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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Update report on the performance of 400 megawatt and larger nuclear and coal-fired generating units. Performance through 1977  

SciTech Connect

Forty-seven nuclear generating units and 125 coal-fired generating plants that have had at least one full year of commercial operation are covered in this report. Their performances are evaluated using the capacity factor, availability factor, equivalent availability, and forced outage rate. The data are arranged by state and utility. (DLC)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Restoration of the graphite memory of a reactor in the third power-generating unit of the Leningrad nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The restoration of the graphite masonry of cell 52-16 in the reactor in the third power-generating unit of the Leningrad nuclear power plant is described. The process reduces to moving...

V. I. Lebedev; Yu. V. Garusov; M. A. Pavlov; A. N. Peunov; E. P. Kozlov

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

4

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

5

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

6

Nuclear reactors in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors in the United States ... A chart listing the operating and planned nuclear reactors in the United States. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Hubert N. Alyea

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 ORNLTM-2007147, Vol. 5 Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research...

8

Suez SNC-Lavalin Nuclear to replace US steam generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SNC-Lavalin Nuclear (USA) has signed a contract with Xcel Energy to replace the Unit #2 steam generators at the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant (PINGP) in Welch, Minnesota.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Measurements of photon ionizing radiation fields in the reactor room of the 4th power-generating unit of the chernobyl nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radiation examination of the reactor room of the damaged fourth unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was performed. The most strongly radiating surfaces...

A. G. Volkovich; V. N. Potapov; S. V. Smirnov; L. I. Urutskoev

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ... The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy enhance safety and security, and develop nuclear power as an energy source for industrial applications Information ... U.S. Department of Energy www.energy.gov DOE Office of Nuclear Energy www.nuclear

Kemner, Ken

11

Next Generation Rooftop Unit | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Generation Rooftop Unit A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit:...

12

United States Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Experience Gained From Programs to Manage High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel in the United States and Other Countries A Report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy April 2011 #12;#12;U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Experience Gained From

13

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

qU oSoLTJRC qU oSoLTJRC United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Protecting People and the Environment NUREG-1872, Vol. 2 HudcD [jE©wftamfsýýpc Wafm(M oran EA Office of New Reactors AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material As of November 1999, you may electronically access NUREG-series publications and other NRC records at NRC's Public Electronic Reading Room at http:t/www.nrc..ov/reading-rm.html. Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments.

14

Douglas United Nuclear monthly report, June 1971  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the activities of Douglas United Nuclear at the Hanford site during the month of June 1971.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan President Bush of the United States and Prime Minister Koizumi of Japan...

16

Next Generation Rooftop Unit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit Next Generation Rooftop Unit Next Generation Rooftop Unit The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research in a next generation rooftop unit (RTU). More than half of U.S. commercial building space is cooled by packaged heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. Existing rooftop HVAC units consume more than 1.3% of the United States' annual energy usage annually. Project Description This project seeks to evaluate optimal design strategies for significantly improving the efficiency of rooftop units. The primary market for this project is commercial buildings, such as supermarkets and hotels. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National

17

United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy...

18

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington Dear Speaker Pelosi, Senator Byrd, and Secretary Bodman: The Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, and transporting high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. The Board is required to report its findings

19

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

con202vf UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300, the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (Board) submits its second report of 2003 in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Public Law 100-203. The Act requires the Board

20

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington are pleased to transmit a technical report prepared by the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (Board. Based on its review of data gathered by the DOE and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems February 28, 2005 - 10:33am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC-The Bush Administration today took a major step in advancing international efforts to develop the next generation of clean, safe nuclear energy systems. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined representatives from Canada, France, Japan, and the United Kingdom to sign the first multilateral agreement in history aimed at the development of next generation nuclear energy systems. The work of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is essential to advancing an important component of the Bush Administration's comprehensive energy strategy in the development of next generation nuclear energy technologies.

22

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan An outline on the United States and Japan's joint nuclear energy action...

23

Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

Schmalensee, Richard

24

Nuclear power eyed to generate industrial heat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power eyed to generate industrial heat ... The American Nuclear Society has called for "an aggresssive national policy aimed at demonstrating specific capabilities and providing incentives for the application of nuclear power to meeting industrial energy needs." ...

1983-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

26

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: September 26, 2014 Data for: July 2014 Next Release: October 2014 Year Capacity and Generation by State and Reactor...

27

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 AUG i 3 1979 ,,~---Y--*. FCAF:Wi3 )I 70-364 : i: SNM-414,jAmendment No. 3 --A Babcock and Wilcox Company Nuclear Materials Division ATTN: Mr. Michael A. Austin Manager, Technical Control 609 North Warren Avenue Apollo, Pennsylvania 15613 Gentiemen: (1 i' \ (. \ In accordance with your application dated June 18, 1979, and pursuant to Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 70, Materials License SNM-414 is hereby amended to: 1. Delete the function of the Regulatory Projects Coordinator, and 2. Alter the experience requirements for the function of Licensing and Nuclear Safety Specialist. Replacement pages for the license and condition section of the application are attached. Included are changes to License SNM-414 pages to reflect

28

Minimal nuclear deterrence : a nuclear arsenal reduction plan for the United States ; Nuclear arsenal reduction plan for the United States .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The global political climate has called for reductions to nuclear arsenals around the world. This thesis researches how potential deep cuts to the United States' (more)

Laderman, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

"1. Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois" Illinois" "1. Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330 "2. Byron Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2300 "3. LaSalle Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2238 "4. Baldwin Energy Complex","Coal","Dynegy Midwest Generation Inc",1785 "5. Quad Cities Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",1774 "6. Dresden Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",1734 "7. Powerton","Coal","Midwest Generations EME LLC",1538 "8. Elwood Energy LLC","Gas","Dominion Elwood Services Co",1350

30

United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) Annual Steering Committee Meeting United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International...

31

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - 2013 Peer Review | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

emrgtech11shen040313.pdf More Documents & Publications A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Next Generation Rooftop Unit...

32

Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear...

33

Specific activity of243Am and243Cm in the fuel of the 4th power-generating unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activity ratios241Am/241Am.243Cm/244Cm, and242Cm/244Cm in core samples taken at the industrial site of the object Cover were measured. The content of243Am and243Cm in the fuel in the 4th power-generating un...

V. A. Ageev; S. L. Vyrichek; A. P. Lashko; T. N. Lashko; A. A. Odintsov

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

THE BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY The first time that electricity was generated from nuclear energy occurred in an experimental breeder reactor in Idaho in 1951. The idea for a breeder reactor (a reactor that could produce more fuel than it uses) first occurred to scientists working on the nation's wartime atomic energy program in the early 1940's. Experimental evidence indicated that the breeding of nuclear fuel was possible in a properly designed reactor, but time and resources were not then available to pursue the idea After the war, the newly established Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy) assigned some of the nation's nuclear skills and resources to developing peaceful uses of the atom. The large bodies of uranium ore found in the 1950's were

35

Simulation of a generator for a wind-power unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of excitation systems of generators for wind-power units is carried out, a software package for generator simulation is presented, and the sequence of the...

I. M. Kirpichnikova; A. S. Martyanov; E. V. Solomin

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Experience in operating and upgrading the No. 5 unit of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant practical base for developing a reliable source of nuclear energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The No. 5 unit of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant, starting commercial operations on September 26, 1980, is the first power-generating unit with a 1000 MW VVER in our country. The assimilation of its power g...

I. L. Vitkovskii

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator Activities OAS-L-14-11 August 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and...

38

Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology September 29, 2014 - 11:06am Addthis Fostering the Next...

39

United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements September 30, 2009 - 1:23pm Addthis U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Italian Minister for Economic Development Claudio Scajola today signed two important nuclear energy agreements that may lead to construction of new nuclear power plants and improved cooperation on advanced nuclear energy systems and fuel cycle technologies in both countries. The U.S.-Italy Joint Declaration Concerning Industrial and Commercial Cooperation in the Nuclear Energy Sector, which was signed on behalf of the United States by Secretary Chu and Deputy Secretary of Commerce Dennis F. Hightower, affirms the strong interest of the United States and Italy to encourage their respective nuclear industries to seek opportunities for the

40

United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements September 30, 2009 - 1:23pm Addthis U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Italian Minister for Economic Development Claudio Scajola today signed two important nuclear energy agreements that may lead to construction of new nuclear power plants and improved cooperation on advanced nuclear energy systems and fuel cycle technologies in both countries. The U.S.-Italy Joint Declaration Concerning Industrial and Commercial Cooperation in the Nuclear Energy Sector, which was signed on behalf of the United States by Secretary Chu and Deputy Secretary of Commerce Dennis F. Hightower, affirms the strong interest of the United States and Italy to encourage their respective nuclear industries to seek opportunities for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011). Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download February 17, 2012 EIS-0476: Notice of Adoption of Final Environmental Impact Statement Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4, Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Support Funding for Construction, Burke County, GA

42

Property:NbrGeneratingUnits | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NbrGeneratingUnits NbrGeneratingUnits Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NbrGeneratingUnits Property Type Number Description Number of Generating Units. Pages using the property "NbrGeneratingUnits" Showing 12 pages using this property. B BLM Geothermal Facility + 3 + Blundell 1 Geothermal Facility + 1 + Blundell 2 Geothermal Facility + 1 + E ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility + 2 + F Faulkner I Energy Generation Facility + 6 + N Navy I Geothermal Facility + 3 + Navy II Geothermal Facility + 3 + Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant + 3 + North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant + 5 + P Puna Geothermal Facility + 10 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 1 + Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center + 1 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:NbrGeneratingUnits&oldid=400184#SMWResults"

43

Electric generating prospects for nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the nuclear power plants in the U.S. today are of the light-water variety. In many parts of the U.S. these plants are competitive with plants burning coal, but the electricity that they generate will be more costly in the future as uranium supplies ...

Manson Benedict

1970-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Investing in the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders Investing in the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders August 9, 2011 - 5:12pm Addthis Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy As part of the Energy Department's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP) annual workshop, I met today with professors from across the country and announced awards of up to $39 million for research projects aimed at developing cutting-edge nuclear energy technologies. The awards will also help train and educate the next generation of nuclear industry leaders in the U.S. These projects, led by 31 universities in more than 20 states, will help to enable the safe, secure and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy in the United States.

45

World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 - Datasets...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Energy Information ... World Net Nuclear Electric ... Dataset Activity Stream World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 International data showing world net...

46

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7" 7" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

47

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

48

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9" 9" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

49

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6" 6" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

50

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10" 10" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

51

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8" 8" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

52

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

53

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5" 5" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

54

Marine Nuclear Propulsion for the United Kingdom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the Government in an adjournment debate in the House of Commons on March 21 on marine nuclear ... nuclear propulsion, the Joint Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Transport, Mr. John Hay, said ...

1960-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

55

Microstructural Characterization of Next Generation Nuclear Graphites  

SciTech Connect

This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

Karthik Chinnathambi; Joshua Kane; Darryl P. Butt; William E. Windes; Rick Ubic

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Future Trends in Nuclear Power Generation [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Future Trends in Nuclear Power Generation [and Discussion...the Calder Hall reactors were ordered...building and operating nuclear power stations...situations, a high nuclear share of new capacity...1980s. The fast reactor, prototypes of...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor " "PlantReactor Name","Generator ID","State","Type","2009 Summer Capacity"," 2010 Annual...

58

Minimal nuclear deterrence : a nuclear arsenal reduction plan for the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global political climate has called for reductions to nuclear arsenals around the world. This thesis researches how potential deep cuts to the United States' large strategic nuclear arsenal would affect its current ...

Laderman, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

62

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Salem Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Salem Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

63

EIS-0362: Colorado Springs Utilities' Next Generation CFB Coal Generating Unit, CO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve Colorado Springs Utilities design, construction, and operation of their Next- Generation Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Coal Generating Unit demonstration plant near Fountain, El Paso County, Colorado.

64

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Radiation Control Program The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in Maine. The Legislature

65

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

66

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03 United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNITED NUCLEAR CORP. (MO.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Mallinckrodt Chemical Works Mallinckrodt Nuclear Corporation MO.0-03-1 MO.0-03-2 Location: Hematite , Missouri MO.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MO.0-03-3 Site Operations: Commercial fuel fabrication operation. Licensed to reclaim unirradiated enriched uranium from scrap generated in fuel fabrication and fuel material preparation. MO.0-03-1 MO.0-03-2 MO.0-03-3 MO.0-03-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed - Commercial operations MO.0-03-3 MO.0-03-5 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MO.0-03-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

67

United States Nuclear Data Program (USNDP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NNDC Databases: NuDat | NSR | XUNDL | ENSDF | MIRD | ENDF | CSISRS | Sigma NNDC Databases: NuDat | NSR | XUNDL | ENSDF | MIRD | ENDF | CSISRS | Sigma Search the NNDC: Go NNDC Site Index USNDP Meetings 2013 Nov. 18-22 USNDP Proceedings 2012 Annual Meeting Nov. 5-9 2011 Annual Meeting 2010 Annual Meeting 2009 Annual Meeting 2008 Annual Meeting 2007 Annual Meeting 2006 Annual Meeting Distributions CSEWG List USNDP List CSEWG & USNDP List Nuclear Data Needs for Homeland Security USNDP Structure Coordinating Committee Members Member Organizations Archival Webpage 1996 U.S. Nuclear Data Program Sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Physics - Office of Science - U.S. Department of Energy Reports FY 2012 Annual Report FY 2011 Annual Report FY 2010 Annual Report FY 2009 Annual Report FY 2008 Annual Report FY 2007 Annual Report FY 2006 Annual Report

68

EM Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority EM Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (left) and Mark Lesinski, U.K.'s Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Executive Director for Delivery, renewed the Statement of Intent between DOE and NDA in a signing ceremony this week. DOE Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (left) and Mark Lesinski, U.K.'s Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Executive Director for Delivery, renewed the Statement of Intent between DOE and NDA in a signing ceremony this week. Florida International University's DOE Fellows gather for a photo with DOE Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (eighth from left) and DOE Fellows director, Dr. Leo Lagos (tenth from left), at the 2012 Waste Management Symposia in Phoenix this week.

69

Unit Commitment Considering Generation Flexibility and Environmental Constraints  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a new framework for power system unit commitment process, which incorporates the generation flexibility requirements and environmental constraints into the existing unit commitment algorithm. The generation flexibility requirements are to address the uncertainties with large amount of intermittent resources as well as with load and traditional generators, which causes real-time balancing requirements to be variable and less predictable. The proposed flexibility requirements include capacity, ramp and ramp duration for both upward and downward balancing reserves. The environmental constraints include emission allowance for fossil fuel-based generators and ecological regulations for hydro power plants. Calculation of emission rates is formulated. Unit commitment under this new framework will be critical to the economic and reliable operation of the power grid and the minimization of its negative environmental impacts, especially when high penetration levels of intermittent resources are being approached, as required by the renewable portfolio standards in many states.

Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.; Zhu, Yunhua; Lu, Ning; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Chakrabarti, Bhujanga B.

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

71

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

72

NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative September 09, 2008 Washington, DC NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

73

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resources. However, the technology has not been demonstrated...nonrenewable natural gas), although various measures...energy. Outlook Nuclear technology is at a crossroads. The...International Forum, A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

74

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Water generator replaces bottled water in nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WaterPure International Incorporated of Doylestown, Pennsylvania, USA, has announced that it has placed its atmospheric water generator (AWG) inside a selected nuclear power plant.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Announced United States nuclear tests, July 1945--December 1990  

SciTech Connect

This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by event name all nuclear tests conducted and announced by the United States from July 1945 to December 1990 with the exception of the GMX experiments. Discussion is included on test dates, test series, test yields, test locations, test types and purposes, test totals for Nevada Test Site (NTS) detection of radioactivity from NTS events, and categorization of NTS nuclear tests. Briefly discussed are agreements between the US and the Soviet Union regarding test banning. (MB)

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60 Million to Train Next Generation 60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology September 20, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to continue America's leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure. The 91 awards announced today will help train and educate the next generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative

78

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology September 20, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to continue America's leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure. The 91 awards announced today will help train and educate the next generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative

79

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor prototype with the capability to produce process heat, electricity and/or hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor is based on research and development activities supported by DOE's Generation IV nuclear energy systems initiative.

80

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REGION I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REGION I REGION I 475 ALLENDALE ROAD KING OF PRUSSIA, PENNSYLVANIA 194061415 Docket No. 040-07123 JUL. 19 '996 License No. SUB-748 (Retired) United States -Department of Energy O ffice of EnvironmentalRestoration ATTN: W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D. EM-241 Cloverleaf Building 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, Maryland 20874-1290 SUBJECT: NL INDUSTRIES, ALBANY, NEW YORK Dear Dr. Williams: We are aware that DOE is responsible for the former National Lead Company (NL Industries) facility near Albany, New York. During a recent review of retired AEC License No. SUB-748, we found records which provide additional information concerning the use of source material at the facility. Copies of AEC documents which describe activities at that facility are enclosed. License No. SUB-00748 authorized possession of 38,000 pounds of uranium during

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

82

Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

83

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new installations in the short term. DOE needs to give those immediate objectives the highest priority and any additional support they require to assure their success. DOE is pursuing two initiatives to encourage a greater use of nuclear energy systems. The initiatives have been reviewed by NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning (GRNS) and they are: * A Near Term Development (NTD) Roadmap which is in the process of being

84

Identifying and Characterizing Candidate Areas for Siting New Nuclear Capacity in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff recently completed an internal 'Energy Assurance' study examining the key issues associated with the country's energy needs for the future focusing on generation sources, baseload options, transmission and distribution, reduction of greenhouse gases, and overall energy security issues. In examining the various generation sources including nuclear power and renewables, one principal finding was that 300 GW(e) of new nuclear electrical generating capacity would be needed by 2050. With that need, the initial, obvious question is can 300 GW(e) of nuclear capacity be sited in the United States? In an attempt to address that question as well as others, ORNL initiated a 'National Electric Generation Siting Study,' which is to be a multiphase study to address several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. The initial phase of this study is to examine the nuclear option. This paper summarizes the approach developed for screening sites, the methodology employed that includes spatial modeling, and preliminary results using the southeast United States to demonstrate the usefulness of the overall approach as a test case.

Mays, Gary T [ORNL] [ORNL; Jochem, Warren C [ORNL] [ORNL; Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL] [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL] [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL] [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL] [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

D.McNew/GettyIMaGes San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.McNew/GettyIMaGes San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, California. CORRESPONDENCE Checklist be supplied by solar power plants covering about 36,000 square kilometres of land in the desert southwest,theycanberampedupquickly.Annualinstallationofwind- energy capacity in the United States has quadrupled from Counterpoint Not wanted, not needed J. Doyne

86

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

87

United States and Czech Republic Establish a Joint Civil Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish a Joint Civil Nuclear Establish a Joint Civil Nuclear Cooperation Center in Prague United States and Czech Republic Establish a Joint Civil Nuclear Cooperation Center in Prague June 12, 2013 - 12:17pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 PRAGUE, Czech Republic - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently joined with the U.S. Embassy in Prague and the Czech Republic's Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports to sign an agreement that establishes a joint Civil Nuclear Cooperation Center in Prague. The creation of this Center is another valued step in expanding U.S.-Czech energy collaboration and fulfills the commitment made by President Obama and Czech Prime Minister Nečas in October 2011 to establish such a Center to facilitate and coordinate joint activities and support regional initiatives in the

88

Viability of an expanded United States nuclear power program and its effects on energy markets .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The four biggest energy sources in the United States are coal, crude oil, natural gas, and nuclear power. While coal and nuclear power are produced (more)

Khan, Tanzeer S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7" 7" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","MultiGenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

90

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8" 8" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","MultiGenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

91

Generation IV (Gen IV) - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation IV (Gen Generation IV (Gen IV) Generation IV Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Major Programs Generation IV (Gen IV) Development of next generation nuclear systems featuring significant advances in sustainability, economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Bookmark and Share Generation IV Fact Sheet (73 KB) Overview Generation IV nuclear energy systems target significant advances over current-generation and evolutionary systems in the areas of sustainability, safety and reliability, and economics. These systems are to be deployable by 2030 in both industrialized and developing countries. Development of Generation IV systems is an international initiative. A

92

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo

93

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo

94

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

teri.ehresman@inl.gov Bill Cabage (ORNL), 865-574-4399, cabagewh@ornl.gov Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident conditions IDAHO FALLS - A safer...

96

United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group Meeting United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear...

97

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOEs project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

09" 09" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

99

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10" 10" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

100

Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped charged jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high-temperature plasma systems. Fusion reactors will likely depend on lithium-based ceramics to produce tritium that fuels the fusion plasma, while high-temperature alloys or ceramics will contain and control the hot plasma. All the while, alloys, ceramics, and ceramic-related processes continue to find applications in the management of wastes and byproducts produced by these processes.

John Marra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

103

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inhomogeneously distributed fission gas bubbles and oxides, and noble metal precipitates...conventional island (the turbine and generator). At the end of its...coproduct of nonrenewable natural gas), although various measures such as cooling...International Forum, A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

104

Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Flushing, NY); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven, NY); Todosow, Michael (Miller Place, NY)

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

105

Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

106

An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect

The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated toolkit consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

Timothy J. Leahy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear Navy United States Atomic Energy Commission Historical Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Navy Navy United States Atomic Energy Commission Historical Advisory Committee Chairman, Alfred D. Chandler, Jr. Harvard University John T. Conway Consolidated Edison Company Lauchlin M. Currie Carmel, California A. Hunter Dupree Brown University Ernest R. May Harvard University Robert P. Multhauf Smithsonian Institution Nuclear Navy 1946-1962 Richard G. Hewlett and Francis Duncan The University of Chicago Press Chicago and London The University of Chicago Press Chicago 60637 The University of Chicago Press Ltd., London Published 1974 Printed in the United States of America International Standard Book Number: 0-226-33219-5 Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 74-5726 RICHARD G. HEWLETT is chief historian of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. He is coauthor, with Oscar E.

108

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

109

Methane generation at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station  

SciTech Connect

The methane generation at Grand Gulf has been brought to light twice. The initial event occurred in February 1990 and the second in December 1993. Both events involved the receipt of a cask at Barnwell Waste Management Facility that when opened indicated a gas escaping. The gas was subsequently sampled and indicated a percentage of explosive gas. Both events involved powdered resin and indicated that the generation was from a bacterial attack of the organic materials (cellulose in the powdered resin mixture). The first event occurred and was believed to be isolated in a particular waste stream. The situation was handled and a biocide was found to be effective in treatment of liners until severe cross contamination of another waste stream occurred. This allowed the shipment of a liner that was required to be sampled for explosive gases. The biocide used by GGNS was allowed reintroduction into the floor drains and this allowed the buildup of immunity of the bacterial population to this particular biocide. The approval of a new biocide has currently allowed GGNS to treat liners and ship them offsite.

Carver, M.L. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Port Gibson, MS (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

111

Job Creation Due to Nuclear Power Resurgence in The United States  

SciTech Connect

The recent revival of global interest in the next generation of nuclear power reactors is causing a reexamination of the role of nuclear power in the United States. This renewed interest has led to questions regarding the capability and capacity of current U.S. industries to support a renewal of nuclear power plant deployment. Key among the many questions currently being asked is what potential exists for the creation of new jobs as a result of developing and operating these new plants? Idaho National Laboratory and Bechtel Power Corporation collaborated to perform a Department of Energy-sponsored study that evaluated the potential for job creation in the U.S. should these new next generation nuclear power plants be built. The study focused primarily on providing an initial estimate of the numbers of new manufacturing jobs that could be created, including those that could be repatriated from overseas, resulting from the construction of these new reactors. In addition to the growth in the manufacturing sector, the study attempted to estimate the potential increase in construction trades necessary to accomplish the new construction.

C. R. Kenley; R. D. Klingler; C. M. Plowman; R. Soto; R. J. Turk; R. L. Baker; S. A. Close; V. L. McDonnell; S. W. Paul; L. R. Rabideau; S. S. Rao; B. P. Reilly

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The future of nuclear power in the United States : economic and regulatory challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the economic and regulatory challenges that must be faced by potential investors in new nuclear power plants in the United States. The historical development of the existing fleet of over 100 nuclear ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Viability of an expanded United States nuclear power program and its effects on energy markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The four biggest energy sources in the United States are coal, crude oil, natural gas, and nuclear power. While coal and nuclear power are produced domestically, more than 70% of crude oil and 20% of natural gas is imported. ...

Khan, Tanzeer S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the United States Department Of Energy Public Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 The UNITED STATES 3 NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION and 4 the UNITED STATES 5 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 6 7 PUBLIC MEETING 8 9 DISCUSSION OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SECTION 3116 OF 10 THE NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT 11 12 Commencing at 9:10 a.m., November 16, 2006 13 at the L'Enfant Plaza Hotel 14 480 L'Enfant Plaza, SW 15 Washington DC 20024 16 17 Public meeting organized by: 18 Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. 19 20010 Century Boulevard, Suite 500 20 Germantown, Maryland 20874 21 (301) 972-4430 22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 2 P R O C E E D I N G S MR. CAMERON: Good morning everyone. My name is Chip Cameron. I'm an assistant general counsel in the office of General Counsel at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. And I would like to

115

I UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGU.LATORYCOMMISS& REGION I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' \*-'- ' \*-'- I UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGU.LATORYCOMMISS& REGION I 63, PARK AVENUE KING OF PRUSSIA. PENNSY LVANIA 19406 I..*. :+ 2 6 JUN 1979 2.lr.b The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Health Division of Health Care Standards 8 Regulation ATTN: Mr. Gerald S. Parker, Director Radiation Control Programs 80 Boylston Street, Room 835 Boston, Massachusetts 02116 Dear Mr. Parker: Enclosed for your information and retention is a copy of the NRC, Region I Investigation Report No. 078-154-A which documents our investigation into.the source of the radioactive material found at the privately owned landfill in Norton, Massachusetts. The report has been prepared in two parts. Confidential - Restricted data has been intentionally omitted.

116

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...capacity of waste repositories for decommissioning waste in the second half of the century will...is returned to the manufacturer for decommissioning and disposal. Because fuel handling is avoided at the...International Forum, A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...be refueled while remaining online (LWRs have...distributed fission gas bubbles and oxides, and...long-term storage. Life extension. This...16) (which have remaining design work to be...the fueled-for-life core, that is, a nuclear...island (the turbine and generator...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

118

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for the United States Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Hypergraph on FErari ­ Optimization of FFC generated code ­ Equivalent to optimizing matrix-vector product code ­ Graph

Wolf, Michael M.

119

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ENSURING A SKILLED WORKFORCE FOR THE NUCLEAR RENAISSANCE The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carolina. Georgia's four nuclear units account for more than one-fourth of the State's electricity generation. South Carolina's five nuclear units supply about half of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project 2009 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the NGNP Project is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy technology to the United States and other economies by demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not served by light water reactors (LWRs). Those markets typically use fossil fuels to fulfill their energy needs, and high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) like the NGNP can reduce this dependence and the resulting carbon footprint.

Larry Demick; Jim Kinsey; Keith Perry; Dave Petti

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet | National United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet Fact Sheet United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet Mar 27, 2012

123

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

124

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan The United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan is intended to provide a framework for bilateral collaboration in nuclear energy. This Action Plan builds upon our significant, longstanding civilian nuclear cooperation, and will contribute to increasing energy security and managing nuclear waste, addressing nuclear nonproliferation and climate change, advancing goals put forth in President Bush's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. The Action Plan was signed by representatives of both nations in April 2007. The Action Plan will be implemented by Steering Committee Co-Chairs. Assistant Secretary of Energy Dennis Spurgeon, or his designee, will serve as the U.S. Co-Chair. Japanese Co-Chairs will be selected

126

United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation April 25, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - United States Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Japan's Ministers Akira Amari, Bunmei Ibuki, and Taro Aso, this week presented to U.S. President George W. Bush and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, the United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan. The Action Plan - a product of extensive negotiations between the U.S. and Japan - provides a framework for increased collaboration in nuclear energy. It builds upon the significant, longstanding civilian nuclear cooperation between the two nations and will contribute to increasing

127

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest  

SciTech Connect

This Revision 9 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 9 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through September 30, 1990. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346. Persons using this Digest are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in support of any position before the Commission or any of its adjudicatory tribunals. Persons using this Digest are also placed on notice that it is intended for use only as an initial research tool, that it may, and likely does, contain errors, including errors in analysis and interpretation of decisions, and that the user should not rely on the Digest analyses and interpretations but must read, analyze and rely on the user's own analysis of the actual Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions cited. Further, neither the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Aspen Systems Corporation, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any material presented in the Digest. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on general matters. Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. (JF)

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Quantifying Avoided Fuel Use and Emissions from Solar Photovoltaic Generation in the Western United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantifying Avoided Fuel Use and Emissions from Solar Photovoltaic Generation in the Western United States ... National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd, Golden, Colorado 80401 ...

Paul Denholm; Robert M. Margolis; James M. Milford

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

129

United Kingdom HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal United Kingdom HEU Removal Location United Kingdom United States 52 24' 15.1416" N, 1 34' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

130

United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group Meeting United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group Meeting December 10, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Moscow - Earlier this week, Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman, representing the United States government, signed a joint statement with Russia's Director General of the State Atomic Energy Corporation "Rosatom" Sergey Kirienko on the results of the Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group meeting that took place on December 6-7, 2010. The Working Group meeting strengthened cooperation between the U.S. and Russia on civil nuclear energy and nuclear security. Read the joint statement (PDF - 412 kb) signed by Deputy Secretary Poneman

131

An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable (more)

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

United States Nuclear Energy and Non-Proliferation Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I believe that U.S. nuclear energy and non-proliferation policy is not well understood, and I hope ... I shall speak first about the role of nuclear energy within the context of overall energy policy, then about ...

Daniel P. Serwer

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Text to Text : plot unit searches generated from English  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The story of Macbeth centers around revenge. World War I was started by an act of revenge. Even though these two stories are seemingly unrelated, humans use the same concept to draw meaning from them. Plot units, revenge ...

Nackoul, David Douglas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Autonomous Control of Inverter-Interfaced Distributed Generation Units for Harmonic Current Filtering and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous Control of Inverter-Interfaced Distributed Generation Units for Harmonic Current-interfaced Distributed Generation (DG) units, which can autonomously share harmonic currents and resonance damping, such that harmonic resonances and voltage distortions can be damped. To autonomously share harmonic currents, a droop

Chen, Zhe

135

Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions Tao Xie1 of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105 Abstract. Unit testing, a common step in software development, presents a chal- lenge. When produced manually, unit test suites are often insufficient to identify defects. The main

Xie, Tao

136

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling April 16, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Mexican Minister of Finance and Public Credit Agustin Carstens today signed an agreement to help detect and prevent the smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive material. Under the Megaports agreement, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will collaborate with Mexican Customs to install radiation detection equipment at four Mexican seaports that account for nearly 90 percent of container traffic in Mexico. The agreement is part of the 2005 Security and Prosperity Partnership. "The Megaports Agreement signed today solidifies the United States and

137

Security by Design in the United States: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

by Design in the United States: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear by Design in the United States: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Security by Design in the United States: ... Fact Sheet Security by Design in the United States: Fact Sheet Mar 23, 2012 Since the events of September 11, 2001, security requirements for nuclear

138

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling April 16, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Mexican Minister of Finance and Public Credit Agustin Carstens today signed an agreement to help detect and prevent the smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive material. Under the Megaports agreement, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will collaborate with Mexican Customs to install radiation detection equipment at four Mexican seaports that account for nearly 90 percent of container traffic in Mexico. The agreement is part of the 2005 Security and Prosperity Partnership. "The Megaports Agreement signed today solidifies the United States and

139

United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials.

Newton, J. W.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 | National Nuclear Security United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Plutonium Pits > The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear Energy United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear Energy September 30, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Italian Minister for Economic Development Claudio Scajola today signed two important nuclear energy agreements that may lead to construction of new nuclear power plants and improved cooperation on advanced nuclear energy systems and fuel cycle technologies in both countries. The U.S.-Italy Joint Declaration Concerning Industrial and Commercial Cooperation in the Nuclear Energy Sector, which was signed on behalf of the United States by Secretary Chu and Deputy Secretary of Commerce Dennis F. Hightower, affirms the strong interest of the United States and Italy to

142

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report The objective of this document is to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry with the basis for a plan to ensure the availability of near-term nuclear energy options that can be in operation in the U.S. by 2010. This document identifies the technological, regulatory, and institutional gaps and issues that need to be addressed for new nuclear plants to be deployed in the U.S. in this timeframe. It also identifies specific designs that could be deployed by 2010, along with the actions and resource requirements that are needed to ensure their

143

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report The objective of this document is to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry with the basis for a plan to ensure the availability of near-term nuclear energy options that can be in operation in the U.S. by 2010. This document identifies the technological, regulatory, and institutional gaps and issues that need to be addressed for new nuclear plants to be deployed in the U.S. in this timeframe. It also identifies specific designs that could be deployed by 2010, along with the actions and resource requirements that are needed to ensure their

144

Innovative systems for sustainable nuclear energy generation and waste management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The limited amount of fossil resources, the impact of green-house gas emissions on the world climate, the rising demand of primary energy projected to 2050, lead to a potentially critical situation for the world energy supply. The need for alternative (to fossil energies) massive energy production is evaluated to 10 Gtoe. The potential of Nuclear Energy generation at the level of 5 Gtoe is examined. Such a sustainable production can only be met by a breeder reactor fleet for which a deployment scenario is described with the associated constraints. Waste management is discussed in connection with different nuclear energy development scenarios according to the point in time when breeder reactors are started. At the world level, it appears that the optimal handling of today's wastes rests on an early decision to develop tomorrow's breeder reactors.

Jm Loiseaux; S David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Alternative similarity renormalization group generators in nuclear structure calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The similarity renormalization group (SRG) has been successfully applied to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. In almost all practical applications in nuclear physics, an SRG generator with the kinetic energy operator is used. With this choice, a fast convergence of many-body calculations can be achieved, but at the same time substantial three-body interactions are induced even if one starts from a purely two-nucleon (NN) Hamiltonian. Three-nucleon (3N) interactions can be handled by modern many-body methods. However, it has been observed that when including initial chiral 3N forces in the Hamiltonian, the SRG transformations induce a non-negligible four-nucleon interaction that cannot be currently included in the calculations for technical reasons. Consequently, it is essential to investigate alternative SRG generators that might suppress the induction of many-body forces while at the same time might preserve the good convergence. In this work we test two alternative generators with oper...

Dicaire, Nuiok M; Navratil, Petr

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Alternative similarity renormalization group generators in nuclear structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The similarity renormalization group (SRG) has been successfully applied to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. In almost all practical applications in nuclear physics, an SRG generator with the kinetic energy operator is used. With this choice, a fast convergence of many-body calculations can be achieved, but at the same time substantial three-body interactions are induced even if one starts from a purely two-nucleon (NN) Hamiltonian. Three-nucleon (3N) interactions can be handled by modern many-body methods. However, it has been observed that when including initial chiral 3N forces in the Hamiltonian, the SRG transformations induce a non-negligible four-nucleon interaction that cannot be currently included in the calculations for technical reasons. Consequently, it is essential to investigate alternative SRG generators that might suppress the induction of many-body forces while at the same time might preserve the good convergence. In this work we test two alternative generators with operators of block structure in the harmonic oscillator basis. In the no-core shell model calculations for 3H, 4He, and 6Li with chiral NN force, we demonstrate that their performances appear quite promising.

Nuiok M. Dicaire; Conor Omand; Petr Navrtil

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

Alternative similarity renormalization group generators in nuclear structure calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The similarity renormalization group (SRG) has been successfully applied to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. In almost all practical applications in nuclear physics, an SRG generator with the kinetic energy operator is used. With this choice, a fast convergence of many-body calculations can be achieved, but at the same time substantial three-body interactions are induced even if one starts from a purely two-nucleon (NN) Hamiltonian. Three-nucleon (3N) interactions can be handled by modern many-body methods. However, it has been observed that when including initial chiral 3N forces in the Hamiltonian, the SRG transformations induce a non-negligible four-nucleon interaction that cannot be currently included in the calculations for technical reasons. Consequently, it is essential to investigate alternative SRG generators that might suppress the induction of many-body forces while at the same time might preserve the good convergence. In this work we test two alternative generators with operators of block structure in the harmonic oscillator basis. In the no-core shell model calculations for 3H, 4He and 6Li with chiral NN force, we demonstrate that their performances appear quite promising.

Nuiok M. Dicaire; Conor Omand; Petr Navratil

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

148

STOCHASTIC FLOW SEQUENCE GENERATION AND ASPINALL UNIT OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the University of Colorado in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Science by Professor Balaji Rajagopalan The Aspinall Unit is comprised of three reservoirs that lie on the western for the Colorado River Basin, paleo reconstructed flows dating back to the 1500's suggest that such events

149

Removal of deposited copper from nuclear steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A review of the copper-removal process implemented during the cleaning of the NPD nuclear steam generator in Ontario revealed that major shortcomings in the process were depletion of the strong ammonia solution and relatively poor copper removal. Tests have shown that the concentration of the ammonia solution can be preserved close to its initial value, and high concentrations of complexed copper obtained, by sparging the ammonia solution with oxygen recirculating through a gas recirculation loop. Using recirculating oxygen for sparging at ambient air temperature, approximately 11 g/l of copper were dissolved by 100 g/l ammonia solution while the gaseous ammonia content of the recirculating gas remained well below the lower flammability limit. The corrosion rates of mild steel and commonly used nuclear steam generator tube materials in oxygenated ammonia solution were less than 30 mil/yr and no intergranular attack of samples was observed during tests. A second technique studied for the removal of copper is to ammoniate the spent iron-removal solvent to approximately pH 9.5 and sparge with recirculating oxygen. Complexed ferric iron in the spent iron-removal solvent was found to be the major oxidizing agent for metallic copper. The ferric iron can be derived from oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron to the ferric state or from dissolved oxides of iron directly. To extract copper from the secondary sides of nuclear steam generators, strong ammonia solution sparged with recirculating oxygen is recommended as the first stage, while ammoniated spent iron-removal solvent sparged with recirculating oxygen may be used to remove the copper freshly exposed during the removal of iron.

McSweeney, P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION WAWINQTON, 0. C....  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of technology, and the economics of improvements in relation to benefits to the public health and safety.' Surface Contamination The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of...

151

Siting and sizing of distributed generation units using GA and OPF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the important task of finding the optimal siting and sizing of Distributed Generation (DG) units for a given distribution network so that the cost of active and reactive power generation can be minimized. The optimization technique ... Keywords: distributed generation, genetic alghorithm(GA), optimal power flow(OPF)

M. Hosseini Aliabadi; M. Mardaneh; B. Behbahan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Joint Statement by the United States and Italy on the 2014 Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit Press Release Mar 24, 2014 See a fact sheet here. The White House Office of the Press Secretary Italy and the United States of America are pleased...

153

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

154

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

155

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

156

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

157

Generating Unstructured Nuclear Reactor Core Meshes in Parallel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor core examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.

Rajeev Jain; Timothy J. Tautges

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ronald E. Hagen, John R. Moens, and Zdenek D. Nikodem Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy International Atomic Energy Agency Vienna, Austria November 6-9, 2001 iii Energy Information Administration/ Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contents Page I. The Electric Power Industry and the Greenhouse Gas Issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. The Current Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 III. The Future Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IV. Factors That Affect Nuclear Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 V. Conclusion

159

United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan 1. Introduction 1.1 Background and Objective President Bush of the U n i t e d States and Prime Minister Koizumi of Japan have both stated their strong support for the contribution of nuclear power to energy security and the global environment. Japan w a s the first nation to endorse President Bush's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. During the June 29,2006 meeting between President Bush and Prime Minister Koizumi, "We discussed research and development that will help speed up fnt breeder reactors and new types of reprocessing so that we cmt help deal with the cost of globalization when it comes to energy; make ourselves more secure, economicallyI a s well n make us less dependent on hycirocmbons ..... " (I)

160

Nuclear Waste Management in the United StatesStarting Over  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...selection of Yucca Mountain prevented the...Unreliable funding source...The Yucca Mountain program will...nuclear waste disposal (17...UndergroundYucca Mountain and the Nation's...Sweden, SNF disposal site , www...

Rodney C. Ewing; Frank N. von Hippel

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

INL Director Discusses the Future for Nuclear Energy in the United States  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains that the United States should develop its energy policies based on an assessment of the current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear reactors and the costs and benefits of providing electricity through various energy sources. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Grossenbacher, John

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

162

Backgrounder: Geothermal resource production, steam gathering, and power generation at Salton Sea Unit 3, Calipatria, California  

SciTech Connect

The 10,000-kilowatt Salton Sea Unit 1 power plant was designed to demonstrate that electrical power generation, using the highly saline brines from the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir, was technically and economically feasible. Unit 1, owned by Earth Energy, a Unocal subsidiary, began operating in 1982, initiating an intensive testing program which established the design criteria necessary to construct the larger 47,500-kilowatt Unit 3 power plant, unit 3 contains many of the proprietary or patented technological innovations developed during this program. Design, construction and start-up of the Unit 3 power generating facility began in December, 1986, and was completed in 26 months. By the end of 1988, the brine handling system was in full operation, and the turbine had been tested at design speed. Desert Power Company, a Unocal subsidiary, owns the power generating facility. Unocal owns the brine resource production facility. Power is transmitted by the Imperial Irrigation District to Southern California Edison Company.

None

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 120, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States- Reference Case (xls, 119.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

164

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

165

Hydrogen Generation from Dimethyl Ether for Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Generation from Dimethyl Ether for Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units ... Vehicle manufacturers are rushing ahead with research into alternative fuels such as dimethyl ether (DME), biodiesel, methanol, ethanol, and hydrogen. ...

Marita Nilsson; Lars J. Pettersson; Brd Lindstrm

2006-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

166

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

167

NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 1  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Energy Conversion Unit with Optimized Waveform Generation Sally Sajadian and Euzeli C. dos Santos Jr.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conversion Unit with Optimized Waveform Generation Sally Sajadian and Euzeli C. dos Santos to increase the efficiency of the devices dealing with energy conversion. The power supplies devices able and interleaved converters. This paper proposes an energy conversion unit constituted by a single-phase DC

Zhou, Yaoqi

169

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

Mark Holbrook

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Event generator for nuclear collisions at intermediate energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An event generator, HIPSE (heavy-ion phase-space exploration), dedicated to the description of nuclear collisions in the intermediate energy range is presented. Based on the sudden approximation and on geometrical hypothesis, it can conveniently simulate heavy-ion interactions at all impact parameters and thus can constitute a valuable tool for the understanding of processes such as neck emission or multifragmentation in peripheral or?and central collisions. After a detailed description of the ingredients of the model, first comparisons with experimental data collected by the INDRA Collaboration are shown. Special emphasis is put on the kinematical characteristics of fragments and light particles observed at all impact parameters for Xe+Sn reactions at 25 and 50MeV?nucleon and Ni+Ni at 82MeV?nucleon.

Denis Lacroix; Aymeric Van Lauwe; Dominique Durand

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

174

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

175

A Perspective on Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste has the deserved reputation as one of ... facing the United States and other nations using nuclear reactors for electric power generation. This pa...

D. Warner North

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water  

SciTech Connect

An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

Bud'ko, I. O. [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation)] [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. G. [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)] [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

178

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5" 5" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

179

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

180

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6" 6" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology  

SciTech Connect

We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes. The new evaluations are based on both experimental data and nuclear reaction theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, {sup 6}Li, {sup 10}B, Au and for {sup 235,238}U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced reactions up to an energy of 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; and (10) New methods developed to provide uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same, ENDF-6 format, as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched U thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The {sup 238}U, {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 9}Be reflector biases in fast systems are largely removed; (c) ENDF/B-VI.8 good agreement for simulations of highly enriched uranium assemblies is preserved; (d) The underprediction of fast criticality of {sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu assemblies is removed; and (e) The intermediate spectrum critical assemblies are predicted more accurately. We anticipate that the new library will play an important role in nuclear technology applications, including transport simulations supporting national security, nonproliferation, advanced reactor and fuel cycle concepts, criticality safety, medicine, space applications, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear physics facility design. The ENDF/B-VII.0 library is archived at the National Nuclear Data Center, BNL. The complete library, or any part of it, may be retrieved from www.nndc.bnl.gov.

Chadwick, M B; Oblozinsky, P; Herman, M; Greene, N M; McKnight, R D; Smith, D L; Young, P G; MacFarlane, R E; Hale, G M; Haight, R C; Frankle, S; Kahler, A C; Kawano, T; Little, R C; Madland, D G; Moller, P; Mosteller, R; Page, P; Talou, P; Trellue, H; White, M; Wilson, W B; Arcilla, R; Dunford, C L; Mughabghab, S F; Pritychenko, B; Rochman, D; Sonzogni, A A; Lubitz, C; Trumbull, T H; Weinman, J; Brown, D; Cullen, D E; Heinrichs, D; McNabb, D; Derrien, H; Dunn, M; Larson, N M; Leal, L C; Carlson, A D; Block, R C; Briggs, B; Cheng, E; Huria, H; Kozier, K; Courcelle, A; Pronyaev, V; der Marck, S

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

will also serve as input for a longer term and broader scope Generation IV Nuclear Technology Roadmap being prepared by DOE, as discussed below. In order to meet this...

183

Applications of Extraction Chromatography in the Development of Radionuclide Generator Systems for Nuclear Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Applications of Extraction Chromatography in the Development of Radionuclide Generator Systems for Nuclear Medicine ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ...

Mark L. Dietz; E. Philip Horwitz

2000-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy May 6, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an international collaborative that is advancing new, safer nuclear energy systems. Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an international collaborative that is advancing new, safer nuclear energy systems. Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies Nuclear power reactors currently under construction worldwide boast modern safety and operational enhancements that were designed by the global nuclear energy industry and enhanced through research and development (R&D)

185

United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear Energy Research and Development United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear Energy Research and Development September 16, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Vienna, Austria - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and South African Minister of Energy Dipuo Peters signed a bilateral Agreement on Cooperation in Research and Development of Nuclear Energy on September 14 in Vienna. This Agreement will facilitate cooperation in the areas of advanced nuclear energy systems and reactor technology. The two countries will collaborate in research and development of advanced technologies for improving the cost, safety, and proliferation-resistance of nuclear power systems. The agreement will also expand efforts to promote and maintain nuclear science

186

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Evolution of Nuclear Power Generation for Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Among the available energy alternatives nuclear power offers important advantages and in many cases is the only viable alternative given actual operation conditions on Mars. We know that nuclear is the most co...

Liviu Popa-Simil

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...system using battery energy storage. The widespread...intermittent renewable energies and might restore the cost benefits of nuclear energy in the 2030s. Nuclear...plant and appropriate grid infrastructure, economic considerations...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

189

Pseudo-random number generators for Monte Carlo simulations on Graphics Processing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic uniform pseudo-random number generators are implemented on ATI Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The performance results of the realized generators (multiplicative linear congruential (GGL), XOR-shift (XOR128), RANECU, RANMAR, RANLUX and Mersenne Twister (MT19937)) on CPU and GPU are discussed. The obtained speed-up factor is hundreds of times in comparison with CPU. RANLUX generator is found to be the most appropriate for using on GPU in Monte Carlo simulations. The brief review of the pseudo-random number generators used in modern software packages for Monte Carlo simulations in high-energy physics is present.

Demchik, Vadim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Pseudo-random number generators for Monte Carlo simulations on Graphics Processing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic uniform pseudo-random number generators are implemented on ATI Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The performance results of the realized generators (multiplicative linear congruential (GGL), XOR-shift (XOR128), RANECU, RANMAR, RANLUX and Mersenne Twister (MT19937)) on CPU and GPU are discussed. The obtained speed-up factor is hundreds of times in comparison with CPU. RANLUX generator is found to be the most appropriate for using on GPU in Monte Carlo simulations. The brief review of the pseudo-random number generators used in modern software packages for Monte Carlo simulations in high-energy physics is present.

Vadim Demchik

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Generation risk assessment in volatile conditions with wind, hydro, and natural gas units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper studies a generating company (GENCO)s midterm (a few months to a year) scheduling payoffs and risks in volatile operating conditions. The proposed algorithm considers the integration of intermittent wind units into a GENCOs generation assets and coordinates the GENCOs hourly wind generation schedule with that of natural gas (NG) units (with volatile gas prices) and hydro units (with water inflow forecast) for maximizing the GENCOs payoff. The proposed midterm GENCO model applies market price forecasts to the risk-constrained stochastic price-based unit commitment (PBUC) for calculating the GENCOs risk in energy and ancillary services markets. The proposed PBUC minimizes the cost of (a) NG contracts, storage, startup and shutdown, (b) startup and shutdown of cascaded hydro units, and (c) penalty for defaulting on the scheduled power delivery. Simulation results show that the diversification of generating assets including bilateral contracts (BCs) could enhance the GENCOs midterm planning by increasing the expected payoff and decreasing the financial risk.

Cem Sahin; Mohammad Shahidehpour; Ismet Erkmen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

193

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

194

Why the IBEW supports expanding nuclear power generation in the USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) represents workers, many who work in the utility and power generation industries. The IBEW has been and continues to be a vocal supporter of the expansion of nuclear power generation in the USA. Five years ago, there was a general expectation that nuclear capacity would expand greatly. It did not, and in part the absence of more new nuclear construction is the natural outcome of a misguided energy market regulation system. We close with a set of priorities for rebuilding the energy regulatory scheme that would benefit our members and ratepayers and would, at the same time, lead to and require an expansion of nuclear power. The article describes the state of nuclear power in the USA today, the IBEW's role in the utility industry and nuclear power generation; the IBEW's priorities for the US energy market and why those priorities lead the IBEW to call for the expansion of nuclear power in the USA.

William Bill Riley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Application of CFB technology for large power generating units and CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect

Data on the development of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology for combustion of fuels in large power generating units are examined. The problems with raising the steam parameters and unit power of boilers with a circulating fluidized bed are examined. With the boiler system at the 460 MW unit at Lagisza (Poland) as an example, the feasibility of raising the efficiency of units with CFB boilers through deep recovery of the heat of the effluent gases and reducing expenditure for in-house needs is demonstrated. Comparative estimates of the capital and operating costs of 225 and 330 MW units are used to determine the conditions for optimum use of CFB boilers in the engineering renovation of thermal power plants in Russia. New areas for the application of CFB technology in CO{sub 2} capture are analyzed in connection with the problem of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Ryabov, G. A., E-mail: georgy.ryabov@gmail.com; Folomeev, O. M.; Sankin, D. A.; Khaneev, K. V.; Bondarenko, I. G.; Mel'nikov, D. A. [JSC 'All-Russian Thermotechnical Institute' ('VTI') (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

MHK Technologies/OCGen turbine generator unit TGU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OCGen turbine generator unit TGU OCGen turbine generator unit TGU < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage OCGen turbine generator unit TGU.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Renewable Power Company Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Lubec Narrows Tidal *MHK Projects/Nenana Rivgen *MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal *MHK Projects/Western Passage OCGen Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description he OCGen turbine-generator unit (TGU) is unidirectional regardless of current flow direction. Two cross flow turbines drive a permanent magnet generator on a single shaft. OCGen modules contain the ballast/buoyancy tanks and power electronics/control system allowing for easier installation. The OCGen TGU can be stacked either horizontally or vertically to form arrays.

197

Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was established under the Energy Policy Act in August 2005 (EPACT-2005). EPACT-2005 defined an overall plan and timetable for NGNP research, design, licensing, construction and operation by the end of FY 2021. At the time that EPACT-2005 was passed, it was envisioned that key aspects of the project included: NGNP is based on R&D activities supported by the Gen-IV Nuclear Energy initiative;  NGNP is to be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen or (to do) both;  The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be the lead national lab for the project;  NGNP will be sited at the INL in

198

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Integration of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (withdrawn prior to award)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Colorado Springs Utilities Colorado Springs, CO aDDItIonaL tEaM MEMBERs Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. Clinton, NJ IntegratIon of advanced emIssIons controls to Produce next-generatIon cIrculatIng fluId Bed coal generatIng unIt (wIthdrawn PrIor to award) Project Description Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities) and Foster Wheeler are planning a joint demonstration of an advanced coal-fired electric power plant using advanced, low-cost emission control systems to produce exceedingly low emissions. Multi- layered emission controls will be

200

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

194,1095428,1211897,1374523,1347985,1262403,1340639,1347577,1387346,15503218 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",840,,639800,598183,639443,403029,346066,489260,629320,629209,610996,637714,619...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2889,1359120,1330655,1334646,1369191,1335231,1264610,725939,1043730,14168091 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",842,,640210,332640,639812,611739,611473,610763,626182,625966,612739,514485,-32...

202

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

049398,1385659,1329546,1365357,1364550,1315097,826104,724688,842506,13689571 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",836,,642446,580408,640573,616442,635753,607660,621404,622382,608955,74815,-336...

203

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0183,1370443,1333879,1333266,1232981,970683,1026829,1008188,1033852,14689416 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",840,,638732,576736,637898,614123,622312,611199,598045,569278,582588,637484,278...

204

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2613,979493,1330868,1372259,1363174,1328057,1383098,1348837,1393879,15486102 "Arkansas Nuclear One 1",843,,642145,579996,631611,425625,233279,610804,629284,623738,610379,634652,620...

205

Proposal for broader United States-Russian transparency of nuclear arms reductions  

SciTech Connect

During the January 1994 Summit Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin agreed on the goal of ensuring the ``transparency and irreversibility`` of the nuclear arms reduction process. As a result, negotiations are presently underway between the United States Government and the Russian Federation to confirm the stockpiles of plutonium and highly enriched uranium removed from nuclear weapons. In December 1994 the United States presented a paper to the Russian Federation proposing additional measures to provide broader transparency of nuclear arms reduction. The US Department of Energy is studying the implementation of these broader transparency measures at appropriate DOE facilities. The results of the studies include draft protocols for implementation, assessments of the implementation procedures and the impacts on the facilities and estimates of the cost to implement these measures at various facilities.

Percival, C.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ingle, T.H.; Bieniawski, A.J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A0-44073 A0-44073 November 2008 Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States Paul Denholm and Robert Margolis Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States Paul Denholm and Robert Margolis Prepared under Task No. PVB7.6301 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A0-44073 November 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

207

DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it is seeking public and industry input on how to best achieve the goals and meet the requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) demonstration project work at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory. DOE today issued a Request for Information and Expressions of Interest from prospective participants and interested parties on utilizing cutting-edge high temperature gas reactor technology in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by enabling nuclear energy to replace fossil fuels used by industry for process heat. "This is an opportunity to advance the development of safe, reliable, and

208

A unit commitment study of the application of energy storage toward the integration of renewable generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To examine the potential benefits of energy storage in the electric grid a generalized unit commitment model of thermal generating units and energy storage facilities is developed. Three different storage scenarios were testedtwo without limits to total storage assignment and one with a constrained maximum storage portfolio. Given a generation fleet based on the City of Austins renewable energy deployment plans results from the unlimited energy storage deployment scenarios studied show that if capital costs are ignored large quantities of seasonal storage are preferred. This operational approach enables storage of plentiful wind generation during winter months that can then be dispatched during high cost peak periods in the summer. These two scenarios yielded $70 million and $94 million in yearly operational cost savings but would cost hundreds of billions to implement. Conversely yearly cost reductions of $40 million can be achieved with one compressed air energy storage facility and a small set of electrochemical storage devices totaling 13?GWh of capacity. Similarly sized storage fleets with capital costs service lifetimes and financing consistent with these operational cost savings can yield significant operational benefit by avoiding dispatch of expensive peaking generators and improving utilization of renewable generation throughout the year. Further study using a modified unit commitment model can help to clarify optimal storage portfolios reveal appropriate market participation approaches and determine the optimal siting of storage within the grid.

Chioke Harris; Jeremy P. Meyers; Michael E. Webber

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Economic feasibility of heat supply from nuclear power plants in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy is regarded as competitive for urban district heating applications. Hot water heat transport systems of up to 50 miles are feasible for heat loads over 1500 MWt, and heat load density of over 130 MWt/mi/sup 2/is most suitable for nuclear applications. An incremental approach and a nuclear plant design provision for future heat extraction are recommended. Nuclear district heating technology status is discussed, particularly turbine design. Results of a study for retrofitting a major existing nuclear power plant to cogeneration operation are presented. The study indicates that for transmission distances up to 20 miles it is economical to generate and transport between 600 and 1200 MWt of district heat.

Roe, K.K.; Oliker, I.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

211

New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

212

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

213

The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Relevance of Generation The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Sari Fink, Kevin Porter, and Jennifer Rogers Exeter Associates, Inc. Columbia, Maryland Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48987 October 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Sari Fink, Kevin Porter, and Jennifer Rogers Exeter Associates, Inc. Columbia, Maryland

214

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

215

Evaluation of performance of combined heat and power systems with dual power generation units (D-CHP).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this research, a new combined heat and power (CHP) system configuration has been proposed that uses two power generation units (PGU) operating simultaneously (more)

Knizley, Alta Alyce

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Burnup verification at Arkansas Nuclear One-unit 1 using the Fork measurement system  

SciTech Connect

The Fork measurement system, designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards program, has been used for several years to examine spent fuel assemblies at nuclear reactors around the world. The objective of the test program described here is to demonstrate the ability of the Fork system to verify the records for assembly burnup at U.S. nuclear utilities. The measurements described here were performed at Arkansas Nuclear One, operated by Energy Operations, Inc. The Fork system was used to examine 34 assemblies in the storage pool of Arkansas Nuclear One-Unit 1. The correlation between the neutron measurements and the reactor records produced an average random deviation in burnup of 3.0% from the calibration, which translates into an average variation of 2.2% in the reactor records for burnup. The system proved to be compatible with utility operations.

Ewing, R.I. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bosler, G.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Priore, J. [Entergy Oerations, Inc., Russellville, AR (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

TVA chooses nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TVA chooses nuclear power ... In giving the nod to a nuclear (over a coal) power generating station 10 days ago, TVA probably gave nuclear power its biggest boost to date. ... The $247 million nuclear power planta dual boiling-water reactor unit with a total capacity of 2.2 million kw(e).will ...

1966-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

219

Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association's Springverville unit 3 earns POWER's highest honor  

SciTech Connect

It is said that pioneers take the arrows. In the case of Springerville Unit 3 - a 418 MW(net) expansion of a Tucson Electric Power facility in Arizona and the first pulverized coal-fired units built in the US in more than decade, the arrows were many. Although Tri-State (the developer), Tuscon Electric (the host), and Bechtel Power (the EPC contractor) were wounded by delayed deliveries of major equipment, bankruptcy of a major supplier, and a labor shortage, the companies showed their pioneering spirit and completed the project ahead of schedule. For ushering in a new generation of clean and desperately needed baseload capacity, Springerville Unit 3 is POWER magazine's 2006 Plant of the Year. 9 figs.

Peltier, R.

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Vibrant fault diagnosis for hydroelectric generator units with a new combination of rough sets and support vector machine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fault diagnosis for hydroelectric generator unit (HGU) is significant to prevent dangerous accidents from occurring and to improve economic efficiency. The faults of HGU involve overlapping fault patterns which may denote a kind of faults in the ... Keywords: Fault diagnosis, Hydroelectric generator unit, Rough sets, Support vector machine

Xiaoyuan Zhang; Jianzhong Zhou; Jun Guo; Qiang Zou; Zhiwei Huang

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Single-bridge unit-connected HVDC generation with increased pulse number  

SciTech Connect

A true unit-connected generator-HVdc convertor scheme is proposed which removes the need to use two bridges in series to achieve twelve-pulse operation. Moreover, the combination of a single main bridge and an auxiliary feedback dc ripple reinjection bridge is shown to increase the pulse number from 6 to 18. This is achieved purely by natural commutation and is equally valid for rectification and inversion. The theoretical waveforms are validated by extensive experimental verification.

Villablanca, M.; Arrillaga, J. (Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nuclear & Uranium - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net Find statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net generation, nuclear share of electricity net generation, and capacity factor. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional Formats Nuclear Overview: PDF CSV XLS Monthly statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net generation, nuclear share of electricity net generation, and capacity factor. PDFXLS Annual statistics on nuclear generating units, power plants operations, and uranium. › Nuclear Generating Units, 1955-2010 › PDF XLS Nuclear Power Plant Operations, 1957-2010 › PDF XLS Uranium Overview, 1949-2010 › PDF XLS Uranium & Nuclear Fuel Additional Formats U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates › Release Date: July 2010 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has updated its estimates of uranium reserves for year-end 2008. This represents the first revision of the estimates since 2004. PDF

223

Nuclear energy policy in the United States 19902010: A federal or state responsibility?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines from a policy perspective nuclear energy policy in the United States (US) from 1990 to 2010 and questions whether it is or has become a Federal or State responsibility. The present study, as befits policy research, engages with many disciplines (for example, in particular, law and politics) and hence the contributions move beyond that of nuclear energy policy literature and in particular to that on nuclear new build and other assessments of large infrastructure projects. Several examples at the Federal level are identified that demonstrate that the nuclear industry has evolved to a stage where it requires a focus on the power of actions at a more localised (state) level in order to re-ignite the industry. The research concludes that there remains a misunderstanding of the issue of project management for complex construction projects, and it is highly arguable whether many of its issues have been resolved. Further, the research asserts that the economics of nuclear energy are not the most influential reason for no nuclear new build in the US.

Raphael J. Heffron

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Phillips/United Nuclear site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Phillips/United Nuclear site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Phillips/United Nuclear site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,500,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $45,200,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing.The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $87/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by either heap leach or conventional plant process. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive under present or foreseeable market conditions.

none,

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Acoustic Emission Monitoring of ASME Section III Hydrostatic Test: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Through the cooperation of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has installed instrumentation on Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 for the purpose of test and evaluation of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and piping for flaw detection. This report describes the acoustic emission monitoring performed during the ASME Section III hydrostatic testing of Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 and the results obtained. Highlights of the results are: Spontaneous AE was detected from a nozzle area during final pressurization. Evaluation of the apparent source of the spontaneous AE using an empirically derived AE/fracture mechanics relationship agreed within a factor of two with an evaluation by ASME Section XI Code procedures. AE was detected from a fracture specimen which was pressure coupled to the 10-inch accumulator nozzle. This provided reassurance of adequate system sensitivity. High background noise was observed when all four reactor coolant pumps were operating. Work is continuing at Watts Bar Unit 1 toward AE monitoring hot functional testing and subsequently monitoring during reactor operation.

Hutton,, P. H.; Taylor,, T. T.; Dawson,, J. F.; Pappas,, R. A.; Kurtz,, R. J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the 2030s. Nuclear power could also be widely used for desalination, another efficient way to use surplus power in an electricity...country of origin would have access to the spent fuel. The economics of small and fueled-for-life reactors versus large reactors...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

227

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL

Siefert, Chris

228

Program generator for experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a programmable pulse-train generator for experiments in relaxation analysis. The generator produces up to eight pulses, whose durations and spacings can be varied from 0.5 sec to 160 sec in 0.1-usec steps. The maximum number of pulse-train repetitions is 160. An individual program provides a Carr-Percell train. A clock pulse for the measuring and recording devices is established after any pulse of a compiled program or after the last 180 degree pulse in a Carr train. The generator is implemented by integrated circuits of series 155.

Babkin, A.F.; Kuznetsov, V.K.; Makarenko, V.L.; Rusanov, A.V.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

230

Next Generation CANDU Technology: Competitive Design for the Nuclear Renaissance  

SciTech Connect

AECL has developed the design for a next generation of CANDU{sup R} plants by marrying a set of enabling technologies to well-established successful CANDU features. The basis for the design is to replicate or adapt existing CANDU components for a new core design. By adopting slightly enriched uranium fuel, a core design with light water coolant, heavy water moderator and reflector has been defined, based on the existing CANDU fuel channel module. This paper summarizes the main features and characteristics of the reference next-generation CANDU design. The progress of the next generation of CANDU design program in meeting challenging cost, schedule and performance targets is described. AECL's cost reduction methodology is summarized as an integral part of the design optimization process. Examples are given of cost reduction features together with enhancement of design margins. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Hedges, K.R.; Pakan, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Radiation consequences of seawater contamination during floating storage of reactor-compartment units from salvaged nuclear-powered submarines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The storage time before salvaging of decommissioned nuclear-powered submarines and the floating storage time of reactor units from salvaged submarines ... decades. During this time, radioactive contamination of seawater

A. Ya. Blekher; N. L. Kuchin; I. V. Sergeev

233

Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B rapid cooldown test and validation of simulation model  

SciTech Connect

The SOPHT code was assessed against Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B commissioning data from a heat transport system rapid cooldown. It was found that (a) under a rapid upstream depressurization, the steam relief valves, like orifices, had a lower discharge coefficient than the corresponding steadystate value and (b) the flashing of water in the steam generators during depressurization causes the at-power boiling heat transfer correlations to overpredict the steam generator heat transfer.

Chang, Y.F.; Langan, M.D.; Sermer, P.; Watson, P.C.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Analysis and section of processes for the disposition of excess fissile material from nuclear weapon dismantlement in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war and the acceleration of nuclear disarmament efforts by the United States (US) and Russia are generating large quantities of surplus fissile nuclear materials that are no longer needed for military purposes. The safe and secure disposition of this surplus material to prevent theft or reuse in weapons has become a high priority for the US Department of Energy (USDOE). Many options exist for storage and disposition (use or disposal) of these surplus materials. The criteria, which have been developed from the basis for a preliminary ``screening`` of options, to eliminate from further consideration those options that do not meet minimal requirements. Factors, or attributes, contained in the screening and selection criteria include: (1) resistance to theft and diversion by unauthorized parties, (2) resistance to retrieval, extraction, and reuse by the host nation, (3) technical viability, (4) environmental, safety, and health impacts, (5) cost effectiveness, (6) timeliness, (7) fostering of progress and cooperation with Russia and others, (8) public and institutional acceptance, and (9) additional benefits. The evaluation of environmental impacts, in accordance with the US National Environmental Policy Ac (NEPA) process, is an integral part of the overall evaluation process. Because of the variety of physical and chemical forms of the nuclear material inventory, and because of the large number of possible disposition technologies and final forms, several hundred possible pathways to disposition have been defined and have undergone a systematic selection process. Also, because nuclear material disposition will have far ranging impacts, extensive public, in the form of public and stakeholder, input was integral to the selection process.

Myers, B.R.; Armantrout, G.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Erickson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

236

Design of Micro-grid System Based on Renewable Power Generation Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Micro-grid system is currently a conceptual solution to fulfill the commitment of reliable power delivery for future power systems. Renewable power sources such as wind and hydro offer the best potential for emission free power for future micro-grid systems. This paper presents a micro-grid system based on wind and hydro power sources and addresses issues related to operation, control, and stability of the system. The micro-grid system investigated in this paper represents a case study in Newfoundland, Canada. It consists of a small hydro generation unit and a wind farm that contains nine variable- speed, double-fed induction generator based wind turbines. Using Matlab/Simulink, the system is modeled and simulated to identify the technical issues involved in the operation of a micro-grid system based on renewable power generation units. The operational modes, technical challenges and a brief outline of conceptual approaches to addressing some of the technical issues are presented for further investigation.

Dr. K. Ravich; M. Manasa; Mr. P. Yohan Babu; G. V. P. Anjaneyulu

237

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the United States Senate Committee...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

associated with occupational medical services and tank farm vapor exposures at the Hanford Site. During the Cold War, the United States' nuclear weapons complex generated large...

238

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LlCENSE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' ,' ' .:,: ' ,' ,,.. : .-: .: .A,.. :. .:,: ' .' :l:. ,:.:,. ,. ."i i..' ./. ' . : :, *:..: ,.a~ :.. ,::;: ;#j ,,. .,.' ' : 8:;) ,,> ,' UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LlCENSE pp.o-o\ 43 Licensee 1. Name spm%r ch+ti (hlqay 3. 2. Address i%si&t Building Kansas cay 5, ifissouri ~..--. 3. License No. .m4-329 I 4. Exp/rotion Date Sepikmber 30, I.962 -6. Special Nuclear:Material ~~~~SnrichedtoS~ I under this license ia the a-235 i.soto~p. one thoti (1ooo) kgs u-235 Contab$i in mani- etiched ta s$in ths U23.5 / isotope. -- 8. Authorized useFor i&e C' nwiC&. professing Of +ZXlXX enriohd IQ t0 s$-tifie u-235 isoi;ope bn, accordanoe 6th the procedures desczibed ii the, J.ic3x1m3~s ag@kations of Jme 22 andduly 28; 19%

239

United States Program on Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

The President signed the Congressional Joint Resolution on July 23, 2002, that designated the Yucca Mountain site for a proposed geologic repository to dispose of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is currently focusing its efforts on submitting a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in December 2004 for construction of the proposed repository. The legislative framework underpinning the U.S. repository program is the basis for its continuity and success. The repository development program has significantly benefited from international collaborations with other nations in the Americas.

Stewart, L.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448.000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate. Of the estimated solids, the hazardous wastes (e.g., electrical vehicle batteries and light tubes) were about 2% of the total volumes. The generation of solid HE residues varied uniformly with the HE production rates and ranged from about 20% of the total solids volume for the 100 HE units/yr case to about 60% for the 2000 units/yr case. The HE machining operations generated 60 to 80% of the total solid HE residues, depending on the assumed production rate, and were also the sources of the most concentrated HE residues.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Informing the next nuclear generation - how does the Ginna plant branch do it?  

SciTech Connect

Most of us are familiar with the latest advertising phrase, ``Our children are our future.`` This phrase has been used in so many instances - from concerns about waste, Social Security, and the federal deficit to drug abuse and violence. One more area can be added to the list and advertised nuclear power. Since the establishment of the Ginna plant branch (GPB) in 1992, our target audience has been the next nuclear generation (our children), but our vehicle for dissemination has been the current generation (the adults). Have you ever thought about how often your opinions affect the children you come in contact with? One of GPB`s goals is to provide as much information as possible to teachers, neighbors, and civic organizations of our community so that there is a nuclear future that can be carried on by the next generation.

Saavedra, A. [Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation, Ontario, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

Bowman, C.D.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

244

The B61-based "Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator:" Clever retrofit or headway towards fourth-generation nuclear weapons?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is scientifically and technically possible to build an earth penetrating device that could bury a B61-7 warhead 30 meters into concrete, or 150 meters into earth, before detonating it. The device (based on knowledge and technology that is available since 50 years) would however by large and cumbersome. Better penetrator materials, components able to withstand larger stresses, higher impact velocities, and/or high-explosive driven penetration aids, can only marginally improve the device. It is conclude that the robust nuclear earth penetrator (RNEP) program may be as much motivated by the development of new technology directly applicable to next generation nuclear weapons, and by the political necessity to periodically reasses the role and utility of nuclear weapons, then by the perceived military need of a weapon able to destroy deeply buried targets.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The costs of generating electricity and the competitiveness of nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides an analysis on the costs of generating electricity from nuclear and fossil sources (coal and natural gas) based on the most recent technical data available in literature. The aim is to discuss the competitiveness of nuclear power in a liberalized market context by considering the impact on the generating costs of the main factors affecting the viability of the nuclear option. Particular attention will be devoted to study the variability of the generating costs regarding the level of risk perceived by investors through a sensitivity analysis of the generating costs with respect to the cost of capital and the debt fraction of initial investment. The impact of environment policies is also considered by including a tax on carbon emissions. The analysis reveals that nuclear power could have ample potentiality also in a competitive market, particularly if the level of risk perceived by the investors keeps standing low. For low values of the cost of capital, nuclear power seems to be the most viable solution. Uncertainty about environmental policies and unpredictability of carbon emissions costs might offer further margins of competitiveness.

Carlo Mari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

EIS-0092: Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Unit 1 of the Mt. Tom Generation Station Unit 1 from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

247

A practical design for an integrated HVDC unit - connected hydro-electric generating station  

SciTech Connect

To date, several authors (see reference list) have proclaimed benefits which can be achieved by integrating HVDC converter stations directly with generating units. The cost of a significant amount of plant and facilities found in conventional schemes is thereby eliminated. So far as is known however, no detailed studies have been done to quantify these benefits. This paper outlines the results of a study made recently by the Manitoba HVDC Research Centre to determine the practicality of such a scheme. To give credence to the results an actual hydro station design was used incorporating a HVDC thyristor valve scheme in a hypothetical situation. Financial and other benefits were determined for this example together with conclusions and recommendations for future specific projects and further areas of study.

Ingram, L. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg (CA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Joint US/Russian study on the development of a decommissioning strategy plan for RBMK-1000 unit No. 1 at the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this joint U.S./Russian study was to develop a safe, technically feasible, economically acceptable strategy for decommissioning Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) Unit No. 1 as a representative first-generation RBMK-1000 reactor. The ultimate goal in developing the decommissioning strategy was to select the most suitable decommissioning alternative and end state, taking into account the socioeconomic conditions, the regulatory environment, and decommissioning experience in Russia. This study was performed by a group of Russian and American experts led by Kurchatov Institute for the Russian efforts and by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. efforts and for the overall project.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Technical cooperation on nuclear security between the United States and China : review of the past and opportunities for the future.  

SciTech Connect

The United States and China are committed to cooperation to address the challenges of the next century. Technical cooperation, building on a long tradition of technical exchange between the two countries, can play an important role. This paper focuses on technical cooperation between the United States and China in the areas of nonproliferation, arms control and other nuclear security topics. It reviews cooperation during the 1990s on nonproliferation and arms control under the U.S.-China Arms Control Exchange, discusses examples of ongoing activities under the Peaceful Uses of Technology Agreement to enhance security of nuclear and radiological material, and suggests opportunities for expanding technical cooperation between the defense nuclear laboratories of both countries to address a broader range of nuclear security topics.

Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL ­ Supply chains and logistics ­ Systems of systems (e.g., the nuclear fuel cycle, fleet management) #12

Langerhans, Brian

251

Planning for a multi-generational future : policies, regulations, and designs for multi-generational housing in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-generational housing is a rising trend that is increasingly being considered as a viable housing option for the Boomerang generation, Baby Boomers and the aging population, and immigrant families. Cultural preferences, ...

Shin, Stephanie H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fast neutron fluence of yonggwang nuclear unit 1 reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix H, requires that the neutron dosimetry be present to monitor the reactor vessel throughout plant life. The Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry System has been installed for Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 1 after complete withdrawal of all six in-vessel surveillance capsules. This system has been installed in the reactor cavity annulus in order to measure the fast neutron spectrum coming out through the reactor pressure vessel. Cycle specific neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain the energy dependent neutron flux throughout the reactor geometry including dosimetry positions. Comparisons between calculations and measurements were performed for the reaction rates of each dosimetry sensors and results show good agreements. (authors)

Yoo, C.; Km, B.; Chang, K.; Leeand, S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 150 Dukjin-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J. [Chungnam National Univ., 220 Gung-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

Compressor and Turbine Models of Brayton Units for Space Nuclear Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Closed Brayton Cycles with centrifugal flow, single-shaft turbo-machines are being considered, with gas cooled nuclear reactors, to provide 10's to 100's of electrical power to support future space exploration missions and Lunar and Mars outposts. Such power system analysis is typically based on the cycle thermodynamics, for given operating pressures and temperatures and assumed polytropic efficiencies of the compressor and turbine of the Brayton energy conversion units. Thus the analysis results not suitable for modeling operation transients such as startup and changes in the electric load. To simulate these transients, accurate models of the turbine and compressor in the Brayton rotating unit, which calculate the changes in the compressor and turbine efficiencies with system operation are needed. This paper presents flow models that account for the design and dimensions of the compressor impeller and diffuser, and the turbine stator and rotor blades. These models calculate the various enthalpy losses and the polytropic efficiencies along with the pressure ratios of the turbine and compressor. The predictions of these models compare well with reported performance data of actual hardware. In addition, the results of a parametric analysis to map the operations of the compressor and turbine, as functions of the rotating shaft speed and inlet Mach number of the gas working fluid, are presented and discussed. The analysis used a binary mixture of He-Xe with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole as the working fluid.

Gallo, Bruno M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of Nuclear Safety Matters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of Nuclear Safety Matters.

256

The virtual digital nuclear power plant: A modern tool for supporting the lifecycle of VVER-based nuclear power units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article describes the Virtual Digital VVER-Based Nuclear Power Plant computerized system comprising a totality of verified ... a model intended for describing the behavior of nuclear power plant (NPP) syste...

G. V. Arkadov; A. P. Zhukavin; A. E. Kroshilin; I. A. Parshikov

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Decommissioning of Large Components as an Example of Steam Generator from PWR Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the procedure for the qualification of large components (Steam Generators) as an IP-2 package, the ship transport abroad to Sweden and the external treatment of this components to disburden the Nuclear Power Plant from this task, to assure an accelerated the deconstruction phase and to minimize the amount of waste. In conclusion: The transport of large components to an external treatment facility is linked with many advantages for a Nuclear Power Plant: - Disburden of the Nuclear Power Plant from the treatment of such components, - no timely influence on the deconstruction phase of the power reactor and therewith an accelerated deconstruction phase and - minimization of the waste to be returned and therewith less demand of required waste storage capacity. (authors)

Beverungen, M. [GNS Gesellschaft fur Nuklear-Service mbH, Hollestrabe 7A (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

259

Survey of insulation used in nuclear power plants and the potential for debris generation. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

In support of Unresolved Safety Issue A-43, 'Containment Emergency Sump Performance,' 11 nuclear power plants representative of different U.S. reactor manufacturers and architect-engineers were surveyed to identify and document the types and amounts of insulation used, location within containment, components insulated, material characteristics, and methods of installation and attachment. A preliminary assessment was made of the potential effects of insulation debris generated as the result of a loss-of-coolant accident (pipe break).

Reyer, R.; Gahan, E.; Riddington, J.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A novel KICAPCA fault detection model for condition process of hydroelectric generating unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fault detection and diagnosis of hydroelectric generating unit (HGU) have significant importance to the security of hydropower plant and the power system. In recent years, many fault detection methods based on spectral characteristic of vibration signals have been published. However, some faults cannot be effectively recognized just with spectral features for condition process monitoring of HGU. Thus, this study presents a novel fault detection model based on kernel independent component analysis and principal component analysis (KICAPCA) monitoring model for condition process of HGU. Each of the condition processes is equivalent to a multivariate statistical process monitoring (MSPM). KICAPCA model of the specific MSPM is trained by normal condition process data at first. Then, confidence limits of two monitoring indices (Hotellings T2 statistic and SPE statistic) of the trained KICAPCA model are used to monitor the same condition process and detect fault online. Moreover, the proposed monitoring model is applied to a real condition process of HGU. Compared to ICAPCA and PCA monitoring model, the proposed model has superior performance in fault detection.

Wenlong Zhu; Jianzhong Zhou; Xin Xia; Chaoshun Li; Jian Xiao; Han Xiao; Xinxin Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. We prepared volume estimates by applying this method to actual past Pantex plant HE production operations. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448,000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Evaluation Metrics for Intermediate Heat Exchangers for Next Generation Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the United States with abundant, clean, and secure energy as initiated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct; Public Law 109-58,2005). The NGNP Project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and/or high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications.

Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Nolan Anderson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

"This awesome field"; a history of United States nuclear testing and its influence on nuclear thought, 1945-1963.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The history of U. S. nuclear testing between 1945 and 1963 is not only a vivid and exciting story but also one of profound historical (more)

Blades, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Locating hot and cold-legs in a nuclear powered steam generation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor steam generator includes a reactor vessel for heating water and a steam generator with a pump casing at the lowest point on the steam generator. A cold-leg pipe extends horizontally between the steam generator and the reactor vessel to return water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel. The bottom of the cold-leg pipe is at a first height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A hot-leg pipe with one end connected to the steam generator and a second end connected to the reactor vessel has a first pipe region extending downwardly from the steam generator to a location between the steam generator and the reactor vessel at which a bottom of the hot-leg pipe is at a second height above the bottom of the reactor vessel. A second region extends from that location in a horizontal direction at the second height to the point at which the hot-leg pipe connects to the reactor vessel. A pump is attached to the casing at a location below the first and second heights and returns water from the steam generator to the reactor vessel over the cold-leg. The first height is greater than the second height and the bottom of the steam generator is at a height above the bottom of the reactor vessel that is greater than the first and second heights. A residual heat recovery pump is below the hot-leg and has an inlet line from the hot-leg that slopes down continuously to the pump inlet. 2 figures.

Ekeroth, D.E.; Corletti, M.M.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

265

Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect

In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the operating envelope of both fission and fusion reactors. In advanced fission reactors composite materials are being designed in an effort to extend the life and improve the reliability of fuel rod cladding as well as structural materials. Composites are being considered for use as core internals in the next generation of gas-cooled reactors. Further, next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will rely on the capabilities of advanced composites to safely withstand extremely high neutron fluxes while providing superior thermal shock resistance.

Simos, N.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

MEASUREMENTS OF THE CONFINEMENT LEAKTIGHTNESS AT THE KOLA NUCLEAR POWER STATION (UNIT 2) IN RUSSIA  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report on the INSP project entitled, ``Kola Confinement Leaktightness'' conducted by BNL under the authorization of Project Work Plan WBS 1.2.2.1. This project was initiated in February 1993 to assist the Russians to reduce risks associated with the continued operation of older Soviet-designed nuclear power plants, specifically the Kola VVER-440/230 Units 1 and 2, through upgrades in the confinement performance to reduce the uncontrolled leakage rate. The major technical objective of this-project was to improve the leaktightness of the Kola NPP VVER confinement boundaries, through the application of a variety of sealants to penetrations, doors and hatches, seams and surfaces, to the extent that current technology permitted. A related objective was the transfer, through training of Russian staff, of the materials application procedures to the staff of the Kola NPP. This project was part of an overall approach to minimizing uncontrolled releases from the Kola NPP VVER440/230s in the event of a serious accident, and to thereby significantly mitigate the consequences of such an accident. The US provided materials, application technology, and applications equipment for application of sealant materials, surface coatings, potting materials and gaskets, to improve the confinement leaktightness of the Kola VVER-440/23Os. The US provided for training of Russian personnel in the applications technology.

GREENE,G.A.; GUPPY,J.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001  

SciTech Connect

OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the selected thermochemical process and to define the selected reactor and process to the point that capital costs, operating costs and the resultant cost of hydrogen can be estimated. During original contract negotiation, it was necessary to reduce work scope to meet funding limits. As a result, the reactor interface and process will not be iterated to the point that only hydrogen is produced. Rather, hydrogen and electricity will be co-generated and the hydrogen cost will be stated as a function of the electricity sales price.

Brown, L.C.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

R. Shane Johnson, Associate Director Office of Advanced Nuclear Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research September 30, 2002 Generation IV International Forum Generation IV International Forum Presentation to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Generation IV International Forum Generation IV International Forum 6 Government-sanctioned organization working together to plan the future of nuclear energy * Chartered in July 2002 * Conduct joint R&D on next-generation nuclear energy systems * Voluntary member participation in specific projects 6 Observer Organizations * OECD-NEA * IAEA * Euratom South Korea U.S.A. Argentina Brazil Canada France Japan South Africa United Kingdom Switzerland Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology

269

Financial valuation of investments in future power generation technologies: nuclear fusion and CCS in an emissions trading system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper outlines a model approach for the financial valuation of future power generation technologies, such as nuclear fusion or carbon capture and storage (CCS) under an emissions trading regime. Since on imp...

Heinz Eckart Klingelhfer; Peter Kurz

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nonlinear Adaptive Control of Networked Power Generators with Remote Measurement Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided by Phasor Measurement Units (PMU). The proposed control system is designed in a robust way illustrate its good behavior, and suggest that the new measurement and data transmission devices can bring Measurement Units (PMU). These devices are far beyond SCADA, and let one envisage the use of real time remote

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

271

Disaster policy and nuclear liability: Insights from post-Chernobyl agriculture in the United Kingdom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent events at Chernobyl have again brought the issues of nuclear safety to the forefront of the nuclear power debate. Fortunately, our experience with such incidents has been very limited, but it is imp...

William A. Kerr; Adrienne S. Kwaczek; Sian Mooney

272

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Automatic code generation enables nuclear gradient computations for fully internally contracted multireference theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical nuclear gradients for fully internally contracted complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) are reported. This implementation has been realized by an automated code generator that can handle spin-free formulas for the CASPT2 energy and its derivatives with respect to variations of molecular orbitals and reference coefficients. The underlying complete active space self-consistent field and the so-called Z-vector equations are solved using density fitting. With full internal contraction the size of first-order wave functions scales polynomially with the number of active orbitals. The CASPT2 gradient program and the code generator are both publicly available. This work enables the CASPT2 geometry optimization of molecules as complex as those investigated by respective single-point calculations.

MacLeod, Matthew K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Application of CFB technology for large power generating units and CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the development of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology for combustion of fuels in large ... feasibility of raising the efficiency of units with CFB boilers through deep recovery of the heat ......

G. A. Ryabov; O. M. Folomeev; D. A. Sankin

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Concentrated solar power in the future of electricity generation: a synthesis of reasons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electricity generation. Experience...steam-Rankine coal-fired power plants, nuclear...defaults in generation units. Large...need to have a generation system with...the unitary power will have to...and natural gas. Evidently...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

System Definition Document: Reactor Data Necessary for Modeling Plutonium Disposition in Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (USDOE) has contracted with Duke Engineering and Services, Cogema, Inc., and Stone and Webster (DCS) to provide mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services in support of USDOE's mission to dispose of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. The nuclear station units currently identified as mission reactors for this project are Catawba Units 1 and 2 and McGuire Units 1 and 2. This report is specific to Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2, but the details and materials for the McGuire reactors are very similar. The purpose of this document is to present a complete set of data about the reactor materials and components to be used in modeling the Catawba reactors to predict reactor physics parameters for the Catawba site. Except where noted, Duke Power Company or DCS documents are the sources of these data. These data are being used with the ORNL computer code models of the DCS Catawba (and McGuire) pressurized-water reactors.

Ellis, R.J.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","2,538","20,943",40.3,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "V C Summer Unit 1",966,"8,487",16.3,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Co" "4 Plants 7 Reactors","6,486","51,988",100.0

282

Stochastic Real-Time Scheduling of Wind-thermal Generation Units ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power produced by thermal unit i in time t (MW). Pps,t. Power .... problem is presented in Section V. Simulation results are pre- sented in section VI ...... operation of a virtual power plant using two stage stochastic programming,. Energy, vol.

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Study of Linear Equivalent Circuits of Electromechanical Systems for Turbine Generator Units.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The thesis utilizes the analogy in dynamic equations between a mechanical and an electrical system to convert the steam-turbine, micro-turbine, wind-turbine and hydro-turbine generator mechanical (more)

Tsai, Chia-Chun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Impact of unit commitment constraints on generation expansion planning with renewables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing use of renewables pushes thermal generators against operating constraints - e.g. ramping, minimum output, and operating reserves - that are traditionally ignored in expansion planning models. We show how including ...

Palmintier, Bryan Stephen

285

The role of the United Nations in the post nuclear weapon world.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since the creation of the United Nations in 1945 in the wake of World War II and the failure of the League of Nations, the (more)

Taber, Caitlin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

BARI, R.; ET AL.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Unit commitment with wind power generation: integrating wind forecast uncertainty and stochastic programming.  

SciTech Connect

We present a computational framework for integrating the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in stochastic unit commitment/energy dispatch formulations that account for wind power uncertainty. We first enhance the WRF model with adjoint sensitivity analysis capabilities and a sampling technique implemented in a distributed-memory parallel computing architecture. We use these capabilities through an ensemble approach to model the uncertainty of the forecast errors. The wind power realizations are exploited through a closed-loop stochastic unit commitment/energy dispatch formulation. We discuss computational issues arising in the implementation of the framework. In addition, we validate the framework using real wind speed data obtained from a set of meteorological stations. We also build a simulated power system to demonstrate the developments.

Constantinescu, E. M.; Zavala, V. M.; Rocklin, M.; Lee, S.; Anitescu, M. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Univ. of Chicago); (New York Univ.)

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

288

Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

John Saurwein

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

New generation nuclear fuel structures: dense particles in selectively soluble matrix  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a technology for dispersing sub-millimeter sized fuel particles within a bulk matrix that can be selectively dissolved. This may enable the generation of advanced nuclear fuels with easy separation of actinides and fission products. The large kinetic energy of the fission products results in most of them escaping from the sub-millimeter sized fuel particles and depositing in the matrix during burning of the fuel in the reactor. After the fuel is used and allowed to cool for a period of time, the matrix can be dissolved and the fission products removed for disposal while the fuel particles are collected by filtration for recycle. The success of such an approach would meet a major goal of the GNEP program to provide advanced recycle technology for nuclear energy production. The benefits of such an approach include (1) greatly reduced cost of the actinide/fission product separation process, (2) ease of recycle of the fuel particles, and (3) a radiation barrier to prevent theft or diversion of the recycled fuel particles during the time they are re-fabricated into new fuel. In this study we describe a method to make surrogate nuclear fuels of micrometer scale W (shell)/Mo (core) or HfO2 particles embedded in an MgO matrix that allows easy separation of the fission products and their embedded particles. In brief, the method consists of physically mixing W-Mo or hafnia particles with an MgO precursor. Heating the mixture, in air or argon, without agitation, to a temperature is required for complete decomposition of the precursor. The resulting material was examined using chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and micro X-ray computed tomography and found to consist of evenly dispersed particles in an MgO + matrix. We believe this methodology can be extended to actinides and other matrix materials.

Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pattillo, Steve G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Electric co-generation units equipped with wood gasifier and Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of industrial waste such as oil sludges, waste plastic, lubricant oils, paper and wood poses serious problems due to the ever increasing amount of material to be disposed of and to the difficulty in finding new dumping sites. The interest in energy recovery technologies is accordingly on the increase. In particular, large amounts of waste wood are simply burned or thrown away causing considerable environmental damage. In this context the co-generation technique represents one of the possible solutions for efficient energy conversion. The present paper proposes the employment of a Stirling engine as prime mover in a co-generation set equipped with a wood gasifier. A Stirling engine prototype previously developed in a joint project with Mase Generators, an Italian manufacturer of fixed and portable electrogenerators, is illustrated and its design is described.

Bartolini, C.M.; Caresana, F.; Pelagalli, L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A critical study on Kennedys Cost-Benefit-Analysis New nuclear power generation in the UK.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The demand for energy is forever growing. The technology of extracting power from uranium through nuclear facilities is rather old. Core melting, nuclear bombs, (more)

Strng, Jonathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography  

SciTech Connect

A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. Primary sources of information in preparing this bibliography were bibliographies on Oceania, citations in published papers, CIS Index and Abstracts, Monthly Catalog of United States Government Publications, Nuclear Science Abstracts, Energy Research Abstracts, numerous bibliographies on radiation ecology, and suggestions by many individuals whom we contacted. One goal in this bibliography is to include complete documentation of the source of congressional reports and other government-related publications. In addition, page numbers for material in this bibliography are provided in parentheses when the subject matter of a book or document is not restricted to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands.

Robison, W.L. (ed.) (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Schultz, V. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA)); Schultz, S.C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

SciTech Connect

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A pilot application of risk-informed methods to establish inservice inspection priorities for nuclear components at Surry Unit 1 Nuclear Power Station. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability Program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed risk-informed approaches for inservice inspection plans of nuclear power plants. This method uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) results to identify and prioritize the most risk-important components for inspection. The Surry Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 was selected for pilot application of this methodology. This report, which incorporates more recent plant-specific information and improved risk-informed methodology and tools, is Revision 1 of the earlier report (NUREG/CR-6181). The methodology discussed in the original report is no longer current and a preferred methodology is presented in this Revision. This report, NUREG/CR-6181, Rev. 1, therefore supersedes the earlier NUREG/CR-6181 published in August 1994. The specific systems addressed in this report are the auxiliary feedwater, the low-pressure injection, and the reactor coolant systems. The results provide a risk-informed ranking of components within these systems.

Vo, T.V.; Phan, H.K.; Gore, B.F.; Simonen, F.A.; Doctor, S.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared in accordance with the guidelines in DOE/E-0023 (DOE 1981), covers the program activities conducted around Nevada Test Site (NTS) for calendar year 1981. It contains descriptions of pertinent features of the NTS and its environs, summaries of the dosimetry and sampling methods, analytical procedures, and the analytical results from environmental measurements. Where applicable, dosimetry and sampling data are compared to appropriate guides for external and internal exposures of humans to ionizing radiation. The monitoring networks detected no radioactivity in the various media which could be attributed to US nuclear testing. Small amounts of fission products were detected in air samples as a result of the People's Republic of China nuclear test and atmospheric krypton-85 increased, following the trend beginning in 1960, due to increased use of nuclear technology. Strontium-90 in milk and cesium-137 in meat samples continued the slow decline as observed for the last several years.

Black, S.C.; Grossman, R.F.; Mullen, A.A.; Potter, G.D.; Smith, D.D.; Hopper, J.L. (comps.)

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Analysis of the operational reliability of a power-generating unit with a BN-600 reactor during the period 19801993  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The high quality of the design and the additional improvements to separate units of the main equipment and systems at the initial stage of operation (first main circulation pump, steam generators, safety and c...

N. N. Oshkanov; A. G. Sheinkman; P. P. Govorov

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Meteotsunami in the Great Lakes and on the Atlantic coast of the United States generated by the derecho of June 2930, 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tsunami-like intense sea-level oscillations, associated with atmospheric activity (meteorological tsunamis), are common in the Great Lakes and on the East Coast of the United States. They are generated by vari...

Jadranka epi?; Alexander B. Rabinovich

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

An integrated computer-based training simulator for the operative personnel of the 800-MW power-generating unit at the Perm District Power Station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The integrated computer-based training simulator for an 800-MW power-generating unit is described. Its capacities for training the personnel of the boiler-turbine and chemical departments are shown.

N. Yu. Pevneva; V. N. Piskov; A. N. Zenkov

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

From the first nuclear power plant to fourth-generation nuclear power installations [on the 60th anniversary of the Worlds First nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful commissioning in the 1954 of the Worlds First nuclear power plant constructed at the Institute for Physics ... center for training Soviet and foreign specialists on nuclear power plants, the personnel...

V. I. Rachkov; S. G. Kalyakin; O. F. Kukharchuk; Yu. I. Orlov

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Small modular reactors and the future of nuclear power in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Small modular reactors are the latest new technology that nuclear advocates tout as the game changer that will overcome previous economic failures of nuclear power. The debate over \\{SMRs\\} has been particularly intense because of the rapid failure of large nuclear renaissance reactors in market economies, the urgent need to address climate change, and the dramatic success of alternative, decentralized resources in lowering costs and increasing deployment. This paper assesses the prospects for SMR technology from three perspectives: the implications of the history of cost escalation in nuclear reactor construction for learning, economies of scale and other process that SMR advocates claim will lower cost; the challenges SMR technology faces in terms of high costs resulting from lost economies of scale, long lead time needed to develop a new design, the size of the task to create assembly lines for modular reactors and intense concern about safety; and the cost and other characteristics e.g. scalability, speed to market, flexibility, etc. of available alternatives compared SMR technology. The paper concludes that the decision of the major vendors (Westinghouse and B&W) to dramatically reduce SMR development efforts reflects the severe disadvantages that SMR technology faces in the next several decades.

Mark Cooper

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

High Energy Utilization, Co-Generation Nuclear power Plants With Static Energy Conversion  

SciTech Connect

In addition to being cost effective, very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion could meet the needs and the energy mix in underdeveloped countries and remote communities, which may include electricity, residential and industrial space heating, seawater desalination, and/or high temperature process heat or steam for industrial uses. These plants are also an attractive option in naval, marine, and undersea applications, when the absence of a sound signature is highly desirable. An Analysis is performed of Gas Cooled Reactor (CGR) and Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (LMR), very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion, using a combination of options. These include Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converters (AMTECs) and both single segment and segmented thermoelectric converters. The total energy utilization of these plants exceeds 88%. It includes the fraction of the reactor's thermal power converted into electricity and delivered to the Grid at 6.6 kVA and those used for residential and industrial space heating at {approx}370 K, seawater desalination at 400 K, and/or high temperature process heat or steam at {approx}850 K. In addition to its inherently high reliability, modularity, low maintenance and redundancy, static energy conversion used in the present study could deliver electricity to the Grid at a net efficiency of 29.5%. A LMR plant delivers 2-3 times the fraction of the reactor thermal power converted into electricity in a GCR plant, but could not provide for both seawater desalination and high temperature process heat/steam concurrently, which is possible in GCR plants. The fraction of the reactor's thermal power used for non-electrical power generation in a GCR plant is {approx} 10 - 15% higher than in a LMR plant. (authors)

El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies and Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 90, 063412 (2014) Effect of nuclear vibration on high-order-harmonic generation of aligned H2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 90, 063412 (2014) Effect of nuclear vibration on high-order-harmonic generation of aligned H2 + molecules Dmitry A. Telnov,1,* John Heslar,2, and Shih-I Chu2,3, 1 Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504, Russia 2 Department of Physics, Center for Quantum

Chu, Shih-I

303

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

305

Optimal sizing study of hybrid wind/PV/diesel power generation unit  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a methodology of sizing optimization of a stand-alone hybrid wind/PV/diesel energy system is presented. This approach makes use of a deterministic algorithm to suggest, among a list of commercially available system devices, the optimal number and type of units ensuring that the total cost of the system is minimized while guaranteeing the availability of the energy. The collection of 6 months of data of wind speed, solar radiation and ambient temperature recorded for every hour of the day were used. The mathematical modeling of the main elements of the hybrid wind/PV/diesel system is exposed showing the more relevant sizing variables. A deterministic algorithm is used to minimize the total cost of the system while guaranteeing the satisfaction of the load demand. A comparison between the total cost of the hybrid wind/PV/diesel energy system with batteries and the hybrid wind/PV/diesel energy system without batteries is presented. The reached results demonstrate the practical utility of the used sizing methodology and show the influence of the battery storage on the total cost of the hybrid system. (author)

Belfkira, Rachid; Zhang, Lu; Barakat, Georges [Groupe de Recherche en Electrotechnique et Automatique du Havre, University of Le Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 1123, 76063 Le Havre (France)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity of Simulated Glass Forming Nuclear Waste Melts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-level nuclear waste is generated during reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuels. At present, these wastes are stored at various locations in the United States until a final waste form (i.e., glass, SYNROC, ......

James U. Derby; L. David Pye; M. J. Plodinec

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Property exempt from taxation: nuclear generation facility property: K.S.A. 79-230 (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation would exempt from state property taxes any property purchased, constructed or installed to expand capacity at an existing nuclear plant or to build a new nuclear plant. A...

308

Monitoring attosecond dynamics of coherent electron-nuclear wave packets by molecular high-order-harmonic generation  

SciTech Connect

A pump-probe scheme for preparing and monitoring electron-nuclear motion in a dissociative coherent electron-nuclear wave packet is explored from numerical solutions of a non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A mid-ir intense few-cycle probe pulse is used to generate molecular high-order-harmonic generation (MHOHG) from a coherent superposition of two or more dissociative coherent electronic-nuclear wave packets, prepared by a femtosecond uv pump pulse. Varying the time delay between the intense ir probe pulse and the uv pump pulse by a few hundreds of attoseconds, the MHOHG signal intensity is shown to vary by orders of magnitude, thus showing the high sensitivity to electron-nuclear dynamics in coherent electron-nuclear wave packets. We relate this high sensitivity of MHOHG spectra to opposing electron velocities (fluxes) in the electron wave packets of the recombining (recolliding) ionized electron and of the bound electron in the initial coherent superposition of two electronic states.

Bredtmann, Timm [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Takustrasse 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, Andre D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: Summary status report: Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 through April 19, 1987. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

Doerge, D. H.; Haffner, D. R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

ASSESSMENT OF THE RADIONUCLIDE COMPOSITION OF "HOT PARTICLES" SAMPLED IN THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOURTH REACTOR UNIT  

SciTech Connect

Fuel-containing materials sampled from within the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) 4th Reactor Unit Confinement Shelter were spectroscopically studied for gamma and alpha content. Isotopic ratios for cesium, europium, plutonium, americium, and curium were identified and the fuel burnup in these samples was determined. A systematic deviation in the burnup values based on the cesium isotopes, in comparison with other radionuclides, was observed. The conducted studies were the first ever performed to demonstrate the presence of significant quantities of {sup 242}Cm and {sup 243}Cm. It was determined that there was a systematic underestimation of activities of transuranic radionuclides in fuel samples from inside of the ChNPP Confinement Shelter, starting from {sup 241}Am (and going higher), in comparison with the theoretical calculations.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Marra, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

STARLIB: A NEXT-GENERATION REACTION-RATE LIBRARY FOR NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS  

SciTech Connect

STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, {gamma}), (p, {alpha}), ({alpha}, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

Sallaska, A. L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8462 (United States); Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Goriely, S. [Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 226, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X., E-mail: anne.sallaska@nist.gov [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

International Environmental Evaluation for the Helical Screw Expander Generator Unit Projects in Cesano, Italy and Broadlands, New Zealand  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Helical Screw Expander (HSE) Generator Program are (1) to accelerate the development of geothermal resources by introducing this advanced conversion technology, (2) to provide operating experience to prospective users of the equipment, and (3) to collect data on the performance and reliability of the equipment under various geothermal resource conditions. The participants hope to achieve these goals by testing a small-scale, transportable HSE generator at existing geothermal test facilities that produce fluids of different salinity, temperature and pressure conditions. This Environmental Evaluation has been prepared, using available information, to analyze the environmental consequences of testing the HSE generator. Its purpose is to support a decision on the need for a complete environmental review of the HSE program under the terms of Executive Order 121 14, ''Environmental Effects Abroad of Major federal Actions''. This Executive Order requires review of projects which involve the release of potentially toxic effluents that are strictly regulated in the United States, or which may have significant environmental effects on the global commons, on natural or ecological resources of international significance, or on the environment of non-participating countries. The final guidelines implementing the provisions of the Executive Order for DOE have been published. This evaluation deals with testing to be conducted at Cesano, Italy by the designated contractor of the Italian government, the Ente Narionale per l'Energia Ellectrica (ENEL), and at Broadlands, New Zealand by the Ministry of Works and Development of New Zealand. Testing at Cerro Prieto, Mexico has already been completed by the Comision Federal de Electricidad and is not evaluated in this report.

Webb, J.W.; Mezga, L.J.; Reed, A.W.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A practical strategy for reducing the future security risk of United States spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

Depletion calculations show that advanced oxide (AOX) fuels can be used in existing light water reactors (LWRs) to achieve and maintain virtually any desired level of US (US) reactor-grade plutonium (R-Pu) inventory. AOX fuels are composed of a neutronically inert matrix loaded with R-Pu and erbium. A 1/2 core load of 100% nonfertile, 7w% R-Pu AOX and 3.9 w% UO{sub 2} has a net total plutonium ({sup TOT}Pu) destruction rate of 310 kg/yr. The 20% residual {sup TOT}Pu in discharged AOX contains > 55% {sup 242}Pu making it unattractive for nuclear explosive use. A three-phase fuel-cycle development program sequentially loading 60 LWRs with 100% mixed oxide, 50% AOX with a nonfertile component displacing only some of the {sup 238}U, and 50% AOX, which is 100% nonfertile, could reduce the US plutonium inventory to near zero by 2050.

Chodak, P. III; Buksa, J.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis Group

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

This project will use proton irradiation to further understand the microstructural stability of ceramics being considered as matrix material for advanced nuclear fuels.

Todd R. Allen

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Induced Radioactivity and Waste Classification of Reactor Zone Components of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 After Final Shutdown  

SciTech Connect

The dismantlement of the reactor core materials and surrounding structural components is a major technical concern for those planning closure and decontamination and decommissioning of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Specific issues include when and how dismantlement should be accomplished and what the radwaste classification of the dismantled system would be at the time it is disassembled. Whereas radiation levels and residual radiological characteristics of the majority of the plant systems are directly measured using standard radiation survey and radiochemical analysis techniques, actual measurements of reactor zone materials are not practical due to high radiation levels and inaccessibility. For these reasons, neutron transport analysis was used to estimate induced radioactivity and radiation levels in the Chernobyl NPP Unit 1 reactor core materials and structures.Analysis results suggest that the optimum period of safe storage is 90 to 100 yr for the Unit 1 reactor. For all of the reactor components except the fuel channel pipes (or pressure tubes), this will provide sufficient decay time to allow unlimited worker access during dismantlement, minimize the need for expensive remote dismantlement, and allow for the dismantled reactor components to be classified as low- or medium-level radioactive waste. The fuel channel pipes will remain classified as high-activity waste requiring remote dismantlement for hundreds of years due to the high concentration of induced {sup 63}Ni in the Zircaloy pipes.

Bylkin, Boris K. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Davydova, Galina B. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Zverkov, Yuri A. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Krayushkin, Alexander V. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Neretin, Yuri A. [Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine); Nosovsky, Anatoly V. [Slavutych Division of the International Chernobyl Center (Ukraine); Seyda, Valery A. [Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine); Short, Steven M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States)

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Economic and environmental analysis of power generation expansion in Japan considering Fukushima nuclear accident using a multi-objective optimization model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power has long been a cornerstone of energy policy in Japan, a country with few natural resources of its own. However, following on from the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the Japanese government is now in the throes of reviewing its nuclear power policy. On the other hand, under continuing policies of greenhouse gas reduction, it is crucial to consider scenarios for the country to realize an economic, safe and low-carbon power generation system in the future. Therefore, in the present study, economic and environmental analysis was conducted on the power generation system in Japan up to 2030 using a multi-objective optimization methodology. Four nuclear power scenarios were proposed in light of the nuclear accident: (1) actively anti-nuclear; (2) passively negative towards nuclear; (3) conservative towards nuclear; and (4) active expansion of nuclear power. The obtained capacity mix, generation mix, generation cost, CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of the scenarios were compared and analysed. The obtained results show that the large scale penetration of PV (photovoltaic), wind and LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) power can partly replace nuclear power, however, removing nuclear power entirely was not suggested from economic, environmental and energy security perspectives.

Qi Zhang; Benjamin C. Mclellan; Tetsuo Tezuka; Keiichi N. Ishihara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Characterization of a Stochastic Procedure for the Generation and Transport of Fission Fragments within Nuclear Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the ever-increasing demands of the nuclear power community to extend fuel cycles and overall core-lifetimes in a safe and economic manner, it is becoming more necessary to extend the working knowledge of nuclear fuel performance. From...

Hackemack, Michael Wayne

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Discharge source coupled to a deceleration unit for anion beam generation: Application to H{sub 2}{sup ?} photodetachment  

SciTech Connect

A cathode discharge source coupled to a deceleration unit for anion beam generation is described. The discharge source, made of stainless steel or duralumin electrodes and Macor insulators, is attached to the exit nozzle valve plate at one end, and to an Einzel lens to the other end. Subsequently, a cylindrical retardation unit is attached to the Einzel lens to decelerate the ions in order to optimize the laser beam interaction time required for spectroscopic investigations. The compact device is able to produce beam intensities of the order of 2 10{sup 12} anions/cm{sup 2} s and 20 ?rad of angular divergence with kinetic energies ranging from 30 to 120 eV. Using distinct gas mixtures for the supersonic expansion together with a linear time-of-flight spectrometer, anions of great relevance in molecular astrophysics like, for example, H{sub 2}{sup ?}, C{sub 3}H{sup ?}, C{sub 2}{sup ?}, C{sub 2}H{sup ?}, HCN{sub 2}{sup ?}, CO{sub 2}{sup ?}, CO{sub 2}H{sup ?}, C{sub 4}{sup ?}, C{sub 4}H{sup ?}, C{sub 5}H{sub 4}{sup ?}, C{sub 5}H{sub 6}{sup ?}, C{sub 7}N{sup ?}, and C{sub 10}N{sup ?} were produced. Finally, in order to demonstrate the capability of the experimental technique the photodetachment cross-section of the metastable H{sub 2}{sup ?}, predominantly in the (v = 0, J = 26) state, was measured following laser excitation at ?{sub exc}= 565 nm obtaining a value of ?{sub ph}= 0.04 . To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that this anion cross-section has been measured.

Rudnev, V.; Urea, A. Gonzlez [Unidad de Lseres y Haces Moleculares, Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Universidad Complutense, Juan XXIII-1, Madrid 28040 (Spain)] [Unidad de Lseres y Haces Moleculares, Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Universidad Complutense, Juan XXIII-1, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On other hand, accidents at nuclear facilities could nott ed expos ur e from a nuclear accident which would warrantresulting from accidents at nuclear facilities. Average

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL Sandia National Laboratories CSRI Student Seminar July 2008 #12;Motivation · Graph algorithms perform extremely well on multithreaded architectures like the Cray MTA-2. ­ Won IC graph benchmarking contest

Devine, Karen

322

2013 UNITED KINGDOM ATOMIC ENERGY AUTHORITY The following article appeared in Journal of Nuclear Materials, Vol.439, Issues 1-3, August  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2013 UNITED KINGDOM ATOMIC ENERGY AUTHORITY The following article appeared in Journal of Nuclear temperatures, reaction path (i) (sinks) dominates and at a high dose rates and/or low irradiation temperature for Fusion Energy (CCFE) Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB, UK Name: Christopher Hardie Address: Department

323

Analysis of ground motions at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station April 9, 1968  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...concrete mat foundation. The turbine generator, the plant auxiliary...transferred to the secondary turbine steam system by the steam generators...has resulted in a bothersome maintenance problem which requires replacement...self-sustMned Wineharger wind-generator to charge the batteries...

G. W. Housner; P. J. West; C. G. Johnson

324

The state and prospects of coal and nuclear power generation in Russia (review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the modern state and development trends for coal and nuclear power engineering in Russia up to 2030 are generalized. It is emphasized that from the viewpoint of strategy, coal and uranium fuel will be ...

V. V. Salomatov

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Executive Summary Mission As we become more in this new century, the benefits of nuclear fission as a key energy source for both the near- and long method of generating energy from nuclear fission in both the United States and the world. A key mission

326

Small Modular Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Technologies » Small Modular Reactor Technologies » Small Modular Nuclear Reactors Small Modular Nuclear Reactors Cutaway of 2-Unit Generation mPower SMR Installation. | © 2012 Generation mPower LLC. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted with permission. Cutaway of 2-Unit Generation mPower SMR Installation. | © 2012 Generation mPower LLC. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted with permission. The development of clean, affordable nuclear power options is a key element of the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. As a part of this strategy, a high priority of the Department has been to help accelerate the timelines for the commercialization and deployment of small modular reactor (SMR) technologies through the SMR Licensing Technical Support program. Begun

327

EIS-0086: Conversion to Coal, New England Power Company, Salem Harbor Generating Station Units 1, 2, and 3 Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Units I, 2, and 3 of the Salem Harbor Generating Station from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

328

EIS-0105: Conversion to Coal, Baltimore Gas & Electric Company, Brandon Shores Generating Station Units 1 and 2, Anne Arundel County, Maryland  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energys Economic Regulatory Administration Office of Fuels Program, Coal and Electricity Division prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with prohibiting the use of petroleum products as a primary energy source for Units 1 and 2 of the Brandon Shores Generating Station, located in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

329

Multi-Objective Optimization Analysis of Post-Fukushima Power Generation Planning in Japan with Considering Nuclear Powers Risk Cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, multi-objective optimization analysis was conducted on the post-Fukushima power generation planning in Japan up to 2030 from economic and environmental perspectives with considering nuclear

Qi Zhang; Tetsuo Tezuka; Keiichi Ishihara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

Acoustic monitoring and signature analysis in nuclear and fossil energy generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic monitoring and analysis in nuclear and fossil energy plants has been accompanied by transducer development for the hot environment. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires acoustic monitoring systems on nuclear reactors for detecting potential failures. Accelerometers are attached at critical points and their output is automatically analyzed to give warnings of loose parts or excessive vibration. In addition to providing a warning the system can monitor arrival time to be used for fault location. For use as a potential boiling detector of breeder reactors the acoustic signature of the sodium coolant boiling has been compared with background noise level. High temperature sodium?immersible microphones and waveguides for smooth energy transfer were developed for this investigation. High?temperature acoustic sensors have been used in a coal gasification plant. The presence of solids in a steam?char line has been automatically determined using passive monitoring of relative sound intensities of different frequency bands.

Henry B. Karplus

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the radiological burden due to the battle-field use of circa 400 tons of depleted-uranium munitions in Iraq (and of about 40 tons in Yugoslavia) is comparable to that arising from the hypothetical battle-field use of more than 600 kt (respectively 60 kt) of high-explosive equivalent pure-fusion fourth-generation nuclear weapons. Despite the limited knowledge openly available on existing and future nuclear weapons, there is sufficient published information on their physical principles and radiological effects to make such a comparison. In fact, it is shown that this comparison can be made with very simple and convincing arguments so that the main technical conclusions of the paper are undisputable -- although it would be worthwhile to supplement the hand calculations presented in the paper by more detailed computer simulations in order to consolidate the conclusions and refute any possible objections.

Gsponer, A; Vitale, B; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Vitale, Bruno

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Circuitry is described for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrument to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on. 1 figures.

Brown, R.A.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Circuitry for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrut to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on.

Brown, Roger A. (Amsterdam, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

( )Ministers delay decision on site for 10-billion-dollar nuclear fusion reactor 20/12/2003 The European Union, the United States and four other countries failed in talks agree on a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

( )Ministers delay decision on site for 10-billion-dollar nuclear fusion reactor 20-dollar international nuclear fusion reactor. Delegates from the European Union, the United States, China, Japan, South's first nuclear fusion reactor will provide an economic boon to its chosen site: French officials estimate

336

Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation.

Ralph E.H. Sims; Hans-Holger Rogner; Ken Gregory

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Nuclear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear Power Nuclear Power picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Nuclear power is projected to represent a growing share of the developing world’s electricity consumption from 1999 through 2020. New plant construction and license extensions for existing plants are expected to produce a net increase in world nuclear capacity. Nuclear power plants generated electricity in 29 countries in 1999. A total of 433 nuclear power reactors were in operation (Figure 61), including 104 in the United States, 59 in France, and 53 in Japan. The largest national share of electricity from nuclear power was in France, at 75 percent (Figure 62). Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Lithuania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Sweden, Ukraine, and South Korea depended on nuclear power for at least 40

338

Nuclear Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR - Your article (Nature 365, 599; 1993) on the US-Ukraine stalemate over nuclear weapons prompts the following remarks. The United States made a mistake ... nuclear weapons prompts the following remarks. The United States made a mistake in not recognizing Ukraine as a legitimate successor state to the Soviet nuclear arsenal and is still insisting that ...

Arno Arrak

1994-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

339

Report of the Nuclear Energy Agency Expert Group on Gut Transfer Factors: Implications for Dose per Unit Intake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Report of the Nuclear Energy Agency Expert Group on Gut Transfer Factors: Implications...transfer factors recommended by an Expert Group of the Nuclear Energy Agency for intakes of certain important elements in......

G.M. Kendall; J.D. Harrison; T.P. Fell

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Outlook on Generation IV Nuclear Systems and Related Materials R&D Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Preoccupations of energy security and concerns about of the role that future reactors should play for minimizing long-lived radioactive ... that gives first priority to developing a new generation of fast neutron...

F. Carr; C. Renault; P. Anzieu; P. Brossard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health and Safety Aspects of Pro- posed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-FuelHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. NeroResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein was not carried out in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation

Columbia University

345

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein of Bio in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation and Disposition

346

Los Alamos National Laboratory new generation standard nuclear material storage container - the SAVY4000 design  

SciTech Connect

Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based standard involving storage of nuclear material (RD003). This RD003 requirements document has sense been updated to reflect requirements as identified with recently issued DOE M 441.1-1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual'. The new packaging manual was issued at the encouragement of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board with a clear directive for protecting the worker from exposure due to loss of containment of stored materials. The Manual specifies a detailed and all inclusive approach to achieve a high level of protection; from package design & performance requirements, design life determinations of limited life components, authorized contents evaluations, and surveillance/maintenance to ensure in use package integrity over time. Materials in scope involve those stored outside an approved engineered-contamination barrier that would result in a worker exposure of in excess of 5 rem Committed Effective Does Equivalent (CEDE). Key aspects of meeting the challenge as developed around the SAVY-3000 vented storage container design will be discussed. Design performance and acceptance criteria against the manual, bounding conditions as established that the user must ensure are met to authorize contents in the package (based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide), interface as a safety class system within the facility under the LANL plutonium facility DSA, design life determinations for limited life components, and a sense of design specific surveillance program implementation as LANL moves forward into production and use of the SAVY-3000 will all be addressed. The SAVY-3000 is intended as a work horse package for the DOE complex as a vented storage container primarily for plutonium in solid form.

Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010...

348

Nuclear Medicine | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Medicine Nuclear Medicine SHARE Nuclear Medicine The Medical Isotope Program is focused on the development of: improved reactor production and processing methods to provide medical radioisotopes; new radionuclide generator systems; design and evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for applications in nuclear medicine and oncology; and association with Medical Cooperative Programs throughout the world for the further pre-clinical testing and clinical evaluation of agents developed at ORNL. In the United States, only ORNL has the combined resources of a stable isotope inventory, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), hot cell processing capabilities, and a wide range of support functions required for such research. These collective resources provide unique capabilities for

349

New technology for purging the steam generators of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A technology for removal of undissolved impurities from a horizontal steam generator using purge water is developed on the basis of a theoretical analysis. A purge with a maximal flow rate is drawn off from the zone with the highest accumulation of sludge in the lower part of the steam generator after the main circulation pump of the corresponding loop is shut off and the temperatures of the heat transfer medium at the inlet and outlet of the steam generator have equilibrated. An improved purge configuration is used for this technology; it employs shutoff and regulator valves, periodic purge lines separated by a cutoff fixture, and a D{sub y} 100 drain union as a connector for the periodic purge. Field tests show that the efficiency of this technology for sludge removal by purge water is several times that for the standard method.

Budko, I. O.; Kutdjusov, Yu. F.; Gorburov, V. I. [Scientific-Research Center for Energy Technology 'NICE Centrenergo' (Russian Federation); Rjasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'The All-Rissia Nuklear Power Engineering Research and Development Institute' (VNIIAM) (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Transmutation of Nuclear Waste in the Two-Zone Subcritical System Driven by High- Intensity Neutron Generator - 12098  

SciTech Connect

The main problems of transmutation of high-level radioactive waste (minor actinides and long-lived fission products) are considered in our work. The range of radioactive waste of nuclear power is analyzed. The conditions under which the transmutation of radioactive waste will be most effective are analyzed too. The modeling results of a transmutation of the main radioactive isotopes are presented and discussed. The transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products are modeled in our work (minor actinides - Np-237, Am-241, Am-242, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245; long-lived fission products - I-129, Tc-99). The two-zone subcritical system is calculated with help of different neutron-physical codes (MCNP, Scale, Montebarn, Origen). The ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library used in above calculations. Thus, radioactive wastes can be divided into two main groups that need to be transmuted. The minor actinides form the first group and the long-lived fission products form the second one. For the purpose of effective transmutation these isotopes must be extracted from the spent nuclear fuel with the help of either PUREX technology or pyrometallurgical technology. The two-zone reactor system with fast and thermal regions is more effective for nuclear waste transmutation than the one-zone reactor. Modeling results show that nearly all radioactive wastes can be transmuted in the two-zone subcritical system driven by a high-intensity neutron generator with the external neutron source strength of 1.10{sup 13} n/sec. Obviously, transmutation rate will increase with a rise of the external neutron source strength. From the results above we can also see that the initial loading of radioactive isotopes into the reactor system should exceed by mass those isotopes that are finally produced. (authors)

Babenko, V.O. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Metrolohichna str. 14-b, Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine); Gulik, V.I.; Pavlovych, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, pr. Nauky 47, Kyiv, 03680 (Ukraine)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

PARTNERSHIP FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEXT GENERATION SIMULATION TOOLS TO EVALUATE CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS AND MATERIALS USED IN NUCLEAR APPLICATION - 8388  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE has initiated a multidisciplinary cross cutting project to develop a reasonable and credible set of tools to predict the structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cement barriers used in nuclear applications over extended time frames (e.g., > 100 years for operating facilities and > 1000 years for waste management). A partnership that combines DOE, NRC, academia, private sector, and international expertise has been formed to accomplish the project objectives by integrating existing information and realizing advancements where necessary. The set of simulation tools and data developed under this project will be used to evaluate and predict the behavior of cementitious barriers used in near surface engineered waste disposal systems, e.g., waste forms, containment structures, entombments and environmental remediation, including decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The simulation tools will also support analysis of structural concrete components of nuclear facilities (spent fuel pools, dry spent fuel storage units, and recycling facilities, e.g., fuel fabrication, separations processes). Simulation parameters will be obtained from prior literature and will be experimentally measured under this project, as necessary, to demonstrate application of the simulation tools for three prototype applications (waste form in concrete vault, high level waste tank grouting, and spent fuel pool). Test methods and data needs to support use of the simulation tools for future applications will be defined. This is a national issue that affects all waste disposal sites that use cementitious waste forms and structures, decontamination and decommissioning activities, service life determination of existing structures, and design of future public and private nuclear facilities. The problem is difficult because it requires projecting conditions and responses over extremely long times. Current performance assessment analyses show that engineered barriers are typically the primary control to prevent the release of radionuclides from nuclear facilities into the environment. In the absence of an adequate predictive tool, assessments cannot fully incorporate the effectiveness of the concrete barriers, and the inventory of radionuclides (especially the long-lived radionuclides) that may be safely disposed of in shallow land disposal and the predicted service life of operating nuclear facilities. This project is 5 year effort focused on reducing uncertainties associated with current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increasing the consistency and transparency of the assessment process. The results of this project will enable improved risk-informed, performance-based decision making, and supports several of the strategic initiatives in the DOE-EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap.

Langton, C; Richard Dimenna, R

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

352

Water chemistry of the system for cooling the electrical generator stator of the power unit at a thermal power station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from studies of the water chemistry used in the system for cooling the stator windings of alternators used in supercritical-pressure power units are presented, and a solution is ... suggested using which ...

B. M. Larin; A. B. Larin; A. N. Korotkov; M. Yu. Oparin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nuclear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Nuclear Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 82. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity Table 96. Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Table 97. Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, nuclear power capacity increases from 101.0 gigawatts in 2009 to 110.5 gigawatts in 2035 (Figure 82), including 3.8 gigawatts of expansion at existing plants and 6.3 gigawatts of new capacity. The new capacity includes completion of a second unit at the Watts Bar site, where construction on a partially completed plant has

354

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

355

Model of sludge behavior in nuclear plant steam generators. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The accumulation of large amounts of sludge in pressurized water reactor steam generators is thought to be a cause of accelerated corrosion by trace impurities which concentrate in such deposits. Based on fundamental principles, this study develops a mathematical model for predicting the behavior (e.g., deposition and reentrainment) of sludge in steam generators. The calculated sludge behavior shows good agreement with the limited amount of experimental data available. The results suggest that the continued accumulation of sludge on the tubesheet might be preventable, and that if it could be, the incoming sludge would be removed by blowdown. An analysis of the uncertainties in the model led to suggested priorities for further analytical and experimental work to gain a better understanding of sludge behavior. 29 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

Beal, S.K.; Chen, J.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and with the exception of CPVC, no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied. The testing shows no major concerns for compatibility over the short duration of these tests but does indicate that longer duration exposure studies are warranted, especially for Tefzel. However, the physical changes experienced by Tefzel in the improved solvent were comparable to the physical changes obtained when Tefzel is placed in CSSX baseline solvent. Therefore, there is no effect of the improved solvent beyond those observed in CSSX baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

Memorandum of Understanding between the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Company of Radioactive Waste of Spain Concerning Cooperation in the Field of Used Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Memorandum of Understanding between the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Company of Radioactive Waste of Spain Concerning Cooperation in the Field of Used Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management

358

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL) University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA 13) General Atomics, San Diego, CA, USA 14) Mission Research

359

Power conversion unit studies for the next generation nuclear plant coupled to a high-temperature steam electrolysis facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. A high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production plant was coupled to the reactor...

Barner, Robert Buckner

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

360

Temperature and thermal stress distributions for the HFIR permanent reflector generated by nuclear heating  

SciTech Connect

The beryllium permanent reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor has the main functions for slowing down and reflecting the neutrons and housing the experimental facilities. The reflector is heated as a result of the nuclear reaction. Heat is removed mainly by the cooling water passing through the densely distributed coolant holes along the vertical or axial direction of the reflector. The reflector neutronic distribution and its heating rate are calculated by J.C. Gehin of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by applying the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. The heat transfer boundary conditions along several reflector interfaces are estimated to remove additional heat from the reflector. The present paper is to report the calculation results of the temperature and the thermal stress distributions of the permanent reflector by applying the computer aided design code I-DEAS and the finite element code ABAQUS. The present calculation is to estimate the high stress areas as a result of the new beam tube cutouts along the horizontal mid-plane of the reflector of the recent reactor upgrade project. These high stresses were not able to be calculated in the preliminary design analysis in earlier 60`s. The heat transfer boundary conditions are used in this redesigned calculation. The material constants and the acceptance criteria for the allowable stresses are mainly based on that assumed in the preliminary design report.

Chang, S.J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nuclear power can reduce emissions and maintain a strong economy: Rating Australias optimal future electricity-generation mix by technologies and policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Legal barriers currently prohibit nuclear power for electricity generation in Australia. For this reason, published future electricity scenarios aimed at policy makers for this country have not seriously considered a full mix of energy options. Here we addressed this deficiency by comparing the life-cycle sustainability of published scenarios using multi-criteria decision-making analysis, and modeling the optimized future electricity mix using a genetic algorithm. The published CSIRO e-future scenario under its default condition (excluding nuclear) has the largest aggregate negative environmental and economic outcomes (score=4.51 out of 8), followed by the Australian Energy Market Operators 100% renewable energy scenario (4.16) and the Greenpeace scenario (3.97). The e-future projection with maximum nuclear-power penetration allowed yields the lowest negative impacts (1.46). After modeling possible future electricity mixes including or excluding nuclear power, the weighted criteria recommended an optimized scenario mix where nuclear power generated >40% of total electricity. The life-cycle greenhouse-gas emissions of the optimization scenarios including nuclear power were nuclear power is an effective and logical option for the environmental and economic sustainability of a future electricity network in Australia.

Sanghyun Hong; Corey J.A. Bradshaw; Barry W. Brook

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

Michael W. Patterson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

he students, faculty, and research staff of the MIT Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering (NSE) generate, control, and apply nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T he students, faculty, and research staff of the MIT Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering and technology. Professor Richard K. Lester Head, Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering rklester contact Professor Richard K. Lester, Head Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering rklester

Polz, Martin

364

1Nuclear Materials Technology Division/Los Alamos National Laboratory Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the United States had no easy way of recover- ing plutonium from its nuclear weapons with- out generating1Nuclear Materials Technology Division/Los Alamos National Laboratory 0 Publications Nuclear Fuels-Dehydride Recycle Process for Plutonium Recovery 4-5 Electrolytic Decontamination of Oralloy 6 Applied Weapons

365

United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) Annual Steering Committee Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On November 17-18, 2014, the Department of Energys Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE/NE) hosted the annual U.S.-ROK INERI Steering Committee meeting in Washington, D.C. The Steering Committee...

366

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers, Volumes 1, 2.  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001 ???????????????????????????????? September 2004. ???????????????????????????????· Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. ???????????????????????????????· Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. ???????????????????????????????· Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. ???????????????????????????????· Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. ???????????????????????????????· Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. ???????????????????????????????· Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform

Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Hines, J. Wesley; Lu, Baofu; Huang, Xuedong; Penha, Rosani, L.; Perillo, Sergio, R.; Zhao, Ke

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers.  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001-September 2004. (1) Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. (2) Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. (3) Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. (4) Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. (5) Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. (6) Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform. (7) Implementation of a moving-window technique in the time domain for detecting and quantifying flaw types in tubular structures. A window zooming technique was also developed for flaw location in tubes. (8) Theoretical study of elastic wave propagation (longitudinal and shear waves) in metallic flat plates and tubing with and without flaws. (9) Simulation of the Lamb wave propagation using the finite-element code ABAQUS. This enabled the verification of the experimental results. The research tasks included both analytical research and experimental studies. The experimental results helped to enhance the robustness of fault monitoring methods and to provide a systematic verification of the analytical results. The results of this research were disseminated in scientific meetings. A journal manuscript was submitted for publication. The new findings of this research have potential applications in aerospace and civil structures. The report contains a complete bibliography that was developed during the course of the project.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

368

Monthly/Annual Energy Review - nuclear section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Monthly and latest annual statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor the U.S, Public Health Service (PHs) has conducted radiological monitoring in the offsite areas around United States nuclear test areas. The primary objective of this monitoring has been the protection of the health and safety of

370

Technical evaluation of the noise and isolation testing of the safety features actuation system at the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical evaluation of the noise and isolation testing of the safety features actuation system at the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The tests were to verify that faults on the non-Class 1E circuits would not propagate to the Class 1E circuits and degrade them below acceptable levels. The tests conducted demonstrated that the safety features actuation system did not degrade below acceptable levels nor was the system's ability to perform its protective functions affected.

Selan, J.C.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation » Bilateral Cooperation » International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports August 13, 2013 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the

372

Efficiency of producing additional power in units of nuclear power stations containing water-cooled-water-moderated reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a basic possibility to raise the maximum power of a unit containing the VVR-1000 reactor in the course of the fuel charge burn-up and with lowering the coefficient of the energy-release nonuniformity...

R. Z. Aminov; V. A. Khrustalev; A. A. Serdobintsev

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Nuclear Power Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Onofre Nuclear Generating Station San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Bob Ashe-Everest Southern California Edison 10 Incoming New Fuel Inspecting New Fuel SONGS Unit 1 Fuel Storage SONGS Unit 1 Fuel Storage History History u Shipped 270 Fuel Assemblies (F/A) from Unit 1 to Morris, Illinois. u Transshipped 70 U1 F/As to U2 spent fuel pool (SFP). u Transshipped 118 U1 F/As to U3 SFP. SONGS ISFSI Loading SONGS ISFSI Loading u Moved 5 dry shielded canisters (DSC) from U3 SFP to the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Each DSC contains up to 24 F/As. u Moved 9 DSCs from U1 SFP to the ISFSI. u At total of 325 U1 F/As have been moved into dry storage to date. u Scheduled to move 3 DSCs from U2 SFP to the ISFSI May 2005. Canister into Cask FA being loaded into canister

374

Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography  

SciTech Connect

A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. This document is the bibliography.

Schultz, V. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA)); Schultz, S.C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA)); Robison, W.L. (ed.) (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Chapter 7 - Nuclear Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nuclear energy grew rapidly during the 19601975 period in countries such as France, the United States, and Norway. But nuclear energy ran into problems in the 1970s because of public concern over the radioactive waste it generates, and this concern suppressed the further expansion of nuclear power. The public perception had begun to change in recent years, as concern about atmospheric carbon dioxide levels led to a renewed interest in energy sources not reliant on hydrocarbons. But, in 2010, a tsunami in Japan led to an accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, and the ensuing release of radioactive materials once again raised concerns about safety. At the same time, limited supplies of uranium have caused the price of that fuel material to go up. The solution to the shortage and resulting price increase is fast breeder reactors that use both uranium and thorium fuels. Unfortunately, this technology has not yet been perfected and commercialized.

Brian F. Towler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years March 8, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today commended the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's decision to approve the first-ever Early Site Permit (ESP) for the Exelon Generation Company's Clinton site, in central Illinois. This decision marks a major milestone in the President's plan to expand the use of safe and clean nuclear power. As part of President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative - which seeks to change the way we power this nation - nuclear power will play an increasingly

377

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

378

Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Numbers 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement Number 13  

SciTech Connect

This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), and Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER. These issues relate to: Design criteria -- structures, components, equipment, and systems; Reactor; Instrumentation and controls; Electrical power systems; Auxiliary systems; Conduct of operations; Accident analysis; and Quality assurance.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to the Minutes for the to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting September 30 to October 1, 2002 MEMORANDUM To: Chairman, Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) From: Thomas B. Cochran, Member of NERAC Date: October 16, 2002 Subject: "A Technology Roadmap on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems," a report of the NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning Please include these additional remarks in your transmittal of the subject report to DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. Perhaps the greatest security threat to the United States today, and of paramount concern to American citizens since September 11, 2001, is that nuclear weapon- usable materials will be stolen, seized, or secretly diverted from nuclear facilities and then used by

380

Forecast of criticality experiments and experimental programs needed to support nuclear operations in the United States of America: 1994--1999  

SciTech Connect

This Forecast is generated by the Chair of the Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup (ENIWG), with input from Department of Energy and the nuclear community. One of the current concerns addressed by ENIWG was the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board`s Recommendation 93-2. This Recommendation delineated the need for a critical experimental capability, which includes (1) a program of general-purpose experiments, (2) improving the information base, and (3) ongoing departmental programs. The nuclear community also recognizes the importance of criticality theory, which, as a stepping stone to computational analysis and safety code development, needs to be benchmarked against well-characterized critical experiments. A summary project of the Department`s needs with respect to criticality information includes (1) hands-on training, (2) criticality and nuclear data, (3) detector systems, (4) uranium- and plutonium-based reactors, and (5) accident analysis. The Workgroup has evaluated, prioritized, and categorized each proposed experiment and program. Transportation/Applications is a new category intended to cover the areas of storage, training, emergency response, and standards. This category has the highest number of priority-1 experiments (nine). Facilities capable of performing experiments include the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF) along with Area V at Sandia National Laboratory. The LACEF continues to house the most significant collection of critical assemblies in the Western Hemisphere. The staff of this facility and Area V are trained and certified, and documentation is current. ENIWG will continue to work with the nuclear community to identify and prioritize experiments because there is an overwhelming need for critical experiments to be performed for basic research and code validation.

Rutherford, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs,

382

Chapter 24 - Nuclear energy future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter attempts to concisely describe the role that nuclear power may take in the meeting the worlds future energy needs. Historically, economic considerations have triumphed all other considerations when selecting an energy source. Nuclear power growth stagnated in the late twentieth century for a variety of reasons. A revival in nuclear reactor construction is beginning in the United States and elsewhere at the start of the twenty-first century. World energyand especially electricityuse is increasing and sustainable approaches to meeting this need are sought. With rising concern about climate change, nuclear power is found to be the lowest contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, even compared to solar and wind power. Besides electricity generation, power reactors can be utilized for large-scale desalination and hydrogen generation.

Raymond L. Murray; Keith E. Holbert

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Nuclear Workforce Initiative - SRSCRO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear Nuclear Workforce Initiative The United States stands on the brink of a nuclear renaissance - a resurging confidence in the power of the clean, safe atom to finally conquer...

384

Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Technologies Reactor Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Small Modular Reactor Technologies Small modular reactors can also be made in factories and transported to sites where they would be ready to "plug and play" upon arrival, reducing both capital costs and construction times. The smaller size also makes these reactors ideal for small electric grids and for locations that

385

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation's electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit greenhouse gases. Continued and expanded reliance on nuclear energy is one key to meeting future demand for electricity in the U.S. and is called for in the National Energy Policy. Nevertheless, no new nuclear plants have been built in the U.S. in many years, and none are currently slated for construction. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear

386

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation's electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit greenhouse gases. Continued and expanded reliance on nuclear energy is one key to meeting future demand for electricity in the U.S. and is called for in the National Energy Policy. Nevertheless, no new nuclear plants have been built in the U.S. in many years, and none are currently slated for construction. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear

387

Walk the Line: The Development of Route Selection Standards for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-level Radioactive Waste in the United States - 13519  

SciTech Connect

Although storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) are widely dispersed throughout the United States, these materials are also relatively concentrated in terms of geographic area. That is, the impacts of storage occur in a very small geographic space. Once shipments begin to a national repository or centralized interim storage facility, the impacts of SNF and HLRW will become more geographically distributed, more publicly visible, and almost certainly more contentious. The selection of shipping routes will likely be a major source of controversy. This paper describes the development of procedures, regulations, and standards for the selection of routes used to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The paper begins by reviewing the circumstances around the development of HM-164 routing guidelines. The paper discusses the significance of New York City versus the Department of Transportation and application of HM-164. The paper describes the methods used to implement those regulations. The paper will also describe the current HM-164 designated routes and will provide a summary data analysis of their characteristics. This analysis will reveal the relatively small spatial scale of the effects of HM 164. The paper will then describe subsequent developments that have affected route selection for these materials. These developments include the use of 'representative routes' found in the Department of Energy (DOE) 2008 Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the formerly proposed Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The paper will describe recommendations related to route selection found in the National Academy of Sciences 2006 report Going the Distance, as well as recommendations found in the 2012 Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. The paper will examine recently promulgated federal regulations (HM-232) for selection of rail routes for hazardous materials transport. The paper concludes that while the HM 164 regime is sufficient for certain applications, it does not provide an adequate basis for a national plan to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to centralized storage and disposal facilities over a period of 30 to 50 years. (authors)

Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States)] [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States)] [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)] [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

389

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

390

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

391

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

392

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

393

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

394

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

395

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

396

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

397

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

398

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

399

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

400

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

402

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

403

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

404

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

405

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

406

Investing in the next generation: The Office of Nuclear Energy Issues Requests for Scholarship and Fellowship Applications.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Today, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) announced two new Requests for Applications (RFAs) for the Integrated University Program (IUP).

407

Nuclear Energy-Depend On It Helping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-Depend On It Helping to Power America for More Than Five Decades Past, Present, and Future ... The United States introduced nuclear energy into our domestic electricity production in 1957 and now produces approximately 20 percent of our total electricity and 70 percent of our low-carbon electricity from nuclear energy, according to the Energy Information Administration. More than 100 U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors provide reliable, affordable electricity in 31 states. Nuclear energy can help meet our Nation's need for dependable electricity into the future. The use of nuclear power is increasing around the world: z 29 countries worldwide operate a total of 437 nuclear reactors for electricity generation, with 55 new nuclear reactors under construction in 14 countries.

408

Office of Nuclear Energy | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Small Modular Reactors The Small Modular Reactor program advances the licensing and commercialization of this next-generation technology in the United States. Read more Middle School STEM Curriculum The Harnessed Atom curriculum offers essential principles and fundamental concepts on energy and nuclear science. Read more Educating Future Nuclear Engineers The Nuclear Energy University Program offers fellowships and scholarships for graduate and undergraduate students. Read more Managing Used Fuel and Waste REPORT: Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Read more Consortium for Advanced Simulations of LWRs The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is

409

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments. Volume 9. Summary status report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 to May 5, 1985. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

Doerge, D. H.; Miller, R. L.; Scotti, K. S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Solid radioactive waste management facility design for managing CANDU{sup R} 600 MW nuclear generating station re-tube/refurbishment Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

The main design features of the re-tube canisters, waste handling equipment and waste containers designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL{sup R}) and implemented in support of the re-tube/refurbishment activities for Candu 600 MW nuclear generating stations are described in this paper. The re-tube/refurbishment waste characterization and the waste management principles, which form the basis of the design activities, are also briefly outlined. (authors)

Pontikakis, N.; Hopkins, J.; Scott, D.; Bajaj, V.; Nosella, L. [AECL, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMERGENCY PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSINGEmergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination ofproposed nuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Nuclear safety lies in greater transparency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Chinas nuclear expansion relies on generation III reactors, such as the Westinghouse AP1000 and the Areva European Pressurized Reactor (EPR). The industry promises that these models ... work and cost-cutting often flourish, will sacrifice safety for speed. To date, the AP1000 reactors in the Zhejiang and Shandong provinces are the only commercial units worldwide. Of ...

Qiang Wang

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

415

VT Nuclear Services ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VT Nuclear Services ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: VT Nuclear Services ltd Place: Warrington, United Kingdom Zip: WA4 4BP Sector: Services Product: VT Nuclear Services...

416

United States Atomic Energy Commission formed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formed As the United Nations Atomic Energy Commission failed to come to grips with the growing nuclear weapons problem, the United States worked to establish its own formal...

417

Reactor Physics Parametric and Depletion Studies in Support of TRISO Particle Fuel Specification for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

Reactor physics calculations were initiated to answer several major questions related to the proposed TRISO-coated particle fuel that is to be used in the prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) or the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These preliminary design evaluation calculations help ensure that the upcoming fuel irradiation tests will test appropriate size and type of fuel particles for a future NGNP reactor design. Conclusions from these calculations are expected to confirm and suggest possible modifications to the current particle fuel parameters specified in the evolving Fuel Specification. Calculated results dispel the need for a binary fuel particle system, which is proposed in the General Atomics GT-MHR concept. The GT-MHR binary system is composed of both a fissile and fertile particle with 350- and 500- micron kernel diameters, respectively. For the NGNP reactor, a single fissile particle system (single UCO kernel size) can meet the reactivity and power cycle length requirements demanded of the NGNP. At the same time, it will provide substantial programmatic cost savings by eliminating the need for dual particle fabrication process lines and dual fuel particle irradiation tests required of a binary system. Use of a larger 425-micron kernel diameter single fissile particle (proposed here), as opposed to the 350-micron GT-MHR fissile particle size, helps alleviate current compact particle packing fractions fabrication limitations (<35%), improves fuel block loading for higher n-batch reload options, and tracks the historical correlation between particle size and enrichment (10 and 14 wt% U-235 particle enrichments are proposed for the NGNP). Overall, the use of the slightly larger kernel significantly broadens the NGNP reactor core design envelope and provides increased design margin to accommodate the (as yet) unknown final NGNP reactor design. Maximum power-peaking factors are calculated for both the initial and equilibrium NGNP cores. Radial power-peaking can be fully controlled with particle packing fraction zoning (no enrichment zoning required) and discrete burnable poison rods. Optimally loaded NGNP cores can expect radial powerpeaking factors as low as 1.14 at beginning of cycle (BOC), increasing slowly to a value of 1.25 by end of cycle (EOC), an axial power-peaking value of 1.30 (BOC), and for individual fuel particles in the maximum compact <1.05 (BOC) and an approximate value of 1.20 (EOC) due to Pu-239 buildup in particles on the compact periphery. The NGNP peak particle powers, using a conservative total power-peaking factor (~2.1 factor), are expected to be <150 mW/particle (well below the 250 mW/particle limit, even with the larger 425-micron kernel size).

James W. Sterbentz; Bren Phillips; Robert L. Sant; Gray S. Chang; Paul D. Bayless

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Effect of Nuclear Motion on Molecular High-Order Harmonics and on Generation of Attosecond Pulses in Intense Laser Pulses  

SciTech Connect

We calculate harmonic spectra and shapes of attosecond-pulse trains using numerical solutions of Non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Shroedinger equation for 1D H{sub 2} molecules in an intense laser pulse. A very strong signature of nuclear motion is seen in the time profiles of high-order harmonics. In general the nuclear motion shortens the part of the attosecond-pulse train originating from the first electron contribution, but it may enhance the second electron contribution for longer pulses. The shape of time profiles of harmonics can thus be used for monitoring the nuclear motion.

Bandrauk, Andre D.; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Kawai, Shinnosuke; Lu, Huizhong [Departement de Chimie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Qc, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

419

United States Government Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOEF' " ,)5.8 DOEF' " ,)5.8 (08-93") * United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: November 27, 2002 OAS-L-03-06 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A02LA042/A02LL019) SUBJECT: Audit of "Recruitment and Retention at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories" TO: Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The U.S. Nuclear Weapons Program's mission of maintaining a safe and reliable nuclear weapons stockpile relies on the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA), the Los Alamos National Laboratories' (Los Alamos), and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories' (Livermore) ability to develop a new generation of highly qualified professionals. It is essential that Los Alamos and Livermore recruit and retain individuals

420

Energy Department Announces New Investments to Train Next Generation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to Train Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders, Advance University-Led Nuclear Innovation Energy Department Announces New Investments to Train Next Generation of Nuclear Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests 60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy...

422

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor defueling and disassembly. Summary status report. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information relating to the preparations for defueling the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor and disassembly activities being performed concurrently with decontamination of the facility. Data have been collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources and entered in a computerized data sysem which permits extraction/manipulation of specific data which can be used in planning for recovery from a loss of coolant event similar to that experienced at TMI-2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains summaries of man-hours, manpower, and radiation exposures incurred during the period of April 23, 1979 to April 16, 1985, in the completion of activities related to preparation for reactor defueling. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are not included within the scope of this report. Computerized reports included in this document are: A chronological summary listing work performed for the period; and summary reports for each major task undertaken in connection with the specific scope of this report. Presented in chronological order for the referenced time period. Manually-assembled table summaries are included for: Labor and exposures by department; and labor and exposures by major activity.

Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination. Summary status report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information relating to decontamination of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor building. The report covers activities for the period of June 1, 1979 through March 29, 1985. The data collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources were entered into a computerized data system which permits extraction/manipulation of specific information which can be used in planning for recovery from an accident similar to that experienced at TMI-2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains summaries of man-hours, manpower, and radiation exposures incurred during decontamination of the reactor building. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are excluded from the scope of this report. Computerized reports included in this document are: a chronological summary listing work performed relating to reactor building decontamination for the period specified; and summary reports for each major task during the period. Each task summary is listed in chronological order for zone entry and subtotaled for the number of personnel entries, exposures, and man-hours. Manually-assembled table summaries are included for: labor and exposures by department and labor and exposures by major activity.

Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Environmental assessment for the manufacture and shipment of nuclear reactor fuel from the United States to Canada  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has declared 41.9 tons (38 metric tons) of weapons-usable plutonium surplus to the United States` defense needs. A DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement analyzed strategies for plutonium storage and dispositioning. In one alternative, plutonium as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel would be irradiated (burned) in a reengineered heavy-water-moderated reactor, such as the Canadian CANDU design. In an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE proposes to fabricate and transport to Canada a limited amount of MOX fuel as part of the Parallex (parallel experiment) Project. MOX fuel from the US and Russia would be used by Canada to conduct performance tests at Chalk River Laboratories. MOX fuel would be fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory and transported in approved container(s) to a Canadian port(s) of entry on one to three approved routes. The EA analyzes the environmental and human health effects from MOX fuel fabrication and transportation. Under the Proposed Action, MOX fuel fabrication would not result in adverse effects to the involved workers or public. Analysis showed that the shipment(s) of MOX fuel would not adversely affect the public, truck crew, and environment along the transportation routes.

Rangel, R.C.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Energy Management in Olefins Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the point where waste heat from pyrolysis generates more than enough steam to power the olefins unit recovery section. Furthermore, incorporating gas turbine driven electrical generators or process compressors adds to the utility export potential of the unit...

Wells, T. A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL with high-number wire arrays The conversion of Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II output ~1.6 MJ ~200 TW Marx 11.4 MJ water vacuum Electrical to x-ray energy Conversion efficiency ~ 15

427

Nuclear options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... sad if transient commercial expediency led the country to take risks now by adopting nuclear reactor designs from abroad which are in some respects technically less sound than those produced at ... much lower priority. It can be anticipated, however; that although the types of nuclear reactor selected as the best that Britain could build next may be suitable for unit designs ...

G. R. Bainbridge

1974-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

428

Supplement Analysis for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, (DOE/EIS-0310-SA-01) (08/05/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-SA-01 0-SA-01 Supplement Analysis for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility Introduction and Background The Department of Energy (DOE), pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), issued the Final PEIS for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility (Nuclear Infrastructure (NI) PEIS, DOE/EIS-0310) in December 2000. Under the Authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the DOE's missions include: (1) producing isotopes for research and applications

429

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The proposed Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Program, which is part of the Presidents Advanced Energy Initiative, is intended to support a safe, secure, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy, both domestically and internationally. Domestically, the GNEP Program would promote technologies that support economic, sustained production of nuclear-generated electricity, while reducing the impacts associated with spent nuclear fuel disposal and reducing proliferation risks. The Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action envisions changing the United States nuclear energy fuel cycle from an open (or once-through) fuel cyclein which nuclear fuel is used in a power plant one time and the resulting spent nuclear fuel is stored for eventual disposal in a geologic repositoryto a closed fuel cycle in which spent nuclear fuel would be recycled to recover energy-bearing components for use in new nuclear fuel. At this time, DOE has no specific proposed actions for the international component of the GNEP Program. Rather, the United States, through the GNEP Program, is considering various initiatives to work cooperatively with other nations. Such initiatives include the development of grid-appropriate reactors and the development of reliable fuel services (to provide an assured supply of fresh nuclear fuel and assist with the management of the used fuel) for nations who agree to employ nuclear energy only for peaceful purposes, such as electricity generation.

R.A. Wigeland

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Office of Nuclear Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Small Modular Reactors The Small Modular Reactor program advances the licensing and commercialization of this next-generation technology in the United States. Read more Middle School STEM Curriculum The Harnessed Atom curriculum offers essential principles and fundamental concepts on energy and nuclear science. Read more Educating Future Nuclear Engineers The Nuclear Energy University Program offers fellowships and scholarships for graduate and undergraduate students. Read more Managing Used Fuel and Waste REPORT: Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Read more Consortium for Advanced Simulations of LWRs The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is the first DOE Hub for the modeling and simulation (M&S) of commercial

431

Nuclear Operations Application to Environmental Restoration at Corrective Action Unit 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has responsibility for environmental restoration at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly the Nevada Test Site). This includes remediation at locations where past testing activities have resulted in the release of plutonium to the environment. One of the current remediation efforts involves a site where an underground subcritical nuclear safety test was conducted in 1964. The underground test was vented through a steel pipe to the surface in a closed system where gas samples were obtained. The piping downstream of the gas-sampling apparatus was routed belowground to a location where it was allowed to vent into an existing radioactively contaminated borehole. The length of the pipe above the ground surface is approximately 200 meters. This pipe remained in place until remediation efforts began in 2007, at which time internal plutonium contamination was discovered. Following this discovery, an assessment was conducted to determine the quantity of plutonium present in the pipe. This site has been identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites. The quantity of plutonium identified at CAU 547 exceeded the Hazard Category 3 threshold but was below the Hazard Category 2 threshold specified in DOE Standard DOE-STD-1027-92. This CAU, therefore, was initially categorized as a Hazard Category 3 environmental restoration site. A contaminated facility or site that is initially categorized as Hazard Category 3, however, may be downgraded to below Hazard Category 3 if it can be demonstrated through further analysis that the form of the material and the energy available for release support reducing the hazard category. This is an important consideration when performing hazard categorization of environmental restoration sites because energy sources available for release of material are generally fewer at an environmental restoration site than at an operating facility and environmental restoration activities may result in the complete removal of source material.

Kevin Cabble (NSO), Mark Krauss and Patrick Matthews (N-I)

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

432

Nuclear theory for high-energy nuclear reactions of biomedical relevance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Presentations Nuclear theory for high-energy nuclear reactions of biomedical relevance...Nuclear Data Needs for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems, April 5-7, 2005...2005. Nuclear theory for high-energy nuclear reactions of biomedical relevance......

A. J. Koning; M. C. Duijvestijn

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

90-MW single-shaft power generating steam-gas unit based on the GT-65 gas turbine and K-30-60 steam turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is an examination of a variant of the monoblock PGU-90 steam-gas unit developed at the Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod (LMZ) branch of Silovye mashiny based on a GT-65 gas turbine unit and a K-30-...

A. S. Lebedev; O. V. Antonyuk; V. A. Martyanov

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle (T-D Cycle{trademark}) application for nuclear and fossil-fueled power generating plants  

SciTech Connect

The Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle is a combination of the best attributes of both nuclear power and combined cycle gas power plants. A technology patented in 1994 by Battelle Memorial Institute offers a synergistic approach to power generation. A typical combined cycle is defined as the combination of gas turbine Brayton Cycle, topping steam turbine Rankine Cycle. Exhaust from the gas turbine is used in heat recovery steam generators to produce steam for a steam turbine. In a standard combined cycle gas turbine-steam turbine application, the gas turbine generates about 65 to 70 percent of system power. The thermal efficiency for such an installation is typically about 45 to 50 percent. A T-D combined cycle takes a new, creative approach to combined cycle design by directly mixing high enthalpy steam from the heat recovery steam generator, involving the steam generator at more than one pressure. Direct mixing of superheated and saturated steam eliminates the requirement for a large heat exchanger, making plant modification simple and economical.

Tsiklauri, B.; Korolev, V.N.; Durst, B.M.; Shen, P.K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Confirmation of the seismic resistance of nuclear power plant equipment after assembly  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the natural frequencies and damping decrements of nuclear power plant equipment can only be determined experimentally and directly at the power generation units (reactors) of nuclear power plants under real disassembly conditions for the equipment, piping network, thermal insulation, etc. A computational experimental method is described in which the natural frequencies and damping decrements are determined in the field and the seismic resistance is reevaluated using these values. This method is the basis of the standards document 'Methods for confirming the dynamic characteristics of systems and components of the generating units of nuclear power plants which are important for safety' prepared and introduced in 2012.

Kaznovsky, P. S.; Kaznovsky, A. P.; Saakov, E. S.; Ryasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'Atomtehenergo' (Russian Federation)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

437

Activation cross sections of $\\alpha$-particle induced nuclear reactions on hafnium and deuteron induced nuclear reaction on tantalum: production of $^{178}$W/$^{178m}$Ta generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of $^{178m}$Ta through $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,xn)$^{178}$W-$^{178m}$Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,x)$^{179,177,176,175}$W, $^{183,182,178g,177,176,175}$Ta, $^{179m,177m,175}$Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and $\\gamma$-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the $^{nat}$Ta(d,xn)$^{178}$W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ($^3$He,x)) production routes for $^{178}$W.

Trk'anyi, F; Ditri, F; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V; Uddin, M S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California",and Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants", Lawrencejected lifetime for a nuclear power plant is 40 years, a

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Postconstruction report of the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

Remedial actions conducted under the auspices of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) were completed at the Y-12 United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Disposal Site in August 1992. The purpose of this Postconstruction Report is to summarize numerous technical reports and provide CERCLA documentation for completion of the remedial actions. Other CERCLA reports, such as the Feasibility Study for the UNC Disposal Site, provide documentation leading up to the remedial action decision. The remedial action chosen, placement of a modified RCRA cap, was completed successfully, and performance standards were either met or exceeded. This remedial action provided solutions to two environmentally contaminated areas and achieved the goal of minimizing the potential for contamination of the shallow groundwater downgradient of the site, thereby providing protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance and maintenance of the cap will be accomplished to ensure cap integrity, and groundwater monitoring downgradient of the site will continue to confirm the acceptability of the remedial action chosen.

Oakley, L.B.; Siberell, J.K.; Voskuil, T.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Generation of a novel 1km NDVI data set over Canada, the northern United States, and Greenland based on historical AVHRR data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time series of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from satellite observations provide important information on the state of terrestrial vegetation over a wide range of spatiotemporal scales. For understanding long-term changes in terrestrial ecosystems (post-1981), data collected by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board the satellites of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) series is a unique source of information. In this paper, we describe a new processing methodology for a comprehensive AVHRR data set at 1km spatial resolution acquired over Canada, the northern United States and Greenland post-1981. The methodology incorporates a pre-processing algorithm, Canadian AVHRR Processing System (CAPS), recently developed by the Canada Centre of Remote Sensing (CCRS), which enables highly accurate geolocation and ortho-rectification at efficiency rates of >90%. Once image navigation is completed, our approach consists of five key steps: first, two clear-sky composites for each 10day interval are generated from the forward or backward scattering hemisphere; second, AVHRR Channel 1 and 2 reflectances are normalized to the AVHRR/3 on board NOAA-17 to account for differences in the spectral response function among the AVHRR sensors; third, atmospheric correction is performed using the Simplified Method for Atmospheric correction (SMAC) algorithm, using standard meteorological data sets (water vapor, surface level air pressure, ozone); fourth, NDVI is calculated based on atmospherically corrected Channel 1 and 2 reflectances; and finally, the NDVI is adjusted for directional effects based on the Ross-Thick Li-Sparse Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model. The processed NDVI data are compared to an equivalent spatially and temporally overlapping MODIS NDVI data set from 2001 to 2005 for validation. Results at continental scale indicate that time series of MODIS and AVHRR were similar for a wide range of biomes and generalized ecoregions. Analysis stratified by land cover indicated that the correlation was strongest for homogeneous land cover types, such as cropland, when compared to structurally more diverse classes, such as deciduous broadleaf forests. The comparison of the NDVI at the local scale at seven sites of the Fluxnet Canada Research Network resulted in the correlation coefficient r=0.95. Given confidence in the processing approach, this NDVI data set can be a valuable source of information for climate and vegetation-related studies over Canada and the northern United States.

Fabio M.A. Fontana; Nicholas C. Coops; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov; Alexander P. Trishchenko; Michael Riffler; Michael A. Wulder

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Annual 2 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs, maximize safety, minimize proliferation risk, and handle used fuel and

442

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste management proceedings. Keywords Nuclear, nuclear power plant, spent fuel, nuclear waste, dataCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT-RELATED DATA of Submitted Data 3 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DATA REQUESTS 6 A. Environmental Impacts 6 B. Spent Fuel Generation 8 C

443

DD nuclear fusion induced by laser-generated plasma at 1016Wcm?2 intensity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deuterated polyethylene targets (CD2-monomer), as thin and thick films, were laser irradiated in a vacuum at 1016Wcm?2 intensity. The produced plasma was monitored in situ using the Thomson parabola spectrometer, ion collectors and SiC semiconductor detectors. For thin targets irradiated under target-normal-sheath-acceleration conditions, laser accelerated deuterons with energies higher than 3.0MeV were measured along the normal to the target surface. Characteristic emissions at 3.0 and 2.5MeV for protons and neutrons, respectively, have been detected confirming the production of nuclear fusion events. The evidence of nuclear fusion effects was evaluated and discussed.

Lorenzo Torrisi; Salvatore Cavallaro; Maria Cutroneo; Josef Krasa; Daniel Klir

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan for LightRegulatory Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licens- ing. Standard Review Plan.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Radioisotope Power System Delivery, Ground Support and Nuclear Safety Implementation: Use of the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator for the NASA's Mars Science Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Radioisotope power systems have been used for over 50 years to enable missions in remote or hostile environments. They are a convenient means of supplying a few milliwatts up to a few hundred watts of useable, long-term electrical power. With regard to use of a radioisotope power system, the transportation, ground support and implementation of nuclear safety protocols in the field is a complex process that requires clear identification of needed technical and regulatory requirements. The appropriate care must be taken to provide high quality treatment of the item to be moved so it arrives in a condition to fulfill its missions in space. Similarly it must be transported and managed in a manner compliant with requirements for shipment and handling of special nuclear material. This presentation describes transportation, ground support operations and implementation of nuclear safety and security protocols for a radioisotope power system using recent experience involving the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator for National Aeronautics and Space Administrations Mars Science Laboratory, which launched in November of 2011.

S.G. Johnson; K.L. Lively; C.C. Dwight

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Output and Performance of Nuclear Power Plants by Im- provedPower, Tomari Nuclear Power Plant (Units 1, 2) License

Djurcic, Zelimir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

Lyons, Peter

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

448

The U.S. Generation IV Implementation Strategy  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to respond to Congressional direction contained in Senate Report 107-220 from the Senate Committee on Appropriations regarding the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 2003. In that report, the Committee instructed the Department to prepare a report regarding how it intends to carry out the results of the Generation IV Roadmap. This report is the U.S. Department of Energy's response to the Congressional directive. It summarizes results from the Generation IV Technology Roadmap and the strategy for implementing of the Generation IV program in the United States. Planning for the implementation of the Generation IV program is based on (1) the long-term outlook for nuclear energy in the United States, (2) the advice of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee during the two-year development of the Generation IV Technology Roadmap, and (3) the need for the Generation IV program to be integrated with other nuclear energy research programs of the Department. Considerable emphasis is given to developing the priorities and necessary timelines for the U.S. Generation IV Program, as well as developing international R&D cooperation that will benefit the program and strengthen U.S. leadership in nuclear technology R&D.

None

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV materials. Through the results obtained from this integrated materials behavior and NDE study, new insight will be gained into the best nondestructive creep and microstructure monitoring methods for the particular mechanisms identified in these materials. The proposed project includes collaboration with a national laboratory partner and the results will also serve as a foundation to guide the efforts of scientists in the DOE laboratory, university, and industrial communities concerned with the technological challenges of monitoring creep and microstructural evolution in materials planned to be used in Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems.

Nagy, Peter

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

451

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

452

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

453

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation The Office of International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation (INEPC) collaborates with international partners to support the safe, secure, and peaceful use of nuclear energy. It works both bilaterally and multilaterally to accomplish this work. Today, nuclear energy represents the single largest source of, carbon-free baseload energy, accounting for nearly 20% of the electricity generated in the United States and 70% of our low-carbon production, avoiding over 600 million metric tons of carbon emissions. With approximately 440 commercial reactors operating in 30 countries-and 300 more valued at $1.6 trillion

455

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

456

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

457

Closing the circle on the splitting of the atom: The environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production in the United States and what the Department of Energy is doing about it  

SciTech Connect

In the grand scheme of things we are a little more than halfway through the cycle of splitting the atom for weapons purposes. If we visualize this historic cycle as the full sweep of a clockface, at zero hour we would find the first nuclear chain reaction by Enrico Fermi, followed immediately by the Manhattan Project and the explosion of the first atomic bombs. From two o`clock until five, the United States built and ran a massive industrial complex that produced tens of thousands of nuclear weapons. At half past, the Cold War ended, and the United States shut down most of its nuclear weapons factories. The second half of this cycle involves dealing with the waste and contamination from nuclear weapons production - a task that had, for the most part, been postponed into the indefinite future. That future is now upon us. Dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War is in many ways as big a challenge for us today as the building of the atomic bomb was for the Manhattan Project pioneers in the 1940s. Our challenges are political and social as well as technical, and we are meeting those challenges. We are reducing risks, treating wastes, developing new technologies, and building democratic institutions for a constructive debate on our future course.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

2010_Nuclear_Security_Joint_Statement.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

2010NuclearSecurityJointStatement.pdf 2010NuclearSecurityJointStatement.pdf 2010NuclearSecurityJointStatement.pdf More Documents & Publications United States and France...

459

Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the...

460

UNITED STATES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG WASHINOTDN 28.0. C. ' -lr ' \ ' ' --- ".I ?--" ' z I. .~;-4.' J frr*o& 2 ii, - - -4 70-147 LRL:JCD JAN !! 8 1958 Oregon Metallurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albany, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very 33uly yours, r:; I,;, ll)~gQ""d".- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended Distribution: bRO0 Attn: Dr. H.M.Roth DFMusser NMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIN (2) HSteele LRL SRGustavson LRL Document room Formal file Suppl. file Br & Div rf's ' .b liwwArry s/VW- ' q+ ' yj/ 2; 2-' , COP' 1 J JAM01958 -- UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Preparing Non-nuclear Engineers for the Nuclear Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preparing Non-nuclear Engineers for the Nuclear Field Elizabeth K. Ervin The University. An understanding of power generation is important for all modern-day engineers, and nuclear energy serves as a good-four universities have nuclear- related programs, including Nuclear or Radiological Engineering, Nuclear Science

Ervin, Elizabeth K.

462

Next Generation CANDU Performance Assurance  

SciTech Connect

AECL is developing a next generation CANDU design to meet market requirements for low cost, reliable energy supplies. The primary product development objective is to achieve a capital cost substantially lower than the current nuclear plant costs, such that the next generation plant will be competitive with alternative options for large-scale base-load electricity supply. However, other customer requirements, including safety, low-operating costs and reliable performance, are being addressed as equally important design requirements. The main focus of this paper is to address the development directions that will provide performance assurance. The next generation CANDU is an evolutionary extension of the proven CANDU 6 design. There are eight CANDU 6 units in operation in four countries around the world and further three units are under construction. These units provide a sound basis for projecting highly reliable performance for the next generation CANDU. In addition, the next generation CANDU program includes development and qualification activities that will address the new features and design extensions in the advanced plant. To limit product development risk and to enhance performance assurance, the next generation CANDU design features and performance parameters have been carefully reviewed during the concept development phase and have been deliberately selected so as to be well founded on the existing CANDU knowledge base. Planned research and development activities are required only to provide confirmation of the projected performance within a modest extension of the established database. Necessary qualification tests will be carried out within the time frame of the development program, to establish a proven design prior to the start of a construction project. This development support work coupled with ongoing AECL programs to support and enhance the performance and reliability of the existing CANDU plants will provide sound assurance that the next generation CANDU plants will meet customer expectations. (authors)

Wren, David J.; Allsop, P.J.; Hopwood, J.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- Fuel

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUELHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil- FuelHealth and Safety Aspects of Pro- posed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Effect on the condition of the metal in A K-300-3.5 turbine owing to multicycle fatigue from participation of a power generating unit in grid frequency and power regulation  

SciTech Connect

The effect on the condition of the rotor material owing to multicycle fatigue caused by variable stresses during participation of a power generating unit in grid frequency and power regulation is evaluated using the K-300-23.5 steam turbine as an example. It is shown that during normalized primary frequency regulation the safety factor is at least 50, while during automatic secondary regulation of frequency and power there is essentially no damage to the metal.

Lebedeva, A. I.; Zorchenko, N. V.; Prudnikov, A. A.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Coal ................................................ 4,367 4,077 4,747 4,181 4,473 4,125 4,983 4,330 4,414 4,003 4,796 4,178 4,344 4,479 4,348 Natural Gas .................................... 2,802 2,843 3,694 2,863 2,713 2,880 3,636 2,707 2,792 2,972 3,815 2,849 3,052 2,986 3,109 Petroleum (a) .................................. 74 73 81 67 73 70 75 66 75 70 76 66 74 71 71 Other Gases ................................... 32 33 36 32 32 34 37 33 33 35 39 34 33 34 35 Nuclear ........................................... 2,176 2,044 2,257 2,170 2,106 2,037 2,167 2,010 2,144 2,074 2,206 2,055 2,162 2,080 2,120 Renewable Energy Sources: Conventional Hydropower ........... 736 886 716 633 765 887 708 646 767 919 729 659 742 751 768 Wind ............................................ 491 520 353 449 477 521 379 475

468

United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear Energy Research and Development United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear Energy Research and...

469

United States and Czech Republic Join Together to Announce Bilateral...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Czech Republic Join Together to Announce Bilateral Nuclear Energy Research and Development Efforts United States and Czech Republic Join Together to Announce Bilateral Nuclear...

470

United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear Energy United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear Energy September 30, 2009 - 12:00am...

471

REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198  

SciTech Connect

Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

Lowry, N.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

472

Nuclear Eclectic Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...much higher future costs for oil and natural gas. However, the...ELECTRICITY GENERATION FROM COAL, OIL, AND NUCLEAR FUEL, NUCLEAR...electricity generation from coal, oil, and nuclear fuel, cite about...possibility that stimu-lated a marathon debate between the Union of...

David J. Rose

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

473

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the United States Senate Committee on Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Senate Committee on United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Gregory H. Friedman: Before the United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources June 17, 2004 Before the United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify regarding recent allegations associated with occupational medical services and tank farm vapor exposures at the Hanford Site. During the Cold War, the United States' nuclear weapons complex generated large amounts of hazardous and radioactive waste. The Department of Energy is responsible for the cleanup of numerous contaminated sites and facilities that supported nuclear weapons production activities. Associated with this is the need to protect the safety and health of the

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A preliminary user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation Nuclear Plants  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in the awareness of a system status is an essential requirement to achieve safety in every kind of plant. In particular, in the case of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), a progress is crucial to enhance the Human Machine Interface (HMI) in order to optimize monitoring and analyzing processes of NPP operational states. Firstly, as old-fashioned plants are concerned, an upgrading of the whole console instrumentation is desirable in order to replace an analog visualization with a full-digital system. In this work, we present a novel instrument able to interface the control console of a nuclear reactor, developed by using CompactRio, a National Instruments embedded architecture and its dedicated programming language. This real-time industrial controller composed by a real-time processor and FPGA modules has been programmed to visualize the parameters coming from the reactor, and to storage and reproduce significant conditions anytime. This choice has been made on the basis of the FPGA properties: high reliability, determinism, true parallelism and re-configurability, achieved by a simple programming method, based on LabVIEW real-time environment. The system architecture exploits the FPGA capabilities of implementing custom timing and triggering, hardware-based analysis and co-processing, and highest performance control algorithms. Data stored during the supervisory phase can be reproduced by loading data from a measurement file, re-enacting worthwhile operations or conditions. The system has been thought to be used in three different modes, namely Log File Mode, Supervisory Mode and Simulation Mode. The proposed system can be considered as a first step to develop a more complete Decision Support System (DSS): indeed this work is part of a wider project that includes the elaboration of intelligent agents and meta-theory approaches. A synoptic has been created to monitor every kind of action on the plant through an intuitive sight. Furthermore, another important aim of this work is the possibility to have a front panel available on a web interface: CompactRio acts as a remote server and it is accessible on a dedicated LAN. This supervisory system has been tested and validated on the basis of the real control console for the 1-MW TRIGA reactor RC-1 at the ENEA, Casaccia Research Center. In this paper we show some results obtained by recording each variable as the reactor reaches its maximum level of power. The choice of a research reactor for testing the developed system relies on its training and didactic importance for the education of plant operators: in this context a digital instrument can offer a better user-friendly tool for learning and training. It is worthwhile to remark that such a system does not interfere with the console instrumentation, the latter continuing to preserve the total control. (authors)

Memmi, F.; Falconi, L.; Cappelli, M.; Palomba, M.; Santoro, E.; Bove, R.; Sepielli, M. [UTFISST, ENEA Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model - 13413  

SciTech Connect

This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system, and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity. (authors)

Djokic, Denia [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Piet, Steven J.; Pincock, Layne F.; Soelberg, Nick R. [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)] [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

ARE WE LOSING OUT IN NUCLEAR POWER?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ARE WE LOSING OUT IN NUCLEAR POWER? ... The question of whether the United States is losing its commanding position in the development of nuclear power is no exception. ...

WALTER J. MURPHY

1956-07-02T23:59:59.000Z