generation Figure 13. Small MercantileWeekday Total Electricity Generation (No Storage Adoption

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste management proceedings. Keywords Nuclear, nuclear power plant, spent fuel, nuclear waste, dataCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT-RELATED DATA of Submitted Data 3 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DATA REQUESTS 6 A. Environmental Impacts 6 B. Spent Fuel Generation 8 C

318

DĖD nuclear fusion induced by laser-generated plasma at 1016†W†cm?2 intensity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deuterated polyethylene targets (CD2-monomer), as thin and thick films, were laser irradiated in a vacuum at 1016†W†cm?2 intensity. The produced plasma was monitored in situ using the Thomson parabola spectrometer, ion collectors and SiC semiconductor detectors. For thin targets irradiated under target-normal-sheath-acceleration conditions, laser accelerated deuterons with energies higher than 3.0†MeV were measured along the normal to the target surface. Characteristic emissions at 3.0 and 2.5†MeV for protons and neutrons, respectively, have been detected confirming the production of nuclear fusion events. The evidence of nuclear fusion effects was evaluated and discussed.

Lorenzo Torrisi; Salvatore Cavallaro; Maria Cutroneo; Josef Krasa; Daniel Klir

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","2,538","20,943",40.3,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "V C Summer Unit 1",966,"8,487",16.3,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Co" "4 Plants 7 Reactors","6,486","51,988",100.0

320

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan for LightRegulatory Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licens- ing. Standard Review Plan.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Radioisotope Power System Delivery, Ground Support and Nuclear Safety Implementation: Use of the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator for the NASA's Mars Science Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioisotope power systems have been used for over 50 years to enable missions in remote or hostile environments. They are a convenient means of supplying a few milliwatts up to a few hundred watts of useable, long-term electrical power. With regard to use of a radioisotope power system, the transportation, ground support and implementation of nuclear safety protocols in the field is a complex process that requires clear identification of needed technical and regulatory requirements. The appropriate care must be taken to provide high quality treatment of the item to be moved so it arrives in a condition to fulfill its missions in space. Similarly it must be transported and managed in a manner compliant with requirements for shipment and handling of special nuclear material. This presentation describes transportation, ground support operations and implementation of nuclear safety and security protocols for a radioisotope power system using recent experience involving the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator for National Aeronautics and Space Administrationís Mars Science Laboratory, which launched in November of 2011.

S.G. Johnson; K.L. Lively; C.C. Dwight

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

PARTNERSHIP FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEXT GENERATION SIMULATION TOOLS TO EVALUATE CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS AND MATERIALS USED IN NUCLEAR APPLICATION - 8388  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE has initiated a multidisciplinary cross cutting project to develop a reasonable and credible set of tools to predict the structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cement barriers used in nuclear applications over extended time frames (e.g., > 100 years for operating facilities and > 1000 years for waste management). A partnership that combines DOE, NRC, academia, private sector, and international expertise has been formed to accomplish the project objectives by integrating existing information and realizing advancements where necessary. The set of simulation tools and data developed under this project will be used to evaluate and predict the behavior of cementitious barriers used in near surface engineered waste disposal systems, e.g., waste forms, containment structures, entombments and environmental remediation, including decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The simulation tools will also support analysis of structural concrete components of nuclear facilities (spent fuel pools, dry spent fuel storage units, and recycling facilities, e.g., fuel fabrication, separations processes). Simulation parameters will be obtained from prior literature and will be experimentally measured under this project, as necessary, to demonstrate application of the simulation tools for three prototype applications (waste form in concrete vault, high level waste tank grouting, and spent fuel pool). Test methods and data needs to support use of the simulation tools for future applications will be defined. This is a national issue that affects all waste disposal sites that use cementitious waste forms and structures, decontamination and decommissioning activities, service life determination of existing structures, and design of future public and private nuclear facilities. The problem is difficult because it requires projecting conditions and responses over extremely long times. Current performance assessment analyses show that engineered barriers are typically the primary control to prevent the release of radionuclides from nuclear facilities into the environment. In the absence of an adequate predictive tool, assessments cannot fully incorporate the effectiveness of the concrete barriers, and the inventory of radionuclides (especially the long-lived radionuclides) that may be safely disposed of in shallow land disposal and the predicted service life of operating nuclear facilities. This project is 5 year effort focused on reducing uncertainties associated with current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increasing the consistency and transparency of the assessment process. The results of this project will enable improved risk-informed, performance-based decision making, and supports several of the strategic initiatives in the DOE-EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap.

Langton, C; Richard Dimenna, R

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV materials. Through the results obtained from this integrated materials behavior and NDE study, new insight will be gained into the best nondestructive creep and microstructure monitoring methods for the particular mechanisms identified in these materials. The proposed project includes collaboration with a national laboratory partner and the results will also serve as a foundation to guide the efforts of scientists in the DOE laboratory, university, and industrial communities concerned with the technological challenges of monitoring creep and microstructural evolution in materials planned to be used in Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems.

Nagy, Peter

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

325

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

326

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

327

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

60 60 Vermont Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable 1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 - = No data reported. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

328

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

329

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Nebraska Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,363 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,849 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable 1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

330

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee profile Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

331

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

332

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Iowa Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable 1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100.0 Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

333

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

334

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20 20 Kansas Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable 1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

335

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Iowa Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable 1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100.0 Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

336

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

337

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20 20 Kansas Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable 1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

338

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

339

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

340

Nuclear Power Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Onofre Nuclear Generating Station San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Bob Ashe-Everest Southern California Edison 10 Incoming New Fuel Inspecting New Fuel SONGS Unit 1 Fuel Storage SONGS Unit 1 Fuel Storage History History u Shipped 270 Fuel Assemblies (F/A) from Unit 1 to Morris, Illinois. u Transshipped 70 U1 F/As to U2 spent fuel pool (SFP). u Transshipped 118 U1 F/As to U3 SFP. SONGS ISFSI Loading SONGS ISFSI Loading u Moved 5 dry shielded canisters (DSC) from U3 SFP to the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Each DSC contains up to 24 F/As. u Moved 9 DSCs from U1 SFP to the ISFSI. u At total of 325 U1 F/As have been moved into dry storage to date. u Scheduled to move 3 DSCs from U2 SFP to the ISFSI May 2005. Canister into Cask FA being loaded into canister

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Preparing Non-nuclear Engineers for the Nuclear Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preparing Non-nuclear Engineers for the Nuclear Field Elizabeth K. Ervin The University. An understanding of power generation is important for all modern-day engineers, and nuclear energy serves as a good-four universities have nuclear- related programs, including Nuclear or Radiological Engineering, Nuclear Science

Ervin, Elizabeth K.

342

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- FuelHealth and Safety Aspects of Pro- posed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

346

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

347

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

348

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

349

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

350

REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

Lowry, N.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nuclear Eclectic Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...much higher future costs for oil and natural gas. However, the...ELECTRICITY GENERATION FROM COAL, OIL, AND NUCLEAR FUEL, NUCLEAR...electricity generation from coal, oil, and nuclear fuel, cite about...possibility that stimu-lated a marathon debate between the Union of...

David J. Rose

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

352

Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model - 13413  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system, and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity. (authors)

Djokic, Denia [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Piet, Steven J.; Pincock, Layne F.; Soelberg, Nick R. [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)] [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Massachusetts Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable 1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

354

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Mississippi Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable 1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 81 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

355

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Illinois Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable 1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

356

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

63 63 Wisconsin Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable 1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

357

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Tennessee Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable 1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

358

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Arizona Total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable 1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

359

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Illinois Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable 1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

360

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable 1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

48 48 Pennsylvania Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable 1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

362

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other 1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable 1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

363

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

41 41 New Jersey New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by source, 2010 Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable 1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

364

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Michigan Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable 1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

365

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Ohio Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable 1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

366

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Missouri Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable 1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

367

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable 1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

368

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Florida Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other 1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable 1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

369

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Minnesota Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,594 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable 1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

370

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

21 21 Louisiana Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable 1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

371

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

34 34 North Carolina North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable 1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

372

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 South Carolina South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable 1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

373

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other 1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable 1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

374

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Massachusetts Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable 1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

375

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 California California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable 1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 67,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

376

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 New York New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable 1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

377

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

63 63 Wisconsin Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable 1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

378

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Connecticut Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable 1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

379

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Maryland Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable 1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

380

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 California California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable 1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 67,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Missouri Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable 1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

382

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Florida Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other 1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable 1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

383

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable 1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

384

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Minnesota Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,594 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable 1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

385

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable 1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

386

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

34 34 North Carolina North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable 1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

387

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Texas Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable 1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

388

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 New York New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable 1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

389

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Ohio Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable 1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

390

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

48 48 Pennsylvania Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable 1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

391

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 New Hampshire New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable 1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

392

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Mississippi Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable 1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 81 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

393

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Maryland Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable 1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

394

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 South Carolina South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable 1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

395

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Michigan Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable 1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

396

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrity monitoring and flaw diagnostics of flat beams and tubular structures was investigated in this research task using guided acoustic signals. A piezo-sensor suite was deployed to activate and collect Lamb wave signals that propagate along metallic specimens. The dispersion curves of Lamb waves along plate and tubular structures are generated through numerical analysis. Several advanced techniques were explored to extract representative features from acoustic time series. Among them, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a recently developed technique for the analysis of non-linear and transient signals. A moving window method was introduced to generate the local peak characters from acoustic time series, and a zooming window technique was developed to localize the structural flaws. The time-frequency analysis and pattern recognition techniques were combined for classifying structural defects in brass tubes. Several types of flaws in brass tubes were tested, both in the air and in water. The techniques also proved to be effective under background/process noise. A detailed theoretical analysis of Lamb wave propagation was performed and simulations were carried out using the finite element software system ABAQUS. This analytical study confirmed the behavior of the acoustic signals acquired from the experimental studies. The report presents the background the analysis of acoustic signals acquired from piezo-electric transducers for structural defect monitoring. A comparison of the use of time-frequency techniques, including the Hilbert-Huang transform, is presented. The report presents the theoretical study of Lamb wave propagation in flat beams and tubular structures, and the need for mode separation in order to effectively perform defect diagnosis. The results of an extensive experimental study of detection, location, and isolation of structural defects in flat aluminum beams and brass tubes are presented. The results of this research show the feasibility of on-line monitoring of small structural flaws by the use of transient and nonlinear acoustic signal analysis, and its implementation by the proper design of a piezo-electric transducer suite.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Perspective on Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste has the deserved reputation as one of ... facing the United States and other nations using nuclear reactors for electric power generation. This pa...

D. Warner North

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted ... Of all the issues haunting nuclear power plants, that of disposing of the radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel they generate has been the most vexing. ...

1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

399

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

400

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

402

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

403

The Future of Energy from Nuclear Fission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is an important part of our current global energy system, and contributes to supplying the significant demand for electricity for many nations around the world. There are 433 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries with an installed capacity of 367 GWe as of October 2011 (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Nuclear electricity generation totaled 2630 TWh in 2010 representing 14% the worldís electricity generation. The top five countries of total installed nuclear capacity are the US, France, Japan, Russia and South Korea at 102, 63, 45, 24, and 21 GWe, respectively (WNA, 2012a). The nuclear capacity of these five countries represents more than half, 68%, of the total global nuclear capacity. The role of nuclear power in the global energy system today has been motivated by several factors including the growing demand for electric power, the regional availability of fossil resources and energy security concerns, and the relative competitiveness of nuclear power as a source of base-load electricity. There is additional motivation for the use of nuclear power because it does not produce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or local air pollutants during its operation and contributes to low levels of emissions throughout the lifecycle of the nuclear energy system (Beerten, J. et. al., 2009). Energy from nuclear fission primarily in the form of electric power and potentially as a source of industrial heat could play a greater role for meeting the long-term growing demand for energy worldwide while addressing the concern for climate change from rising GHG emissions. However, the nature of nuclear fission as a tremendously compact and dense form of energy production with associated high concentrations of radioactive materials has particular and unique challenges as well as benefits. These challenges include not only the safety and cost of nuclear reactors, but proliferation concerns, safeguard and storage of nuclear materials associated with nuclear fuel cycles. In March of 2011, an unprecedented earthquake of 9 magnitude and ensuing tsunami off the east coast of Japan caused a severe nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan (Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 2011). The severity of the nuclear accident in Japan has brought about a reinvestigation of nuclear energy policy and deployment activities for many nations around the world, most notably in Japan and Germany (BBC, 2011; Reuter, 2011). The response to the accident has been mixed and its full impact may not be realized for many years to come. The nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan has not directly affected the significant on-going nuclear deployment activities in many countries. China, Russia, India, and South Korea, as well as others, are continuing with their deployment plans. As of October 2011, China had the most reactors under construction at 27, while Russia, India, and South Korea had 11, 6, and 5 reactors under construction, respectively (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Ten other nations have one or two reactors currently under construction. Many more reactors are planned for future deployment in China, Russia, and India, as well as in the US. Based on the World Nuclear Associationís data, the realization of Chinaís deployment plan implies that China will surpass the US in total nuclear capacity some time in the future.

Kim, Son H.; Taiwo, Temitope

2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

404

Department of Energy Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S.  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to 4 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S. Universities Department of Energy Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S. Universities December 15, 2005 - 4:46pm Addthis $12 Million in Support to Be Provided for Innovative R&D Projects WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced 24 research awards totaling $12 million over three years to U.S. universities to engage students and professors in DOE's advanced nuclear energy research and development programs, including the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. "These awards support the department's advanced nuclear technology development efforts and foster the education and training of the next generation of scientists and engineers needed to move this vital industry

405

The Role of Nuclear Power in Reducing Risk of the Fossil Fuel Prices and Diversity of Electricity Generation in Tunisia: A Portfolio Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the global energy trend to substitute fossil fuel, the nuclear power has known an important ... degrees of uncertainties related to nuclear and fossil fuel. The higher uncertainty of fossil fuel prices make...

Mohamed Ben Abdelhamid; Chaker Aloui; Corinne ChatonÖ

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nuclear Energy Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Role of Synchrotron Radiation in Solving Scientific Challenges in Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems 27 to 28 January 2010 at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source Scope Third-generation...

407

The Next Generation Nuclear The Next Generation Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use VHTR technology to: Use VHTR technology to: Produce electricity, and Produce electricity, and Process heat for hydrogen production and other Process heat for...

408

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Georgia Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.4 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 53.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.2 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 17.4 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable 1 637 1.7 3,181 2.3 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 137,577 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1

409

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Georgia Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.4 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 53.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.2 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 17.4 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable 1 637 1.7 3,181 2.3 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 137,577 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1

410

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Virginia Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable 1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent)

411

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Virginia Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable 1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent)

412

Request For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons This document identifies the nuclear weapon records generated by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex Request...

413

Secretary Chu Announces $38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear 8 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects Secretary Chu Announces $38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects May 20, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced the selection of 42 university-led research and development projects for awards totaling $38 million. These projects, funded over three to four years through the Department's Nuclear Energy University Program, will help advance nuclear education and develop the next generation of nuclear technologies. "We are taking action to restart the nuclear industry as part of a broad approach to cut carbon pollution and create new clean energy jobs," said Secretary Chu. "These projects will help us develop the nuclear

414

U.S. Spent Nuclear Fuel Data as of December 31, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Nuclear > Spent Nuclear Fuel Home > Nuclear > Spent Nuclear Fuel Release Date: October 1, 2004 Next Release: Late 2010** Spent nuclear fuel data is collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The spent nuclear fuel (SNF) data includes detailed characteristics of SNF generated by commercial U.S. nuclear power plants. From 1983 through 1995 this data was collected annually. Since 1996 this data has been collected every three years. The latest available detailed data covers all SNF discharged from commercial reactors before December 31, 2002, and is maintained in a data base by the EIA. Summary data tables from this data base may be found as indicated below. Table 1. Total U.S. Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges, 1968 - 2002

415

Secretary Chu Announces $38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

$38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear $38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects Secretary Chu Announces $38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects May 20, 2010 - 12:05pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced the selection of 42 university-led research and development projects for awards totaling $38 million. These projects, funded over three to four years through the Department's Nuclear Energy University Program, will help advance nuclear education and develop the next generation of nuclear technologies. "We are taking action to restart the nuclear industry as part of a broad approach to cut carbon pollution and create new clean energy jobs," said Secretary Chu. "These projects will help us develop the nuclear

416

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High- importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy...

417

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Capacity and Generation, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History 1. Capacity and Generation, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History Table 2. U.S. Nuclear Reactor Ownership Data PDF XLS Plant/Reactor Name Generator ID Utility Name - Operator Owner Name % Owned Arkansas Nuclear One 1 Entergy Arkansas Inc Entergy Arkansas Inc 100 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 Entergy Arkansas Inc Entergy Arkansas Inc 100 Beaver Valley 1 FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company FirstEnergy Nuclear Generation Corp 100 Beaver Valley 2 FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company FirstEnergy Nuclear Generation Corp 100 Braidwood Generation Station 1 Exelon Nuclear Exelon Nuclear 100 Braidwood Generation Station 2 Exelon Nuclear Exelon Nuclear 100 Browns Ferry 1 Tennessee Valley Authority Tennessee Valley Authority 100

418

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

419

Nuclear Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy ... A brief summary of the history and key concepts of nuclear energy. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Charles D. Mickey

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nuclear batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear batteries ... Describes the structure, operation, and application of nuclear batteries. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Alfred B. Garrett

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Measurements of photon ionizing radiation fields in the reactor room of the 4th power-generating unit of the chernobyl nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radiation examination of the reactor room of the damaged fourth unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was performed. The most strongly radiating surfaces...

A. G. Volkovich; V. N. Potapov; S. V. Smirnov; L. I. UrutskoevÖ

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locatingĖdominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater†[186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locatingĖtotal dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

nuclear energy Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum...

424

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

425

Nuclear Forensics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear...

426

Quadrennial Technology Review's Alternative Generation Workshop...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Workshop Slides Preliminary Slides for Alternative Generation Workshop including Carbon Capture and Sequestration, Nuclear Power, Wind Power, Water Power, Geothermal...

427

Total Solar Irradiance Variability and the Solar Activity Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is suggested that the solar variability is due to the perturbed nature of the solar core and this variability is provided by the variability of the solar neutrino flux from the solar neutrino detectors i.e., Homestake, Superkamiokande, SAGE and GALLEX-GNO. The solar neutrino flux in the standard solar model (SSM) was calculated on the assumption of L_nu (neutrino luminosity) = L_gamma (optical luminosity) which implies that if there is a change in optical luminosity then solar neutrino flux data will also be changed. An internal dynamo due to the cyclic variation of nuclear energy generation inside the core of the sun is responsible for the solar activity cycle was suggested and thus the internal magnetic field is also variable. Again the changes in the nuclear energy generation induce structural changes that result in variations of the global solar parameters i.e., luminosity, radius and temperatures etc. From the analysis of total solar irradiance (TSI) data during the year from 1970 to 2003 we have found five phases within the solar activity cycle. The first phase (I) starts before two years from the sunspot minimum. The second phase (II) starts at the time of sunspot minimum and phase (III) starts before 2/3 years from sunspot maximum whereas phase (IV) starts at sunspot maximum and fifth phase (V) starts at after 2-3 years from sunspot maximum.

Probhas Raychaudhuri

2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Prospects for Closed Cycle M.P.D. Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...P.D. Power Generation B. C. Lindley...cycles (direct nuclear, indirect nuclear...on combustion or nuclear energy, to the...restrictions. Nuclear reactors to provide temperatures...p.d. power generation is mainly in progress...

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Issues for New Nuclear Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Explore * Idaho's energy picture * Nuclear power in the U.S. * Potential for a nuclear power plant in Idaho 0 5 10 15 20 25 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Million Megawatt-Hours Total...

430

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

431

Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National Laboratory William C. Horak, Chair Nuclear Science and Technology Department #12;BNL Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - 1948 National&T Department #12;Nuclear Energy Today 435 Operable Power Reactors, 12% electrical generation (100 in US, 19

Ohta, Shigemi

432

Nuclear Induction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic moments of nuclei in normal matter will result in a nuclear paramagnetic polarization upon establishment of equilibrium in a constant magnetic field. It is shown that a radiofrequency field at right angles to the constant field causes a forced precession of the total polarization around the constant field with decreasing latitude as the Larmor frequency approaches adiabatically the frequency of the r-f field. Thus there results a component of the nuclear polarization at right angles to both the constant and the r-f field and it is shown that under normal laboratory conditions this component can induce observable voltages. In Section 3 we discuss this nuclear induction, considering the effect of external fields only, while in Section 4 those modifications are described which originate from internal fields and finite relaxation times.

F. Bloch

1946-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Improving the management of nuclear technology: Technical, financial, and organizational measures for assessing the performance of nuclear utilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is the outcome of a study with the objective of better understanding and improving the quality of the management of technology in the case of the nuclear power industry. The authors tried to deal with this topic in an empirical way, namely by conducting four case studies on the major nuclear power utilities in the State of New York and by doing a comparative analysis of the material collected, focusing on the main economic and organizational issues, and the management of technology practices that pertain to nuclear power generation. The study covered in depth the nuclear divisions of only four out of a total of fifty-five nuclear utilities that exist in the United States, hence we want to stress the caveat that it has an exploratory rather than a statistically conclusive nature.

Elias Carayannis; Jose Maldifassi

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Materials Research Needs for Near-Term Nuclear Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Material

John R. Weeks

435

Projections of U. S. GHG Reductions from Nuclear Power New Capacity Based on Historic Levels of Investment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical rates of capital investment in nuclear plant construction was used as a guide to estimate the rate of future capacity introduction. The magnitude of nuclear capacity was then used to determine the effect on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electrical production in the U.S. to 2050. Total capital investment in nuclear power plant construction for every U.S. nuclear unit from 1964 to 1990 were obtained and the total investment and divided by their construction period to provide a value for possible rate of investment. The total linear rate of capital expenditure over the entire period was determined as well as that for the period of peak construction from 1973 to 1985, $11.5 billion/y and $17.9 billion/y, respectively in 2004$. These were used with a variety of capital cost estimates for nuclear construction to obtain several scenarios for nuclear capacity additions. Total nuclear generation out to 2050 was calculated assuming current plants would be constrained by 60-year operating licenses (i.e., a single 20-year life extension). The effect on nuclear generating capacity was projected and the resultant impact on GHG emissions determined assuming nuclear would directly replace coal-fired generation. It was concluded that actually reductions in emissions would not be experienced until 2038, yet growth in emissions from electrical production would be slowed up through that point. Nuclear energy, therefore cannot have a dramatic short-term effect on emissions, as likely cannot any energy producing technology due to the significant time to introduce large-scale changes. Nuclear power, however, can have a major longer term impact on emissions, particularly under more favorable cost and investment conditions.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Nuclear power is the use of sustained nuclear fission to generate heat and electricity. Nuclear power plants provide about 6 percent of the world's energy and 13-14 percent of the world's electricity. Featured Five Years of Building the Next Generation of Reactors Simulated three-dimensional fission power distribution of a single 17x17 rod PWR fuel assembly. | Photo courtesy of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). A two-year update on the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors and the progress being made in overcoming barriers to national

437

Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act calls for the establishment of a tax-exempt, tax-deductible decommissioning fund by the licensee of any nuclear power generating facility to pay for the...

438

Electricity investments and development of power generation capacities : An approach of the drivers for investment choices in Europe regarding nuclear energy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In a context of growing energy prices and climate change mitigation, the thesis addresses the issues of investments in power generation capacities and in particularÖ (more)

Shoai Tehrani, Bianka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Simulation of thermal stress influence on the Boom Clay kerogen (Oligocene, Belgium) in relation to long-term storage of high activity nuclear waste: I. Study of generated soluble compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Closed pyrolyses were performed on the Boom Clay kerogen to simulate the weak thermal stress applied during the in situ CERBERUS heating experiment (80 įC for 5 a). Two stronger thermal stresses, encompassing the range generally considered for the long-term disposal of high-activity nuclear waste (80 įC for 1 ka and 120 įC for 3 ka), were also simulated. Quantitative and qualitative studies were carried out on the products thus generated with a focus on the C12+ fraction, especially on its polar components. It thus appeared that the soluble C12+ fractions generated during these simulation experiments comprise a wide variety of polar O- and/or N-containing compounds, including carboxylic acids and phenols. The nature and/or the relative abundance of these polar compounds exhibit strong variations, with the extent of the thermal stress, reflecting the primary cracking of different types of structures with different thermal stability and the occurrence of secondary degradation reactions. These observations support the idea that the compounds, generated upon exposure of the Boom Clay kerogen to a low to moderate thermal stress, may affect the effectiveness of the geological barrier upon long-term storage of high-activity nuclear waste.

I. Deniau; S. Derenne; C. Beaucaire; H. Pitsch; C. Largeau

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Nuclear Power Technology: A Mandate for Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Fission Reactor

Kunmo Chung; George A. Hazelrigg

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Covariance and sensitivity data generation at ORNL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......parameter covariance generation. In this paper...retroactive covariance generation approach for the gadolinium...COVARIANCE DATA GENERATION IN SAMMY Over the...quality of the basic nuclear data. Thermal reactor designs and applications......

L. C. Leal; H. Derrien; N. M. Larson; A. Alpan

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

442

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

443

New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

444

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

445

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,Summary of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience for

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

447

World nuclear outlook 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

NONE

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

448

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

449

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

450

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

452

Nuclear Reactions in Stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

21 February 1961 research-article Nuclear Reactions in Stars T. G. Cowling Thermonuclear reactions important for the generation of stellar energy during different phases of stellar evolution are discussed. The Royal...

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4...

454

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Energy from nuclear power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power should play a pivotal and expanded role in supplying world energy, the authors says. Risks must be minimized by designing a new generation of safe reactors. Atomic energy's vast potential can be harnessed only if issues of safety, waste and nuclear-weapon proliferation are addressed by a globally administered institution. The current situation in nuclear power is described before addressing its future.

Haefele, W.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Lithium and nuclear fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the EEC of a decision on the siting of the Joint European Torus (JET) nuclear fusion project, worrying setbacks though these are for European fusion research, should not be allowed ... gain is the highest (about 1,800 per fusion reaction). The first generation of nuclear fusion reactors will therefore need a continuous supply of both deuterium and tritium fuel.

Nick Walton, Ed Spooner

1976-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

457

Power generation using solar power plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Pursuing the commitment of California State to generate at least 20 percent of total generated energy from the renewable source by the year 2010 ratherÖ (more)

Amin, Parth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 Million to Develop the Next 0 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant March 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced selections for the award of approximately $40 million in total to two teams led by Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse Electric Co. and San Diego-based General Atomics for conceptual design and planning work for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The results of this work will help the Administration determine whether to proceed with detailed efforts toward construction and demonstration of the NGNP. If successful, the NGNP Demonstration Project will demonstrate high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology that will be capable of producing electricity as well as process

459

Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

40 Million to Develop the Next 40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant March 9, 2010 - 12:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced selections for the award of approximately $40 million in total to two teams led by Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse Electric Co. and San Diego-based General Atomics for conceptual design and planning work for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The results of this work will help the Administration determine whether to proceed with detailed efforts toward construction and demonstration of the NGNP. If successful, the NGNP Demonstration Project will demonstrate high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology that will be capable of producing electricity as well as process

460

Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant March 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced selections for the award of approximately $40 million in total to two teams led by Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse Electric Co. and San Diego-based General Atomics for conceptual design and planning work for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The results of this work will help the Administration determine whether to proceed with detailed efforts toward construction and demonstration of the NGNP. If successful, the NGNP Demonstration Project will demonstrate high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Total dose radiation response of plasma-damaged NMOS devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma-damaged NMOS devices were subjected to the X-ray total dose irradiation. Unlike the traditional hot-carrier or Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) stress where the hole trap generation is less pronounced, this study shows enhanced hole trap and interface trap generation on plasma-damaged devices after total dose irradiation.

Yue, J.; Lo, E.; Flanery, M. [Honeywell Solid-State Electronic Center, Plymouth, MN (United States)] [Honeywell Solid-State Electronic Center, Plymouth, MN (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Specific activity of243Am and243Cm in the fuel of the 4th power-generating unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activity ratios241Am/241Am.243Cm/244Cm, and242Cm/244Cm in core samples taken at the industrial site of the object ďCoverĒ were measured. The content of243Am and243Cm in the fuel in the 4th power-generating un...

V. A. Ageev; S. L. Vyrichek; A. P. Lashko; T. N. Lashko; A. A. Odintsov

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Snap-Together Nuclear Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Snap-Together Nuclear Power ... The U.S. moved further along last month on an experiment to build a new generation of nuclear power plant reactors. ... Supporters hope these physically smaller reactors will have more flexible applications and incur less financial risk and construction cost than the nationís current fleet of 104 large and aging nuclear power plants. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

465

Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Programs >> Nuclear Energy Error Error Nuclear Energy Home - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Energy Home - RCC * Increasing...

466

National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear Data Portal www.nndc.bnl.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Nuclear Data Center #12;Nuclear Data Portal www.nndc.bnl.gov Nuclear Data Portal New generation of nuclear data services, using modern and powerful DELL servers, Sybase relational database software, Linux operating system, and Java programming language. The Portal includes nuclear structure

Ohta, Shigemi

467

THE NUCLEAR ENERGY REVOLUTIONó1966  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the coming generation. It is this...cheap nuclear power, about which...water nuclear power plant. At its...for a coal-fired power plant of the...Utilities Rochester Gas & Electric Consolidated...available for generation 76 per cent of...

Alvin M. Weinberg; Gale Young

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials.

Fontana, Giorgio [University of Trento, 38050 POVO (Italy); Baker, Robert M. L. Jr. [Transportation Sciences Corporation and GRAVWAVE LLC, 8123 Tuscany Avenue, Playa del Rey, California 90293 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

Honoring Our Past, Securing Our Future | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

nuclear weapons into LEU fuel for U.S. power plants, generating 10 percent of U.S. electricity. Preventing nuclear smuggling and strengthening the nonproliferation regime -...

470

Nondestructive Spent Fuel Assay Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Techniques for Nuclear Safeguards," LA-UR 09-01188, ANSessential for many nuclear safeguards applications, such asof the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, NA-241 has

Quiter, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

ENSURING A SKILLED WORKFORCE FOR THE NUCLEAR RENAISSANCE The...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carolina. Georgia's four nuclear units account for more than one-fourth of the State's electricity generation. South Carolina's five nuclear units supply about half of the...

472

Definition: Distributed generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Distributed generation A term used by the power industry to describe localized or on-site power generation[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Distributed generation, also called on-site generation, dispersed generation, embedded generation, decentralized generation, decentralized energy or distributed energy, generates electricity from many small energy sources. Most countries generate electricity in large centralized facilities, such as fossil fuel, nuclear, large solar power plants or hydropower plants. These plants have excellent economies of scale, but usually transmit electricity long distances and can negatively affect the environment. Distributed generation allows collection of energy from many

473

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emergencies, Le. , accidents at nuclear facilities, there isas a result of nuclear accidents; these are the Protectiveassociated with a nuclear accident is of greater importance

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

R. Shane Johnson, Associate Director Office of Advanced Nuclear Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research September 30, 2002 Generation IV International Forum Generation IV International Forum Presentation to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Generation IV International Forum Generation IV International Forum 6 Government-sanctioned organization working together to plan the future of nuclear energy * Chartered in July 2002 * Conduct joint R&D on next-generation nuclear energy systems * Voluntary member participation in specific projects 6 Observer Organizations * OECD-NEA * IAEA * Euratom South Korea U.S.A. Argentina Brazil Canada France Japan South Africa United Kingdom Switzerland Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology

475

Nuclear weapon detection categorization analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This statement of work is for the Proof of Concept for nuclear weapon categories utility in Arms control. The focus of the project will be to collect, analyze and correlate Intrinsic Radiation (INRAD) calculation results for the purpose of defining measurable signatures that differentiate categories of nuclear weapons. The project will support START III negotiations by identifying categories of nuclear weapons. The categories could be used to clarify sub-limits on the total number of nuclear weapons.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

477

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thirty-second volume of issuances (1--496) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards, Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and Administrative Law Judges it covers the period from July 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990. The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. Issuances are referred to as follows: Commission--CLI, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards--ALAB, Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards--LBP, Administrative Law Judges--ALJ, Directors'Decisions--DD, and Denial of Petitions for Rulemaking--DPRM. Specific facilities discussed are: Carroll County Nuclear Station; Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station; Perry Nuclear Power Plant; Quad Cities Nuclear Power Stations; Seabrook Station; Shoreham Nuclear Generating Plant; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; and Vogtle Electric Generating Plant.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Safeguards Licensing Aspects of a Future Generation IV Demonstration Facility.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Generation IV (Gen IV) is a developing new generation of nuclear power reactors which is foreseen to bring about a safer and more sustainableÖ (more)

Ňberg Lindell, Matilda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

480

New Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Generating Technology to Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION 30 TH BIRTHDAY CONFERENCE April 7, 2008 Linda G. Stuntz Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 2 The Target * Energy related emissions of CO2 will increase by about 16% in AEO 2008 Reference Case between 2006 and 2030 (5,890 MM metric tons to 6,859 MM metric tons). (#s from Caruso Senate Energy testimony of 3/4/08). * Last year, emissions from electricity generation were 40% of total energy-related GHG emissions. * Based on projected annual electricity demand growth of 1.1%. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 3 The Target Cont'd * 16.4 GW of new nuclear + 2.7 GW Uprates of existing plants less 4.5 GW of retirements. * Coal responsible for 54% of generation in 2030.