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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

2

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

3

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

4

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

5

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project 2009 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the NGNP Project is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy technology to the United States and other economies by demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not served by light water reactors (LWRs). Those markets typically use fossil fuels to fulfill their energy needs, and high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) like the NGNP can reduce this dependence and the resulting carbon footprint.

Larry Demick; Jim Kinsey; Keith Perry; Dave Petti

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

7

Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

John Saurwein

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the selected thermochemical process and to define the selected reactor and process to the point that capital costs, operating costs and the resultant cost of hydrogen can be estimated. During original contract negotiation, it was necessary to reduce work scope to meet funding limits. As a result, the reactor interface and process will not be iterated to the point that only hydrogen is produced. Rather, hydrogen and electricity will be co-generated and the hydrogen cost will be stated as a function of the electricity sales price.

Brown, L.C.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Update report on the performance of 400 megawatt and larger nuclear and coal-fired generating units. Performance through 1977  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forty-seven nuclear generating units and 125 coal-fired generating plants that have had at least one full year of commercial operation are covered in this report. Their performances are evaluated using the capacity factor, availability factor, equivalent availability, and forced outage rate. The data are arranged by state and utility. (DLC)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

Survey of insulation used in nuclear power plants and the potential for debris generation. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of Unresolved Safety Issue A-43, 'Containment Emergency Sump Performance,' 11 nuclear power plants representative of different U.S. reactor manufacturers and architect-engineers were surveyed to identify and document the types and amounts of insulation used, location within containment, components insulated, material characteristics, and methods of installation and attachment. A preliminary assessment was made of the potential effects of insulation debris generated as the result of a loss-of-coolant accident (pipe break).

Reyer, R.; Gahan, E.; Riddington, J.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 ORNLTM-2007147, Vol. 5 Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research...

13

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ... The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy enhance safety and security, and develop nuclear power as an energy source for industrial applications Information ... U.S. Department of Energy www.energy.gov DOE Office of Nuclear Energy www.nuclear

Kemner, Ken

15

Annual Report Generator.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This report analyzes the needs to build an annual report generator which has the properties of Modularity, Simplicity in use and Maintainability based onÖ (more)

Lin, Yingwei

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Model of sludge behavior in nuclear plant steam generators. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulation of large amounts of sludge in pressurized water reactor steam generators is thought to be a cause of accelerated corrosion by trace impurities which concentrate in such deposits. Based on fundamental principles, this study develops a mathematical model for predicting the behavior (e.g., deposition and reentrainment) of sludge in steam generators. The calculated sludge behavior shows good agreement with the limited amount of experimental data available. The results suggest that the continued accumulation of sludge on the tubesheet might be preventable, and that if it could be, the incoming sludge would be removed by blowdown. An analysis of the uncertainties in the model led to suggested priorities for further analytical and experimental work to gain a better understanding of sludge behavior. 29 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

Beal, S.K.; Chen, J.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT Form used to support nuclear materials accountability and control. NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT More...

18

NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1975  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gove and A. H. Wapstra, Nuclear Data Tables 11, 127 (1972).P. Jackson, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Report (1975)national Conference on Nuclear Structure and Spec≠ troscopy,

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

[Nuclear theory: Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses topics on : nuclear structure models; algebraic models of hadronic structure; nuclear reactions; hot rotating nuclei; chaos in nuclei; signatures of the quark-gluon plasma; hadronic spectroscopy; octupole collectivity in nuclei; finite-temperature methods for the many-body problem; and classical limit of algebraic hamiltonians. (LSP)

Iachello, F.; Alhassid, Y.; Kusnezov, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

(Nuclear theory: Annual report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses topics on : nuclear structure models; algebraic models of hadronic structure; nuclear reactions; hot rotating nuclei; chaos in nuclei; signatures of the quark-gluon plasma; hadronic spectroscopy; octupole collectivity in nuclei; finite-temperature methods for the many-body problem; and classical limit of algebraic hamiltonians. (LSP)

Iachello, F.; Alhassid, Y.; Kusnezov, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nuclear power eyed to generate industrial heat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power eyed to generate industrial heat ... The American Nuclear Society has called for "an aggresssive national policy aimed at demonstrating specific capabilities and providing incentives for the application of nuclear power to meeting industrial energy needs." ...

1983-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

22

California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

23

JPRS report, nuclear developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains articles concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) China; (2) Japan, North Korea, South Korea, Taiwan; (3) Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia; (4) Argentina, Brazil, Panama; (5) India, Iran, Pakistan, Israel, Afghanistan; (6) Soviet Union; (7) France, Germany, Turkey, Belgium, Canada, Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom; and (8) South Africa.

NONE

1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Microstructural Characterization of Next Generation Nuclear Graphites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

Karthik Chinnathambi; Joshua Kane; Darryl P. Butt; William E. Windes; Rick Ubic

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: September 26, 2014 Data for: July 2014 Next Release: October 2014 Year Capacity and Generation by State and Reactor...

26

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new installations in the short term. DOE needs to give those immediate objectives the highest priority and any additional support they require to assure their success. DOE is pursuing two initiatives to encourage a greater use of nuclear energy systems. The initiatives have been reviewed by NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning (GRNS) and they are: * A Near Term Development (NTD) Roadmap which is in the process of being

27

"1. Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois" Illinois" "1. Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330 "2. Byron Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2300 "3. LaSalle Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2238 "4. Baldwin Energy Complex","Coal","Dynegy Midwest Generation Inc",1785 "5. Quad Cities Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",1774 "6. Dresden Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",1734 "7. Powerton","Coal","Midwest Generations EME LLC",1538 "8. Elwood Energy LLC","Gas","Dominion Elwood Services Co",1350

28

CONSULTANT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Jobs Plan, Governor Brown established a 2020 goal of 12,000 megawatts of localized renewable energy development, or distributed generation, in California. In May 2012, Southern California Edison, renewables, interconnection, integration, electricity, distribution, transmission, costs. Please use

29

THE BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY The first time that electricity was generated from nuclear energy occurred in an experimental breeder reactor in Idaho in 1951. The idea for a breeder reactor (a reactor that could produce more fuel than it uses) first occurred to scientists working on the nation's wartime atomic energy program in the early 1940's. Experimental evidence indicated that the breeding of nuclear fuel was possible in a properly designed reactor, but time and resources were not then available to pursue the idea After the war, the newly established Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy) assigned some of the nation's nuclear skills and resources to developing peaceful uses of the atom. The large bodies of uranium ore found in the 1950's were

30

The National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator Activities OAS-L-14-11 August 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and...

31

Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology September 29, 2014 - 11:06am Addthis Fostering the Next...

32

Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reporting Criteria Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria January 1, 2012 Nuclear Safety Noncompliances Associated With Occurrences (DOE Order 232.2) These tables provide the criteria...

33

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation ¬Ľ Bilateral Cooperation ¬Ľ International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports August 13, 2013 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the

34

Nuclear proliferation status report. Status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information concerning the nuclear proliferation status of the following countries: (1) Russia, (2) Ukraine, (3) Belarus, (4) Kazakhstan, (5) Israel, (6) India, (7) Pakistan, (8) South Africa, (9) North Korea, (10) Iraq, (11) Iran, (12) Lybia, (13) Algeria, (14) Syria, (15) Brazil, (16) Argentina, and (17) Taiwan.

NONE

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Electric generating prospects for nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the nuclear power plants in the U.S. today are of the light-water variety. In many parts of the U.S. these plants are competitive with plants burning coal, but the electricity that they generate will be more costly in the future as uranium supplies ...

Manson Benedict

1970-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NMMSS Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog NMMSS Reports Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms > NMMSS Reports NMMSS Reports U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

37

January 2003, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 2003, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION January 2003, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE January 2003, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE The ANTT Subcommittee met in Washington on Dec 4-5, 2002 to review progress in the transmutation program, and to learn about major organizational changes that affect the management of the program. The NE's new Advanced Nuclear Research Office (NE-20) now oversees both the transmutation program (ANTT) and the Generation-IV program (GEN-IV). antt14Jan_03.pdf More Documents & Publications October 2003, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE

38

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs,

39

Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October...

40

Audit Report National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons Systems Configuration Management DOEIG-0902 March 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 - Datasets...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Energy Information ... World Net Nuclear Electric ... Dataset Activity Stream World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 International data showing world net...

42

[Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nuclear Safety Policy, Guidance & Reports | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Nuclear Safety Policy, Guidance & Reports Nuclear Safety Policy, Guidance & Reports The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes and maintains nuclear safety policy, requirements, and...

44

Future Trends in Nuclear Power Generation [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Future Trends in Nuclear Power Generation [and Discussion...the Calder Hall reactors were ordered...building and operating nuclear power stations...situations, a high nuclear share of new capacity...1980s. The fast reactor, prototypes of...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Nuclear Engineering Student Learning Outcome Assessment Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nuclear Engineering Student Learning Outcome Assessment Report 1. Program mission The Nuclear and graduate education to tomorrow's leaders in nuclear engineering. The program provides well-educated nuclear engineering professionals and leaders to Missouri and the nation in the commercial nuclear industry, national

Missouri-Rolla, University of

46

Suez SNC-Lavalin Nuclear to replace US steam generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SNC-Lavalin Nuclear (USA) has signed a contract with Xcel Energy to replace the Unit #2 steam generators at the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant (PINGP) in Welch, Minnesota.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor " "PlantReactor Name","Generator ID","State","Type","2009 Summer Capacity"," 2010 Annual...

48

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMERGENCY PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSINGEmergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination ofproposed nuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . ē . . . .

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 Annual 2 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs, maximize safety, minimize proliferation risk, and handle used fuel and

50

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

Myers, W.D. [ed.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Radiation Control Program The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in Maine. The Legislature

53

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home ¬Ľ Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

54

NUCLEAR POWER IN CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR POWER IN CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT Prepared For: California Energy Commission Prepared No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear Policy;Abstract This consultant report examines how nuclear power issues have evolved since publication

55

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOEís project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California",and Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants", Lawrencejected lifetime for a nuclear power plant is 40 years, a

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative September 09, 2008 Washington, DC NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

58

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letters 24, 1507 (1970); Nuclear Data B4, 663 (1970). 5. R.S. Hager and E. C. Seltzer, Nuclear Data A4, 1 (1968). 6. H.J. Nijgh, and R. Van Lieshout, Nuclear Spectroscopy Tables (

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan for LightRegulatory Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licens- ing. Standard Review Plan.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resources. However, the technology has not been demonstrated...nonrenewable natural gas), although various measures...energy. Outlook Nuclear technology is at a crossroads. The...International Forum, ďA Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Final Technical Report; NUCLEAR ENGINEERING RECRUITMENT EFFORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the summary of a project whose purpose was to support the costs of developing a nuclear engineering awareness program, an instruction program for teachers to integrate lessons on nuclear science and technology into their existing curricula, and web sites for the exchange of nuclear engineering career information and classroom materials. The specific objectives of the program were as follows: OBJECTIVE 1: INCREASE AWARENESS AND INTEREST OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING; OBJECTIVE 2: INSTRUCT TEACHERS ON NUCLEAR TOPICS; OBJECTIVE 3: NUCLEAR EDUCATION PROGRAMS WEB-SITE; OBJECTIVE 4: SUPPORT TO UNIVERSITY/INDUSTRY MATCHING GRANTS AND REACTOR SHARING; OBJECTIVE 5: PILOT PROJECT; OBJECTIVE 6: NUCLEAR ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT SURVEY AT UNIVERSITIES

Kerrick, Sharon S.; Vincent, Charles D.

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

62

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Douglas United Nuclear monthly report, June 1971  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the activities of Douglas United Nuclear at the Hanford site during the month of June 1971.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems February 28, 2005 - 10:33am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC-The Bush Administration today took a major step in advancing international efforts to develop the next generation of clean, safe nuclear energy systems. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined representatives from Canada, France, Japan, and the United Kingdom to sign the first multilateral agreement in history aimed at the development of next generation nuclear energy systems. The work of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is essential to advancing an important component of the Bush Administration's comprehensive energy strategy in the development of next generation nuclear energy technologies.

65

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

66

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

67

Water generator replaces bottled water in nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WaterPure International Incorporated of Doylestown, Pennsylvania, USA, has announced that it has placed its atmospheric water generator (AWG) inside a selected nuclear power plant.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Generating Reports & Graphs in Portfolio Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on how to generate reports and graphs in Portfolio Manager.

69

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

60 Million to Train Next Generation 60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology September 20, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to continue America's leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure. The 91 awards announced today will help train and educate the next generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative

70

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology September 20, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to continue America's leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure. The 91 awards announced today will help train and educate the next generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative

71

Nuclear power outlook dim, report concludes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power outlook dim, report concludes ... Without significant changes in technology, management, and level of public acceptance, nuclear power in the U.S. is unlikely to be expanded in this century beyond the reactors already under construction, says Congress' Office of Technology Assessment. ... Nuclear power is not inherently unsafe, OTA says. ...

1984-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- FuelHealth and Safety Aspects of Pro- posed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor prototype with the capability to produce process heat, electricity and/or hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor is based on research and development activities supported by DOE's Generation IV nuclear energy systems initiative.

76

Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Annual Reports Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy > Annual Reports Annual Reports NNSA's Naval Reactors is committed to providing information about its operations. Environmental Monitoring Report NT-12-1 - May 2012 - ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND DISPOSAL OF

77

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Generating Unstructured Nuclear Reactor Core Meshes in Parallel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor core examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a ľ pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.

Rajeev Jain; Timothy J. Tautges

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

TECHNICAL EVALUATION REPORT EMERGENCY DIESEL GENERATOR TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS STUDY RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to review technical specifications for emergency diesel generators in the context of new information developed in the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program and the application of current NRC regulatory concepts and knowledge. Aging and reliability relationships related to the standard technical specifications are reviewed and supported by data and published information to ensure that conservative and beneficial specifications are identified. Where technical specifications could adversely influence aging and reliability, the technical issues and reasonable alternatives are identified for consideration. This report documents and spans the technical progress from the published and approved regulatory documents to the current knowledge basis. This ensures that the technical bases for the technical specifications discussed are documented and relatively complete subject information is contained in one document. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has participated in the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program directed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Division of Engineering. The NPAR study of emergency diesel generator aging was performed in two phases. In Phase I, plant operating experience, ~ata, expert opinion and statistical methods were used to produce a new data base related to aging, reliability, and operational readiness of nuclear service diesel generators. Phase II was chiefly concerned with aging mitigation measures.

Hoopingarner, K. R.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

82

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

83

Nuclear Data and Measurements Series Reports - Nuclear Data Program -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

REPORTS REPORTS Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Group 1 (ANL/NDM-1 - ANL/NDM-20) Group 2 (ANL/NDM-21 - ANL/NDM-40) Group 3 (ANL/NDM-41 - ANL/NDM-60) Group 4 (ANL/NDM-61 - ANL/NDM-80) Group 5 (ANL/NDM-81 - ANL/NDM-100) Group 6 (ANL/NDM-101 - ANL/NDM-120) Group 7 (ANL/NDM-121 - ANL/NDM-140) Group 8 (ANL/NDM-141 - ANL/NDM-160) Group 9 (ANL/NDM-161 - ANL/NDM-180) Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS Bookmark and Share Contents Information on the Nuclear Data and Measurements Series Reports and

84

Second generation heliostat. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heliostat subsystem design is described. The test program is summarized, including component testing, subsystem operation at MDAC-Huntington Beach, and the shipment and installation at the Central Receiver Test Facility. The production heliostat description, the manufacturing process definitions, and the manufacturing facility definition are summarized. The installation, operations, and maintenance requirements for the 50 MWe field are summarized. Results are given of the cost analysis of the MDAC Second Generation Heliostat when produced at an annual rate of 50,000 units per year and installed and operated in a field of 5412 heliostats. Possible future development activities aimed at further cost reduction are discussed. (LEW)

Steinmeyer, D.A.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Generation IV (Gen IV) - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation IV (Gen Generation IV (Gen IV) Generation IV Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Major Programs Generation IV (Gen IV) Development of next generation nuclear systems featuring significant advances in sustainability, economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Bookmark and Share Generation IV Fact Sheet (73 KB) Overview Generation IV nuclear energy systems target significant advances over current-generation and evolutionary systems in the areas of sustainability, safety and reliability, and economics. These systems are to be deployable by 2030 in both industrialized and developing countries. Development of Generation IV systems is an international initiative. A

86

Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

i i NUCLEAR SEPARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES WORKSHOP REPORT November 7, 2011 FINAL TABLE OF CONTENTS Acronyms and Initialisms............................................................................................................ iii Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................... 1 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 9 1.1 Overview .......................................................................................................................... 9 1.2 Background .................................................................................................................... 10

87

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Annual Report, December...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Development Annual Report, December 2014 Nuclear Safety Research and Development Annual Report, December 2014 December 8, 2014 - 1:22pm Addthis Nuclear Safety Research...

88

Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Report to...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Report to the Secretary of Energy Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Report to the Secretary of Energy The Blue...

89

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo

90

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo

91

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

92

Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

teri.ehresman@inl.gov Bill Cabage (ORNL), 865-574-4399, cabagewh@ornl.gov Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident conditions IDAHO FALLS - A safer...

93

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

Mark Holbrook

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT INSTRUCTIONS|Year: 2013 No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |PURPOSE|Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry.| |REQUIRED RESPONDENTS|Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT,

95

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While our main emphasis is on experimental problems involving heavy-ion accelerators, we have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of our measurements. During the last year we have led several experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and participated in others at Argonne National Laboratory. Also, we continue to be very active in the collaboration to study ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in a RHIC detector R&D project. Our experimental work is in four broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) heavy-ion induced transfer reactions, (3) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (4) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas will be described in this document in sections IIA, IIB, IIC, and IID, respectively. Areas (1), (3), and (4) concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Area (2) pursues the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum, both to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions. An important component of our program is the strong emphasis on the theoretical aspects of nuclear structure and reactions.

Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

1993-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped charged jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inhomogeneously distributed fission gas bubbles and oxides, and noble metal precipitates...conventional ďislandĒ (the turbine and generator). At the end of its...coproduct of nonrenewable natural gas), although various measures such as cooling...International Forum, ďA Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

99

Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NA-STD-3016-2006 NA-STD-3016-2006 May 2006 DOE LIMITED STANDARD HAZARD ANALYSIS REPORTS FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE OPERATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006 iii FORWARD This Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) technical standard is approved for use by the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application and Stockpile Operations (NA-12), and is available for use to prepare Nuclear Explosive Operation (NEO) Hazard Analysis Reports (HARs) as required by 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management." This Standard is

100

Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Flushing, NY); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven, NY); Todosow, Michael (Miller Place, NY)

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

102

An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated ďtoolkitĒ consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

Timothy J. Leahy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nuclear waste isolation activities report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Included are: a report from the Deputy Assistant Secretary, a summary of recent events, new literature, a list of upcoming waste management meetings, and background information on DOE`s radwaste management programs. (DLC)

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Safety Reports Series No. 11, Developing Safety Culture in Nuclear...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in Nuclear Activities: Practical Suggestions to Assist Progress, International Atomic Energy Agency Safety Reports Series No. 11, Developing Safety Culture in Nuclear Activities:...

105

Methane generation at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methane generation at Grand Gulf has been brought to light twice. The initial event occurred in February 1990 and the second in December 1993. Both events involved the receipt of a cask at Barnwell Waste Management Facility that when opened indicated a gas escaping. The gas was subsequently sampled and indicated a percentage of explosive gas. Both events involved powdered resin and indicated that the generation was from a bacterial attack of the organic materials (cellulose in the powdered resin mixture). The first event occurred and was believed to be isolated in a particular waste stream. The situation was handled and a biocide was found to be effective in treatment of liners until severe cross contamination of another waste stream occurred. This allowed the shipment of a liner that was required to be sampled for explosive gases. The biocide used by GGNS was allowed reintroduction into the floor drains and this allowed the buildup of immunity of the bacterial population to this particular biocide. The approval of a new biocide has currently allowed GGNS to treat liners and ship them offsite.

Carver, M.L. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Port Gibson, MS (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

107

JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [December 26, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) China, (2)Japan, (3) Latin America; Argentina, Brazil, (4) Near East and South Asia; India, Israel, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, (5) West Europe; Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, Sweden, Austria, and (6) Soviet Union.

NONE

1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

108

Report of the Task Force on Next Generation High Performance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report of the Task Force on Next Generation High Performance Computing Report of the Task Force on Next Generation High Performance Computing The SEAB Task Force on Next Generation...

109

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation's electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit greenhouse gases. Continued and expanded reliance on nuclear energy is one key to meeting future demand for electricity in the U.S. and is called for in the National Energy Policy. Nevertheless, no new nuclear plants have been built in the U.S. in many years, and none are currently slated for construction. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear

110

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation's electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit greenhouse gases. Continued and expanded reliance on nuclear energy is one key to meeting future demand for electricity in the U.S. and is called for in the National Energy Policy. Nevertheless, no new nuclear plants have been built in the U.S. in many years, and none are currently slated for construction. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear

111

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...capacity of waste repositories for decommissioning waste in the second half of the century will...is returned to the manufacturer for decommissioning and disposal. Because fuel handling is avoided at the...International Forum, ďA Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...be refueled while remaining online (LWRs have...distributed fission gas bubbles and oxides, and...long-term storage. Life extension. This...16) (which have remaining design work to be...the fueled-for-life core, that is, a nuclear...islandĒ (the turbine and generator...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group The Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation IV goals and (2) identify key fuel cycle issues associated with Generation IV goals. This included examination of "fuel resource inputs and waste outputs for the range of potential Generation IV fuel cycles, consistent with projected energy demand scenarios." This report summarizes the results of the studies. The membership of the FCCG comprised 8 US members and 7 members from Generation IV International Forum (GIF) countries including members from

115

NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Information, Reports & Forms | National Nuclear Security Information, Reports & Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms

116

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,Summary of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience for

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Report of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements Report of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements As an element of its plans to return the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site in eastern Idaho to its historic mission of nuclear technology development, the DOE asked its Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) to establish a Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements. The Subcommittee was charged with identifying the "characteristics, capabilities, and attributes a world-class nuclear laboratory would possess". It was also asked "to become familiar with the practices, culture, and facilities of other world-class laboratories - not

119

NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1977-1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Relation Between Nuclear Dynamics and the RenormalizationMultiplicity Distributions in Nuclear Collision M. GyulassyHigh Energy Nuclear Collisions in the Resonance Dominated

Schroeder, L.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

JPRS report supplement: Nuclear developments. Iraq -- Nuclear and missile proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains articles from foreign periodicals from throughout the world, translated into English, that concern nuclear developments, specifically nuclear and missile proliferation in Iraq.

NONE

1990-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

March 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION March 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE March 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) marks a major change in the direction of the DOE's nuclear energy R&D program. It is a coherent plan to test technologies that promise to markedly reduce the problem of nuclear waste treatment and to reduce the proliferation risk in a world with a greatly expanded nuclear power program. It brings the U.S. program into much closer alignment with that of the other major nuclear energy states. GNEP proposes to take spent fuel from existing light water reactors (LWRs),

122

2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative July 2, 2010 - 11:49am Addthis On July 2, 2010, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) issued annual reports for its Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) andInternational Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI), describing accomplishments achieved in 2009. The NERI and I-NERI programs have furthered DOE goals for the past decade, conducting research into many of the key technical issues that impact the expanded use of advanced nuclear energy systems. Researchers have fostered innovative ideas

123

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

124

SHORT REPORT Open Access Nuclear lipid droplets identified by electron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT REPORT Open Access Nuclear lipid droplets identified by electron microscopy of serial that nuclear lipid droplets (LDs) are organized into domains similar to those of cytoplasmic LDs with the nuclear envelope, it could be suggested however that nuclear LDs are cytoplamic LDs trapped within

Boyer, Edmond

125

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Annual Report, December 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is the first annual report of DOEís Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program, managed by the Office of Nuclear Safety in the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security. The report includes a description of the program and summaries of R&D projects related to DOE (including NNSA) nuclear facility and operational safety.

126

Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan This document constitutes the first edition of a long-term research and development (R&D) plan for nuclear technology in the United States. The federally-sponsored nuclear technology programs of the United States are almost exclusively the province of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The nuclear energy areas in DOE include, but are not limited to, R&D related to power reactors and the responsibility for the waste management system for final disposition of the spent fuel resulting from nuclear power reactors. Although a major use of nuclear technology is to supply energy for electricity production, the DOE has far broader roles regarding nuclear

127

2009 UK/US Nuclear Engineering Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the 2009 UK/US Nuclear Engineering Workshop held April 20-21, 2010, in Washington, D.C. to discuss opportunities for nuclear engineering collaboration between researchers in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Richard Rankin

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Annual Report, December...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

This document is the first annual report of DOE's Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program, managed by the Office of Nuclear Safety in the Office of Environment,...

129

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel3 of HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF FOSSIL-FUEL NUCLEAR,HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- FuelHealth and Safety Aspects of Pro- posed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A REVIEW OF AIR QUALITY MODELING TECHNIQUES. VOLUME 8 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel

Rosen, L.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Employee Concerns Reporting Form | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reporting Form | National Nuclear Security Administration Reporting Form | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Human Resources > Employee Concerns Program > How Do You Report A Concern? > Employee Concerns Reporting Form Employee Concerns Reporting Form Employee Concerns Program Policy Statement

133

Innovative systems for sustainable nuclear energy generation and waste management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The limited amount of fossil resources, the impact of green-house gas emissions on the world climate, the rising demand of primary energy projected to 2050, lead to a potentially critical situation for the world energy supply. The need for alternative (to fossil energies) massive energy production is evaluated to 10 Gtoe. The potential of Nuclear Energy generation at the level of 5 Gtoe is examined. Such a sustainable production can only be met by a breeder reactor fleet for which a deployment scenario is described with the associated constraints. Waste management is discussed in connection with different nuclear energy development scenarios according to the point in time when breeder reactors are started. At the world level, it appears that the optimal handling of today's wastes rests on an early decision to develop tomorrow's breeder reactors.

Jm Loiseaux; S David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Alternative similarity renormalization group generators in nuclear structure calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The similarity renormalization group (SRG) has been successfully applied to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. In almost all practical applications in nuclear physics, an SRG generator with the kinetic energy operator is used. With this choice, a fast convergence of many-body calculations can be achieved, but at the same time substantial three-body interactions are induced even if one starts from a purely two-nucleon (NN) Hamiltonian. Three-nucleon (3N) interactions can be handled by modern many-body methods. However, it has been observed that when including initial chiral 3N forces in the Hamiltonian, the SRG transformations induce a non-negligible four-nucleon interaction that cannot be currently included in the calculations for technical reasons. Consequently, it is essential to investigate alternative SRG generators that might suppress the induction of many-body forces while at the same time might preserve the good convergence. In this work we test two alternative generators with oper...

Dicaire, Nuiok M; Navratil, Petr

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Alternative similarity renormalization group generators in nuclear structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The similarity renormalization group (SRG) has been successfully applied to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. In almost all practical applications in nuclear physics, an SRG generator with the kinetic energy operator is used. With this choice, a fast convergence of many-body calculations can be achieved, but at the same time substantial three-body interactions are induced even if one starts from a purely two-nucleon (NN) Hamiltonian. Three-nucleon (3N) interactions can be handled by modern many-body methods. However, it has been observed that when including initial chiral 3N forces in the Hamiltonian, the SRG transformations induce a non-negligible four-nucleon interaction that cannot be currently included in the calculations for technical reasons. Consequently, it is essential to investigate alternative SRG generators that might suppress the induction of many-body forces while at the same time might preserve the good convergence. In this work we test two alternative generators with operators of block structure in the harmonic oscillator basis. In the no-core shell model calculations for 3H, 4He, and 6Li with chiral NN force, we demonstrate that their performances appear quite promising.

Nuiok M. Dicaire; Conor Omand; Petr NavrŠtil

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

136

Alternative similarity renormalization group generators in nuclear structure calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The similarity renormalization group (SRG) has been successfully applied to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. In almost all practical applications in nuclear physics, an SRG generator with the kinetic energy operator is used. With this choice, a fast convergence of many-body calculations can be achieved, but at the same time substantial three-body interactions are induced even if one starts from a purely two-nucleon (NN) Hamiltonian. Three-nucleon (3N) interactions can be handled by modern many-body methods. However, it has been observed that when including initial chiral 3N forces in the Hamiltonian, the SRG transformations induce a non-negligible four-nucleon interaction that cannot be currently included in the calculations for technical reasons. Consequently, it is essential to investigate alternative SRG generators that might suppress the induction of many-body forces while at the same time might preserve the good convergence. In this work we test two alternative generators with operators of block structure in the harmonic oscillator basis. In the no-core shell model calculations for 3H, 4He and 6Li with chiral NN force, we demonstrate that their performances appear quite promising.

Nuiok M. Dicaire; Conor Omand; Petr Navratil

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

137

Removal of deposited copper from nuclear steam generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the copper-removal process implemented during the cleaning of the NPD nuclear steam generator in Ontario revealed that major shortcomings in the process were depletion of the strong ammonia solution and relatively poor copper removal. Tests have shown that the concentration of the ammonia solution can be preserved close to its initial value, and high concentrations of complexed copper obtained, by sparging the ammonia solution with oxygen recirculating through a gas recirculation loop. Using recirculating oxygen for sparging at ambient air temperature, approximately 11 g/l of copper were dissolved by 100 g/l ammonia solution while the gaseous ammonia content of the recirculating gas remained well below the lower flammability limit. The corrosion rates of mild steel and commonly used nuclear steam generator tube materials in oxygenated ammonia solution were less than 30 mil/yr and no intergranular attack of samples was observed during tests. A second technique studied for the removal of copper is to ammoniate the spent iron-removal solvent to approximately pH 9.5 and sparge with recirculating oxygen. Complexed ferric iron in the spent iron-removal solvent was found to be the major oxidizing agent for metallic copper. The ferric iron can be derived from oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron to the ferric state or from dissolved oxides of iron directly. To extract copper from the secondary sides of nuclear steam generators, strong ammonia solution sparged with recirculating oxygen is recommended as the first stage, while ammoniated spent iron-removal solvent sparged with recirculating oxygen may be used to remove the copper freshly exposed during the removal of iron.

McSweeney, P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Institutional Research & Development Reports | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reports | National Nuclear Security Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Institutional Research & Development Reports Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

139

Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report The Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a workshop on nuclear separations technologies in Bethesda, Maryland, on July 27 and 28, 2011, to (1) identify common needs and potential requirements in separations technologies and opportunities for program partnerships, and (2) evaluate the need for a DOE nuclear separations center of knowledge to improve cross- program collaboration in separations technology. The workshop supported Goal 3 of the DOE Strategic Plan1 to enhance nuclear security through defense, nonproliferation, and environmental management. The Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) jointly sponsored the workshop. The Office of Science

140

Physicists Challenge Reports of Accelerated Decay of Nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physicists Challenge Reports of Accelerated Decay of Nuclear Excited State LIVERMORE, Calif.-Physicists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Interim Report of the Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This interim report of the SEAB Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation sets forth its findings and recommendations to date in five timely and important areas

142

Nuclear Waste Management. Semiannual progress report, April 1984-September 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; and supporting studies. 33 figures, 13 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1983-March 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; and supporting studies. 58 figures, 22 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Nuclear Waste Management. Semiannual progress report, October 1984-March 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for the following studies on radioactive waste management: defense waste technology; nuclear waste materials characterization center; and supporting studies. 19 figs., 29 tabs.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

October 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION 6, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE October 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is still evolving. Since our report of March 22, 2006 the DOE has sought to gauge industry interest in participation in the program from its very beginning. At the time the ANTT committee met, August 30- 31, 2006, responses had not yet been received from industry to the DOE's request for Expressions of Interest. This report is based on the assumption that the program outlined recently, which does not include an Advanced Burner Test Reactor, is what

146

NEXT GENERATION MELTER OPTIONEERING STUDY - INTERIM REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D{sub 2}0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; RAMSEY G; LOMAX J; ALLEN H

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ronald E. Hagen, John R. Moens, and Zdenek D. Nikodem Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy International Atomic Energy Agency Vienna, Austria November 6-9, 2001 iii Energy Information Administration/ Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contents Page I. The Electric Power Industry and the Greenhouse Gas Issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. The Current Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 III. The Future Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IV. Factors That Affect Nuclear Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 V. Conclusion

148

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourth Annual Report presents and analyzes 1995 DOE complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 40 reporting sites in 25 States, and trends DOE waste generation from 1991 through 1995. DOE has established a 50% reduction goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, due by December 31, 1999. Routine operations waste generation decreased 37% from 1994 to 1995, and 43% overall from 1993--1995.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel power plants. However,power plants, which are reviewed and licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and relatively few areas of geothermal and

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 Annual 10 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is a research-oriented collaborative program that supports the advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment. The 2010 Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap issued by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), identifies these issues as high capital costs, safety, high-level nuclear waste management, and non-proliferation. Projects under the I-NERI program investigate ways to address these challenges and support future nuclear

151

JTEC panel on nuclear power in Japan. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report examines the status and direction of nuclear power-related research and development in Japan in six areas: the nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear materials, instrumentation and control technology, CAD/CAM, nuclear safety research, and nuclear plant construction. Overall findings suggest that the nuclear power industry in Japan is at an advanced state of development; in particular, Japan is now technologically self-sufficient. Long-term goals of the Japanese program include closure of the complete fuel cycle and pursuit of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor as the future base system.

Hansen, K.F.; Behnke, W.B.; Cousin, S.B.; Evans, E.A.; Olander, D.R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 1  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Report of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements Report of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements As an element of its plans to return the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site in eastern Idaho to its historic mission of nuclear technology development, the DOE asked its Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) to establish a Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements. The Subcommittee was charged with identifying the "characteristics, capabilities, and attributes a world-class nuclear laboratory would possess". It was also asked "to become familiar with the practices, culture, and facilities of other world-class laboratories - not

155

Event generator for nuclear collisions at intermediate energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An event generator, HIPSE (heavy-ion phase-space exploration), dedicated to the description of nuclear collisions in the intermediate energy range is presented. Based on the sudden approximation and on geometrical hypothesis, it can conveniently simulate heavy-ion interactions at all impact parameters and thus can constitute a valuable tool for the understanding of processes such as neck emission or multifragmentation in peripheral or?and central collisions. After a detailed description of the ingredients of the model, first comparisons with experimental data collected by the INDRA Collaboration are shown. Special emphasis is put on the kinematical characteristics of fragments and light particles observed at all impact parameters for Xe+Sn reactions at 25 and 50MeV?nucleon and Ni+Ni at 82MeV?nucleon.

Denis Lacroix; Aymeric Van Lauwe; Dominique Durand

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

Investing in the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders Investing in the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders August 9, 2011 - 5:12pm Addthis Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy As part of the Energy Department's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP) annual workshop, I met today with professors from across the country and announced awards of up to $39 million for research projects aimed at developing cutting-edge nuclear energy technologies. The awards will also help train and educate the next generation of nuclear industry leaders in the U.S. These projects, led by 31 universities in more than 20 states, will help to enable the safe, secure and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy in the United States.

157

Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even though one cannot anticipate the answers in basic research, the return on the public's investment can be maximized through long-range planning of the most promising avenues to explore and the resources needed to explore them." (p. v) "Pursuit of this goal entails developing new technologies and advanced facilities, educating young scientists, training a technical workforce, and contributing to the broader science and technology enterprise?." (p. vi) Ref:: "Nuclear Science: A Long Range Plan", DOE/NSF, Feb. 1996. The purpose of this effort is to develop the first iteration of a

158

Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even though one cannot anticipate the answers in basic research, the return on the public's investment can be maximized through long-range planning of the most promising avenues to explore and the resources needed to explore them." (p. v) "Pursuit of this goal entails developing new technologies and advanced facilities, educating young scientists, training a technical workforce, and contributing to the broader science and technology enterprise?." (p. vi) Ref:: "Nuclear Science: A Long Range Plan", DOE/NSF, Feb. 1996. The purpose of this effort is to develop the first iteration of a

159

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by pursuing international collaborations to conduct research that will advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI promotes bilateral and multilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future of nuclear energy and its global deployment by improving cost performance, enhancing safety, and increasing proliferation resistance of future nuclear energy systems. Information on the program

160

October 2003, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION 3, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE October 2003, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE The committee met in Washington in Sept 16-17 to review progress in the program with respect to a changed set of mission priorities. Our last meeting took place in Dec 2002 after the reorganization that had place the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and GEN IV program together in the Advanced Nuclear Reserach Office (AN-20). Since mission priorities have been evolving, the committee felt that it should wait unti they have settled down before we met again. We have kept in touch during the process,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Separations Technologies Workshop Report Separations Technologies Workshop Report Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report The Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a workshop on nuclear separations technologies in Bethesda, Maryland, on July 27 and 28, 2011, to (1) identify common needs and potential requirements in separations technologies and opportunities for program partnerships, and (2) evaluate the need for a DOE nuclear separations center of knowledge to improve cross- program collaboration in separations technology. The workshop supported Goal 3 of the DOE Strategic Plan1 to enhance nuclear security through defense, nonproliferation, and environmental management. The Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) jointly sponsored the workshop. The Office of Science

162

26 CURA REPORTER Hydrogen Generation Using Magnetite to Store  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainable energy economy in the state. The generated hydrogen also might be used onsite in the mining26 CURA REPORTER Hydrogen Generation Using Magnetite to Store Energy from Alternative Sources by J is hydrogen gas, which is typically generated by using electric current (in this case, provided by wind

Levinson, David M.

163

Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high-temperature plasma systems. Fusion reactors will likely depend on lithium-based ceramics to produce tritium that fuels the fusion plasma, while high-temperature alloys or ceramics will contain and control the hot plasma. All the while, alloys, ceramics, and ceramic-related processes continue to find applications in the management of wastes and byproducts produced by these processes.

John Marra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

How Do You Report A Concern? | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Report A Concern? | National Nuclear Security Administration Report A Concern? | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog How Do You Report A Concern? Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Human Resources > Employee Concerns Program > How Do You Report A Concern? How Do You Report A Concern? DOE/NNSA Federal, contractor and subcontractor employees may report their

165

EEO Plans and Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plans and Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Plans and Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog EEO Plans and Reports Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > EEO Plans and Reports EEO Plans and Reports FY 13 Disabled Veterans Affirmative Action Program Report (pdf, 668kb)

166

ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes. The new evaluations are based on both experimental data and nuclear reaction theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, {sup 6}Li, {sup 10}B, Au and for {sup 235,238}U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced reactions up to an energy of 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; and (10) New methods developed to provide uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same, ENDF-6 format, as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched U thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The {sup 238}U, {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 9}Be reflector biases in fast systems are largely removed; (c) ENDF/B-VI.8 good agreement for simulations of highly enriched uranium assemblies is preserved; (d) The underprediction of fast criticality of {sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu assemblies is removed; and (e) The intermediate spectrum critical assemblies are predicted more accurately. We anticipate that the new library will play an important role in nuclear technology applications, including transport simulations supporting national security, nonproliferation, advanced reactor and fuel cycle concepts, criticality safety, medicine, space applications, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear physics facility design. The ENDF/B-VII.0 library is archived at the National Nuclear Data Center, BNL. The complete library, or any part of it, may be retrieved from www.nndc.bnl.gov.

Chadwick, M B; Oblozinsky, P; Herman, M; Greene, N M; McKnight, R D; Smith, D L; Young, P G; MacFarlane, R E; Hale, G M; Haight, R C; Frankle, S; Kahler, A C; Kawano, T; Little, R C; Madland, D G; Moller, P; Mosteller, R; Page, P; Talou, P; Trellue, H; White, M; Wilson, W B; Arcilla, R; Dunford, C L; Mughabghab, S F; Pritychenko, B; Rochman, D; Sonzogni, A A; Lubitz, C; Trumbull, T H; Weinman, J; Brown, D; Cullen, D E; Heinrichs, D; McNabb, D; Derrien, H; Dunn, M; Larson, N M; Leal, L C; Carlson, A D; Block, R C; Briggs, B; Cheng, E; Huria, H; Kozier, K; Courcelle, A; Pronyaev, V; der Marck, S

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

2010 Report Released | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Released 2010 Report Released January 12, 1987 2010 Report Released Washington, DC White House releases "2010 Report," projecting requirements for maintaining and modernizing...

168

Applications of Extraction Chromatography in the Development of Radionuclide Generator Systems for Nuclear Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Applications of Extraction Chromatography in the Development of Radionuclide Generator Systems for Nuclear Medicine ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ...

Mark L. Dietz; E. Philip Horwitz

2000-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

169

[Electroweak and other interactions in medium-energy nuclear physics]. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: spectrum generating algebra; vibrational spectra in the heavy quarkonia; chiral soliton model; pion neutral photoproduction from proton with polarized photons in the delta-1232 region; compton scattering in the delta- 1232 region; nucleon magnetic polarizability and the role of the delta resonance; eta photo- and electroproduction; perturbative QCD; and nuclear muon capture.

Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy May 6, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an international collaborative that is advancing new, safer nuclear energy systems. Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an international collaborative that is advancing new, safer nuclear energy systems. Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies Nuclear power reactors currently under construction worldwide boast modern safety and operational enhancements that were designed by the global nuclear energy industry and enhanced through research and development (R&D)

171

Second-generation heliostat development. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, manufacture, testing and cost analysis of the second generation heliostat are described in volume I. Volume II consists of appendices of supporting material. These include the drawing tree for the heliostat, structural data of the rack assembly, drive mechanism, and mirror assemblies, tests and results, a trade study on the pedestal foundation design, cost analysis worksheets, study of an edge-support mirror module, and a study of a single-motor, differential brake heliostat drive mechanism. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Report of the State of Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This third biennial Report of the Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects has been prepared in fulfillment of the requirements of NRS 459.0092, which stipulates that the Commission shall report to the Governor and Legislature on any matter relating to radioactive waste disposal the Commission deems appropriate and advise and make recommendations on the policy of the State concerning nuclear waste disposal projects. Chapter One of the Report presents a brief overview of the Commission`s functions and statutory charges. It also contains a summary of developments which have affected the overall nuclear waste disposl issue since the last Commission Report was published in November, 1988. Chapter Two contains a synthesis of Commission activities and reports on the findings of the Commission relative to the geotechnical, environmental, socioeconomic, transportation, intergovernmental and legal aspects of federal and State nuclear waste program efforts.

NONE

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generate steam to drive a steam turbine, giving rise to theValves and Pi~ing STEAM TURBINE COMPONENT OUTAGE CAUSESbasically of a steam-driven turbine, an electric generator

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2009 Annual Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 Annual 9 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2009 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is an international, research-oriented collaboration that supports advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. I-NERI promotes bilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment by improving cost performance, enhancing safety, and increasing proliferation resistance of future nuclear energy systems. A link to the program can be found at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy website.

175

Microsoft Word - spent nuclear fuel report.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel at the Savannah River Site DOE/IG-0727 May 2006 REPORT ON MANAGEMENT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TABLE OF CONTENTS Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Details of Finding 1 Recommendations 2 Comments 3 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology 4 2. Prior Audit Reports 5 3. Management Comments 6 SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL MANGEMENT Page 1 Details of Finding H-Canyon The Department of Energy's (Department) spent nuclear fuel Operations program at the Savannah River Site (Site) will likely require Extended H-Canyon to be maintained at least two years beyond defined operational needs. The Department committed to maintain H-Canyon operational readiness to provide a disposal path for

176

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2008 Annual Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 Annual 8 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2008 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is an international, research-oriented initiative that supports the advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. I-NERI promotes bilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment by improving cost performance, enhancing safety, and increasing proliferation resistance of future nuclear energy systems. A link to the program can be found at the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) website:

177

Institute of Nuclear Power Operations 1994 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report highlights the activities of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. The topics of the report include the president and chairmen`s joint message, overview of programs serving as the foundation for most of its activities, performance indicators for the US nuclear utility industry, and INPO`s 1994 financial reports and rosters. INPO has four technical cornerstone programs that serve as the foundation for most of its activities. (1) Evaluations of nuclear power plants operated by member utilities are conducted on a regularly scheduled basis. (2) INPO supports its member utilities in their work to achieve and maintain accreditation of training programs. (3) Events analysis programs identify and communicate lessons learned from plant events so utilities can take action to prevent similar events at their plants. (4) INPO helps members improve in nuclear operations areas through assistance programs and other activities that continually evolve to meet the changing needs of the nuclear industry

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear tors. for of of These studies can examine safety systems or safety research programsnuclear power plants, and at risk. to reduce population The Light-water Reactor Safety Research Program

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Second-generation heliostat detail design report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of the Second Generation heliostat design is provided, including a summary of the compliance of the design to the key heliostat requirements. The heliostat hardware is described. The requirements, the hardware and software design used to fulfill these requirements and the analysis and test used to evaluate related performance are presented. The technical feasibility and potential cost savings of a variety of automated mirror inspection techniques are assessed. The installation process design, applicable to both the test units and production, is described. The current maintenance process design is described for the production program. (LEW)

Knowles, R.K.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Evolution of Nuclear Power Generation for Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Among the available energy alternatives nuclear power offers important advantages and in many cases is the only viable alternative given actual operation conditions on Mars. We know that nuclear is the most co...

Liviu Popa-Simil

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...system using battery energy storage. The widespread...intermittent renewable energies and might restore the cost benefits of nuclear energy in the 2030s. Nuclear...plant and appropriate grid infrastructure, economic considerations...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emergencies, Le. , accidents at nuclear facilities, there isas a result of nuclear accidents; these are the Protectiveassociated with a nuclear accident is of greater importance

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Nuclear waste programs; Semiannual progress report, October 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Programs of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1991-March 1992. In these programs, studies are underway on the performance of waste glass and spent fuel in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories

Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Emery, J.W.; Feng, X.; Finn, P.A.; Gerding, T.J.; Hoh, J.C. [and others

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System Reporting and Data Submission  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual provides clear and detailed instructions and procedures for documenting and reporting data submissions for nuclear materials transactions, inventories, and material balances to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). Cancels DOE 5633.3B. Canceled by DOE M 474.1-2A.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

Automatic code generation enables nuclear gradient computations for fully internally contracted multireference theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical nuclear gradients for fully internally contracted complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) are reported. This implementation has been realized by an automated code generator that can handle spin-free formulas for the CASPT2 energy and its derivatives with respect to variations of molecular orbitals and reference coefficients. The underlying complete active space self-consistent field and the so-called Z-vector equations are solved using density fitting. With full internal contraction the size of first-order wave functions scales polynomially with the number of active orbitals. The CASPT2 gradient program and the code generator are both publicly available. This work enables the CASPT2 geometry optimization of molecules as complex as those investigated by respective single-point calculations.

MacLeod, Matthew K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from...

189

Why the IBEW supports expanding nuclear power generation in the USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) represents workers, many who work in the utility and power generation industries. The IBEW has been and continues to be a vocal supporter of the expansion of nuclear power generation in the USA. Five years ago, there was a general expectation that nuclear capacity would expand greatly. It did not, and in part the absence of more new nuclear construction is the natural outcome of a misguided energy market regulation system. We close with a set of priorities for rebuilding the energy regulatory scheme that would benefit our members and ratepayers and would, at the same time, lead to and require an expansion of nuclear power. The article describes the state of nuclear power in the USA today, the IBEW's role in the utility industry and nuclear power generation; the IBEW's priorities for the US energy market and why those priorities lead the IBEW to call for the expansion of nuclear power in the USA.

William Bill Riley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NUCLEAR MATERIALS RESEARCH PROGRESS REPORTS FROM 1977  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Effects of Thermonuclear Plasma Interactions Withfor Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor (CTR), USAEC Report LA-

Olander, D.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Alternative electric generation impact simulator : final summary report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report is a short summary of three related research tasks that were conducted during the project "Alternative Electric Generation Impact Simulator." The first of these tasks combines several different types of ...

Gruhl, Jim

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was established under the Energy Policy Act in August 2005 (EPACT-2005). EPACT-2005 defined an overall plan and timetable for NGNP research, design, licensing, construction and operation by the end of FY 2021. At the time that EPACT-2005 was passed, it was envisioned that key aspects of the project included: NGNP is based on R&D activities supported by the Gen-IV Nuclear Energy initiative; Ôā∑ NGNP is to be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen or (to do) both; Ôā∑ The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be the lead national lab for the project; Ôā∑ NGNP will be sited at the INL in

193

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 101-120 - Nuclear Data Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

01 - 120 01 - 120 Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Group 1 (ANL/NDM-1 - ANL/NDM-20) Group 2 (ANL/NDM-21 - ANL/NDM-40) Group 3 (ANL/NDM-41 - ANL/NDM-60) Group 4 (ANL/NDM-61 - ANL/NDM-80) Group 5 (ANL/NDM-81 - ANL/NDM-100) Group 6 (ANL/NDM-101 - ANL/NDM-120) Group 7 (ANL/NDM-121 - ANL/NDM-140) Group 8 (ANL/NDM-141 - ANL/NDM-160) Group 9 (ANL/NDM-161 - ANL/NDM-180) Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS Bookmark and Share Reports 101-120

194

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 121-140 - Nuclear Data Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

21 - 140 21 - 140 Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Group 1 (ANL/NDM-1 - ANL/NDM-20) Group 2 (ANL/NDM-21 - ANL/NDM-40) Group 3 (ANL/NDM-41 - ANL/NDM-60) Group 4 (ANL/NDM-61 - ANL/NDM-80) Group 5 (ANL/NDM-81 - ANL/NDM-100) Group 6 (ANL/NDM-101 - ANL/NDM-120) Group 7 (ANL/NDM-121 - ANL/NDM-140) Group 8 (ANL/NDM-141 - ANL/NDM-160) Group 9 (ANL/NDM-161 - ANL/NDM-180) Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS Bookmark and Share Reports 121-140

195

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 141-160 - Nuclear Data Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

41 - 160 41 - 160 Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Group 1 (ANL/NDM-1 - ANL/NDM-20) Group 2 (ANL/NDM-21 - ANL/NDM-40) Group 3 (ANL/NDM-41 - ANL/NDM-60) Group 4 (ANL/NDM-61 - ANL/NDM-80) Group 5 (ANL/NDM-81 - ANL/NDM-100) Group 6 (ANL/NDM-101 - ANL/NDM-120) Group 7 (ANL/NDM-121 - ANL/NDM-140) Group 8 (ANL/NDM-141 - ANL/NDM-160) Group 9 (ANL/NDM-161 - ANL/NDM-180) Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS Bookmark and Share Reports 141-160

196

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 21-40 - Nuclear Data Program (Argonne  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

21 - 40 21 - 40 Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Group 1 (ANL/NDM-1 - ANL/NDM-20) Group 2 (ANL/NDM-21 - ANL/NDM-40) Group 3 (ANL/NDM-41 - ANL/NDM-60) Group 4 (ANL/NDM-61 - ANL/NDM-80) Group 5 (ANL/NDM-81 - ANL/NDM-100) Group 6 (ANL/NDM-101 - ANL/NDM-120) Group 7 (ANL/NDM-121 - ANL/NDM-140) Group 8 (ANL/NDM-141 - ANL/NDM-160) Group 9 (ANL/NDM-161 - ANL/NDM-180) Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS Bookmark and Share Reports 21-40

197

Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by conducting research to advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI sponsors innovative scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) in cooperation with participating countries. The research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses the key issues affecting the future of nuclear energy and its global deployment. I-NERI research is directed towards improving cost performance, increasing proliferation resistance, enhancing safety, and improving the waste management of future nuclear energy systems. This I-NERI 2005 Annual Report serves to inform interested parties about

199

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

200

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Salem Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Salem Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2010 Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2010 I-NERI Annual Report 2010 I-NERI Annual Report ÔĀģÔĀģÔĀģÔĀģ | i Foreword The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), established the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) in fiscal year (FY) 2001 to conduct advanced nuclear energy systems research in collaboration with international partners. This annual report provides an update on research and development (R&D) accomplishments which the I-NERI program achieved during FY 2010. I-NERI supports bilateral scientific and engineering collaboration in advanced reactor systems and the nuclear fuel cycle and is linked to two of DOE-NE's primary research programs: Reactor Concepts Research, Development and Demonstration and the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. I-NERI is designed to foster international partnerships to address key issues

202

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

194,1095428,1211897,1374523,1347985,1262403,1340639,1347577,1387346,15503218 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",840,,639800,598183,639443,403029,346066,489260,629320,629209,610996,637714,619...

203

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2889,1359120,1330655,1334646,1369191,1335231,1264610,725939,1043730,14168091 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",842,,640210,332640,639812,611739,611473,610763,626182,625966,612739,514485,-32...

204

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

049398,1385659,1329546,1365357,1364550,1315097,826104,724688,842506,13689571 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",836,,642446,580408,640573,616442,635753,607660,621404,622382,608955,74815,-336...

205

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0183,1370443,1333879,1333266,1232981,970683,1026829,1008188,1033852,14689416 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",840,,638732,576736,637898,614123,622312,611199,598045,569278,582588,637484,278...

206

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2613,979493,1330868,1372259,1363174,1328057,1383098,1348837,1393879,15486102 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",843,,642145,579996,631611,425625,233279,610804,629284,623738,610379,634652,620...

207

DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it is seeking public and industry input on how to best achieve the goals and meet the requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) demonstration project work at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory. DOE today issued a Request for Information and Expressions of Interest from prospective participants and interested parties on utilizing cutting-edge high temperature gas reactor technology in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by enabling nuclear energy to replace fossil fuels used by industry for process heat. "This is an opportunity to advance the development of safe, reliable, and

208

DEPARTMENf OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS TANK OPENING REPORT NO 62  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPARTMENf OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS TANK OPENING REPORT NO 62 This report covers three tank openings; 2 history. We were plagued throughout these tank openings by poor beam transmission and spent most of our have, were manufactured and installed. The first tank opening2 May t.o 6 May 1988. This tank opening

Chen, Ying

209

Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document.

Poskanzer, A.M. [ed.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Nuclear materials 1993 annual report. Volume 8, No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1993. The report is published in two parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1993 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Note that the subtitle of No. 2 has been changed from ``Nonreactors`` to ``Nuclear Materials.`` Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1993.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

NUCLEAR MATERIALS RESEARCH PROGRESS REPORTS FOR 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical E f f e c t s of Thermonuclear Plasma I n t e r a cfor Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor (CTR), USAEC Report LA

Olander, D.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

ICF Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and stockpile stewardship. Some of these reports are listed below: Advancing the Science of High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of...

214

Sensors and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Sensors Task Team  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing sensor systems for the basic process parameters in nuclear power plant operation have limitations with respect to accuracy, ease of maintenance and signal processing. These limitations comprise the economy of nuclear power generation. To reduce the costs and improve performance of nuclear power plant fabrication, operation, maintenance and repair we need to advance the sensor technology being applied in the nuclear industry. The economic viability and public acceptance of nuclear power will depend on how well we direct and apply technological advances to the industry. This report was prepared by a team with members representing a wide range of the nuclear industry embracing the university programs, national laboratories, architect engineers and reactor manufacturers. An intensive effort was made to survey current sensor technology, evaluate future trends and determine development needs. This included literature surveys, visits with utilities, universities, laboratories and organizations outside the nuclear industry. Several conferences were attended to take advantage of the access to experts in selected topics and to obtain opinions. Numerous telephone contacts and exchanges by mail supplemented the above efforts. Finally, the broad technical depth of the team members provided the basis for the stimulating working sessions during which this report was organized and drafted.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2006 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2006 The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by conducting research to advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI sponsors innovative scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) in cooperation with participating countries. The research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future of nuclear energy and its global deployment. A link to the program can be found at the NE website. This I-NERI 2006 Annual Report serves to inform interested parties about the program's organization, progress of collaborative research projects undertaken since FY 2003, and future plans for the program. Following is an

216

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2011 Annual Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Annual 1 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2011 Annual Report Fiscal year (FY) 2011 marks the ten-year anniversary of the founding of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative, or I-NERI. Designed to foster international partnerships that address key issues affecting the future global use of nuclear energy, I-NERI is perhaps even more relevant today than at its establishment. In the face of increasing energy demands coupled with clean energy imperatives, we must clear the hurdles to expanding the role of nuclear power in our energy portfolio. And in an increasingly global society, the importance of international cooperation in these efforts has escalated. For ten years, I-NERI has been a vehicle for establishing bilateral

217

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. NeroResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility [HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12 Technical Services, LLC (B&W Y-12) design project team leadership; and an open public

220

Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility [HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12 Technical Services, LLC (B&W Y-12) design project team leadership; and an open public

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility [HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12 Technical Services, LLC (B&W Y-12) design project team leadership; and an open public

222

Operation TEAPOT, 1955 continental nuclear weapons test series. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of an estimated 11,000 DOD personnel, both military and civilian, in Operation TEAPOT, the fifth atmospheric nuclear weapons testing series conducted in Nevada from 18 February to 15 May 1955. Activities engaging DOD personnel included Exercise Desert Rock VI observer programs, troop tests, and technical service programs; AEC scientific and diagnostic experiments to evaluate the effects of the nuclear device; DOD operational programs; and air support.

Ponton, J.; Maag, C.; Wilkinson, M.; Shepanek, R.F.

1981-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

223

Guidance for identifying, reporting and tracking nuclear safety noncompliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides Department of Energy (DOE) contractors, subcontractors and suppliers with guidance in the effective use of DOE`s Price-Anderson nuclear safety Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). Prompt contractor identification, reporting to DOE, and correction of nuclear safety noncompliances provides DOE with a basis to exercise enforcement discretion to mitigate civil penalties, and suspend the issuance of Notices of Violation for certain violations. Use of this reporting methodology is elective by contractors; however, this methodology is intended to reflect DOE`s philosophy on effective identification and reporting of nuclear safety noncompliances. To the extent that these expectations are met for particular noncompliances, DOE intends to appropriately exercise its enforcement discretion in considering whether, and to what extent, to undertake enforcement action.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Theoretical nuclear physics. 1998 progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summaries of progress made on the following topics are given: (1) nonresonant contributions to inelastic N{r_arrow}{Delta}(1232) parity violation; (2) neutron distribution effects in elastic nuclear parity violation; (3) Wilson RG for scalar-plus-fermion field theories at finite density; (4) Perturbation theory for spin ladders using angular momentum coupled bases; (5) mean-field theory for spin ladders using angular momentum density; (6) finite temperature renormalization group effective potentials for the linear Sigma model; (7) negative-parity baryon resonances from lattice QCD; (8) the N{r_arrow}{Delta} electromagnetic transition amplitudes from QCD sum rules; and (9) higher nucleon resonances in exclusive reactions ({gamma}, {pi}N) on nuclei.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports for SIRS Radiometric Measurements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports for SIRS Radiometric Measurements M. H. L. Anderberg, F. P. Rael, and T. L. Stoffell National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program needs high-quality broadband shortwave (SW) (solar) and longwave (LW) irradiance information for the development and validation of atmospheric circulation and climate models. To this end, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) performs a quality assessment of the data from 22 Solar Infrared Stations (SIRS) in the Southern Great Plains (SGP). Data quality reports (DQRs) are instrumental in passing the resultant information to the scientific community. The value of these reports depends on clear and consistent

227

Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled ďValidated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in ScintillatorsĒ (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power - generating capability and one without.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the 2030s. Nuclear power could also be widely used for desalination, another efficient way to use surplus power in an electricity...country of origin would have access to the spent fuel. The economics of small and fueled-for-life reactors versus large reactors...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

230

Nuclear and Renewable Energy Synergies Workshop: Report of Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two of the major challenges the U.S. energy sector faces are greenhouse gas emissions and oil that is both imported and potentially reaching a peak (the point at which maximum extraction is reached). Interest in development of both renewable and nuclear energy has been strong because both have potential for overcoming these challenges. Research in both energy sources is ongoing, but relatively little research has focused on the potential benefits of combining nuclear and renewable energy. In September 2011, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) convened the Nuclear and Renewable Energy Synergies Workshop at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to identify potential synergies and strategic leveraging opportunities between nuclear energy and renewable energy. Industry, government, and academic thought leaders gathered to identify potential broad categories of synergies and brainstorm topic areas for additional analysis and research and development (R&D). This report records the proceedings and outcomes of the workshop.

Ruth, M.; Antkowiak, M.; Gossett, S.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

761 761 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142263761 Varnish cache server Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-860 is a generator-level survey that collects specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. The survey data is summarized in reports such as the Electric Power Annual. The survey data is also available for download here. The data are compressed into a self-extracting (.exe) zip folder containing .XLS data files and record layouts. The current file structure (starting with 2009 data) consists

232

Program generator for experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a programmable pulse-train generator for experiments in relaxation analysis. The generator produces up to eight pulses, whose durations and spacings can be varied from 0.5 sec to 160 sec in 0.1-usec steps. The maximum number of pulse-train repetitions is 160. An individual program provides a Carr-Percell train. A clock pulse for the measuring and recording devices is established after any pulse of a compiled program or after the last 180 degree pulse in a Carr train. The generator is implemented by integrated circuits of series 155.

Babkin, A.F.; Kuznetsov, V.K.; Makarenko, V.L.; Rusanov, A.V.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, University of Washington April 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains short discusses on topics in the following areas: astrophysics; giant resonances and photonuclear reactions; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries; accelerator mass spectrometry; medium energy nuclear physics; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; cluster fusion; instrumentation; van de graaff accelerators and ion sources; and computer data acquisition systems. (LSP)

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

ANU SNEAP 2011 Lab Report -14UD Nuclear Physics Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the topics and invite your follow up enquiries. · Accelerator control via EPICS being commissioned · Vacuum oANU SNEAP 2011 Lab Report - 14UD Nuclear Physics Department Research School of Physics 7 new turbo systems installed 9 to be installed. o In-house manufacture of vacuum control units o

235

Nuclear car wash status report, August 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large majority of US imports arrive at seaports in maritime cargo containers. The number of containers arriving is nearly 10 million per year, each with a cargo of up to 30 tons of various materials. This provides a vulnerable entry point for the importation of a nuclear weapon or its components by a terrorist group. Passive radiation sensors are being deployed at portals to detect radioactive material and portable instruments are carried by port personnel to augment detection. Those instruments can detect the neutrons and g-rays produced by {sup 240}Pu that is normally present in weapons grade plutonium in cases where cargo overburden is not too great. However, {sup 235}U produces almost no neutron output in its normal radioactive decay and its principal {gamma}-radiation is at 186 keV and is readily attenuated by small amounts of wood or packing materials. Impurities such as {sup 232}U, often present in reactor irradiated material at the 100-200 ppt level, can provide a detectable signal through significant cargo overburden but the wide variations among samples of HEU make this an unreliable means of detecting SNM. High quality radiography may be useful in determining that the majority of containers are clearly free of SNM. However, some containers will lead to ambiguous results from radiography and passive radiation sensing. For these reasons active neutron interrogation is proposed as a means to produce fission and thus greatly amplify the radiation output of fissionable material to facilitate its reliable detection even when well shielded by large cargo overburden. Historically, the fission signature utilized as the unique identifying feature of fissionable materials is the detection of delayed neutrons. However, these neutrons have very low yield {approx} 0.017 per fission in {sup 235}U, and their low energy results in very poor penetration of hydrogenous materials such as fuels, water, wood, or agricultural products. That signature alone does not provide reliable detection in thick cargos. A new signature has been identified and has been developed within the current project for the detection of well shielded SNM. This SNM signature is based on high-energy {beta}-delayed {gamma}-radiation produced by fission products following neutron or photon induced fission. These {gamma}-rays are high enough in energy (E{sub {gamma}} > 3 MeV) to be readily distinguished from any natural background radioactivity since the latter does not extend above 2.6 MeV. Their abundance is nearly a decade greater than delayed neutrons and their short half-lives deliver nearly all of the signature radiation on time scales of one minute or less and thus facilitate rapid scanning. Finally, for this {gamma}-radiation in the 3-6 MeV range attenuation occurs only by Compton scattering and is in the range where minimum attenuation occurs in all materials. Even the thickest cargos of any material attenuate these {gamma}-rays by only a factor of 10-30X so that the signature is readily detected even with the most challenging shield materials. The goals of the current program are to detect significant quantities (much less than IAEA ''significant'' amounts) of well-shielded SNM, and to do so with detection probability P{sub d} {ge} 95% and with false alarm rates P{sub fp} {le} 0.001. It is the goal to meet these requirements in a scan that requires less than one minute to complete and does so without damage to the cargo or to people who may be hidden inside. We intend to meet these requirements even when the cargo overburden is up to {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2} of any material ranging from fuels and agricultural products to steel and lead.

Prussin, S; Slaughter, D; Pruet, J; Descalle, M; Bernstein, A; Hall, J; Accatino, M; Alford, O; Asztalos, S; Church, J; Loshak, A; Madden, N; Manatt, D; Moore, T; Norman, E; Petersen, D

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

236

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Report summarizes the waste generation and pollution prevention activities of the major operational sites in the Department of Energy (DOE). We are witnessing progress in waste reduction from routine operations that are the focus of Department-wide reduction goals set by the Secretary on May 3,1996. The goals require that by the end of 1999, we reduce, recycle, reuse, and otherwise avoid waste generation to achieve a 50 percent reduction over 1993 levels. This Report provides the first measure of our progress in waste reduction and recycling against our 1993 waste generation baseline. While we see progress in reducing waste from our normal operations, we must begin to focus attention on waste generated by cleanup and facilities stabilization activities that are the major functions of the Office of Environmental Management. Reducing the generation of waste is one of the seven principles that I have established for the Office of Environmental Management Ten Year Plan. As part of our vision to complete a major portion of the environmental cleanup at DOE sites over the next ten years, we must utilize the potential of the pollution prevention program to reduce the cost of our cleanup program. We have included the Secretarial goals as part of the performance measures for the Ten Year Plan, and we are committed to implementing pollution prevention ideas. Through the efforts of both Federal and contractor employees, our pollution prevention program has reduced waste and the cost of our operations. I applaud their efforts and look forward to reporting further waste reduction progress in the next annual update of this Report.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Next Generation CANDU Technology: Competitive Design for the Nuclear Renaissance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AECL has developed the design for a next generation of CANDU{sup R} plants by marrying a set of enabling technologies to well-established successful CANDU features. The basis for the design is to replicate or adapt existing CANDU components for a new core design. By adopting slightly enriched uranium fuel, a core design with light water coolant, heavy water moderator and reflector has been defined, based on the existing CANDU fuel channel module. This paper summarizes the main features and characteristics of the reference next-generation CANDU design. The progress of the next generation of CANDU design program in meeting challenging cost, schedule and performance targets is described. AECL's cost reduction methodology is summarized as an integral part of the design optimization process. Examples are given of cost reduction features together with enhancement of design margins. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Hedges, K.R.; Pakan, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

State of Nevada, Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office narrative report, January 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) is the State of Nevada agency designated by State law to monitor and oversee US Department of Energy (DOE) activities relative to the possible siting, construction, operation and closure of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and to carry out the State of Nevada`s responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During the reporting period the NWPO continued to work toward the five objectives designed to implement the Agency`s oversight responsibilities: (1) Assure that the health and safety of Nevada`s citizens are adequately protected with regard to any federal high-level radioactive waste program within the State; (2) Take the responsibilities and perform the duties of the State of Nevada as described in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987; (3) Advise the Governor, the State Commission on Nuclear Projects and the Nevada State Legislature on matters concerning the potential disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the State; (4) Work closely and consult with affected local governments and State agencies; (5) Monitor and evaluate federal planning and activities regarding high-level radioactive waste disposal. Plan and conduct independent State studies regarding the proposed repository.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Microsoft Word - Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety Noncompliance Reporting Criteria (as of January 1, 2012) Safety Noncompliance Reporting Criteria (as of January 1, 2012) Nuclear Safety Noncompliances Associated With Occurrences (DOE Order 232.2) Consult the DOE Order for the full text of each occurrence criterion 1 Reporting Criteria Group Subgroup Occurrence Category and Summary Description 2 1. Operational Emergencies 3 N/A (1) Operational Emergency (2) Alert (3) Site Area Emergency (4) General Emergency 2. Personnel Safety and Health C. Fires (1) Fire within primary confinement/containment (2d) Self-extinguishing fires D. Explosions (1) Unplanned explosion within primary confinement/containment 3. Nuclear Safety Basis A. Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) Violations (1) Violation of TSR/Operational Safety Requirement (OSR) Safety Limit (2) Violation of other TSR/OSR requirement

240

Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B rapid cooldown test and validation of simulation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SOPHT code was assessed against Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B commissioning data from a heat transport system rapid cooldown. It was found that (a) under a rapid upstream depressurization, the steam relief valves, like orifices, had a lower discharge coefficient than the corresponding steadystate value and (b) the flashing of water in the steam generators during depressurization causes the at-power boiling heat transfer correlations to overpredict the steam generator heat transfer.

Chang, Y.F.; Langan, M.D.; Sermer, P.; Watson, P.C.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Report on discussions with utility engineers about superconducting generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report relates to a series of discussions with electric utility engineers concerning the integration of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generators into the present electric power system. The current and future interest of the utilities in the purchase and use of HTS generators is assessed. Various performance and economic factors are also considered as part of this inspection of the utility prospects for HTS generators. Integration of HTS generators into the electric utility sector is one goal of the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI). The SPI, a major part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems, features vertical teaming of a major industrial power apparatus manufacturers, a producer of HTS wire, and an end-user with assistance and technical support for the national laboratories. The SPI effort on HTS generators is headed by a General Electric Corporation internal team comprised of the Corporate Research Laboratories, Power Generation Engineering, and Power Systems Group. Intermagnetics General corporation, which assisted in the development of the superconducting coils, is the HTS wire and tape manufacturer. Additional technical support is provided by the national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge, and the New York State Institute on Superconductivity. The end-user is represented by Niagara-Mohawk and the Electric Power Research Institute.

none,

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Spent nuclear fuel project - criteria document spent nuclear fuel final safety analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The criteria document provides the criteria and planning guidance for developing the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This FSAR will support the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office decision to authorize the procurement, installation, installation acceptance testing, startup, and operation of the SNF Project facilities (K Basins, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and Canister Storage Building).

MORGAN, R.G.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Milliwatt Generator Project: April 1988--September 1996. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator (MWG) Project from April 1988 to September 1996. Manufacturing of heat sources for the project ended by September 1990. Beginning in October 1990, the major activities of the project have been surveillance and testing of MWGs, disposal of excess MWGs, and reclamation of the PuO{sub 2} from excess MWG heat sources. Reported activities include fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, compatibility studies, impact testing, examination and electrical testing of surveillance units, and recovery of PuO{sub 2} from heat sources.

Latimer, T.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Audit Report on "The Department's Management of Nuclear Materials Provided to Domestic Licensees"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective if to determine whether the Department of Energy (Department) was adequately managing its nuclear materials provided to domestic licensees. The audit was performed from February 2007 to September 2008 at Department Headquarters in Washington, DC, and Germantown, MD; the Oak Ridge Office and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN. In addition, we visited or obtained data from 40 different non-Departmental facilities in various states. To accomplish the audit objective, we: (1) Reviewed Departmental and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for the control and accountability of nuclear materials; (2) Analyzed a Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) report with ending inventory balances for Department-owned nuclear materials dated September 30, 2007, to determine the amount and types of nuclear materials located at non-Department domestic facilities; (3) Held discussions with Department and NRC personnel that used NMMSS information to determine their roles and responsibilities related to the control and accountability over nuclear materials; (4) Selected a judgmental sample of 40 non-Department domestic facilities; (5) Met with licensee officials and sent confirmations to determine whether their actual inventories of Department-owned nuclear materials were consistent with inventories reported in the NMMSS; and, (6) Analyzed historical information related to the 2004 NMMSS inventory rebaselining initiative to determine the quantity of Department-owned nuclear materials that were written off from the domestic licensees inventory balances. This performance audit was conducted in accordance with generally accepted Government auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient, appropriate evidence to provide a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objective. We believe that the evidence obtained provides a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objectives. The audit included tests of controls and compliance with laws and regulations related to managing the Department-owned nuclear materials provided to non-Departmental domestic licensees. Because our review was limited it would not necessarily have disclosed all internal control deficiencies that may have existed at the time of our audit. We examined the establishment of performance measures in accordance with Government Performance and Results Act of 1993, as they related to the audit objective. We found that the Department had established performance measures related to removing or disposing of nuclear materials and radiological sources around the world. We utilized computer generated data during our audit and performed procedures to validate the reliability of the information as necessary to satisfy our audit objective. As noted in the report, we questioned the reliability of the NMMSS data.

None

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality assurance Standard Review Plan totally dissolvedmore fully in the Standard Review Plan (see Stage 3). Seenuclear power plants: the Standard Review Plan The Nuclear

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

CCN 217493 - Provide a Progress Report Describing the Status...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 of 6 Next Generation Nuclear Plant Licensing NGNP FUEL QUALIFICATION WHITE PAPER DEVELOPMENT STATUS REPORT August 2009 Introduction The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)...

248

Informing the next nuclear generation - how does the Ginna plant branch do it?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of us are familiar with the latest advertising phrase, ``Our children are our future.`` This phrase has been used in so many instances - from concerns about waste, Social Security, and the federal deficit to drug abuse and violence. One more area can be added to the list and advertised nuclear power. Since the establishment of the Ginna plant branch (GPB) in 1992, our target audience has been the next nuclear generation (our children), but our vehicle for dissemination has been the current generation (the adults). Have you ever thought about how often your opinions affect the children you come in contact with? One of GPB`s goals is to provide as much information as possible to teachers, neighbors, and civic organizations of our community so that there is a nuclear future that can be carried on by the next generation.

Saavedra, A. [Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation, Ontario, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reported are: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, criteria for defining waste isolation, and spent fuel and pool component integrity. (DLC)

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

Bowman, C.D.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

252

The B61-based "Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator:" Clever retrofit or headway towards fourth-generation nuclear weapons?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is scientifically and technically possible to build an earth penetrating device that could bury a B61-7 warhead 30 meters into concrete, or 150 meters into earth, before detonating it. The device (based on knowledge and technology that is available since 50 years) would however by large and cumbersome. Better penetrator materials, components able to withstand larger stresses, higher impact velocities, and/or high-explosive driven penetration aids, can only marginally improve the device. It is conclude that the robust nuclear earth penetrator (RNEP) program may be as much motivated by the development of new technology directly applicable to next generation nuclear weapons, and by the political necessity to periodically reasses the role and utility of nuclear weapons, then by the perceived military need of a weapon able to destroy deeply buried targets.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The costs of generating electricity and the competitiveness of nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides an analysis on the costs of generating electricity from nuclear and fossil sources (coal and natural gas) based on the most recent technical data available in literature. The aim is to discuss the competitiveness of nuclear power in a liberalized market context by considering the impact on the generating costs of the main factors affecting the viability of the nuclear option. Particular attention will be devoted to study the variability of the generating costs regarding the level of risk perceived by investors through a sensitivity analysis of the generating costs with respect to the cost of capital and the debt fraction of initial investment. The impact of environment policies is also considered by including a ďtaxĒ on carbon emissions. The analysis reveals that nuclear power could have ample potentiality also in a competitive market, particularly if the level of risk perceived by the investors keeps standing low. For low values of the cost of capital, nuclear power seems to be the most viable solution. Uncertainty about environmental policies and unpredictability of carbon emissions costs might offer further margins of competitiveness.

Carlo Mari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the health and safety impact of fossil fuel emissions.to public health and safety, of any fossil fuel plant areHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

DOE Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Security  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Security DOE Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Security July 17, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Thomas P. D'Agostino, the Department of Energy's Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration, today applauded the British government's new report on advancing the global nuclear security agenda. Issued yesterday, "The Road to 2010 - Addressing the Nuclear Question in the Twenty First Century" outlines a strategy for addressing the threat posed by the proliferation of nuclear weapons ahead of the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. Among other steps, it includes the creation of a UK Center for Nuclear

257

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY DIV. ANNUAL REPORT 1980-81  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polarization Phenomena in Nuclear Physics-1980, AIP Conf.Barrett and D.F. Jackson, Nuclear Sizes and Structure, (K Production in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions A. Shor, K.

Cerny, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY DIV. ANNUAL REPORT 1980-81  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Research Programs Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Reactions J.1. RESEARCH PROGRAMS Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Reactionsnuclei. Complementary research programs in light-ion nuclear

Cerny, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

* This reference number refers to the recommendation number given in the EPSRC/STFC Review of Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Engineering Report Action Plan for the EPSRC/STFC Review of Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Engineering Report Action Plan for the EPSRC/STFC Review of Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Engineering Preface This document will outline the recommendations in order of importance skills provision in nuclear engineering and related areas. Although these two areas have significant

260

Nuclear structure studies. Progress report, [1988--1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, newly initiated work at the FMA is described where the use of double-sided strip detectors for charged particle spectroscopy on nuclides near the proton drip line has been investigated. Half lives for proton emitting nuclides have been determined with improved uncertainties. Several sections report on the results of studies of model parameters in the Z = 50 region for even-even nuclides, for odd-mass nuclides and for odd-odd nuclides. Other studies are reported for nuclear orientation in Br and for structure of Pr-147 which lies in a transition zone between reflection-asymmetric, spherical, and prolate nuclides. And there is a section in which the positions of the single Particle levels in the A = 100 region are discussed.

Walters, W.B.

1993-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

D.McNew/GettyIMaGes San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, California.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D.McNew/GettyIMaGes San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, California. CORRESPONDENCE Checklist be supplied by solar power plants covering about 36,000 square kilometres of land in the desert southwest,theycanberampedupquickly.Annualinstallationofwind- energy capacity in the United States has quadrupled from Counterpoint Not wanted, not needed J. Doyne

262

Milliwatt Generator Project. Progress report, April 1986--March 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator Project from April 1986 through March 1988. Activities included fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, fabrication of pressure-burst test units, compatibility studies, impact testing, and examination of surveillance units. The major task of the Los Alamos Milliwatt Generator Project is to fabricate MC2893A heat sources (4.0 W) for MC2730A radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS) and MC3599 heat sources (4.5 W) for MC3500 RTGs. The MWG Project interfaces with the following contractors: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (designer); E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Savannah River Plant (fuel); Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility (metal hardware); and General Electric Company, Neutron Devices Department (RTGs). In addition to MWG fabrication activities, Los Alamos is involved in (1) fabrication of pressure-burst test units, (2) compatibility testing and evaluation, (3) examination of surveillance units, and (4) impact testing and subsequent examination of compatibility and surveillance units.

Latimer, T.W.; Rinehart, G.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report.

Mahoney, J. (ed.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nuclear technology programs. Semiannual progress report, April--September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April through September 1991. These programs involve R & D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1988--March 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1988--March 1989. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories. 127 refs., 76 figs., 103 tabs.

Harmon, J.E. [ed.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1990--March 1991. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transpose of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

NONE

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nuclear and Renewable Energy Synergies Workshop: Report of Proceedings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis is operated by the Alliance Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Colorado-Boulder, the Colorado School of Mines, the Colorado State University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Stanford University. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Nuclear and Renewable Energy Synergies Workshop: Report of Proceedings Mark Ruth, Mark Antkowiak, and Scott Gossett Technical Report NREL/TP-6A30-52256 December 2011 The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Colorado-Boulder,

268

Audit Report: OAS-L-14-11 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Report: OAS-L-14-11 August 20, 2014 The National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator Activities Neutron generators (NG) are nuclear weapon components that have...

269

Institute for Nuclear Theory annual report No. 2, 1 March 1991--29 February 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses research on the following topics in Nuclear physics: electromagnetic interactions and few-nucleon systems; N*'s and nucleon structure; mesons and fields in nuclei; and nuclear astrophysics of type II supernovae. (LSP).

Haxton, W.; Henley, E.M. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nuclear Science Division, Annual report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains short papers of research conducted in the following areas: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation; and, 88-inch cyclotron operations.

Poskanzer, A.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Lofdahl, J.B. (eds.)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1995-1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saladin5, and C.H. Yu6 Nuclear Science Division, LawrenceMoretto, G.J. Wozniak, Nuclear Science Division, LawrenceComment on ďProbing the Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase TransitionĒ

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1984-85  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. Xcssi. and W. Wolf. Nuclear-Reaction-Time Studies of U +Kį Produced in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Phys. Lett.Momentum Distributions of Nuclear Fragments in im Collisions

Mahoney Editor, Jeannette

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NUCLEAR SCIENCE DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979-1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979). {Laboratory for Nuclear Studies, Osaka University,D. Loveland, and G. T. Seaborg, Nuclear Science Div. AnnualBohr and B. R. Hottel son. Nuclear Structure Vol. 1 (W. A.

Cerny, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

NUCLEAR SCIENCE DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979-1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Research Programs Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Reactions J.1. RESEARCH PROGRAMS. E X O T I C NUCLEI A N D NUCLEAR R E A

Cerny, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Decommissioning of Large Components as an Example of Steam Generator from PWR Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the procedure for the qualification of large components (Steam Generators) as an IP-2 package, the ship transport abroad to Sweden and the external treatment of this components to disburden the Nuclear Power Plant from this task, to assure an accelerated the deconstruction phase and to minimize the amount of waste. In conclusion: The transport of large components to an external treatment facility is linked with many advantages for a Nuclear Power Plant: - Disburden of the Nuclear Power Plant from the treatment of such components, - no timely influence on the deconstruction phase of the power reactor and therewith an accelerated deconstruction phase and - minimization of the waste to be returned and therewith less demand of required waste storage capacity. (authors)

Beverungen, M. [GNS Gesellschaft fur Nuklear-Service mbH, Hollestrabe 7A (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1984-85  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Argonne National Laboratory Physics Colloquium, March 22, 1985: Compression and Expansion in Realtivistic Nuclear

Mahoney Editor, Jeannette

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1984-85  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PROGRAMS Exotic Nuclei and Decay Modes Heavy Element Radiochemistry New Element and Isotope Synthesis Nuclear

Mahoney Editor, Jeannette

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV`s) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG and G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin).

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Locating hot and cold-legs in a nuclear powered steam generation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor steam generator includes a reactor vessel for heating water and a steam generator with a pump casing at the lowest point on the steam generator. A cold-leg pipe extends horizontally between the steam generator and the reactor vessel to return water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel. The bottom of the cold-leg pipe is at a first height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A hot-leg pipe with one end connected to the steam generator and a second end connected to the reactor vessel has a first pipe region extending downwardly from the steam generator to a location between the steam generator and the reactor vessel at which a bottom of the hot-leg pipe is at a second height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A second region extends from that location in a horizontal direction at the second height to the point at which the hot-leg pipe connects to the reactor vessel. A pump is attached to the casing at a location below the first and second heights and returns water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel over the cold-leg. The first height is greater than the second height and the bottom of the steam generator is at a height above the bottom of the reactor vessel that is greater than the first and second heights. A residual heat recovery pump is below the hot-leg and has an inlet line from the hot-leg that slopes down continuously to the pump inlet. 2 figures.

Ekeroth, D.E.; Corletti, M.M.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the operating envelope of both fission and fusion reactors. In advanced fission reactors composite materials are being designed in an effort to extend the life and improve the reliability of fuel rod cladding as well as structural materials. Composites are being considered for use as core internals in the next generation of gas-cooled reactors. Further, next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will rely on the capabilities of advanced composites to safely withstand extremely high neutron fluxes while providing superior thermal shock resistance.

Simos, N.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Institute for Nuclear Theory. Annual report No. 3, 1 March 1992--28 February 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly discussion the following programs of the Institute for Nuclear Theory: fundamental interactions in nuclei; strangeness in hadrons and nuclei; microscopic nuclear structure theory; nuclear physics in atoms and molecules; phenomenology and lattice QCD; and large amplitude collective motion.

Haxton, W.; Bertsch, G.; Henley, E.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

U.N. report concludes that Syrian site destroyed in 2007 was a nuclear reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.N. report concludes that Syrian site destroyed in 2007 was a nuclear reactor Joby Warrick, 24 May.N. claims was a nuclear plant before and after a Sept. 6 Israeli airstrike. The left image is from 5 Aug that Syria "very likely" was building a secret nuclear reactor in 2007 when the partially completed project

285

Operating experience feedback report -- turbine-generator overspeed protection systems: Commercial power reactors. Volume 11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) review of operating experience of main turbine-generator overspeed and overspeed protection systems. It includes an indepth examination of the turbine overspeed event which occurred on November 9, 1991, at the Salem Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. It also provides information concerning actions taken by other utilities and the turbine manufacturers as a result of the Salem overspeed event. AEOD`s study reviewed operating procedures and plant practices. It noted differences between turbine manufacturer designs and recommendations for operations, maintenance, and testing, and also identified significant variations in the manner that individual plants maintain and test their turbine overspeed protection systems. AEOD`s study provides insight into the shortcomings in the design, operation, maintenance, testing, and human factors associated with turbine overspeed protection systems. Operating experience indicates that the frequency of turbine overspeed events is higher than previously thought and that the bases for demonstrating compliance with NRC`s General Design Criterion (GDC) 4, Environmental and dynamic effects design bases, may be nonconservative with respect to the assumed frequency.

Ornstein, H.L.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Financial valuation of investments in future power generation technologies: nuclear fusion and CCS in an emissions trading system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper outlines a model approach for the financial valuation of future power generation technologies, such as nuclear fusion or carbon capture and storage (CCS) under an emissions trading regime. Since on imp...

Heinz Eckart KlingelhŲfer; Peter Kurz

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Report by a special panel of the American Nuclear Society: Protection and management of plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) established an independent and prestigious panel several months ago to take the matter up where the US National Academy of Science (NAS) left off. The challenge was to look at the broader issue of what to do with civil plutonium, as well as excess weapons material. In terms of approach, the report focused on several short- and long-term issues. The short-term focus was on the disposition of excess weapons plutonium, while the longer-range issue concerned the disposition of the plutonium being produced in the civil nuclear fuel cycle. For the short term, the ANS panel strongly endorsed the concept that all plutonium scheduled for release from the US and Russian weapons stocks should be converted to a form that is intensively radioactive in order to protect the plutonium from theft of seizure (the spent fuel standard). However, since the conversion will at best take several years to complete, the panel has concluded that immediate emphasis should be placed on the assurance that all unconverted materials are protected as securely as when they were part of the active weapon stockpiles. More importantly, the panel also recommended prompt implementation of the so-called reactor option for disposing of surplus US and Russian weapons plutonium. The longer-term issues covered by the panel were those posed by the growing stocks of both separated plutonium and spent fuel generated in the world`s civil nuclear power programs. These issues included what fuel cycle policies should be prudently pursued in light of proliferation risks and likely future energy needs, what steps should be taken in regard to the increase in the demand for nuclear power in the future, and how civil plutonium in its various forms should be protected and managed to minimize proliferation. Overall, the panel concluded that plutonium is an energy resource that should be used and not a waste material to be disposed of.

Bengelsdorf, H. [Bengelsdorf (Harold), Bethesda, MD (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Spin  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Spin Rocket Motor Project," DOE/IG-0740 Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Spin Rocket Motor Project," DOE/IG-0740 The Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories are refurbishing the Spin Rocket Motor, a prime component of the B61 nuclear weapon system. Both the original motor produced in i966 and the version last produced in 1991 are the subjects of the refurbishment. Both motors, which are essentially identical, produce thrust to arm the weapon. In December 2001, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) received Nuclear Weapons Council Standing and Safety Committee (NWCSSC) approval to study the feasibility and cost of replacement options In April 2003, the NWCSSC

289

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A compilation of reports of the Advisory Committee on nuclear waste, July 1995 -- June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation contains 8 reports issued by the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste (ACNW) during the eighth year of its operation. The reports were submitted to the Chairman and Commissioners of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All reports prepared by the Committee have been made available to the public through the NRC Public Document Room, the U.S. Library of Congress, and the internet at http://www.nrc.gov/ACRSACNW.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Safety Reports Series No. 11, Developing Safety Culture in Nuclear Activities: Practical Suggestions to Assist Progress, International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Safety Reports Series No. 11, Developing Safety Culture in Nuclear Activities: Practical Suggestions to Assist Progress, International Atomic Energy Agency

292

Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in {sup 30}P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized {gamma}-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary.

Ludwig, E.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

State of Nevada, Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office narrative report, October 1--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) is the State of Nevada agency designated by State law to monitor and oversee US Department of Energy (DOE) activities relative to the possible siting, construction, operation and closure of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and to carry out the State of Nevada`s responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During the reporting period the NWPO continued to work toward the five objectives designed to implement the Agency`s oversight responsibilities. (1) Assure that the health and safety of Nevada`s citizens are adequately protected with regard to any federal high-level radioactive waste program within the State. (2) Take the responsibilities and perform the duties of the State of Nevada as described in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. (3) Advise the Governor, the State Commission on Nuclear Projects and the Nevada State Legislature on matters concerning the potential disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the State. (4) Work closely and consult with affected local governments and State agencies. (5) Monitor and evaluate federal planning and activities regarding high-level radioactive waste disposal. Plan and conduct independent State studies regarding the proposed repository.

NONE

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY12 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building on previous internal investments and leveraging ongoing advancements in semantic technologies, PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In developing this proof of concept prototype, the utility and relevancy of semantic technologies to the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D) has been better understood.

Hohimer, Ryan E.; Pomiak, Yekaterina G.; Neorr, Peter A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Strasburg, Jana D.

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Report to the Secretary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Report to the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Report to the Secretary of Energy Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Report to the Secretary of Energy The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) was formed by the Secretary of Energy at the request of the President to conduct a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle and recommend a new strategy. It was cochaired by Rep. Lee H. Hamilton and Gen. Brent Scowcroft. Other Commissioners were Mr. Mark H. Ayers, the Hon. Vicky A. Bailey, Dr. Albert Carnesale, Sen. Pete Domenici, Ms. Susan Eisenhower, Sen. Chuck Hagel, Mr. Jonathan Lash, Dr. Allison M. Macfarlane, Dr. Richard A. Meserve, Dr. Ernest J. Moniz, Dr. Per Peterson, Mr. John Rowe, and Rep. Phil Sharp.

296

EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

BARI, R.; ET AL.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Report of the Infrastructure Task Force of the Nuclear Energy Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the Infrastructure Task Force of the Nuclear Energy of the Infrastructure Task Force of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Report of the Infrastructure Task Force of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee On October 1, 2002 the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee was asked to provide specific, focused updates to its Nuclear Science and Technology Infrastructure Roadmap and review the specific issues at the DOE key nuclear energy research and development (R&D) laboratories. This activity was assigned to a five-member Infrastructure Task Force (ITF). After receiving extensive written materials from DOE, the Idaho Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), on November 6-8, 2002 the ITF visited the Idaho site and received briefings and tours of the INEEL and ANL-W facilities.

298

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1995-1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research program is primarily focused on high-energy nuclearprogram in heavy element research, production of exotic nuclei and nuclearresearch priorities present special opportunities and challenges for the nuclear data program.

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1984-85  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PROGRAMS Exotic Nuclei and Decay Modes Heavy Element Radiochemistry New Element and Isotope Synthesis Nuclearand nuclear studies of lawrencium isotopes have been ini≠ tiated. New Element and Isotope Synthesis The research program

Mahoney Editor, Jeannette

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY13 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12) PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) the SNAP demonstration was enhanced with respect to query and navigation usability issues.

Hohimer, Ryan E.; Strasburg, Jana D.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT|Year:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT|Year: REPORT|Year: 2013 OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and disclosure information, see the provisions stated on the last page of the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction.| |SCHEDULE 1. IDENTIFICATION| |Survey Contact| |Name:__________________________________________|Title:___________________________________________|

302

Manual for Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System Reporting and Data Submission  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual provides detailed instructions for documenting and reporting data submissions for nuclear materials transactions, inventories, and material balances to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). Cancels DOE M 474.1-2. Canceled by DOE M 470.4-6.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

NNSA Releases UPF "Red Team" Report | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) "Red Team" report, written by a team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thom Mason. The report outlines options for NNSA to...

304

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001-September 2004. (1) Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. (2) Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. (3) Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. (4) Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. (5) Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. (6) Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform. (7) Implementation of a moving-window technique in the time domain for detecting and quantifying flaw types in tubular structures. A window zooming technique was also developed for flaw location in tubes. (8) Theoretical study of elastic wave propagation (longitudinal and shear waves) in metallic flat plates and tubing with and without flaws. (9) Simulation of the Lamb wave propagation using the finite-element code ABAQUS. This enabled the verification of the experimental results. The research tasks included both analytical research and experimental studies. The experimental results helped to enhance the robustness of fault monitoring methods and to provide a systematic verification of the analytical results. The results of this research were disseminated in scientific meetings. A journal manuscript was submitted for publication. The new findings of this research have potential applications in aerospace and civil structures. The report contains a complete bibliography that was developed during the course of the project.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

305

New generation nuclear fuel structures: dense particles in selectively soluble matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a technology for dispersing sub-millimeter sized fuel particles within a bulk matrix that can be selectively dissolved. This may enable the generation of advanced nuclear fuels with easy separation of actinides and fission products. The large kinetic energy of the fission products results in most of them escaping from the sub-millimeter sized fuel particles and depositing in the matrix during burning of the fuel in the reactor. After the fuel is used and allowed to cool for a period of time, the matrix can be dissolved and the fission products removed for disposal while the fuel particles are collected by filtration for recycle. The success of such an approach would meet a major goal of the GNEP program to provide advanced recycle technology for nuclear energy production. The benefits of such an approach include (1) greatly reduced cost of the actinide/fission product separation process, (2) ease of recycle of the fuel particles, and (3) a radiation barrier to prevent theft or diversion of the recycled fuel particles during the time they are re-fabricated into new fuel. In this study we describe a method to make surrogate nuclear fuels of micrometer scale W (shell)/Mo (core) or HfO2 particles embedded in an MgO matrix that allows easy separation of the fission products and their embedded particles. In brief, the method consists of physically mixing W-Mo or hafnia particles with an MgO precursor. Heating the mixture, in air or argon, without agitation, to a temperature is required for complete decomposition of the precursor. The resulting material was examined using chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and micro X-ray computed tomography and found to consist of evenly dispersed particles in an MgO + matrix. We believe this methodology can be extended to actinides and other matrix materials.

Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pattillo, Steve G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Institute for Nuclear Theory annual report No. 4, 1 March 1993--28 February 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute for Nuclear Theory was created as a national center by the Department of Energy. It began operations March 1, 1990. This annual report summarizes the INT`s activities during its fourth year of operations.

Haxton, W.; Bertsch, G.; Henley, E.M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Iraqi nuclear weapons development program. Final report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an abstract of the final report focusing on the collection, collation, analysis, and recording of information pertaining to Iraqi nuclear weapons development and on the long term monitoring of Iraq.

Not Available

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Modular Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Program. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 2.0 of this report summarizes the MOD-RTG reference flight design, and Section 3.0 discusses the Ground Demonstration System design. Multicouple technology development is discussed in Section 4.0, and Section 5.0 lists all published technical papers prepared during the course of the contract.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

A critical study on Kennedys Cost-Benefit-Analysis ĎNew nuclear power generation in the UKí.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The demand for energy is forever growing. The technology of extracting power from uranium through nuclear facilities is rather old. Core melting, nuclear bombs,Ö (more)

Stršng, Jonathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest Ė i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Final Report for "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data" adds block-structured (mosaic) grid support, parallel processing, and 2D/3D curvilinear interpolation to the open-source UV-CDAT climate data analysis tool. Block structured grid support complies to the Gridspec extension submitted to the Climate and Forecast metadata conventions. It contains two parts: aggregation of data spread over multiple mosaic tiles (M-SPEC) and aggregation of temporal data stored in different files (F-SPEC). Together, M-SPEC and F-SPEC allow users to interact with data stored in multiple files as if the data were in a single file. For computational expensive tasks, a flexible, multi-dimensional, multi-type distributed array class allows users to process data in parallel using remote memory access. Both nodal and cell based interpolation is supported; users can choose between different interpolation libraries including ESMF and LibCF depending on the their particular needs.

Pletzer, Alexander

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

313

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY RADIATION ANNUAL REPORT 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic reliability of Complex System & decision Analysis I. Papazoglou Occupational Risk Assessment I PHYSICS OF THE REACTOR I. Stamatelatos Exposure of the Population to Ionizing Radiations of the Enironment LABORATORY G. Pantelias Operation & Maintenance of Research Reactor M. Stakakis Nuclear Analytical Techniques

315

Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1982-March 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of technical progress reports designed to report radioactive waste management programs at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Accomplishments in the following programs are reported: waste stabilization; Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; low-level waste management; remedial action; and supporting studies.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Design acceptance summary report for the new generation transfer pump (NGTP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents design review of the New Generation Transfer Pump versus the functions and requirements of the SY-101 Rapid Mitigation Project. Previously unpublished documentation for the pump is included in support of the design.

IRONS, J.

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Nuclear Power Reactor Sites December 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Washington, D.C. Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel The picture on the cover is the Connecticut Yankee Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation site in Haddam, Connecticut, with 43 dry storage NRC-licensed dual-purpose (storage and transport) casks. ii Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The House Appropriations Committee Print that accompanied the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008, requests that the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department):

318

From the first nuclear power plant to fourth-generation nuclear power installations [on the 60th anniversary of the Worldís First nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful commissioning in the 1954 of the Worldís First nuclear power plant constructed at the Institute for Physics ... center for training Soviet and foreign specialists on nuclear power plants, the personnel...

V. I. Rachkov; S. G. Kalyakin; O. F. Kukharchuk; Yu. I. OrlovÖ

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers, Volumes 1, 2.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001 √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬? September 2004. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform

Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Hines, J. Wesley; Lu, Baofu; Huang, Xuedong; Penha, Rosani, L.; Perillo, Sergio, R.; Zhao, Ke

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

320

Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei {sup 30}P and {sup 34}Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using {sup 166}Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented.

Ludwig, E.J.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High Energy Utilization, Co-Generation Nuclear power Plants With Static Energy Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to being cost effective, very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion could meet the needs and the energy mix in underdeveloped countries and remote communities, which may include electricity, residential and industrial space heating, seawater desalination, and/or high temperature process heat or steam for industrial uses. These plants are also an attractive option in naval, marine, and undersea applications, when the absence of a sound signature is highly desirable. An Analysis is performed of Gas Cooled Reactor (CGR) and Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (LMR), very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion, using a combination of options. These include Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converters (AMTECs) and both single segment and segmented thermoelectric converters. The total energy utilization of these plants exceeds 88%. It includes the fraction of the reactor's thermal power converted into electricity and delivered to the Grid at 6.6 kVA and those used for residential and industrial space heating at {approx}370 K, seawater desalination at 400 K, and/or high temperature process heat or steam at {approx}850 K. In addition to its inherently high reliability, modularity, low maintenance and redundancy, static energy conversion used in the present study could deliver electricity to the Grid at a net efficiency of 29.5%. A LMR plant delivers 2-3 times the fraction of the reactor thermal power converted into electricity in a GCR plant, but could not provide for both seawater desalination and high temperature process heat/steam concurrently, which is possible in GCR plants. The fraction of the reactor's thermal power used for non-electrical power generation in a GCR plant is {approx} 10 - 15% higher than in a LMR plant. (authors)

El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies and Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 90, 063412 (2014) Effect of nuclear vibration on high-order-harmonic generation of aligned H2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 90, 063412 (2014) Effect of nuclear vibration on high-order-harmonic generation of aligned H2 + molecules Dmitry A. Telnov,1,* John Heslar,2, and Shih-I Chu2,3, 1 Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504, Russia 2 Department of Physics, Center for Quantum

Chu, Shih-I

323

Reaching the hip-hop generation: Final (symposium proceedings) report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this final (closing) report is to capture the flavor of the symposium held March 1 and 2, 1993 in New York City convened by Motivational Educational Entertainment, Inc. (MEE), a black-owned communications research, consulting, and video production company based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The mission of MEE is to understand, reach, and positively affect inner-city youth. Traditional communication approaches from mainstream sources to at-risk youth often don`t account for the unique way youth communicate among themselves and how they relate to the media. This understanding, however, is crucial. To understand youth communication, the people who create and send both entertaining and educational messages to urban youth must be brought into the dialogue. The meeting in New York was intended to provide an important opportunity for senders to meet and evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of their messages. In addition, the MEE symposium provided a forum for the continuing public debate about what needs to be done to reach today`s urban teens. Included in this document is a description of symposium goals/objectives, symposium activities, the reaction to and analysis of the symposium, recommendations for future MEE courses of action, and an appendix containing copies of press articles.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900įC and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2ľCr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986.

none,

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Temperature and thermal stress distributions for the HFIR permanent reflector generated by nuclear heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beryllium permanent reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor has the main functions for slowing down and reflecting the neutrons and housing the experimental facilities. The reflector is heated as a result of the nuclear reaction. Heat is removed mainly by the cooling water passing through the densely distributed coolant holes along the vertical or axial direction of the reflector. The reflector neutronic distribution and its heating rate are calculated by J.C. Gehin of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by applying the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. The heat transfer boundary conditions along several reflector interfaces are estimated to remove additional heat from the reflector. The present paper is to report the calculation results of the temperature and the thermal stress distributions of the permanent reflector by applying the computer aided design code I-DEAS and the finite element code ABAQUS. The present calculation is to estimate the high stress areas as a result of the new beam tube cutouts along the horizontal mid-plane of the reflector of the recent reactor upgrade project. These high stresses were not able to be calculated in the preliminary design analysis in earlier 60`s. The heat transfer boundary conditions are used in this redesigned calculation. The material constants and the acceptance criteria for the allowable stresses are mainly based on that assumed in the preliminary design report.

Chang, S.J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) Senior Technical Safety Manager (STSM) Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - August 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) Self-Assessment Report Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program CONTENTS Background ................................................................................................................................ 1 Results ....................................................................................................................................... 1 Assessment Criteria ................................................................................................................... 1 Finding ....................................................................................................................................... 2 Observation ............................................................................................................................... 2

328

Report of the Nuclear Energy Agency Expert Group on Gut Transfer Factors: Implications for Dose per Unit Intake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Report of the Nuclear Energy Agency Expert Group on Gut Transfer Factors: Implications...transfer factors recommended by an Expert Group of the Nuclear Energy Agency for intakes of certain important elements in......

G.M. Kendall; J.D. Harrison; T.P. Fell

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

World nuclear outlook 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

NONE

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

330

SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS 2008 ANNUAL REPORT ORNL NEUTRON SCIENCES The Next Generation of Materials Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and colleagues.They initially reported that an iron-based material can conduct electricity without resistance close to conducting electric- ity with zero resistance at room temperature. Such materials wouldSCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS 2008 ANNUAL REPORT ORNL NEUTRON SCIENCES The Next Generation of Materials

331

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending June 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report the excitation functions for production of gallium-66 via {alpha}-induced nuclear reactions on enriched zinc-66 have been measured with E{sub {alpha}}{le}27.3 Mev and E{sub {alpha}}{le}43.7 MeV employing the stack thin-target technique. In addition, the induced activity of gallium-67 in the same sets of targets allowed an evaluation of the excitation functions of the corresponding nuclear reactions. These preliminary studies have demonstrated that sufficient levels of gallium-66 can be produced by {alpha}-induced reactions on enriched zinc targets. A series of radioiodinated analogues of 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}, {alpha}-diphenylacetate (QNB) have been prepared. These new analogues include 1-azabicyclo-(2.2.2)oct-3-yl{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(4-iodophenyl)-{alpha}-methylacetate(2,I-WNA), 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl (3-iodo)-xanthene-9-carboxylate (3,I-QNX), and 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(E-1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (4,I-QNP), which have also been radiolabeled with iodine-125 with high specific activity. The biodistribution, brain uptake, and receptor specificity of these new analogues are currently being studied. Shipments of radioactive agents made to collaborators during this period included. One shipment of iodine-125-labeled 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) and tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Property exempt from taxation: nuclear generation facility property: K.S.A. 79-230 (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation would exempt from state property taxes any property purchased, constructed or installed to expand capacity at an existing nuclear plant or to build a new nuclear plant. A...

333

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site Office Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site Office 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report for Federal Technical Personnel January 2013 DOENE-ORSO CONCURRENCE AND APPROVAL CONCURRENCE: Marianne Heiskell, Lease and Technical Management Branch Chief Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site Office Randy DeVault, Regulatory Management Branch Chief, NE-ORSO Nucl~ffic ,___.~,. Larry Perkins, Deputy Manager, Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site Office APPROVAL: January 2013 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report Date I /v/13 Date! 1/~3/13 Date ,;:L :/ /. * ~ Page ii DOENE-ORSO Table of Contents Section 1: Current Mission(s) of the Organization and Potential Changes Section 2: Technical Staffing Section 3: Current Shortages and Plans for Filling

334

Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee (FCSC) of NEAC met in Washington, August 17- 19, 2010. DOE's new science-based approach to all matters related to nuclear energy is being implemented. The general approach was outlined to NEAC in the briefing on the NE Roadmap. There are many new directions being considered, and this meeting of the FCSC was to brief the Subcommittee on new directions in nuclear energy that might go beyond our present 4.5% enriched LWRs. The goal is to develop new concepts that have advantages over present systems in some combination of cost, passive safety, proliferation resistance, sustainability, and used fuel disposition.

335

Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee (FCSC) of NEAC met in Washington, August 17- 19, 2010. DOE's new science-based approach to all matters related to nuclear energy is being implemented. The general approach was outlined to NEAC in the briefing on the NE Roadmap. There are many new directions being considered, and this meeting of the FCSC was to brief the Subcommittee on new directions in nuclear energy that might go beyond our present 4.5% enriched LWRs. The goal is to develop new concepts that have advantages over present systems in some combination of cost, passive safety, proliferation resistance, sustainability, and used fuel disposition.

336

Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants: Annual report, 1993. Volume 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1993 have been compiled and reported. The summary data for the years 1974 through 1992 are included for comparison. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1993 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

Tichler, J.; Doty, K.; Lucadamo, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Monitoring attosecond dynamics of coherent electron-nuclear wave packets by molecular high-order-harmonic generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pump-probe scheme for preparing and monitoring electron-nuclear motion in a dissociative coherent electron-nuclear wave packet is explored from numerical solutions of a non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A mid-ir intense few-cycle probe pulse is used to generate molecular high-order-harmonic generation (MHOHG) from a coherent superposition of two or more dissociative coherent electronic-nuclear wave packets, prepared by a femtosecond uv pump pulse. Varying the time delay between the intense ir probe pulse and the uv pump pulse by a few hundreds of attoseconds, the MHOHG signal intensity is shown to vary by orders of magnitude, thus showing the high sensitivity to electron-nuclear dynamics in coherent electron-nuclear wave packets. We relate this high sensitivity of MHOHG spectra to opposing electron velocities (fluxes) in the electron wave packets of the recombining (recolliding) ionized electron and of the bound electron in the initial coherent superposition of two electronic states.

Bredtmann, Timm [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Takustrasse 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, Andre D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report, December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Space and Terrestrial Systems Division of the US Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

Bronisz, S.E. (comp.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report, February 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Space and Terrestrial Systems Division of the US Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

Bronisz, S.E. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1996 Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This first annual report on DOE`s Price Anderson Amendments Act enforcement program covers the activities, accomplishments, and planning for calendar year 1996. It also includes the infrastructure development activities of 1995. It encompasses the activities of the headquarters` Office of Enforcement in the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) and Investigation and the coordinators and technical advisors in DOE`s Field and Program Offices and other EH Offices. This report includes an overview of the enforcement program; noncompliances, investigations, and enforcement actions; summary of significant enforcement actions; examples where enforcement action was deferred; and changes and improvements to the program.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is DOE`s first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety fuels program. Progress report, February 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The two programs involved are: General-Purpose Heat Source Development and Space Nuclear Safety and Fuels. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

Maraman, W.J. (comp.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration for Ways to Reduce Operating Costs for Small Producers Project: 08123-10 April 30, 2012 Loy Sneary, President Robin Dahlheim, Sales Gulf Coast Green Energy 1801 7th St, Ste 230 Bay City, TX 77414 RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Gulf Coast Green Energy as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO

344

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 2000 [USDOE] [9th edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ninth edition of the Annual Report of Waste Generation and Pollution Prevention Progress highlights waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost savings/avoidance for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pollution Prevention Program for Fiscal Year 2000. This edition marks the first time that progress toward meeting the 2005 Pollution Prevention Goals, issued by the Secretary of Energy in November 1999, is being reported. In addition, the Annual Report has a new format, and now contains information on a fiscal year basis, which is consistent with other DOE reports.

None

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

STARLIB: A NEXT-GENERATION REACTION-RATE LIBRARY FOR NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, {gamma}), (p, {alpha}), ({alpha}, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

Sallaska, A. L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8462 (United States); Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Goriely, S. [Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 226, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X., E-mail: anne.sallaska@nist.gov [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will use proton irradiation to further understand the microstructural stability of ceramics being considered as matrix material for advanced nuclear fuels.

Todd R. Allen

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Separation of technetium from nuclear waste stream simulants. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author studied liquid anion exchangers, such as Aliquat-336 nitrate, various pyridinium nitrates, and related salts, so that they may be applied toward a specific process for extracting (partitioning) and recovering {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from nuclear waste streams. Many of the waste streams are caustic and contain a variety of other ions. For this reason, the author studied waste stream simulants that are caustic and contain appropriate concentrations of selected, relevant ions. Methods of measuring the performance of the exchangers and extractant systems included contact experiments. Batch contact experiments were used to determine the forward and reverse extraction parameters as a function of temperature, contact time, phase ratio, concentration, solvent (diluent), and other physical properties. They were also used for stability and competition studies. Specifically, the author investigated the solvent extraction behavior of salts of perrhenate (ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}), a stable (non-radioactive) chemical surrogate for {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. Results are discussed for alternate organic solvents; metalloporphyrins, ferrocenes, and N-cetyl pyridium nitrate as alternate extractant salts; electroactive polymers; and recovery of ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}.

Strauss, S.H. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1995-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

348

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Economic and environmental analysis of power generation expansion in Japan considering Fukushima nuclear accident using a multi-objective optimization model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power has long been a cornerstone of energy policy in Japan, a country with few natural resources of its own. However, following on from the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the Japanese government is now in the throes of reviewing its nuclear power policy. On the other hand, under continuing policies of greenhouse gas reduction, it is crucial to consider scenarios for the country to realize an economic, safe and low-carbon power generation system in the future. Therefore, in the present study, economic and environmental analysis was conducted on the power generation system in Japan up to 2030 using a multi-objective optimization methodology. Four nuclear power scenarios were proposed in light of the nuclear accident: (1) actively anti-nuclear; (2) passively negative towards nuclear; (3) conservative towards nuclear; and (4) active expansion of nuclear power. The obtained capacity mix, generation mix, generation cost, CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of the scenarios were compared and analysed. The obtained results show that the large scale penetration of PV (photovoltaic), wind and LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) power can partly replace nuclear power, however, removing nuclear power entirely was not suggested from economic, environmental and energy security perspectives.

Qi Zhang; Benjamin C. Mclellan; Tetsuo Tezuka; Keiichi N. Ishihara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Characterization of a Stochastic Procedure for the Generation and Transport of Fission Fragments within Nuclear Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the ever-increasing demands of the nuclear power community to extend fuel cycles and overall core-lifetimes in a safe and economic manner, it is becoming more necessary to extend the working knowledge of nuclear fuel performance. From...

Hackemack, Michael Wayne

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Research in nuclear physics. Progress report, 1992--1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: Search for Massive Neutrinos in the Recoil Spectrum of {sup 37}Cl following Electron Capture Decay of {sup 37}Ar; A Monte Carlo Simulation of the Electron Capture Decay of {sup 37}Ar with an Admixture of Massive Neutrinos: Search for 17-keV Neutrinos in the Internal Bremsstrahlung Spectrum of {sup 125}I; {beta}{sup +} Decay and Cosmic-Ray Half-Lives of {sup 143}Pm and {sup 144}Pm; and Production Cross Sections from the Bombardment of Natural Mo with Protons.

Kozub, R.L.; Hindi, M.M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Special committee review of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's severe accident risks report (NUREG--1150)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) published a draft report Severe Accident Risks: An Assessment for Five US Nuclear Power Plants,'' NUREG-1150. This report updated, extended and improved upon the information presented in the 1974 Reactor Safety Study,'' WASH-1400. Because the information in NUREG-1150 will play a significant role in implementing the NRC's Severe Accident Policy, its quality and credibility are of critical importance. Accordingly, the Commission requested that the RES conduct a peer review of NUREG-1150 to ensure that the methods, safety insights and conclusions presented are appropriate and adequately reflect the current state of knowledge with respect to reactor safety. To this end, RES formed a special committee in June of 1989 under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Committee, composed of a group of recognized national and international experts in nuclear reactor safety, was charged with preparing a report reflecting their review of NUREG-1150 with respect to the adequacy of the methods, data, analysis and conclusions it set forth. The report which precedes reflects the results of this peer review.

Kouts, H.J.C. (Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (USA)); Apostolakis, G.; Kastenberg, W.E. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA)); Birkhofer, E.H.A. (Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany, F.R.)); Hoegberg, L.G. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)); LeSage, L.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Rasmussen, N.C. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Camb

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Research in heavy-ion nuclear physics. Annual progress report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: Fusion-fission in light nuclear systems; High-resolution Q-value measurement for the {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg reaction; Heavy-ion reactions and limits to fusion; and Hybrid MWPC-Bragg curve detector development.

Sanders, S.J.; Prosser, F.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Intermediate/high energy nuclear physics. Technical progress report, June 15, 1991--June 14, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses progress on the following research: quark cluster model; solving quantum field theories in non-perturbative regime;relativistic wave equations, quarkonia and electron-positron resonances; nuclear dependence at large transverse momentum; factorization at the order of power corrections; single-spin asymmetries; and hadronic photon production. (LSP)

Vary, J.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2008 Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specifi c commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendations, or favoring by the United States Government. The views and opinions expressed by the authors herein do not necessarily state or refl ect those of the United States Government, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. This report has been reproduced from the best copy available.

358

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On other hand, accidents at nuclear facilities could nott ed expos ur e from a nuclear accident which would warrantresulting from accidents at nuclear facilities. Average

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Analysis of ground motions at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station April 9, 1968  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...concrete mat foundation. The turbine generator, the plant auxiliary...transferred to the secondary turbine steam system by the steam generators...has resulted in a bothersome maintenance problem which requires replacement...self-sustMned Wineharger wind-generator to charge the batteries...

G. W. Housner; P. J. West; C. G. Johnson

360

Preliminary evaluation of a fluorescence and radioisotope nuclear smuggling deterrence tag - final report (IL500E)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the efforts completed in identifying candidate fluorescence compounds and radioisotopes for a developing tagging system. The tagging system is being developed as a deterrent to nuclear smuggling, by providing a means of: (1) tracing materials and pilferers to the facility of origin for any recovered special nuclear materials, (2) inventory control of long-term stored items containing special nuclear materials, and (3) tracking materials transferred between facilities. The system uses three types of materials to cover a range of applications intended to prevent the pilfering of special nuclear materials. One material, fluorescent compounds which are invisible without ultraviolet or near-infrared detection systems, is marked on controlled items with a tracking pattern that corresponds to a specified item in a specified location in the data control system. The tagging system uses an invisible, fluorescent dusting powder to mark equipment and personnel who inappropriately handle the tagged material. The tagging system also uses unique combinations of radionuclides to identify the facility of origin for any special nuclear material. This report also summarizes the efforts completed in identifying hardware that will be used for the tagging system. This hardware includes the devices for applying the tagging materials, the commercially available fluorescence detection systems, and gamma ray detection systems assembled from existing, commercially available technologies.

Hartenstein, S.D.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Delmastro, J.R. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The state and prospects of coal and nuclear power generation in Russia (review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the modern state and development trends for coal and nuclear power engineering in Russia up to 2030 are generalized. It is emphasized that from the viewpoint of strategy, coal and uranium fuel will be ...

V. V. Salomatov

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

FORM EIA-860M MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PURPOSE Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: a) Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; b) Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and c) Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry. REQUIRED RESPONDENTS Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT, respondents who have indicated in a previous filing to

363

Annual report on the development and characterization of solidified forms for nuclear wastes, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development and characterization of solidified nuclear waste forms is a major continuing effort at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Contributions from seven programs directed at understanding chemical composition, process conditions, and long-term behaviors of various nuclear waste forms are included in this report. The major findings of the report are included in extended figure captions that can be read as brief technical summaries of the research, with additional information included in a traditional narrative format. Waste form development proceeded on crystalline and glass materials for high-level and transuranic (TRU) wastes. Leaching studies emphasized new areas of research aimed at more basic understanding of waste form/aqueous solution interactions. Phase behavior and thermal effects research included studies on crystal phases in defense and TRU waste glasses and on liquid-liquid phase separation in borosilicate waste glasses. Radiation damage effects in crystals and glasses from alpha decay and from transmutation are reported.

Chick, L.A.; McVay, G.L.; Mellinger, G.B.; Roberts, F.P.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Test and evaluation of computerized nuclear material accounting methods. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the definition of a Material Balance Area (MBA) as a well-defined geographical area involving an Integral operation, the building housing the BFS-1 and BFS-1 critical facilities is considered to consist of one MBA. The BFS materials are in the form of small disks clad in stainless steel and each disk with nuclear material has its own serial number. Fissile material disks in the BFS MBA can be located at three key monitoring points: BFS-1 facility, BFS-2 facility and main storage of BFS fissile materials (storage 1). When used in the BFS-1 or BFS-2 critical facilities, the fissile material disks are loaded in tubes (fuel rods) forming critical assembly cores. The following specific features of the BFS MBA should be taken into account for the purpose of computerized accounting of nuclear material: (1) very large number of nuclear material items (about 70,000 fissile material items); and (2) periodically very intensive shuffling of nuclear material items. Requirements for the computerized system are determined by basic objectives of nuclear material accounting: (1) providing accurate information on the identity and location of all items in the BFS material balance area; (2) providing accurate information on location and identity of tamper-indicating devices; (3) tracking nuclear material inventories; (4) issuing periodic reports; (5) assisting with the detection of material gains or losses; (6) providing a history of nuclear material transactions; (7) preventing unauthorized access to the system and data falsification. In August 1995, the prototype computerized accounting system was installed on the BFS facility for trial operation. Information on two nuclear material types was entered into the data base: weapon-grade plutonium metal and 36% enriched uranium dioxide. The total number of the weapon-grade plutonium disks is 12,690 and the total number of the uranium dioxide disks is 1,700.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

REPORT OF THE WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR FACILITY DESIGN INFORMATION EXAMINATION AND VERIFICATION FOR SAFEGUARDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) implements nuclear safeguards and verifies countries are compliant with their international nuclear safeguards agreements. One of the key provisions in the safeguards agreement is the requirement that the country provide nuclear facility design and operating information to the IAEA relevant to safeguarding the facility, and at a very early stage. , This provides the opportunity for the IAEA to verify the safeguards-relevant features of the facility and to periodically ensure that those features have not changed. The national authorities (State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material - SSAC) provide the design information for all facilities within a country to the IAEA. The design information is conveyed using the IAEAís Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ) and specifies: (1) Identification of the facilityís general character, purpose, capacity, and location; (2) Description of the facilityís layout and nuclear material form, location, and flow; (3) Description of the features relating to nuclear material accounting, containment, and surveillance; and (4) Description of existing and proposed procedures for nuclear material accounting and control, with identification of nuclear material balance areas. The DIQ is updated as required by written addendum. IAEA safeguards inspectors examine and verify this information in design information examination (DIE) and design information verification (DIV) activities to confirm that the facility has been constructed or is being operated as declared by the facility operator and national authorities, and to develop a suitable safeguards approach. Under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), the National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Office of Non-Proliferation and International Security identified the need for more effective and efficient verification of design information by the IAEA for improving international safeguards in the future. Consequently, the NNSA Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243) sponsored a team of U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory nuclear safeguards experts and technologists to conduct a workshop on methods and technologies for improving this activity, under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Approaches Project. The workshop focused on reviewing and discussing the fundamental safeguards needs, and presented technology and/or methods that could potentially address those needs more effectively and efficiently. Conclusions and Recommendations for technology to enhance the performance of DIV inspections are presented by the workshop team.

Richard Metcalf; Robert Bean

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Multi-Objective Optimization Analysis of Post-Fukushima Power Generation Planning in Japan with Considering Nuclear Powerís Risk Cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, multi-objective optimization analysis was conducted on the post-Fukushima power generation planning in Japan up to 2030 from economic and environmental perspectives with considering nuclear

Qi Zhang; Tetsuo Tezuka; Keiichi Ishihara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Restoration of the graphite memory of a reactor in the third power-generating unit of the Leningrad nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The restoration of the graphite masonry of cell 52-16 in the reactor in the third power-generating unit of the Leningrad nuclear power plant is described. The process reduces to moving...

V. I. Lebedev; Yu. V. Garusov; M. A. Pavlov; A. N. Peunov; E. P. Kozlov

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Report of the defense science board task force on defense nuclear agency. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Task Force recommends that: (1) DNA continue to be the DoD focal point for nuclear expertise; (2) The DNA charter be modified to provide focus for non-nuclear activities of critical importance to the DoD. It gives DNA authority to conduct technology base development for advanced conventional munitions, and become a focal point for technologies related to non- and counter-proliteration of weapon systems of mass destruction and their infrastructure (WMD); and (3) Anticipating cessation of UGETs, DNA should aggressively pursue technology development for AGT, AGT/UGT correlation and advanced computations, with emphasis on new theater scenarios, but with the ability to reconstitute for UGT resumption or AGT for large strategic threats within a year or two.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, prepared in accordance with the guidelines in DOE/E-0023 (DOE 1981), covers the program activities conducted around Nevada Test Site (NTS) for calendar year 1981. It contains descriptions of pertinent features of the NTS and its environs, summaries of the dosimetry and sampling methods, analytical procedures, and the analytical results from environmental measurements. Where applicable, dosimetry and sampling data are compared to appropriate guides for external and internal exposures of humans to ionizing radiation. The monitoring networks detected no radioactivity in the various media which could be attributed to US nuclear testing. Small amounts of fission products were detected in air samples as a result of the People's Republic of China nuclear test and atmospheric krypton-85 increased, following the trend beginning in 1960, due to increased use of nuclear technology. Strontium-90 in milk and cesium-137 in meat samples continued the slow decline as observed for the last several years.

Black, S.C.; Grossman, R.F.; Mullen, A.A.; Potter, G.D.; Smith, D.D.; Hopper, J.L. (comps.)

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Acoustic monitoring and signature analysis in nuclear and fossil energy generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic monitoring and analysis in nuclear and fossil energy plants has been accompanied by transducer development for the hot environment. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires acoustic monitoring systems on nuclear reactors for detecting potential failures. Accelerometers are attached at critical points and their output is automatically analyzed to give warnings of loose parts or excessive vibration. In addition to providing a warning the system can monitor arrival time to be used for fault location. For use as a potential boiling detector of breeder reactors the acoustic signature of the sodium coolant boiling has been compared with background noise level. High temperature sodium?immersible microphones and waveguides for smooth energy transfer were developed for this investigation. High?temperature acoustic sensors have been used in a coal gasification plant. The presence of solids in a steam?char line has been automatically determined using passive monitoring of relative sound intensities of different frequency bands.

Henry B. Karplus

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the radiological burden due to the battle-field use of circa 400 tons of depleted-uranium munitions in Iraq (and of about 40 tons in Yugoslavia) is comparable to that arising from the hypothetical battle-field use of more than 600 kt (respectively 60 kt) of high-explosive equivalent pure-fusion fourth-generation nuclear weapons. Despite the limited knowledge openly available on existing and future nuclear weapons, there is sufficient published information on their physical principles and radiological effects to make such a comparison. In fact, it is shown that this comparison can be made with very simple and convincing arguments so that the main technical conclusions of the paper are undisputable -- although it would be worthwhile to supplement the hand calculations presented in the paper by more detailed computer simulations in order to consolidate the conclusions and refute any possible objections.

Gsponer, A; Vitale, B; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Vitale, Bruno

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Circuitry is described for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrument to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on. 1 figures.

Brown, R.A.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Circuitry for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrut to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on.

Brown, Roger A. (Amsterdam, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation.

Ralph E.H. Sims; Hans-Holger Rogner; Ken Gregory

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

High Repetition Rate, LINAC-based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2009 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF), which is possible for nuclei with atomic numbers greater than helium (Z=2), occurs when a nuclear level is excited by resonant absorption of a photon and subsequently decays by reemission of a photon. The excited nuclear states can become readily populated, provided the incident photonís energy is within the Doppler-broadened width of the energy level being excited. Utilizing continuous energy photon spectra, as is characteristic of a bremsstrahlung photon beam, as the inspection source, ensures that at least some fraction of the impinging beam will contribute to the population of the excited energy levels in the material of interest. Upon de-excitation, either to the ground state or to a lower-energy excited state, the emitted fluorescence photonís energy will correspond to the energy difference between the excited state and the state to which it decays. As each isotope inherently contains unique nuclear energy levels, the NRF states for each isotope are also unique. By exploiting this phenomenon, NRF photon detection provides a well-defined signature for identifying the presence of individual nuclear species. This report summarizes the second year (Fiscal Year [FY] 2009) of a collaborative research effort between Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho State Universityís Idaho Accelerator Center, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This effort focused on continuing to assess and optimize NRF-based detection techniques utilizing a slightly modified, commercially available, pulsed medical electron accelerator.

Mathew Kinlaw; Scott Watson; James Johnson; Alan Hunt; Heather Seipel; Edward Reedy

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Studies of nuclear processes; Progress report, 1 September 1992--31 August 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results for the period 1 Sep 92 through 31 Aug 93 are presented in nearly a hundred brief papers, some of which present new but preliminary data. Activities reported may be grouped as follows: Fundamental symmetries in the nucleus (parity-mixing measurements, time reversal invariance measurements, signatures of quantum chaos in nuclei), Internucleon reactions (neutron -- proton interactions, the neutron -- neutron scattering length, reactions between deuterons and very light nuclei), Dynamics of very light nuclei (measurements of D states of very light nuclei by transfer reactions, nuclear reactions between very light nuclei, radiative capture reactions with polarized sources), The many-nucleon problem (nuclear astrophysics, high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation, the nuclear mean field: Dispersive relations and nucleon scattering, configuration mixing in {sup 56}Co and {sup 46}Sc using (d,{alpha}) reactions, radiative capture studies, high energy resolution resonance studies at 100--400 keV, nuclear data evaluation for A=3--20), Nuclear instruments and methods (FN tandem accelerator operation, KN accelerator operation and maintenance, atomic beam polarized ion source, development of techniques for determining the concentration of SF{sub 6} in the accelerator insulating gas mixture, production of beams and targets, detector systems, updating of TeX, Psprint, and associated programs on the VAX cluster), and Educational Activities.

Ludwig, E.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development, Demonstration, and Field Testing of Enterprise-Wide Distributed Generation Energy Management System: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details progress on subcontract NAD-1-30605-1 between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and RealEnergy (RE), the purpose of which is to describe RE's approach to the challenges it faces in the implementation of a nationwide fleet of clean cogeneration systems to serve contemporary energy markets. The Phase 2 report covers: utility tariff risk and its impact on market development; the effect on incentives on distributed energy markets; the regulatory effectiveness of interconnection in California; a survey of practical field interconnection issues; trend analysis for on-site generation; performance of dispatch systems; and information design hierarchy for combined heat and power.

Greenberg, S.; Cooley, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

Nuclear safeguards research and development. Program status report, October 1980-January 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the status of the Nuclear Safeguards Research and Development Program pursued by the Energy, Chemistry-Materials Science, and Operational Security/Safeguards Divisions of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics include nondestructive assay technology development and applications, international safeguards systems. Also discussed are training courses, technology transfer, analytical chemistry methods for fissionable materials safeguards, the Department of Energy Computer Security Technical Center, and operational security.

Henry, C.N. (comp.)

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Outlook on Generation IV Nuclear Systems and Related Materials R&D Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Preoccupations of energy security and concerns about of the role that future reactors should play for minimizing long-lived radioactive ... that gives first priority to developing a new generation of fast neutron...

F. Carrť; C. Renault; P. Anzieu; P. BrossardÖ

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Integrated data base report--1996: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Inventories of most of these materials are reported as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1996, which is September 30, 1996. Commercial SNF and commercial uranium mill tailings inventories are reported on an end-of-calendar year (CY) basis. All SNF and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are SNF, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through FY 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

SRNL CRP progress report [Development of Melt Processed Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Immobilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multiphase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing.

Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

385

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health and Safety Aspects of Pro- posed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-FuelHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Evaluation of the electromagnetic effects due to direct lighting to nuclear explosive areas at Pantex. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the effort to quantify the electromagnetic environments in the nuclear explosive areas at Pantex due to direct lightning. The fundamental measure of the threat to nuclear safety is assumed to be the maximum voltage between any two points in an assembly area, which is then available for producing arcing or for driving current into critical subsystems of a nuclear weapon. This maximum voltage has been computed with simple analytical models and with three-dimensional finite-difference computer codes.

Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events.

388

Los Alamos National Laboratory new generation standard nuclear material storage container - the SAVY4000 design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based standard involving storage of nuclear material (RD003). This RD003 requirements document has sense been updated to reflect requirements as identified with recently issued DOE M 441.1-1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual'. The new packaging manual was issued at the encouragement of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board with a clear directive for protecting the worker from exposure due to loss of containment of stored materials. The Manual specifies a detailed and all inclusive approach to achieve a high level of protection; from package design & performance requirements, design life determinations of limited life components, authorized contents evaluations, and surveillance/maintenance to ensure in use package integrity over time. Materials in scope involve those stored outside an approved engineered-contamination barrier that would result in a worker exposure of in excess of 5 rem Committed Effective Does Equivalent (CEDE). Key aspects of meeting the challenge as developed around the SAVY-3000 vented storage container design will be discussed. Design performance and acceptance criteria against the manual, bounding conditions as established that the user must ensure are met to authorize contents in the package (based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide), interface as a safety class system within the facility under the LANL plutonium facility DSA, design life determinations for limited life components, and a sense of design specific surveillance program implementation as LANL moves forward into production and use of the SAVY-3000 will all be addressed. The SAVY-3000 is intended as a work horse package for the DOE complex as a vented storage container primarily for plutonium in solid form.

Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nuclear physics research at the University of Richmond. Progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarized in this report is the progress achieved during the period from November 1, 1994 to October 31, 1995. The experimental work described in this report is in electromagnetic and heavy-ion nuclear physics. The effort in electromagnetic nuclear physics is in preparation for the research program at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and is focused on the construction and use of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The heavy-ion experiments were performed at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility and SUNY, Stony Brook. The physics interests driving these efforts at CEBAF are in the study of the structure, interactions, and nuclear-medium modifications of mesons and baryons. This year, an extension of the experiment to measure the magnetic form factor of the neutron was approved by the CEBAF Program Advisory Committee Nine (PAC9) for beam at 6 GeV. The authors also submitted updates to PAC9 on the experiments to measure inclusive {eta} photoproduction in nuclei and electroproduction of the {Lambda}, {Lambda}*(1520), and f{sub 0}(975). In addition to these experiments, the authors collaborated on a proposal to measure rare radiative decays of the {phi} meson which was also approved by PAC9. Their contributions to the construction of the CLAS include the development of the drift-chamber gas system, drift-chamber software, and controls software. Major has been leading the effort in the construction of the gas system. In the last year, the Hall B gas shed was constructed and the installation of the gas system components built at the University of Richmond has begun. Over the last six years, the efforts in low-energy heavy-ion physics have decreased due to the change in focus to electromagnetic nuclear physics at CEBAF. Most of the heavy-ion work is completed and there are now new experiments planned. Included in this report are two papers resulting from collaborations on heavy-ion experiments.

Vineyard, M.F.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Major, R.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

New technology for purging the steam generators of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technology for removal of undissolved impurities from a horizontal steam generator using purge water is developed on the basis of a theoretical analysis. A purge with a maximal flow rate is drawn off from the zone with the highest accumulation of sludge in the lower part of the steam generator after the main circulation pump of the corresponding loop is shut off and the temperatures of the heat transfer medium at the inlet and outlet of the steam generator have equilibrated. An improved purge configuration is used for this technology; it employs shutoff and regulator valves, periodic purge lines separated by a cutoff fixture, and a D{sub y} 100 drain union as a connector for the periodic purge. Field tests show that the efficiency of this technology for sludge removal by purge water is several times that for the standard method.

Budko, I. O.; Kutdjusov, Yu. F.; Gorburov, V. I. [Scientific-Research Center for Energy Technology 'NICE Centrenergo' (Russian Federation); Rjasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'The All-Rissia Nuklear Power Engineering Research and Development Institute' (VNIIAM) (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Transmutation of Nuclear Waste in the Two-Zone Subcritical System Driven by High- Intensity Neutron Generator - 12098  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main problems of transmutation of high-level radioactive waste (minor actinides and long-lived fission products) are considered in our work. The range of radioactive waste of nuclear power is analyzed. The conditions under which the transmutation of radioactive waste will be most effective are analyzed too. The modeling results of a transmutation of the main radioactive isotopes are presented and discussed. The transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products are modeled in our work (minor actinides - Np-237, Am-241, Am-242, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245; long-lived fission products - I-129, Tc-99). The two-zone subcritical system is calculated with help of different neutron-physical codes (MCNP, Scale, Montebarn, Origen). The ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library used in above calculations. Thus, radioactive wastes can be divided into two main groups that need to be transmuted. The minor actinides form the first group and the long-lived fission products form the second one. For the purpose of effective transmutation these isotopes must be extracted from the spent nuclear fuel with the help of either PUREX technology or pyrometallurgical technology. The two-zone reactor system with fast and thermal regions is more effective for nuclear waste transmutation than the one-zone reactor. Modeling results show that nearly all radioactive wastes can be transmuted in the two-zone subcritical system driven by a high-intensity neutron generator with the external neutron source strength of 1.10{sup 13} n/sec. Obviously, transmutation rate will increase with a rise of the external neutron source strength. From the results above we can also see that the initial loading of radioactive isotopes into the reactor system should exceed by mass those isotopes that are finally produced. (authors)

Babenko, V.O. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Metrolohichna str. 14-b, Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine); Gulik, V.I.; Pavlovych, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, pr. Nauky 47, Kyiv, 03680 (Ukraine)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Evaluation Metrics for Intermediate Heat Exchangers for Next Generation Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the United States with abundant, clean, and secure energy as initiated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct; Public Law 109-58,2005). The NGNP Project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and/or high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications.

Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Nolan Anderson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

he purpose of this DOE Standard is to establish guidance for the preparation and review of hazard categorization and accident analyses techniques as required in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

1997-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

394

REPORT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPORT REPORT of the INFRASTRUCTURE TASK FORCE of the DOE NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE January 16, 2003 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On October 1, 2002 the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee was asked to provide specific, focused updates to its Nuclear Science and Technology Infrastructure Roadmap and review the specific issues at the DOE key nuclear energy research and development (R&D) laboratories. This activity was assigned to a five-member Infrastructure Task Force (ITF). After receiving extensive written materials from DOE, the Idaho Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), on November 6-8, 2002 the ITF visited the Idaho site and received briefings and tours of the INEEL and ANL-W facilities. INEEL and

395

Nuclear-powered satellite studies. Final report, October 1, 1978-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress achieved during the period October 1, 1978 to March 31, 1980, on US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-76ET33013.M003 is reported. Discussions of several pertinent aspects are included, e.g., schedule, personnel, and technology developments. The reporting period represents the final 18 months of activities of a project which was designed to provide continuing support in the area of nuclear space power technology. Important results have been obtained and communicated to the scientific community via publications and presentations. Project personnel have participated in point design efforts, a NASA Space Power Committee, and periodically provided support to Department of Energy activities as the need arose. This final report is intended to summarize activities over the life of the project.

Kaplan, M.H.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Activation cross sections of $\\alpha$-particle induced nuclear reactions on hafnium and deuteron induced nuclear reaction on tantalum: production of $^{178}$W/$^{178m}$Ta generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of $^{178m}$Ta through $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,xn)$^{178}$W-$^{178m}$Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,x)$^{179,177,176,175}$W, $^{183,182,178g,177,176,175}$Ta, $^{179m,177m,175}$Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and $\\gamma$-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the $^{nat}$Ta(d,xn)$^{178}$W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ($^3$He,x)) production routes for $^{178}$W.

TŠrk'anyi, F; Ditrůi, F; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V; Uddin, M S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

398

Summary Report of the INL-JISEA Workshop on Nuclear Hybrud Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid energy systems utilize two or more energy resources as inputs to two or more physically coupled subsystems to produce one or more energy commodities as outputs. Nuclear hybrid energy systems can be used to provide load-following electrical power to match diurnal to seasonal-scale changes in power demand or to compensate for the variability of renewable wind or solar generation. To maintain economical, full rate operation of the nuclear reactor, its thermal energy available when power demand is low could be diverted into making synthetic vehicle fuels of various types. The Institute for Nuclear Energy Science and Technology (INEST) and the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) co-sponsored an international workshop to identify research topics important in advancing the potential use of hybrid systems with a specific focus on nuclear-renewable hybrid systems. The workshop included presentations ranging from energy challenges and research and development (R&D) directions being pursued by nations to multiple options for hybrid systems. Those options include one that is being commercialized to other opportunities and analysis results quantifying them. The workshop also involved two breakout sessions - one focused on thermal energy management issues especially at unit-operation scale and the second focused on system operations issues including system controls, regulatory issues, technical and economic analysis, and market challenges. A discussion involving the full group focused on more general issues such as societal involvement and participation. Key criteria for selecting hybrid energy system projects and metrics for comparing them were also identified by the full group. The workshop's findings are being used initially by INEST to define topics for a research preproposal solicitation.

Mark Antkowiak; Richard Boardman; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Robert Cherry; Mark Ruth

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report of the Nuclear Manpower Study Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anticipated personnel needs of the nuclear power industry have varied widely in recent years, in response to both increasing regulatory requirements and declining orders for new plants. Recent employment patterns in the nuclear energy field, with their fluctuations, resemble those of defense industries more than those traditionally associated with electric utilities. Reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 by industry and regulators have increased the demand for trained and experienced personnel, causing salaries to rise. Industry, for example, has established several advisory organizations like the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). At the same time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed many new construction and operating requirements in an effort to take advantage of lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident and to respond to the perceived public interest in better regulation of nuclear power. Thus, at present, utilities, architect-engineer firms, reactor vendors, and organizations in the nuclear development community have heavy workloads.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The design and construction of a low cost Van de Graaff generator for nuclear research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ Van Atta, and Do Lo Nor thrupp "A Progress Report on the High Voltage Production of Positive Icn and 81 I;. Et hg, " P~hl 1 5II i, 57 5634, II h, 1948, Vanl AttaE Lo 0 ~ 8 Do Lo Eorthrup3 C ~ M ~ Van Atta, and R, J, Van de Graaff3 "The Des~A...

Riggs, James Willborn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work carried out under Task 2, Concept Definition and Analysis, Task 3, Preliminary R&D and Task 4, Commercial Generating Plant Design, under Contract AC22-92PC91155, ``Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System`` between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of: >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and Particulates {le}25% NSPS; cost {ge}65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. A survey of currently available high temperature alloys has been completed and some of their high temperature properties are shown for comparison. Several of the most promising candidates will be selected for testing to determine corrosion resistance and high temperature strength. The corrosion resistance testing of candidate refractory coatings is continuing and some of the recent results are presented. This effort will provide important design information that will ultimately establish the operating ranges of the HITAF.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on analysis and evaluation of operational data - 1987: Power reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1987. The report is published in two volumes. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 1, covers Power Reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry, with comments regarding the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from Licensee Event Reports, the NRC's Operations Center, and Diagnostic Evaluations. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 2, covers Nonreactors and presents a review of the nonreactors events and misadministration reports that were reported in 1987 and a brief synopsis of AEOD studies published in 1987. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD Reports issued for 1980-1987.

none,

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

Bud'ko, I. O. [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation)] [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. G. [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)] [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, that can help achieve national energy conservation goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. A study of trends reveals that the need for DSG monitoring and control equipment by 1990 to 2000 will be great, measured in tens of thousands. Criteria for assessing DSG integration have been defined and indicate that economic and institutional as well as technical and other factors must be included. The principal emphasis in this report is on the functional requirements for DSG monitoring and control in six major categories. Twenty-four functional requirements have been prepared under these six categories and serve to indicate how to integrate the DSGs with the distribution and other portions of the electric utility system. The results indicate that there are no fundamental technical obstacles to prevent the connection of dispersed storage and generation to the distribution system. However, a communication system of some sophistication will be required to integrate the distribution system and the dispersed generation sources for effective control. The large-size span of generators from 10 kW to 30 MW means that a variety of remote monitoring and control may be required. The results show that an increased effort is required to develop demonstration equipment to perform the DSG monitoring and control functions and to acquire experience with this equipment in the utility distribution environment.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nuclear power can reduce emissions and maintain a strong economy: Rating Australiaís optimal future electricity-generation mix by technologies and policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Legal barriers currently prohibit nuclear power for electricity generation in Australia. For this reason, published future electricity scenarios aimed at policy makers for this country have not seriously considered a full mix of energy options. Here we addressed this deficiency by comparing the life-cycle sustainability of published scenarios using multi-criteria decision-making analysis, and modeling the optimized future electricity mix using a genetic algorithm. The published ĎCSIRO e-futureí scenario under its default condition (excluding nuclear) has the largest aggregate negative environmental and economic outcomes (score†=†4.51 out of 8), followed by the Australian Energy Market Operatorís 100% renewable energy scenario (4.16) and the Greenpeace scenario (3.97). The e-future projection with maximum nuclear-power penetration allowed yields the lowest negative impacts (1.46). After modeling possible future electricity mixes including or excluding nuclear power, the weighted criteria recommended an optimized scenario mix where nuclear power generated >40% of total electricity. The life-cycle greenhouse-gas emissions of the optimization scenarios including nuclear power were nuclear power is an effective and logical option for the environmental and economic sustainability of a future electricity network in Australia.

Sanghyun Hong; Corey J.A. Bradshaw; Barry W. Brook

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 7, Estimate data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment III-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VII - Estimate Data, contains the project cost estimate information.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

Michael W. Patterson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

he students, faculty, and research staff of the MIT Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering (NSE) generate, control, and apply nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T he students, faculty, and research staff of the MIT Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering and technology. Professor Richard K. Lester Head, Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering rklester contact Professor Richard K. Lester, Head Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering rklester

Polz, Martin

411

Improvements needed in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Inspector and Auditor. Report to the Congress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) carry out its responsibilities, a special office of Inspector and Auditor was created in April 1975 to independently review and appraise all NRC operations. This office, in essence, was to provide the Commissioners with oversight over NRC programs and activities and recommend corrective actions. GAO found that the Office of Inspector and Auditor has not been using proven management techniques in scheduling and carrying out its work. These techniques range from systematic planning and prioritization to timely and consistent followup on work. If such techniques were used, it would result in a more orderly management approach and lead to higher quality reports and a better use of staff resources. The independence of the Office of Inspector and Auditor needs to be strengthened. In GAO's view, this only may be possible if NRC accepts and implements the recommendations contained in this report. GAO also suggests that Congress consider establishing a statutory Inspector General office at the NRC. Such an office could help ensure that the Congress and the Commissioners receive objective information on problems within the Commission and enhance public trust in the regulation of commercial nuclear power.

Not Available

1981-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

412

Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future: Report to the Secretary of Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preamble The Blue Ribbon Commission on Americaís Nuclear Future (BRC) was formed by the Secretary of Energy at the request of the President to conduct a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle and recommend a new strategy. It was co-chaired by Rep. Lee H. Hamilton and Gen. Brent Scowcroft. Other Commissioners are Mr. Mark H. Ayers, the Hon. Vicky A. Bailey, Dr. Albert Carnesale, Sen. Pete Domenici, Ms. Susan Eisenhower, Sen. Chuck Hagel, Mr. Jonathan Lash, Dr. Allison M. Macfarlane, Dr. Richard A. Meserve, Dr. Ernest J. Moniz, Dr. Per Peterson, Mr. John Rowe, and Rep. Phil Sharp. The Commission and its subcommittees met more than two dozen times between March 2010 and January 2012 to hear testimony from experts and stakeholders, to visit nuclear waste management facilities in the United States and abroad, and to discuss the issues identified in its Charter. Additionally, in September and October 2011, the Commission held five public meetings, in different regions of the country, to hear feedback on its draft report. A wide variety of organizations, interest groups, and individuals provided input to the Commission at these meetings and through the submission of written materials. Copies of all of these submissions, along with records and transcripts of past meetings, are available at the BRC website (www.brc.gov). This report highlights the Commissionís findings and conclusions and presents recommendations for consideration by the Administration and Congress, as well as interested state, tribal and local governments, other stakeholders, and the public.

none,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Progerams Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A&M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. Other university/organizations represented: University of California in LA, Stanford University, and the IAEA. Four of the students that completed this intensive course participated in a 2-month internship at LLNL. The conclusions of the two pilot courses and internships was a NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The Poster sessions were designed to provide a forum for sharing the results of their summer projects and providing experience in presenting their work to a varied audience of students, faculty and laboratory staff. The success of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of their two pilot efforts in the coming years.

Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G; Essner, J; Dougan, A; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokova, E; Wehling, F

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

Monthly/Annual Energy Review - nuclear section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Monthly and latest annual statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448.000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate. Of the estimated solids, the hazardous wastes (e.g., electrical vehicle batteries and light tubes) were about 2% of the total volumes. The generation of solid HE residues varied uniformly with the HE production rates and ranged from about 20% of the total solids volume for the 100 HE units/yr case to about 60% for the 2000 units/yr case. The HE machining operations generated 60 to 80% of the total solid HE residues, depending on the assumed production rate, and were also the sources of the most concentrated HE residues.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

Provenzano, J.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Report of tritide study at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a study of sample counting results for wipes from routine surface area monitoring conducted at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center (RNGPDC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The study was initiated in November 2006, with two samples suspected of containing erbium tritide, after some samples were found to exhibit higher tritium counting rates upon recount at a later time. The main goal of the study was to determine whether the current practice of analyzing tritium wipe samples once, within a few days of sample collection, is adequate to accurately quantify the amount of tritium on the sample when tritides may be present. Recommendations are made toward routine recounting of vials suspected of containing particulate forms of tritium.

Burkhart, Robert; Coffey, Jaime

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications SHARE Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications...

419

Audit Report - Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories, OAS-M-13-02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cooperative Research and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories OAS-M-13-02 March 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 15, 2013 MEMO MEMORANDUM FOR THE ACTING ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories" BACKGROUND The dissemination of technology developed by the Department of Energy's national laboratories to the general science community and the public, is one of the Department's top priorities. In

420

TOPICAL REPORT ON ACTINIDE-ONLY BURNUP CREDIT FOR PWR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly selection prior to loading. A measurement of the average assembly burnup is required and that measurement must be within 10% of the utility burnup record for the assembly to be accepted. The measurement device must be accurate to within 10%. Each step is described in detail for use with any computer code system and is then demonstrated with the SCALE 4.2 computer code package using 27BURNUPLIB cross sections.

DOE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending March 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report the first fabrication and evaluation of an activated carbon-based osmium-194/iridium-194 generator system is described. Iridium-194 (t{sub {1/2}} = 19.2 h) decays by {Beta}{sup {minus}} emission (E{sub max} = 2.24 MeV) and is a potential candidate for radioimmunotherapy. An important characteristic is availability of {sup 194}Ir from decay of reactor-produced {sup 194}Os (t{sub {1/2}} = 6 y). A novel gas thermochromatographic method was developed for the one step conversion of metallic Os to OsO{sub 4} and subsequent separation and purification of OsO{sub 4}, which was then converted to the K{sub 2}OsCl{sub 6} for generator loading. The yield and the elution profile of carrier-free {sup 194}Ir, and {sup 194}Os breakthrough were determined for a prototype generator which was evaluated over a 10 month-period.l During this period several agents were also supplied to Medical Cooperative investigators, including iodine-123-labelled and iodine-125-labelled fatty acid analogues for studies at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. In addition, gold-198 and tungsten-188/-rhenium-188 generators were shipped to various investigators for therapeutic studies involving tumor-specific antibodies. 19 refs., 3 figs.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Allred, J.F.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Nuclear research with heavy ions. Annual progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics; studies of light-charged-particle emission from fission and er reactions in the system 344-MeV{sup 28}Si+{sup 121}Sb {yields} {sup 149}Tb; the role of reversed kinematics and double kinematic solutions in nuclear reactions studies; improvements in interactive data analysis and graphical representations; studies of the reaction 856-MeV {sup 98}Mo + {sup 51}V{yields}{sup 149}Tb(E*=224-MeV): emission of intermediate-mass fragments; particle-particle correlations in compound nucleus reactions: preliminary consideration of lifetime estimates from small angle data; light particle emission studies using a new scintillator array; statistical evaporation calculations: developments with the computer codes LILITA-N90 and CASCADE; star collaboration studies: simulations for the conceptual design of the STAR detector system at RHIC; asymmetric fission of 149Tb* from the finite-range, rotating-liquid-drop model: mean total kinetic energies for binary fragmentation; and charged-particle evaporation from hot composite nuclei: evidence over a broad z range for distortions from cold nuclear profiles.

Kaplan, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of LASL are presented. The three programs involved are: general-purpose heat source development; space nuclear safety; and fuels program. Three impact tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of a high temperature reentry pulse and the use of CBCF on impact performance. Additionally, two /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ pellets were encapsulated in Ir-0.3% W for impact testing. Results of the clad development test and vent testing are noted. Results of the environmental tests are summarized. Progress on the Stirling isotope power systems test and the status of the improved MHW tests are indicated. The examination of the impact failure of the iridium shell of MHFT-65 at a fuel pass-through continued. A test plan was written for vibration testing of the assembled light-weight radioisotopic heater unit. Progress on fuel processing is reported.

Maraman, W.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Analys av skillnader mellan internationell och svensk rapportering av intršffade hšndelser pŚ kšrnkraftverk; Analysis of differences between international and Swedish reporting of events at nuclear power plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Report of diploma work conducted at the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) as part of the bachelors program in Nuclear Engineering at Uppsala University.Ö (more)

Strandman, Lennart

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-4, Safety Culture: A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group, International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-4, Safety Culture: A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group, International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, 1991

427

Theoretical nuclear physics. Progress report, October 1, 1991--August 1, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: Exact 1-loop vacuum polarization effects in 1 + 1 dimensional QHD; exact 1-fermion loop contributions in 1 + 1 dimensional solitons; exact scalar 1-loop contributions in 1 + 3 dimensions; exact vacuum calculations in a hyper-spherical basis; relativistic nuclear matter with self- consistent correlation energy; consistent RHA-RPA for finite nuclei; transverse response functions in the {triangle}-resonance region; hadronic matter in a nontopological soliton model; scalar and vector contributions to {bar p}p {yields} {bar {Lambda} {Lambda}} reaction; 0+ and 2+ strengths in pion double-charge exchange to double giant-dipole resonances; and nucleons in a hybrid sigma model including a quantized pion field.

Rost, E.; Shephard, J.R.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA GRANT: RESEARCH IN THEORETICAL NUCLEAR AND NEUTRINO PHYSICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main focus of the research supported by the nuclear theory grant DE-FG02-04ER41319 was on studying parton dynamics in high-energy heavy ion collisions, perturbative approach to charm production and its contribution to atmospheric neutrinos, application of AdS/CFT approach to QCD, neutrino signals of dark mattter annihilation in the Sun and on novel processes that take place in dense stellar medium and their role in stellar collapse, in particular the effect of new neutrino interactions on neutrino flavor conversion in Supernovae. In this document we present final technical report on projects completed under the DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER41319.

SARCEVIC, INA

2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Policy considerations affecting nuclear-forces modernization. Technical report, 1 January 1987-15 February 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an assessment of security perspectives, key defense programs and emerging procurement/weapons modernization priorities in six NATO-European countries -the Federal Republic of Germany, France, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Italy, and Belgium. Included is a detailed analysis of the various national perspectives held in each country on issues related to nuclear force acquisition and modernization, conventional force restructuring, and East-West arms control (especially with respect to the CFE talks and potential SNF negotiations). The overall objective of this study is to provide the DoD Acquisition and Policy communities with an up-to-date examination of key political trends and defense policy debates in critical NATO-European countries, with special attention paid to budgetary decisions, military hardware initiatives, and arms control proposals that may impact directly upon vital U.S. (and NATO) defense programs.

Davis, J.K.; Perry, C.M.; Pfaltzgraff, R.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

(Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

Haxton, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nuclear chemistry progress report, Oregon State University. August 1, 1995--August 1, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, the authors summarize the highlights of the work done between August 1, 1995, and August 1, 1996. The work reported herein is the result of a collaborative effort between the nuclear chemists at Oregon State University and many other individuals and research groups. Each project discussed was the result of a joint effort of the groups, interchanging roles in data acquisition and analysis. The work described is part of a project involving the study of low energy (< 10 MeV/nucleon), and intermediate energy (10--100 MeV/nucleon) heavy ion reactions. Their work in the low energy regime included: the first US studies of fusion utilizing radioactive beams. Half of their effort was spent in the study of intermediate energy nuclear collisions. Among the accomplishments were: the establishment of a systematics of angular momentum transfer in peripheral collisions; completion of the first portion of high resolution studies of heavy residue formation in reactions induced by 20 MeV/nucleon {sup 197}Au utilizing the MSU A1200 separator; synthesis of several new neutron-deficient nuclides in reactions of 20 MeV/nucleon {sup 197}Au with heavy targets (Ti, Zr and Au); their participation in exclusive studies of heavy residue formation in the reaction of 35 MeV/nucleon {sup 86}Kr with {sup 197}Au in which it was found that the residues had large associated particle multiplicities indicating their formation in highly dissipative collisions, and that particle emission leading to residue formation relative to fission was favored as the dissipated energy increased.

Loveland, W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. We prepared volume estimates by applying this method to actual past Pantex plant HE production operations. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448,000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nuclear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Nuclear Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 82. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity Table 96. Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Table 97. Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, nuclear power capacity increases from 101.0 gigawatts in 2009 to 110.5 gigawatts in 2035 (Figure 82), including 3.8 gigawatts of expansion at existing plants and 6.3 gigawatts of new capacity. The new capacity includes completion of a second unit at the Watts Bar site, where construction on a partially completed plant has

434

Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project entitled, ďUncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV ReactorsĒ, was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A&M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle (FC) Subcommittee of NEAC met February 7-8, 2012 in Washington (Drs. Hoffmann and Juzaitis were unable to attend). While the meeting was originally scheduled to occur after the submission of the Presidentís FY 2013 budget, the submission was delayed a week; thus, we could have no discussion on balance in the NE program. The Agenda is attached as Appendix A. The main focus of the meeting was on accident tolerant fuels, an important post Fukushima issue, and on issues related to the report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Americaís Nuclear Future (BRC) as related to the responsibility for used fuel disposal which was assigned to the FC program with the end of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. In addition we heard an update on the systems study program which is aimed at helping chose the best options for advanced reactors, and possible new study on separation and waste form relevance to used fuel disposal (these two items are only discussed in this section of the report).

Richter, Burton; Chu, Margaret; Hoffman, Darleane; Juzaitis, Ray; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Omberg, Ronald P.; Rempe, Joy L.; Warin, Dominique

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

436

Microsoft Word - 911160_0 CPA Phase 1 report _FINAL__rel.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Revision 0 ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Final Report - NGNP Core Performance Analysis, Phase 1 Prepared by General...

437

Independent Oversight Activity Report, National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office- March 10-14, 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Contractor Transition Activities for the National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office [IAR-NPO-2014-03-10

438

Theoretical nuclear physics: Final report for period February 1, 1984 to January 31, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear theory at the University of Colorado emphasizes the study of nuclear structure through the use of nuclear reactions. Recent efforts have been focussed on the role of relativistic models in nucleon-nucleus scattering and reactions. Further work delves into the underlying bases of the reaction theory itself.

Rost, E.; Kunz, P.D.

1987-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

440

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generation reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

442

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

443

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

444

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

445

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

446

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

447

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

448

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

449

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

450

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

451

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

452

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

453

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

454

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

455

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

456

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

457

Investing in the next generation: The Office of Nuclear Energy Issues Requests for Scholarship and Fellowship Applications.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) announced two new Requests for Applications (RFAs) for the Integrated University Program (IUP).

458

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to the Minutes for the to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting September 30 to October 1, 2002 MEMORANDUM To: Chairman, Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) From: Thomas B. Cochran, Member of NERAC Date: October 16, 2002 Subject: "A Technology Roadmap on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems," a report of the NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning Please include these additional remarks in your transmittal of the subject report to DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. Perhaps the greatest security threat to the United States today, and of paramount concern to American citizens since September 11, 2001, is that nuclear weapon- usable materials will be stolen, seized, or secretly diverted from nuclear facilities and then used by

459

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary Research and Development, and Task 4, Commercial Generating Plant Design, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, {open_quotes}Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System{close_quotes} between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates {le} 25% NSPS; cost {ge} 65% of heat input; and all solid wastes benign. The report discusses progress in cycle analysis, chemical reactor modeling, ash deposition rate calculations for HITAF (high temperature advanced furnace) convective air heater, air heater materials, and deposit initiation and growth on ceramic substrates.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

ENVIRONMENTAL IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1975 Nonitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT(26-1)-539 for the U . S . ENERGY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION EMSL-LV-5 39-4 May 1976 ENVIRONMENTAL 14ONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December I975 Monitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of

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461

Summary and bibliography of safety-related events at boiling-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a bibliography that contains 100-word abstracts of event reports submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at boiling-water-reactor nuclear power plants in 1980. The 1547 abstracts included on microfiche in this bibliography describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies that were experienced at the facilities. These abstracts are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Full-size keyword and permuted-title indexes to facilitate location of individual abstracts are provided following the text. Tables that summarize the information contained in the bibliography are also provided. The information in the tables includes a listing of the equipment items involved in the reported events and the associated number of reports for each item. Similar information is given for the various kinds of instrumentation and systems, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction).

McCormack, K.E.; Gallaher, R.B.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Summary and bibliography of safety-related events at pressurized-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the data contained in reports submitted by licensees to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning safety-related operational events that occurred at pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants in 1979. A bibliography containing 100-word abstracts of the event reports is included. The 2064 abstracts included in the bibliography describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies experienced at the facilities. They are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Keyword and permuted-title indexes are provided to facilitate location of the abstracts of interest. Tables summarizing the information contained in the bibliography are also presented and discussed. Information listed in the tables includes instrument failures, equipment failures, system failures, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction). Some of the more interesting events that occurred during the year are reviewed in detail. 33 refs.

Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Solid radioactive waste management facility design for managing CANDU{sup R} 600 MW nuclear generating station re-tube/refurbishment Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main design features of the re-tube canisters, waste handling equipment and waste containers designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL{sup R}) and implemented in support of the re-tube/refurbishment activities for Candu 600 MW nuclear generating stations are described in this paper. The re-tube/refurbishment waste characterization and the waste management principles, which form the basis of the design activities, are also briefly outlined. (authors)

Pontikakis, N.; Hopkins, J.; Scott, D.; Bajaj, V.; Nosella, L. [AECL, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrity monitoring and flaw diagnostics of flat beams and tubular structures was investigated in this research task using guided acoustic signals. A piezo-sensor suite was deployed to activate and collect Lamb wave signals that propagate along metallic specimens. The dispersion curves of Lamb waves along plate and tubular structures are generated through numerical analysis. Several advanced techniques were explored to extract representative features from acoustic time series. Among them, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a recently developed technique for the analysis of non-linear and transient signals. A moving window method was introduced to generate the local peak characters from acoustic time series, and a zooming window technique was developed to localize the structural flaws. The time-frequency analysis and pattern recognition techniques were combined for classifying structural defects in brass tubes. Several types of flaws in brass tubes were tested, both in the air and in water. The techniques also proved to be effective under background/process noise. A detailed theoretical analysis of Lamb wave propagation was performed and simulations were carried out using the finite element software system ABAQUS. This analytical study confirmed the behavior of the acoustic signals acquired from the experimental studies. The report presents the background the analysis of acoustic signals acquired from piezo-electric transducers for structural defect monitoring. A comparison of the use of time-frequency techniques, including the Hilbert-Huang transform, is presented. The report presents the theoretical study of Lamb wave propagation in flat beams and tubular structures, and the need for mode separation in order to effectively perform defect diagnosis. The results of an extensive experimental study of detection, location, and isolation of structural defects in flat aluminum beams and brass tubes are presented. The results of this research show the feasibility of on-line monitoring of small structural flaws by the use of transient and nonlinear acoustic signal analysis, and its implementation by the proper design of a piezo-electric transducer suite.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

465

Studies of fluctuation processes in nuclear collisions. Progress report, March 1, 1993--April 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress on grant No.FG05-89ER40530 during the period March 1, 1993 to April 30, 1994. By extending our previous work on the fluid dynamical treatment of the nuclear collective motion, we deduced from the Boltzmann-Langevin (BL) model a set of transport equations for N collective variables and calculated the associated transport coefficients. Work has also continued on investigating the relation between the BUU model and the BL model for the average evolution. The principle investigator spent a fruitful summer (1993) at LBL, where in collaboration with J. Raindrop, we developed a numerical method for simulating the stochastic evolution of the phase-space density near local equilibrium. Two papers have appeared in Phys. Rev. C and Nucl. Phys. A, two papers have been accepted for publication, both in Nucl. Phys. A, and two manuscripts have been submitted to Z. Phys. A for publication. Several seminars/contributed talks were given at various meetings and an invited talk was presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institution Hot and Dense Matter, Bodrum/Turkey.

Ayik, S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Nuclear Science & Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

467

Nuclear threat on the Korean peninsula: The present and the future. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forty years after they were divided by the Cold War, South and North Korea are closer to reunification than ever before. However, North Korea's nuclear weapons program might cause South Koreans to be much less sure about reunification. Today the Cold War is over, but the Korean peninsula is still divided into two Koreas despite the new era of reconciliation. Since December 1991 when a non-aggression pact was signed barring nuclear weapons, North Korea has pursued its nuclear weapon development. In March 1993, North Korea declared its intention to withdraw from the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, and has been refusing a full inspection of its nuclear program. North Korea's nuclear issue is an international issue today. This paper discusses 'what threat we have today' and 'what should be done in the future.'.

Kang, S.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

FY13 Summary Report on the Augmentation of the Spent Fuel Composition Dataset for Nuclear Forensics: SFCOMPO/NF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the FY13 efforts to enhance a dataset of spent nuclear fuel isotopic composition data for use in developing intrinsic signatures for nuclear forensics. A review and collection of data from the open literature was performed in FY10. In FY11, the Spent Fuel COMPOsition (SFCOMPO) excel-based dataset for nuclear forensics (NF), SFCOMPO/NF was established and measured data for graphite production reactors, Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) were added to the dataset and expanded to include a consistent set of data simulated by calculations. A test was performed to determine whether the SFCOMPO/NF dataset will be useful for the analysis and identification of reactor types from isotopic ratios observed in interdicted samples.

Brady Raap, Michaele C.; Lyons, Jennifer A.; Collins, Brian A.; Livingston, James V.

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Out of (South) Africa: Pretoria`s nuclear weapons experience. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary focus of this paper is the impact of key South African leaders on the successful developments and subsequent rollbacks of South Africa`s nuclear weapons capability. It highlights the key milestones in the development of South Africa`s nuclear weapon capability. It also relates how different groups within South Africa (scientists, politicians, military and technocrats) interacted to successfully produce South Africa`s nuclear deterrent. It emphasizes the pivotal influence of the senior political leadership to pursue nuclear rollback given the disadvantages of its nuclear means to achieve vital national interests. The conclusions drawn from flu`s effort are the South African nuclear program was an extreme response to its own identity Crisis. Nuclear weapons became a means to achieving a long term end of a closer affiliation with the West. A South Africa yearning to be identified as a Western nation and receive guarantees of its security rationalized the need for a nuclear deterrent. The deterrent was intended to draw in Western support to counter a feared total onslaught by Communist forces in the region. Two decades later, that same South Africa relinquished its nuclear deterrent and reformed its domestic policies to secure improved economic and political integration with the West.

Horton, R.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471