National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nuclear generation reported

  1. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J; Burchell, Timothy D; Corwin, William R; Fisher, Stephen Eugene; Forsberg, Charles W.; Morris, Robert Noel; Moses, David Lewis

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  3. Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    This report provides information and forecasts important to the domestic and world nuclear and uranium industries.

  4. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

  5. Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Final issue. This report provides information and forecasts important to the domestic and world nuclear and uranium industries. 1997 represents the most recent publication year.

  6. Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a

  7. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project 2009 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick; Jim Kinsey; Keith Perry; Dave Petti

    2010-05-01

    The mission of the NGNP Project is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy technology to the United States and other economies by demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not served by light water reactors (LWRs). Those markets typically use fossil fuels to fulfill their energy needs, and high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) like the NGNP can reduce this dependence and the resulting carbon footprint.

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J

    2008-03-01

    A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

  9. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the

  10. Site Selection & Characterization Status Report for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Holbrook

    2007-09-01

    In the near future, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will need to make important decisions regarding design and construction of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). One part of making these decisions is considering the potential environmental impacts that this facility may have, if constructed here at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides DOE decision makers with a process to systematically consider potential environmental consequences of agency decisions. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Title VI, Subtitel C, Section 644) states that the 'Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) shall have licensing and regulatory authority for any reactor authorized under this subtitle.' This stipulates that the NRC will license the NGNP for operation. The NRC NEPA Regulations (10 CFR Part 51) require tha thte NRC prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a permit to construct a nuclear power plant. The applicant is required to submit an Environmental report (ER) to aid the NRC in complying with NEPA.

  11. Effect of Hurricane Andrew on the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station from August 20--30, 1992. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebdon, F.J.

    1993-03-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Turkey Point Electrical Generating Station with sustained winds of 145 mph (233 km/h). This is the report of the team that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) jointly sponsored (1) to review the damage that the hurricane caused the nuclear units and the utility`s actions to prepare for the storm and recover from it, and (2) to compile lessons that might benefit other nuclear reactor facilities.

  12. Report on reports: nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darmstadter, J.

    1982-11-01

    A joint report by the Nuclear Energy Agency (of the OECD) and the International Energy Agency, nuclear energy prospects to 2000 surveys the factors shaping the future of nuclear power in the 24-country OECD grouping, 13 of whom were operating nuclear power plants as of the end of 1981. Among the factors reviewed are the long-term economic outlook and its effect on total energy consumption, the role of electricity within aggregate energy use, and the economic and policy determinants governing nuclear's future contribution to electric power capacity and generation. The way in which public confidence bears on the nuclear outlook is mentioned as one of the considerations in the policy process, but this is given rather short shrift for an issue which many feel to be at the heart of the present-day nuclear power dilemma. The report describes areas in which nuclear power could offer notable advantages: 1) competitive electricity costs; 2) resource adequacy; 3) security of supply; and 4) environmental integrity. (JMT)

  13. Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new...

  14. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

  15. NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

    1962-09-01

    A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

  16. NERI Final Project Report: On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System for Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Leonard J.; Jarrell, Donald B.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Meador, Richard J.; Sisk, Daniel R.; Hatley, Darrel D.; Watkins, Kenneth S.; Chai, Jangbom; Kim, Wooshik

    2003-06-20

    This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS, where a distributed suite of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures of types expected to be encountered in next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. The project employs state-of-the-art operational sensors, advanced stressor-based instrumentation, distributed computing, RF data network modules and signal processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and gives data that is used to provide prognostics capabilities.

  17. JPRS report, nuclear developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-03-28

    This report contains articles concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) China; (2) Japan, North Korea, South Korea; (3) Bulgaria; (4) Argentina, Brazil, Honduras; (5) India, Iran, Pakistan, Syria; (6) Soviet Union; and (7) France, Germany, Turkey.

  18. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, John Howard; Allen, Todd Randall; Hildebrandt, Philip Clay; Baker, Suzanne Hobbs

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  19. Utilities' Use of Nuclear Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Harold B.

    2002-09-30

    This PowerPoint presentation was given at the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee meeting, held 30 September 2002 in Arlington, VA.

  20. U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: August 25, 2016 Data for: June 2016 Next Release: September 2016 Year Capacity and Generation by State and Reactor 2016 P XLS 2015 P XLS 2014 P XLS 2013 XLS 2012 XLS 2011 XLS 2010 XLS 2009 XLS 2008 XLS 2007 XLS 2006 XLS 2005 XLS 2004 XLS 2003 XLS P = Preliminary U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants projected electricity

  1. Proceedings of the 2. MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The goal of the conference was to try to attract a variety of points of view from well-informed people to debate issues concerning nuclear power. Hopefully from that process a better understanding of what one should be doing will emerge. In organizing the conference lessons learned from the previous one were applied. A continuous effort was made to see to it that the arguments for the alternatives to nuclear power were given abundant time for presentation. This is ultimately because nuclear power is going to have to compete with all of the energy technologies. Thus, in discussing energy strategy all of the alternatives must be considered in a reasonable fashion. The structure the conference used has seven sessions. The first six led up to the final session which was concerned with what the future nuclear power strategy should be. Each session focused upon a question concerning the future. None of these questions has a unique correct answer. Rather, topics are addressed where reasonable people can disagree. In order to state some of the important arguments for each session`s question, the combination of a keynote paper followed by a respondent was used. The respondent`s paper is not necessarily included to be a rebuttal to the keynote; but rather, it was recognized that two people will look at a complex question with different shadings. Through those two papers the intention was to get out the most important arguments affecting the question for the session. The purpose of the papers was to set the stage for about an hour of discussion. The real product of this conference was that discussion.

  2. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-12-01

    monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.''

  3. The National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator Activities OAS-L-14-11 August 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 20, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, SANDIA FIELD OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo Director, Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator Activities"

  4. STEAM GENERATOR FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kinyon, B.W.; Whitman, G.D.

    1963-07-16

    The steam generator described for use in reactor powergenerating systems employs a series of concentric tubes providing annular passage of steam and water and includes a unique arrangement for separating the steam from the water. (AEC)

  5. Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even ...

  6. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation » Bilateral Cooperation » International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports May 19, 2015 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2013 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated

  7. NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT Form used to support nuclear materials accountability and control. NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT (15.02 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE/NRC F 742 DOE F 749 DOE F 5635.9

  8. The Birth of Nuclear-Generated Electricity

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    1999-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-I (EBR-I), built in Idaho in 1949, generated the first usable electricity from nuclear power on December 20, 1951. More importantly, the reactor was used to prove that it was possible to create more nuclear fuel in the reactor than it consumed during operation -- fuel breeding. The EBR-I facility is now a National Historic Landmark open to the public.

  9. California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 2,"1,070","6,989",74.6,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  10. Technical-evaluation report on the adequacy of station electric-distribution-system voltages for the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 1 and 2. (Docket Nos. 50-282, 50-306)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selan, J C

    1982-09-17

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 1 and 2. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system in conjunction with the offsite power sources has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The evaluation finds that with some minor transformer loading modifications, hardware changes and the results of equipment testing and manufacturer data, the offsite sources were demonstrated to supply adequate voltage to the Class 1E equipment under worst case conditions.

  11. Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Library Reports NNSA Comments: Final Report of the Congressional Advisory Panel on the Governance of the Nuclear Security Enterprise

  12. Nuclear proliferation status report. Status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-07-01

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear proliferation status of the following countries: (1) Russia, (2) Ukraine, (3) Belarus, (4) Kazakhstan, (5) Israel, (6) India, (7) Pakistan, (8) South Africa, (9) North Korea, (10) Iraq, (11) Iran, (12) Lybia, (13) Algeria, (14) Syria, (15) Brazil, (16) Argentina, and (17) Taiwan.

  13. Potential nuclear safeguards applications for neutron generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindquist, L.O.

    1980-01-01

    Many nuclear safeguards inspection instruments use neutron sources to interrogate the fissile material (commonly /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu) to be measured. The neutron sources currently used in these instruments are isotopics such as Californium-252, Americium-Lithium, etc. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to transport isotopic sources from one measurement location to another. This represents a significant problem for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspectors because they must take their safeguards instruments with them to each nuclear installation to make an independent measurement. Purpose of this paper is to review the possibility of replacing isotopic neutron sources now used in IAEA safeguards instruments with electric neutron sources such as deuterium-tritium (D-T, 14-MeV neutrons) or deuterium-deuterium (D-D, 2-MeV neutrons). The potential for neutron generators to interrogate spent-light water reactor fuel assemblies in storage pools is also reviewed.

  14. Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October...

  15. 2010 Report Released | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Report Released | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr ... Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline 2010 Report Released 2010 Report Released ...

  16. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology September 29, 2014 - 11:06am Addthis Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology Peter W. Davidson Peter W. Davidson Former Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office (LPO) What are the key facts? If finalized, this solicitation would make available $12.6 billion in loan guarantees for advanced nuclear energy technologies. Learn more about the draft

  18. NNSA Completes Fourth International Meeting on Next Generation Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) NNSA Completes Fourth International Meeting on Next Generation Nuclear Safeguards July 12, 2012 HANOI, VIETNAM - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), together with the Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, announced today the successful completion of the Fourth International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards. Organized by NNSA's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

  19. Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reporting Criteria Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria January 1, 2012 Nuclear Safety Noncompliances Associated With Occurrences (DOE Order 232.2) These tables provide the criteria for reporting nuclear safety noncompliances into the Department of Energy's Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). A more detailed description of the NTS reporting criteria and expectations can be found in the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Enforcement Coordinator Handbook. Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria

  20. Socioeconomic impacts of nuclear generating stations: Crystal River Unit 3 case study. Technical report 1 Oct 78-4 Jan 82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, P.A.

    1982-07-01

    The report documents a case study of the socioeconomic impacts of the construction and operation of the Crystal River Unit 3 nuclear power station. It is part of a major post-licensing study of the socioeconomic impacts at twelve nuclear power stations. The case study covers the period beginning with the announcement of plans to construct the reactor and ending in the period, 1980-81. The case study deals with changes in the economy, population, settlement patterns and housing, local government and public services, social structure, and public response in the study area during the construction/operation of the reactor. A regional modeling approach is used to trace the impact of construction/operation on the local economy, labor market, and housing market. Emphasis in the study is on the attribution of socioeconomic impacts to the reactor or other causal factors. As part of the study of local public response to the construction/operation of the reactor, the effects of the Three Mile Island accident are examined.

  1. NRC Fact-Finding Task Force report on the ATWS event at Salem Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1, on February 25, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    An NRC Region I Task Force was established on March 1, 1983 to conduct fact finding and data collection with regard to the circumstances which led to an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) event at the Public Service Electric and Gas Company's Salem Generating Station, Unit 1 on February 25, 1983. The charter of the Task Force was to determine the factual information pertinent to management and administrative controls which should have ensured proper operation of the reactor trip breakers in the solid state protection system. This report documents the findings of the Task Force along with its conclusions.

  2. Modeling a Helical-coil Steam Generator in RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan V. Hoffer; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan A. Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Options for the primary heat transport loop heat exchangers for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant are currently being evaluated. A helical-coil steam generator is one heat exchanger design under consideration. Safety is an integral part of the helical-coil steam generator evaluation. Transient analysis plays a key role in evaluation of the steam generators safety. Using RELAP5-3D to model the helical-coil steam generator, a loss of pressure in the primary side of the steam generator is simulated. This report details the development of the steam generator model, the loss of pressure transient, and the response of the steam generator primary and secondary systems to the loss of primary pressure. Back ground on High Temperature Gas-cooled reactors, steam generators, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is provided to increase the readers understanding of the material presented.

  3. Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident conditions IDAHO FALLS - A safer and more efficient nuclear fuel is on the horizon. A team of researchers at the ...

  4. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  5. Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

  6. Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems | Department of Energy Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems February 28, 2005 - 10:33am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC-The Bush Administration today took a major step in advancing international efforts to develop the next generation of clean, safe nuclear energy systems. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined representatives from Canada, France, Japan, and the United Kingdom to

  7. Distributed Generation Operational Reliability, Executive Summary Report,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2004 | Department of Energy Reliability, Executive Summary Report, January 2004 Distributed Generation Operational Reliability, Executive Summary Report, January 2004 This report summarizes the results of the project, "Distributed Generation Market Transformation Tools: Distributed Generation Reliability and Availability Database," sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Energy Solutions Center (ESC), New York State Energy Research and Development Authority

  8. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1996-01-16

    This report describes progress in the experimental nuclear physics program of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. It presents findings related to properties of high-spin states, low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics, as well as a brief description of the Joint Institute of Heavy Ion Research (a collaboration between the University of Tennessee, Vanderbilt University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and its activities (particularly those of the last few years), and a list of publications. 89 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Mix and mingle: Networking for the next nuclear generation |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mix and mingle: Networking ... Mix and mingle: Networking for the next nuclear generation Posted: February 25, 2016 ... for science, technology, engineering and math employees. ...

  10. Audit Report National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons Systems Configuration Management DOE/IG-0902 March 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 26, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons Systems Configuration Management" BACKGROUND The National

  11. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, Christi D.; Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United

  12. Final Technical Report; NUCLEAR ENGINEERING RECRUITMENT EFFORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrick, Sharon S.; Vincent, Charles D.

    2007-07-02

    This report provides the summary of a project whose purpose was to support the costs of developing a nuclear engineering awareness program, an instruction program for teachers to integrate lessons on nuclear science and technology into their existing curricula, and web sites for the exchange of nuclear engineering career information and classroom materials. The specific objectives of the program were as follows: OBJECTIVE 1: INCREASE AWARENESS AND INTEREST OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING; OBJECTIVE 2: INSTRUCT TEACHERS ON NUCLEAR TOPICS; OBJECTIVE 3: NUCLEAR EDUCATION PROGRAMS WEB-SITE; OBJECTIVE 4: SUPPORT TO UNIVERSITY/INDUSTRY MATCHING GRANTS AND REACTOR SHARING; OBJECTIVE 5: PILOT PROJECT; OBJECTIVE 6: NUCLEAR ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT SURVEY AT UNIVERSITIES

  13. Washington Nuclear Profile - Columbia Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Columbia Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration ...

  14. Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho

  15. NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative January 02, 2009 International safeguards are a central pillar of the nuclear nonproliferation regime. Administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), international safeguards serve to monitor nuclear activities under the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and are the primary vehicle for verifying compliance with peaceful use and nuclear nonproliferation undertakings. The Department of Energy's National Nuclear

  16. Generating unstructured nuclear reactor core meshes in parallel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jain, Rajeev; Tautges, Timothy J.

    2014-10-24

    Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor coremore » examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a ¼ pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.« less

  17. Generating unstructured nuclear reactor core meshes in parallel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Rajeev; Tautges, Timothy J.

    2014-10-24

    Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor core examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a ¼ pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.

  18. Independent Oversight Activity Report, National Nuclear Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security Administration Production Office - March 10-14, 2014 Independent Oversight Activity Report, National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office - March 10-14,...

  19. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [March 14, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-03-14

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: Libya, India, Pakistan, Soviet Union, Austria, Federal Republic of Germany, and Finland.

  20. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [February 29, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-02-29

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: Canada, Yugoslavia, Argentina, Brazil, India, Pakistan, Soviet Union, Federal Republic of Germany, Hong Kong, and Japan.

  1. Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    i NUCLEAR SEPARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES WORKSHOP REPORT November 7, 2011 FINAL TABLE OF CONTENTS Acronyms and Initialisms............................................................................................................ iii Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................... 1 1. Introduction

  2. Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

    2004-06-01

    This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

  3. Nuclear Safety Policy, Guidance & Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes and maintains nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidance including policy and requirements relating to hazard and accident analysis, facility design and operation, and Quality Assurance.

  4. Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Annual Reports Environmental Monitoring Report NT-16-1 - May 2016 - ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM U.S. NAVAL NUCLEAR-POWERED SHIPS AND THEIR SUPPORT FACILITIES Radiation Exposure Monitoring Report NT-16-2 - May 2016 - OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE FROM U.S. NAVAL NUCLEAR PLANTS AND THEIR SUPPORT FACILITIES Report NT-16-3 - May 2016 - OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE FROM NAVAL REACTORS' DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES Occupational Safety and Health Report

  5. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynne M. Stevens

    2010-07-01

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  6. 1,"Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    LLC",1628 8,"Powerton","Coal","Midwest Generations EME LLC",1538 9,"Elwood Energy LLC","Natural gas","Elwood Energy LLC",1350 10,"Newton","Coal","Illinois Power Generating Co",119

  7. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  8. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" ...0","9,556",94.0,"PWR","applicationvnd.ms-excel","applicationvnd.ms-excel" ...

  9. Reports to the DOE Nuclear Data Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The report in this document were submitted to the Department of Energy, Nuclear Data Committee (DOE-NDC) in April 1988. The reporting laboratories are those with a substantial program for the measurement of neutron and nuclear cross sections of relevance to the US applied nuclear energy program. Appropriate subjects are microscopic neutron cross sections relevant to the nuclear energy program, including shielding. Inverse reactions where pertinent are included; charged-particle cross sections where relevant to developing and testing nuclear models; gamma ray production, radioactive decay, and theoretical developments in nuclear structure which are applicable to nuclear energy programs; and proton and alpha-particle cross sections, at energies of up to 1 GeV, which are of interest to the space program.

  10. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,178","9,197",89.1,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  11. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,164","10,337",101.4,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  12. NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Holbrook

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

  13. Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a workshop on nuclear separations technologies in Bethesda, Maryland, on July 27 and 28, 2011, to (1) identify common needs and potential requirements in...

  14. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,160","9,556",94.0,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  15. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Dresden Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dresden Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 2,867,"7,727",101.7,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" 3,867,"6,866",90.4,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  16. Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY...

  17. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles

  18. Annual Report for NERI Proposal No.2000-0109 on Forewarning of Failure in Critical Equipment at Next-Generation Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hively, LM

    2001-10-10

    This annual report describes the first year's accomplishments under the NERI2000-109 project. We present a model-independent approach to quantify changes in the nonlinear dynamics underlying time-serial data. From time-windowed data sets, we construct discrete distribution functions on the phase space. Condition change between base case and test case distribution functions is assessed by dissimilarity measures via L{sub 1}-distance and {chi}{sup 2} statistic. The discriminating power of these measures is first tested on noiseless model data, and then applied for detecting dynamical change in power from a motor-pump system. We compare the phase-space dissimilarities with traditional linear and nonlinear measures used in the analysis of chaotic systems. We also assess the potential usefulness of the new measures for robust, accurate, and timely forewarning of equipment failure.

  19. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  20. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris; Ludewig, Hans; Todosow, Michael

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

  1. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

  2. POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dwyer, O.E.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

  3. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy J. Leahy

    2010-06-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated toolkit consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  4. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at UTK is involved in heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. During the last year experimental work has been in 3 broad areas: structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, structure of nuclei far from stability, and ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. Results in these areas are described in this document under: properties of high-spin states, study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics (PHENIX, etc.). Another important component of the work is theoretical interpretation of experimental results (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research).

  5. Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NA-STD-3016-2006 May 2006 DOE LIMITED STANDARD HAZARD ANALYSIS REPORTS FOR NUCLEAR ... Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http:www.eh.doe.gov...

  6. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [March 23, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-03-23

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: Canada, Hong Kong, Japan, Brazil, India, Pakistan, Soviet Union, Belgium, Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, and United Kingdom.

  7. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [June 21, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-06-21

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: Canada, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Argentina, Brazil, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Soviet Union, Belgium, France, Turkey, and the United Kingdom.

  8. NMMSS Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NMMSS Reports U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS Reports DOE D-23 DOE Contractors Rev August 2016 DOE Manual 474.2 NMMSS User Guide - Coming Soon! NRC D-24 NRC Licensees Rev August 2016 NUREG/BR-0007, Rev. 6 NUREG/BR-0006, Rev. 7 The electronic version of the D-2, D-3, and D-15 RIS directories are available upon request.

  9. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report The ...

  10. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics...

  11. Nuclear Safety Research and Development Annual Report, December...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Safety Research and Development Annual Report, December 2014 This document is the first annual report of DOE's Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program, ...

  12. GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT GENERATION TOOLS - 12005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, N.

    2011-11-21

    Compliance with National and State environmental regulations (e.g. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) aka SuperFund) requires Savannah River Site (SRS) to extensively collect and report groundwater monitoring data, with potential fines for missed reporting deadlines. Several utilities have been developed at SRS to facilitate production of the regulatory reports which include maps, data tables, charts and statistics. Components of each report are generated in accordance with complex sets of regulatory requirements specific to each site monitored. SRS developed a relational database to incorporate the detailed reporting rules with the groundwater data, and created a set of automation tools to interface with the information and generate the report components. These process improvements enhanced quality and consistency by centralizing the information, and have reduced manpower and production time through automated efficiencies.

  13. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.

    2010-09-29

    Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management, and

  14. NNSA Program Develops the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Experts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Disney, Maren V.

    2015-09-02

    NNSA is fostering the next generation of nuclear security experts is through its successful NNSA Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP). NGFP offers its Fellows an exceptional career development opportunity through hands-on experience supporting NNSA mission areas across policy and technology disciplines. The one-year assignments give tomorrow’s leaders in global nuclear security and nonproliferation unparalleled exposure through assignments to Program Offices across NNSA.

  15. Yonggwang nuclear power plant units 3 and 4; Bridging the gap to the next generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heider, R.C.; Daley, T.J.; Green, K.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of nuclear energy since the oil embargo of 1973 has displaced the use of 4.3 billion barrels of imported oil, which helped conserve 1 billion tons of coal and 6.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas for future generations, and helped protect the environment by reducing utility emissions of carbon dioxide by 20% a year. The current 112 operating nuclear energy plants generate more electricity than those of France, Japan, and the Soviet Union-nations that have made a national commitment to nuclear energy-combined. Yet it has been over 10 years since the last construction permit was issued for a nuclear power plant in the United States. Considering a projected shortfall in baseload electric generation capacity in the mid-1990s, new requirements for costly air pollution controls on coal plants, the concern over increased dependence on oil imports from the unstable Middle East region, and the increased concern over the possible long-term effects of greenhouse gas emissions, the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), the governing organization for the commercial nuclear energy industry, has developed a strategic plan with the goal of being able to order new nuclear power plants by the mid-1990s. The strategic plan, which contains 14 enabling conditions or building blocks, outlines an integrated effort to address the range of institutional and technical issues on which significant progress must be achieved to make nuclear power attractive in the United States for the 1990s.

  16. 2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative | Department of Energy 2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative July 2, 2010 - 11:49am Addthis On July 2, 2010, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) issued annual reports for its Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI)

  17. Nuclear waste isolation activities report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-01

    Included are: a report from the Deputy Assistant Secretary, a summary of recent events, new literature, a list of upcoming waste management meetings, and background information on DOE`s radwaste management programs. (DLC)

  18. ICF Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fusion ICF Reports There are a wide variety of reports that address the world class research and experiments in ICF being performed on behalf of the U.S. ICF Program and stockpile stewardship. Some of these reports are listed below: 2016 Inertial Confinement Fusion Program Framework, U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, May 16, 2016. DOE/NA-0044 2015 Review of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density Science Portfolio, U.S. Department of Energy,

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  20. Impact of the proposed energy tax on nuclear electric generating technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunds, T.A.; Lamont, A.D.; Pasternak, A.D.; Rousseau, W.F.; Walter, C.E.

    1993-05-01

    The President`s new economic initiatives include an energy tax that will affect the costs of power from most electric generating technologies. The tax on nuclear power could be applied in a number of different ways at several different points in the fuel cycle. These different approaches could have different effects on the generation costs and benefits of advanced reactors. The Office of Nuclear Energy has developed models for assessing the costs and benefits of advanced reactor cycles which must be updated to take into account the impacts of the proposed tax. This report has been prepared to assess the spectrum of impacts of the energy tax on nuclear power and can be used in updating the Office`s economic models. This study was conducted in the following steps. First, the most authoritative statement of the proposed tax available at this time was obtained. Then the impacts of the proposed tax on the costs of nuclear and fossil fueled generation were compared. Finally several other possible approaches to taxing nuclear energy were evaluated. The cost impact on several advanced nuclear technologies and a current light water technology were computed. Finally, the rationale for the energy tax as applied to various electric generating methods was examined.

  1. Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-26

    Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure May 28, 2015 -...

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

    2004-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

  5. Nuclear Physics Laboratory 1980 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelberger, E.G.

    1980-09-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: astrophysics and cosmology, fundamental symmetries, nuclear structure and reactions, radiative capture, medium energy physics, heavy ion reactions, research by outside users, accelerators and ion sources, instrumentation and experimental techniques, and computers and computing. Publications are listed. (WHK)

  6. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [January 13, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-01-13

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) Canada, (2) China, (3) Brazil, (4) Near East and South Asia; Egypt, India, (5) Soviet Union, and (6) West Europe; Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, Sweden, United Kingdom.

  7. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [June 1, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-06-01

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) China, (2) Japan, (3) East Europe; Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic, Poland, Hungary, (5) Brazil, (6) Near East and South Asia; India, Israel, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia (7) Soviet Union, and (8) Federal Republic of Germany.

  8. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [December 26, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-12-26

    This report presents the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) China, (2)Japan, (3) Latin America; Argentina, Brazil, (4) Near East and South Asia; India, Israel, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, (5) West Europe; Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, Sweden, Austria, and (6) Soviet Union.

  9. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [January 25, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-01-25

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) China, (2) Latin America; Argentina, Brazil, (3) Near East and South Asia; India, Pakistan, (4) Soviet Union, and (5) West Europe; Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Netherlands, Turkey.

  10. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [August 18, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1987-08-18

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) Australia, (2) China, (3) Canada, (4) Hong Kong, (5) Japan, (6) Yugoslavia, (7) Argentina, (8) Brazil, (9) Egypt, (10) India, (11) Pakistan, (12) Soviet Union, (13) Belgium, (14) Finland, (15) France, and (16) Turkey.

  11. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [November 6, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-11-06

    This report presents the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) China, (2) East Asia; Japan, South Korea, (3) Latin America; Argentina, Cuba, (4) Near East and South Asia; India, Israel, Pakistan, (5) Soviet Union, and (6) West Europe; Canada, Federal Republic of Germany, France, Sweden, Turkey.

  12. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [May 23, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-05-23

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) Japan, (2) China, (3) South Korea, (4) Czechoslovakia, Poland, (5) Argentina, Brazil, (6) Bangladesh, India, Egypt, Iraq, Israel, Pakistan, (7) Soviet Union, and (8) Federal Republic of Germany, Canada, United Kingdom, France.

  13. Nuclear data for radiotherapy: Presentation of a new ICRU report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear data for radiotherapy: Presentation of a new ICRU report and IAEA initiatives Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear data for radiotherapy: Presentation of a ...

  14. Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Authors: Kippen, Karen E. ...

  15. Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source You are accessing a ...

  16. 2010 Inspection and Status Report for the Boiling Nuclear Superheater...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Annual Inspection - Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Site, Rincn, Puerto Rico October 2013 Page 1 2013 Inspection and Status Report for the Former Boiling Nuclear Superheater...

  17. ORISE: Report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates on the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates on the rise in 2013 Number of ... OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of college students graduating with majors in nuclear ...

  18. ORISE: Report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling off in 2014 after five ... OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of college students graduating with majors in nuclear ...

  19. ORISE: Report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates rebounding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates rebounding in 2015 after brief decline ... number of college students graduating with majors in nuclear engineering has rebounded. ...

  20. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities You are accessing a document from the ...

  1. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Beck II; Harold J. Heydt; Emmanuel O. Opare; Kyle B. Oswald

    2010-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  2. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-05-01

    This is the May 1988 annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington. It contains chapters on astrophysics, giant resonances, heavy ion induced reactions, fundamental symmetries, polarization in nuclear reactions, medium energy reactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), research by outside users, Van de Graaff and ion sources, the Laboratory`s booster linac project work, instrumentation, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, Ph.D. degrees granted in the 1987-88 academic year, and publications. Refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-04-01

    This is the April 1989 annual report of the Nuclear Physics Labortaory of the University of Washington. It contains chapters on astrophysics, giant resonances, heavy ion induced reactions, fundamental symmetries, polarization in nuclear reactions, medium energy reactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), research by outside users, Van de Graaff and ion sources, computer systems, instrumentation, and the Laboratory`s booster linac work. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, Ph.D. degrees granted in the 1988-1989 academic year, and publications. Refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radulescu, Laura; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2010-01-21

    The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

  5. JPRS report supplement: Nuclear developments. Iraq -- Nuclear and missile proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-09-14

    This document contains articles from foreign periodicals from throughout the world, translated into English, that concern nuclear developments, specifically nuclear and missile proliferation in Iraq.

  6. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS Nuclear structure; nuclear energy density functional Word Cloud ...

  7. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ANNIHILATION; FLAVOR MODEL; SUPERNOVAE; QUANTUM CHROMODYNAMICS; HEAVY ION REACTIONS; SUN; NUCLEAR THEORY; CONVERSION; CHARM PARTICLES; PROGRESS REPORT; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; STAR...

  8. What future for nuclear power? Workshop report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    A Workshop on this highly controversial subject, organized by the Energy and Environment Programme of the RIIA, was held on 10th November 1997 at Green College, Oxford. The meeting was attended by some forty people from eight countries, coming from the nuclear and electricity generating industry, governments, research organizations, academic institutions, environmental pressure groups and inter-governmental organizations. In addition, subsequent to this Workshop, there have been a number of smaller, more informal discussions on various aspects of the subject. This paper summarizes the main conclusions arising from the Workshop and from these later discussions.

  9. NEAC Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee Report for December 11, 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting | Department of Energy Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee Report for December 11, 2015 Meeting NEAC Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee Report for December 11, 2015 Meeting NEAC Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee Report (856.79 KB) More Documents & Publications MEETING MATERIALS: DECEMBER 11, 2015 MEETING MATERIALS: JUNE 17, 2016 MEETING MATERIALS: JUNE 26, 2015

  10. Table 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units, 1955-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Nuclear Generating Units, 1955-2011 Year Original Licensing Regulations (10 CFR Part 50) 1 Current Licensing Regulations (10 CFR Part 52) 1 Permanent Shutdowns Operable Units 7 Construction Permits Issued 2,3 Low-Power Operating Licenses Issued 3,4 Full-Power Operating Licenses Issued 3,5 Early Site Permits Issued 3 Combined License Applications Received 6 Combined Licenses Issued 3 1955 1 0 0 – – – – – – 0 0 1956 3 0 0 – – – – – – 0 0 1957 1 1 1 – – – – – – 0 1 1958 0 0 0 –

  11. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struble, G.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  12. NNSA Releases New Nuclear Prevent, Counter, and Respond Report | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Releases New Nuclear Prevent, Counter, and Respond Report March 23, 2015 Comprehensive Overview of NNSA's Nonproliferation and Anti-terror Strategy WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) released its report on NNSA's efforts to prevent nuclear proliferation and terrorism, Prevent, Counter, and Respond-A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats (FY 2016-FY 2020) (NPCR). It provides a comprehensive overview for the

  13. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is a research-oriented collaborative program that supports the advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment. The 2010 Nuclear Energy Research and

  14. Nuclear Safety Research and Development Annual Report, December 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document is the first annual report of DOE’s Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program, managed by the Office of Nuclear Safety in the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security. The report includes a description of the program and summaries of R&D projects related to DOE (including NNSA) nuclear facility and operational safety.

  15. Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, W.D.

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  16. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  17. Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Blog Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request for Proposal Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 12:00am NNSA Blog Last week the Nuclear Science Week (NSW) ...

  18. Nuclear Safety Research and Development Annual Report, December...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    December 8, 2014 This document is the first annual report of DOE's Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program, managed by the Office of Nuclear Safety in the Office of ...

  19. 2009 UK/US Nuclear Engineering Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Rankin

    2009-04-01

    This report summarizes the 2009 UK/US Nuclear Engineering Workshop held April 20-21, 2010, in Washington, D.C. to discuss opportunities for nuclear engineering collaboration between researchers in the United States and the United Kingdom.

  20. NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

  1. NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

  2. NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2009-07-14

    Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

  3. NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2009-07-14

    Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

  4. Nuclear Nonproliferation Ontology Assessment Team Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasburg, Jana D.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2012-01-01

    Final Report for the NA22 Simulations, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) Ontology Assessment Team's efforts from FY09-FY11. The Ontology Assessment Team began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2011. During this two-year time frame, the Ontology Assessment team had two objectives: (1) Assessing the utility of knowledge representation and semantic technologies for addressing nuclear nonproliferation challenges; and (2) Developing ontological support tools that would provide a framework for integrating across the Simulation, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) program. The SAM Program was going through a large assessment and strategic planning effort during this time and as a result, the relative importance of these two objectives changed, altering the focus of the Ontology Assessment Team. In the end, the team conducted an assessment of the state of art, created an annotated bibliography, and developed a series of ontological support tools, demonstrations and presentations. A total of more than 35 individuals from 12 different research institutions participated in the Ontology Assessment Team. These included subject matter experts in several nuclear nonproliferation-related domains as well as experts in semantic technologies. Despite the diverse backgrounds and perspectives, the Ontology Assessment team functioned very well together and aspects could serve as a model for future inter-laboratory collaborations and working groups. While the team encountered several challenges and learned many lessons along the way, the Ontology Assessment effort was ultimately a success that led to several multi-lab research projects and opened up a new area of scientific exploration within the Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Verification.

  5. Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

    2012-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

  6. NEXT GENERATION MELTER OPTIONEERING STUDY - INTERIM REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; RAMSEY G; LOMAX J; ALLEN H

    2010-10-19

    The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D{sub 2}0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

  7. Online Monitoring Technical Basis and Analysis Framework for Emergency Diesel Generators - Interim Report for FY 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binh T. Pham; Nancy J. Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal

    2012-12-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is actively conducting research to develop and demonstrate online monitoring capabilities for active components in existing nuclear power plants. Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute are working jointly to implement a pilot project to apply these capabilities to emergency diesel generators and generator step-up transformers. The Electric Power Research Institute Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Software Suite will be used to implement monitoring in conjunction with utility partners: Braidwood Generating Station (owned by Exelon Corporation) for emergency diesel generators, and Shearon Harris Nuclear Generating Station (owned by Duke Energy Progress) for generator step-up transformers. This report presents monitoring techniques, fault signatures, and diagnostic and prognostic models for emergency diesel generators. Emergency diesel generators provide backup power to the nuclear power plant, allowing operation of essential equipment such as pumps in the emergency core coolant system during catastrophic events, including loss of offsite power. Technical experts from Braidwood are assisting Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Power Research Institute in identifying critical faults and defining fault signatures associated with each fault. The resulting diagnostic models will be implemented in the Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Software Suite and tested using data from Braidwood. Parallel research on generator step-up transformers was summarized in an interim report during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  8. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet) (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal. ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 24 POWER ...

  9. Investing in the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders Investing in the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders August 9, 2011 - 5:12pm Addthis Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy As part of the Energy Department's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP) annual workshop, I met today with professors from across the country and announced awards of up to $39 million for research projects aimed at developing

  10. Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy May 6, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an international collaborative that is advancing new, safer nuclear energy systems. Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an international collaborative that is advancing new, safer nuclear energy systems. Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy

  11. Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Administration's B61 Spin Rocket Motor Project," DOEIG-0740 Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Spin Rocket Motor Project," DOEIG-0740 The ...

  12. AUDIT REPORT Cybersecurity Controls Over a Major National Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report: "Cybersecurity Controls Over a Major National Nuclear Security Administration Information System"...

  13. NEAC Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee Report for December...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NEAC Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee Report (856.79 KB) More Documents & Publications MEETING MATERIALS: DECEMBER 11, 2015 MEETING MATERIALS: JUNE 17, 2016 MEETING ...

  14. DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it is seeking public and industry input on how to best achieve the goals and meet the requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) demonstration project work at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory. DOE today issued a Request for Information and Expressions of Interest

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented

  16. A Vision for Nuclear Theory: Report to NSAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Carlson; B. Holstein; X. D. Ji; G. McLaughlin; B. Muller; W. Nazarewicz; K. Rajagopal; W. Roberts; X.-N. Wang

    2003-11-01

    This is the report of the NSAC Subcommittee on Nuclear Theory in response to a charge by the funding agencies to review and evaluate current NSF and DOE supported efforts in nuclear theory and identify strategic plans to ensure a strong U.S. nuclear theory program under various funding scenarios.

  17. Small Modular Reactors- Key to Future Nuclear Power Generation in the U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Small Modular Reactors - Key to Future Nuclear Power Generation in the U.S. University of Chicago, Energy Policy Institute at Chicago

  18. Main Generator Seal Oil Supply Reliability Improvements at Southern California Edison's San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simma, Fred Y.; Chetwynd, Russell J.; Rowe, Stuart A.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the justification for the approach, details and results of the Main Generator Seal Oil System reliability enhancements on the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, SONGS. The SONGS, Unit 3 experienced substantial turbine damage in early 2001 after the turbine bearings lubrication oil supply failed. During a loss of off-site power incident, power was lost to the two AC powered turbine lubrication oil pumps due to a breaker failure in the switchgear and the DC powered emergency bearing lubricating oil pump failed to start due to a breaker trip. The SONGS turbine generators coasted down from full speed to a full stop without lubricating oil. This resulted in significant bearing, journal and steam path damage that required a four-month duration repair outage during a time period where electricity was in short supply in the State of California. The generator hydrogen sealing system remained operable during this event, however it was recognized during the event follow up investigation that this system had vulnerabilities to failure similar to the bearing lubrication system. In order to prevent a reoccurrence of this extremely costly event, SONGS has taken actions to modify both of these critical turbine generator systems by adding additional, continuously operating pumps with a new, independent power source and independently routed cables. The main challenge was to integrate the additional equipment into the existing lubrication and seal oil systems. The lubrication Oil System was the first system to be retro-fitted and these results already have been presented. Reference 2. This paper provides the result of the reliability enhancements for the Main Generator Seal Oil System, which concludes the turbine/generator critical oil systems reliability improvements, performed by SONGS. It is worth noting that the design team discovered and corrected a number of other significant operational issues, which had been present from the early days and also learned

  19. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2013 Annual Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future.

  20. Meeting the Next Generation of Nuclear Nonproliferation Specialists...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... DNN R&D directs an integrated research and development portfolio in support of its mission to detect signs of nuclear proliferation and nuclear detonations. The DNN R&D-funded ...

  1. Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan This document constitutes the first edition of a long-term research and development (R&D) plan for nuclear technology in the United States. The federally-sponsored nuclear technology programs of the United States are almost exclusively the province of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The nuclear energy areas in DOE include, but are

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2007-01-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-12-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-09-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  5. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    This fourth Annual Report presents and analyzes 1995 DOE complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 40 reporting sites in 25 States, and trends DOE waste generation from 1991 through 1995. DOE has established a 50% reduction goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, due by December 31, 1999. Routine operations waste generation decreased 37% from 1994 to 1995, and 43% overall from 1993--1995.

  6. Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

    1987-06-01

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

  7. Nuclear technology programs; Semiannual progress report, October 1989--March 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  9. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gasmore » breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.« less

  10. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  11. Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report on BNLs Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Human Capital Development Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper S. E.

    2014-10-10

    Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL’s) Nonproliferation and National Security Department contributes to the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and International Security Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) through university engagement, safeguards internships, safeguards courses, professional development, recruitment, and other activities aimed at ensuring the next generation of international safeguards professionals is adequately prepared to support the U.S. safeguards mission. This report is a summary of BNL s work under the NGSI program in Fiscal Year 2014.

  12. Report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel discusses the technical, regulatory, and economic aspects of spent-fuel storage at nuclear reactors. The report is intended to provide legislators state officials and citizens in the Midwest with information on spent-fuel inventories, current and projected additional storage requirements, licensing, storage technologies, and actions taken by various utilities in the Midwest to augment their capacity to store spent nuclear fuel on site.

  13. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 7 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by pursuing international collaborations to conduct research that will advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI promotes bilateral and multilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research

  14. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2009 Annual Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2009 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is an international, research-oriented collaboration that supports advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. I-NERI promotes bilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key

  15. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1996-01-16

    The experimental program in nuclear physics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is led by Professors Carrol Bingham, Lee Riedinger, and Soren Sorenseni who respectively lead the studies of the exotic decay modes of nuclei far from stability, the program of high-spin research, and our effort in relativistic heavy-ion physics. Over the years, this broad program of research has been successful partially because of the shared University resources applied to this group effort. The proximity of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has allowed us to build extremely strong programs of joint research, and in addition to play an important leadership role in the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research (JIHIR). Our experimental program is also very closely linked with those at other national laboratories: Argonne (collaborations involving the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) and {gamma}-ray arrays), Brookhaven (the RHIC and Phenix projects), and Berkeley (GAMMASPHERE). We have worked closely with a variety of university groups in the last three years, especially those in the UNISOR and now UNIRIB collaborations. And, in all aspects of our program, we have maintained close collaborations with theorists, both to inspire the most exciting experiments to perform and to extract the pertinent physics from the results. The specific areas discussed in this report are: properties of high-spin states; study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability; and high energy heavy-ion physics.

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen

  17. Thermoacoustic co-generation unit. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.; Corey, J.

    1997-12-09

    The combination of a thermoacoustic engine with a STAR alternator promises to comprise a simple, reliable combustion-powered electric generator. In this CRADA, the authors married these two technologies for the first time, to learn what technical issues arise in the combination. The results are encouraging, but the work is not yet complete.

  18. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low...

  19. A High Intensity Multi-Purpose D-D Neutron Generator for Nuclear Engineering Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ka-Ngo Leung; Jasmina L. Vujic; Edward C. Morse; Per F. Peterson

    2005-11-29

    This NEER project involves the design, construction and testing of a low-cost high intensity D-D neutron generator for teaching nuclear engineering students in a laboratory environment without radioisotopes or a nuclear reactor. The neutron generator was designed, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  20. Investing in the next generation: The Office of Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    educational and research opportunities to prepare NS&E students for nuclear energy professions, in support of NE's mission. NE is seeking applicants for undergraduate...

  1. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    Reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; and analysis of spent fuel policy implementation.

  2. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-09-01

    This Annual Report summarizes and highlights waste generation, waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost avoidance for 44 U.S. Department of Energy reporting sites for Calendar Year 1999. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1999 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments.

  3. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, W.D.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The {open_quotes}early implementation{close_quotes} phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large {gamma}-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive {sup 21}Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium.

  4. INSPECTION REPORT Alleged Nuclear Material Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Alleged Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Weaknesses at the Department of Energy's Portsmouth Project INS-O-15-04 May 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector...

  5. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report The main focus of the research supported by the nuclear theory grant DE-FG02-04ER41319 was on studying parton dynamics in high-energy heavy ion collisions, perturbative approach to charm production and its contribution to atmospheric neutrinos, application of AdS/CFT approach to

  6. Investing in the next generation: The Office of Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The IUP mission is to maintain the discipline of nuclear science and engineering (NS&E). The NE component of IUP supports this mission by providing educational and research ...

  7. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear ... The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by ...

  8. DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process ...

  9. Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedlander, E.M.

    1982-06-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1980 and June 30, 1981. The principal activity of the division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interaction of heavy ions with target nuclei. Complementary research programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluations, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out.

  10. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2006 The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by conducting research to advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI sponsors innovative scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) in cooperation with participating countries. The research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  12. Institute of Nuclear Power Operations annual report, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    This annual report highlights the activities of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. The topics of the report include the president and chairmen`s joint message, overview of programs serving as the foundation for most of its activities, performance indicators for the US nuclear utility industry, and INPO`s 1993 financial reports and rosters. INPO has four technical cornerstone programs that serve as the foundation for most of its activities. (1) Evaluations of nuclear power plants operated by member utilities are conducted on a regularly scheduled basis. (2) INPO supports its member utilities in their work to achieve and maintain accreditation of training programs. (3) Events analysis programs identify and communicate lessons learned from plant events so utilities can take action to prevent similar events at their plants. (4) INPO helps members improve in nuclear operations areas through assistance programs and other activities that continually evolve to meet the changing needs of the nuclear industry.

  13. Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System Reporting and Data Submission

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-02-10

    The manual provides clear and detailed instructions and procedures for documenting and reporting data submissions for nuclear materials transactions, inventories, and material balances to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). Cancels DOE 5633.3B. Canceled by DOE M 474.1-2A.

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, Timothy D; Bratton, Rob; Marsden, Barry; Srinivasan, Makuteswara; Penfield, Scott; Mitchell, Mark; Windes, Will

    2008-03-01

    Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV

  15. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  16. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  17. Interim report on long range plan for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The interim report on the updated NSAC Long Range Plan for Nuclear Physics will be presented to the community for discussion and comment before submission to the funding agencies. The presentation will be coordinated by E. Moniz chair of NSAC.

  18. ORISE: Report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling off in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 after five years of increase ORISE report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling off in 2014 after five years of increase Decline seen in undergraduate and master degrees, while number of doctoral degrees awarded increased FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 31, 2015 FY15-38 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of college students graduating with majors in nuclear engineering has flattened and even declined somewhat after five straight years of continual increases, according to a report by

  19. PUCT Substantive Rule 25.91 Generating Capacity Reports | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PUCT Substantive Rule 25.91 Generating Capacity Reports Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: PUCT Substantive...

  20. Closure for the Seventh Generation - A Report from the Stewardship

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee of the State and Tribal Government Working Group (February 1999) | Department of Energy Closure for the Seventh Generation - A Report from the Stewardship Committee of the State and Tribal Government Working Group (February 1999) Closure for the Seventh Generation - A Report from the Stewardship Committee of the State and Tribal Government Working Group (February 1999) Stakeholder, State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG), long-term stewardship, institutional controls.

  1. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  2. Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors PDF icon Report to Congress on Plan ...

  3. Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration - FY99 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. J. Leahy

    1999-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has created the Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration. The SNRC brings together some of America's finest laboratory and university nuclear researchers in a carefully focused research program intended to produce ''breakthrough'' solutions to the difficult issues of nuclear economics, safety, non-proliferation, and nuclear waste. This integrated program aims to address obstacles that stand in the way of nuclear power development in the US These include fuel cycle concerns related to waste and proliferation, the need for more efficient regulatory practices, and the high cost of constructing and operating nuclear power plants. Funded at an FY99 level of $2.58M, the SNRC is focusing the efforts of scientists and engineers from the INEEL and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to solve complex nuclear energy challenges in a carefully chosen, integrated portfolio of research topics. The result of this collaboration will be research that serves as a catalyst for future direct-funded nuclear research and technology development and which preserves and enhances the INEEL's role as America's leading national laboratory for nuclear power research. In its first year, the SNRC has focused on four research projects each of which address one or more of the four issues facing further nuclear power development (economics, safety, waste disposition and proliferation-resistance). This Annual Report describes technical work and accomplishments during the first year of the SNRC's existence.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

  5. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While the main emphasis is on experimental problems, the authors have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of their measurements. During the last year they have had several experiments at the ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory, the GAMMASPHERE at the LBL 88 Cyclotron, and with the NORDBALL at the Niels Bohr Institute Tandem. Also, they continue to be very active in the WA93/98 collaboration studying ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in the PHENIX Collaboration at the RHIC accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During the last year their experimental work has been in three broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (3) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas are described in this document. These studies concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Another area of research is heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions, which utilize the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions.

  6. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

  7. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Salem Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PSEG Salem Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,174","8,777",85.3,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  8. Illinois Nuclear Profile - LaSalle Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    LaSalle Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,118","9,207",94.0,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  9. Individual Reporting Requirements | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Individual Reporting Requirements DOE Order 472.2, Personnel Security, sets forth reporting requirements for all DOE employees, contractors, and others involved in applying for or holding a DOE access authorization. Reporting must be done verbally within two business days of the event followed by a written confirmation within three additional business days to the Office of Personnel and Facility Clearances and Classification (OPFCC), to include: Legal action effected

  10. ICF Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plasma Science: Advancing Knowledge in the National Interest, National Research Council of the National Academies, The National Academies Press, 2007. Report of the Interagency ...

  11. Threatened and Endangered Species Evaluation for Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Generating Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.

    2004-01-15

    &E species take, consultations, and evaluations of potential effects of operation on T&E species. This search recovered a total of approximately 100 documents from 13 sites. Sites that were in the relicensing or decommissioning processes were excluded from the ADAMS search. In general the ADAMS search did not reveal any serious deficiencies or compliance problems. The most notable finds were reports of takes of green sea turtles at Diablo Canyon. While these events were reported to both the NRC and to NOAA Fisheries, no record of interaction between the two federal agencies was found. Species potentially present at each site were determined via querying the Geographical, Environmental, and Siting Information System (GEn&SIS) database developed for the NRC by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The results of these queries were compared against the 1997 review, and in the cases of sites that were in the relicensing process, with the results of those site specific evaluations. A total of 452 T&E species were identified as potentially occurring near one or more of the operating commercial nuclear power generating plants. Information about each of these species was gathered to support an assessment of the probability of occurrence at each of the reactor sites. Based on the assessments of which species are potentially affected at each site, and the information gathered through the ADAMS search, each site was assigned a priority value for follow-up evaluations. The priority listing did not include any sites that had entered the relicensing process, those where the licensee has indicated that they intend to enter the relicensing process before the end of 2005, or those that have entered the decommissioning process. Of the 39 remaining sites, those that were identified as the highest priority for follow-on evaluations are: Diablo Canyon, San Onofre, Crystal River, Harris, and Vogtle, followed by South Texas, Palo Verde, Salem, and Cooper.

  12. Seismic risk assessment as applied to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, J.

    1984-08-01

    To assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its licensing and evaluation role, the NRC funded the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of developing tools and data bases to evaluate the risk of earthquake caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. This paper describes the SSMRP risk assessment methodology and the results generated by applying this methodology to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station. In addition to describing the failure probabilities and risk values, the effects of assumptions about plant configuration, plant operation, and dependence will be given.

  13. Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poskanzer, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document.

  14. Nuclear materials 1993 annual report. Volume 8, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1993. The report is published in two parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1993 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Note that the subtitle of No. 2 has been changed from ``Nonreactors`` to ``Nuclear Materials.`` Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1993.

  15. INEL integrated spent nuclear fuel consolidation task team report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, R.N.; Clark, J.H.; Chipman, N.A.

    1994-09-12

    This document describes a draft plan and schedule to consolidate spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and special nuclear material (SNW) from aging storage facilities throughout the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in a safe, cost-effective, and expedient manner. A fully integrated and resource-loaded schedule was developed to achieve consolidation as soon as possible. All of the INEL SNF and SNM management task, projects, and related activities from fiscal year 1994 to the end of the consolidation period are logic-tied and integrated with each other. The schedule and plan are presented to initiate discussion of their implementation, which is expected to generate alternate concepts that can be evaluated using the methodology described in this report. Three perturbations to consolidating SNF as soon as possible are also explored. If the schedule is executed as proposed, the new and on-going consolidation activities will require about 6 years to complete and about $25.3M of additional funding. Reduced annual operating costs are expected to recover the additional investment in about 6.4 years. The total consolidation program as proposed will cost about $66.8M and require about 6 years to recover via reduced operating costs from retired SNF/SNM storage facilities. Detailed schedules and cost estimates for the Test Reactor Area Materials Test Reactor canal transfers are included as an example of the level of detail that is typical of the entire schedule (see Appendix D). The remaining work packages for each of the INEL SNF consolidation transfers are summarized in this document. Detailed cost and resource information is available upon request for any of the SNF consolidation transfers.

  16. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,161","9,439",92.8,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"1,161","9,439",92.8

  17. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    This sixth Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 36 reporting sites from 1993 through 1997. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December 31, 1999. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation increased three percent from 1996 to 1997, and decreased 61 percent overall from 1993 to 1997. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1997 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. However, it is important to note that increases in low-level radioactive and low-level mixed waste generation could reverse this achievement. From 1996 to 1997, low-level radioactive waste generation increased 10 percent, and low-level mixed waste generation increased slightly. It is critical that DOE sites continue to reduce routine operations waste generation for all waste types, to ensure that DOE`s Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals are achieved by December 31, 1999.

  18. ORISE: Report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates rebounding in 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    after brief decline report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates rebounding in 2015 after brief decline Increases seen in undergraduate and master degrees, while number of doctorate degrees awarded declined FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 23, 2016 FY16-27 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-After briefly declining in 2014 following five straight years of continual increases, the number of college students graduating with majors in nuclear engineering has rebounded. This is according to an annual study conducted

  19. Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian McKirdy

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

  20. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A.

    1981-06-01

    Reports and summaries are provided for the following programs: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclide in soils; low-level waste generation reduction handbook; waste management system studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

  1. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants: Annual report, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1988-01-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1985 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1985 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  2. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tichler, J.; Benkovitz, C.

    1981-03-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commerical light water reactors during 1978 have been compiled and reported. Data on soild waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1978 release data are compared with previous years releases in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  3. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tichler, J.; Benkovitz, C.

    1983-01-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1980 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1980 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  4. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants: Annual report, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1987-08-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1984 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1984 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  5. Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Monthly Report March 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, Renae

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Formerly: Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report February 2015 Highlights; Jim Cole attended the OECD NEA Expert Group on Innovative Structural Materials meeting in Paris, France; Jim Lane and Doug Copsey of Writers Ink visited PNNL to prepare an article for the NSUF annual report; Brenden Heidrich briefed the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee-Facilities Subcommittee on the Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database project and provided them with custom reports for their upcoming visits to Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and University of California-Berkeley Principal Investigator Mehdi Balooch visited PNNL to observe measurements and help finalize plans for completing the desired suite of analyses. His visit was coordinated to coincide with the visit of Jim Lane and Doug Copsey.

  6. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  7. Guidance for identifying, reporting and tracking nuclear safety noncompliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    This document provides Department of Energy (DOE) contractors, subcontractors and suppliers with guidance in the effective use of DOE`s Price-Anderson nuclear safety Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). Prompt contractor identification, reporting to DOE, and correction of nuclear safety noncompliances provides DOE with a basis to exercise enforcement discretion to mitigate civil penalties, and suspend the issuance of Notices of Violation for certain violations. Use of this reporting methodology is elective by contractors; however, this methodology is intended to reflect DOE`s philosophy on effective identification and reporting of nuclear safety noncompliances. To the extent that these expectations are met for particular noncompliances, DOE intends to appropriately exercise its enforcement discretion in considering whether, and to what extent, to undertake enforcement action.

  8. Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Building on President Obama’s Climate Action Plan to continue America’s leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure.

  9. Integrated Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems: Foundational Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Richard Boardman; John Collins; Mark Ruth; Owen Zinaman; Charles Forsberg

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere to systems that can drastically reduce environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both hydrocarbon resources and clean energy generation sources. Thus, DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options. A concept being advanced by the DOE Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that produces new energy currency for the combined electricity grid, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation energy sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of providing the right type of energy, at the right time, in the right place. At the direction of DOE-NE and DOE-EERE leadership, project leads at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have identified and engaged stakeholders in discussing integrated energy systems that would optimize renewable and nuclear energy integration on a region-by-region basis. Subsequent work will entail conduct of technical, economic, environmental and socio-political evaluations of the leading integrated system options based on a set of criteria established with stakeholder input. The Foundational Workshop for Integrated Nuclear – Renewable Energy Systems was organized around the following objectives: 1. Identify and refine priority region-specific opportunities for integrated nuclear-renewable energy systems in the U.S.; 2. Select Figures of Merit (FOM) to rank and prioritize candidate systems; 3. Discuss enabling technology development needs; 4. Identify analysis requirements, capabilities and gaps to estimate FOM for

  10. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-09-01

    This seventh Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 45 reporting sites from 1993 through 1998. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1998 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments. More detailed information follows this section in the body of the Report. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December31, 1999. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1998 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation decreased 67 percent overall from 1993 to 1998. However, for the first time since 1994, the total amount of materials recycled by the Complex decreased from 109,600 metric tons in 1997 to 92,800 metric tons in 1998. This decrease is attributed to the fact that in 1997, several large ''one-time only'' recycling projects were conducted throughout the Complex. In order to demonstrate commitment to DOE's Complex-wide recycling goal, it is important for sites to identify all potential large-scale recycling/reuse opportunities.

  11. Nuclear and Renewable Energy Synergies Workshop: Report of Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Antkowiak, M.; Gossett, S.

    2011-12-01

    Two of the major challenges the U.S. energy sector faces are greenhouse gas emissions and oil that is both imported and potentially reaching a peak (the point at which maximum extraction is reached). Interest in development of both renewable and nuclear energy has been strong because both have potential for overcoming these challenges. Research in both energy sources is ongoing, but relatively little research has focused on the potential benefits of combining nuclear and renewable energy. In September 2011, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) convened the Nuclear and Renewable Energy Synergies Workshop at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to identify potential synergies and strategic leveraging opportunities between nuclear energy and renewable energy. Industry, government, and academic thought leaders gathered to identify potential broad categories of synergies and brainstorm topic areas for additional analysis and research and development (R&D). This report records the proceedings and outcomes of the workshop.

  12. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  13. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  14. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  15. Space nuclear safety program. Progress report, October-December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, T.G.

    1986-05-01

    This quarterly report covers studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Nuclear Projects of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses.

  16. Space nuclear safety program: Progress report, July--September 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, T.G.

    1989-02-01

    This quarterly report describes studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotope power systems, carried out for the Office of Special Nuclear Projects of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The studies discussed are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses. 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. AUDIT REPORT Follow-up on Nuclear Safety: Safety Basis and Quality...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nuclear Safety: Safety Basis and Quality Assurance at the Los Alamos National Laboratory ... INFORMATION: Audit Report: "Follow-up on Nuclear Safety: Safety Basis and Quality ...

  18. Nuclear Theory and Applications progress report, January 1, 1989-- April 1, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strottman, D.D.; Mutschlecner, A.D.

    1990-12-01

    This report contains brief papers on the following topics: data evaluation and libraries; data processing; nuclear applications; reactions; fission; and nuclear structure.

  19. Summary for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project in Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-08-01

    This paper reports on the major progress that the NGNP Project has made toward developing and commercializing the HTGR technology. Significant R&D progress has been made in addressing key technical issues for qualification of the HTGR fuel and graphite, codification of high temperature materials and verification and validation of design codes. Work is also progressing in heat transfer/transport design and testing and in development of the high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production process. A viable licensing strategy has been formulated in coordination with the NRC and DOE. White papers covering key licensing issues have been and will continue to be submitted and necessary discussions of these key issues have begun with the NRC. Continued government support is needed to complete the Project objectives as established in the 2005 Energy Policy Act.

  20. Summary for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project in Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01

    This paper reports on the major progress that the NGNP Project has made toward developing and commercializing the HTGR technology. Significant R&D progress has been made in addressing key technical issues for qualification of the HTGR fuel and graphite, codification of high temperature materials and verification and validation of design codes. Work is also progressing in heat transfer/transport design and testing and in development of the high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production process. A viable licensing strategy has been formulated in coordination with the NRC and DOE. White papers covering key licensing issues have been and will continue to be submitted and necessary discussions of these key issues have begun with the NRC. Continued government support is needed to complete the Project objectives as established in the 2005 Energy Policy Act.

  1. Next-Generation Batteries: A New Report - Joint Center for Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 14, 2015, Videos Next-Generation Batteries: A New Report Next Generation Batteries: A New Report at AAAS Venkat Srinivasan, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Yi Cui, ...

  2. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    This Report summarizes the waste generation and pollution prevention activities of the major operational sites in the Department of Energy (DOE). We are witnessing progress in waste reduction from routine operations that are the focus of Department-wide reduction goals set by the Secretary on May 3,1996. The goals require that by the end of 1999, we reduce, recycle, reuse, and otherwise avoid waste generation to achieve a 50 percent reduction over 1993 levels. This Report provides the first measure of our progress in waste reduction and recycling against our 1993 waste generation baseline. While we see progress in reducing waste from our normal operations, we must begin to focus attention on waste generated by cleanup and facilities stabilization activities that are the major functions of the Office of Environmental Management. Reducing the generation of waste is one of the seven principles that I have established for the Office of Environmental Management Ten Year Plan. As part of our vision to complete a major portion of the environmental cleanup at DOE sites over the next ten years, we must utilize the potential of the pollution prevention program to reduce the cost of our cleanup program. We have included the Secretarial goals as part of the performance measures for the Ten Year Plan, and we are committed to implementing pollution prevention ideas. Through the efforts of both Federal and contractor employees, our pollution prevention program has reduced waste and the cost of our operations. I applaud their efforts and look forward to reporting further waste reduction progress in the next annual update of this Report.

  3. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  4. Risk perception & strategic decision making :general insights, a framework, and specific application to electricity generation using nuclear energy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, Jeffrey D.

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this report is to promote increased understanding of decision making processes and hopefully to enable improved decision making regarding high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological systems. This report brings together insights regarding risk perception and decision making across domains ranging from nuclear power technology safety, cognitive psychology, economics, science education, public policy, and neural science (to name a few). It forms them into a unique, coherent, concise framework, and list of strategies to aid in decision making. It is suggested that all decision makers, whether ordinary citizens, academics, or political leaders, ought to cultivate their abilities to separate the wheat from the chaff in these types of decision making instances. The wheat includes proper data sources and helpful human decision making heuristics; these should be sought. The chaff includes ''unhelpful biases'' that hinder proper interpretation of available data and lead people unwittingly toward inappropriate decision making ''strategies''; obviously, these should be avoided. It is further proposed that successfully accomplishing the wheat vs. chaff separation is very difficult, yet tenable. This report hopes to expose and facilitate navigation away from decision-making traps which often ensnare the unwary. Furthermore, it is emphasized that one's personal decision making biases can be examined, and tools can be provided allowing better means to generate, evaluate, and select among decision options. Many examples in this report are tailored to the energy domain (esp. nuclear power for electricity generation). The decision making framework and approach presented here are applicable to any high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological system.

  5. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

  6. Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A.

    1997-09-01

    This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

  7. US Releases Updated Plutonium Inventory Report | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) US Releases Updated Plutonium Inventory Report June 29, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced the public release of a report that details the current plutonium inventory of the U.S. Titled The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009, the document serves as an update to Plutonium: the First 50 Years, which was first released by the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996. The report provides the U.S. inventory of

  8. Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports for SIRS Radiometric Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports for SIRS Radiometric Measurements M. H. L. Anderberg, F. P. Rael, and T. L. Stoffell National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program needs high-quality broadband shortwave (SW) (solar) and longwave (LW) irradiance information for the development and validation of atmospheric circulation and climate models. To this end, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) performs a

  9. Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, W.D.; Friedlander, E.M.; Nitschke, J.M.; Stokstad, R.G.

    1981-03-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) during the period between July 1, 1979 and June 30, 1980. The principal objective of the division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interactions of heavy ions with target nuclei, complemented with programs in light ion nuclear science, in nuclear data compilations, and in advanced instrumentation development. The division continues to operate the 88 Inch Cyclotron as a major research facility that also supports a strong outside user program. Both the SuperHILAC and Bevalac accelerators, operated as national facilities by LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, are also important to NSD experimentalists. (WHK)

  10. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-03-01

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R&D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R&D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan.