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1

Nuclear power and the environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although nuclear power is not, in itself, the full answer to the problems of global warming and acid rain, it is true that nuclear power generation produces no carbon or nitrogen emissions. The wastes that nuclear power does produce are small in volume, and can be adequately isolated from the environment. The aim of this paper is to show that an expansion of the nuclear power industry should be one among several measures taken to reduce the world's use of fossil fuels.

Hans Blix

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Environment and Nuclear Programs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment and Nuclear Programs Environment and Nuclear Programs Environment and Nuclear Programs Cooling Tower Reflection | Credit: DOE Archives Cooling Tower Reflection | Credit: DOE Archives Offices of the Deputy General Counsel for Environment and Nuclear Programs Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Environment (GC-51) Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Civilian Nuclear Programs (GC-52 ) Office of the Assistant General Counsel for International and National Security Programs (GC-53) Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance (GC-54) Office of Standard Contract Management (GC-55) Litigation and Enforcement Environment and Nuclear Programs Environment Civilian Nuclear Programs International and National Security Programs NEPA Policy and Compliance Standard Contract Management Technology Transfer and Procurement

3

The MacNuclide nuclear data environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advance in technology have produced intriguing tools that can be applied to problems in nuclear science. Information management in nuclear science is an example of how technology is not quickly exploited. The U.S. Department of Energy supports an extensive program to evaluate published nuclear properties and store them in an electronic data base. Much of the evaluation effort has focused on producing the journal Nuclear Data Sheets and the publication Table of Isotopes. Although the electronic data base can itself be a valuable source of information, the software used to access is was designed using decades-old technologies. The authors of this paper have developed a novel data-base management system for nuclear properties. The application is known as MacNuclide. It is a nuclear data-base environment that uses the highly interactive and intuitive windowing environmentsof desk-top computers. The environment is designed around that image of the chart of nuclides. Questions are posed to the data base by placing constraints on properties and defining collections of nuclides to be used in data-base seraches. Results are displayed either as a simple list of nuclides that meet the imposed constraints or as a color chart of nuclides.

Stone, C.A. (San Jose State Univ., CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Computational Systems & Software Environment | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Computational Systems & Software Environment | National Nuclear Security Computational Systems & Software Environment | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog CSSE Computational Systems & Software Environment Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

5

Nuclear Power and the Environment - Energy Explained, Your Guide To  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explained > Nonrenewable Sources > Nuclear > Nuclear Power & the Environment Explained > Nonrenewable Sources > Nuclear > Nuclear Power & the Environment Energy Explained - Home What Is Energy? Forms of Energy Sources of Energy Laws of Energy Units and Calculators Energy Conversion Calculators British Thermal Units (Btu) Degree-Days U.S. Energy Facts State and U.S. Territory Data Use of Energy In Industry For Transportation In Homes In Commercial Buildings Efficiency and Conservation Energy and the Environment Greenhouse Gases Effect on the Climate Where Emissions Come From Outlook for Future Emissions Recycling and Energy Nonrenewable Sources Oil and Petroleum Products Refining Crude Oil Where Our Oil Comes From Imports and Exports Offshore Oil and Gas Use of Oil Prices and Outlook Oil and the Environment Gasoline Where Our Gasoline Comes From

6

Verifying a nuclear weapon`s response to radiation environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process described in the paper is being applied as part of the design verification of a replacement component designed for a nuclear weapon currently in the active stockpile. This process is an adaptation of the process successfully used in nuclear weapon development programs. The verification process concentrates on evaluating system response to radiation environments, verifying system performance during and after exposure to radiation environments, and assessing system survivability.

Dean, F.F.; Barrett, W.H.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nuclear Power - Operation, Safety and Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as operation, safety, environment and radiation effects. The book is not offering a comprehensive coverage of the material in each area. Instead, selected themes are highlighted by authors of individual chapters representing contemporary interests worldwide...

8

Role of nuclear fusion in future energy systems and the environment under future uncertainties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Debates about whether or not to invest heavily in nuclear fusion as a future innovative energy option have been made within the context of energy technology development strategies. This is because the prospects for nuclear fusion are quite uncertain and the investments therefore carry the risk of quite large regrets, even though investment is needed in order to develop the technology. The timeframe by which nuclear fusion could become competitive in the energy market has not been adequately studied, nor has roles of the nuclear fusion in energy systems and the environment. The present study has two objectives. One is to reveal the conditions under which nuclear fusion could be introduced economically (hereafter, we refer to such introductory conditions as breakeven prices) in future energy systems. The other objective is to evaluate the future roles of nuclear fusion in energy systems and in the environment. Here we identify three roles that nuclear fusion will take on when breakeven prices are achieved: (i) a portion of the electricity market in 2100, (ii) reduction of annual global total energy systems cost, and (iii) mitigation of carbon tax (shadow price of carbon) under CO2 constraints. Future uncertainties are key issues in evaluating nuclear fusion. Here we treated the following uncertainties: energy demand scenarios, introduction timeframe for nuclear fusion, capacity projections of nuclear fusion, CO2 target in 2100, capacity utilization ratio of options in energy/environment technologies, and utility discount rates. From our investigations, we conclude that the presently designed nuclear fusion reactors may be ready for economical introduction into energy systems beginning around 2050–2060, and we can confirm that the favorable introduction of the reactors would reduce both the annual energy systems cost and the carbon tax (the shadow price of carbon) under a CO2 concentration constraint.

Koji Tokimatsu; Jun’ichi Fujino; Satoshi Konishi; Yuichi Ogawa; Kenji Yamaji

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

10

Total Quality Management and nuclear weapons: A historian`s perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total Quality Management (TQM) has become a significant management theme at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper discusses the historical roots of TQM at Los Alamos and how TQM has been used in the development of nuclear weapons.

Meade, R.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Cost Savings of Nuclear Power with Total Fuel Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of fast reactor (FR) generated electricity with pyro-processing is estimated in this article. It compares favorably with other forms of energy and is shown to be less than that produced by light water reactors (LWR's). FR's use all the energy in natural uranium whereas LWR's utilize only 0.7% of it. Because of high radioactivity, pyro-processing is not open to weapon material diversion. This technology is ready now. Nuclear power has the same advantage as coal power in that it is not dependent upon a scarce foreign fuel and has the significant additional advantage of not contributing to global warming or air pollution. A jump start on new nuclear plants could rapidly allow electric furnaces to replace home heating oil furnaces and utilize high capacity batteries for hybrid automobiles: both would reduce US reliance on oil. If these were fast reactors fueled by reprocessed fuel, the spent fuel storage problem could also be solved. Costs are derived from assumptions on the LWR's and FR's five cost components: 1) Capital costs: LWR plants cost $106/MWe. FR's cost 25% more. Forty year amortization is used. 2) The annual O and M costs for both plants are 9% of the Capital Costs. 3) LWR fuel costs about 0.0035 $/kWh. Producing FR fuel from spent fuel by pyro-processing must be done in highly shielded hot cells which is costly. However, the five foot thick concrete walls have the advantage of prohibiting diversion. LWR spent fuel must be used as feedstock for the FR initial core load and first two reloads so this FR fuel costs more than LWR fuel. FR fuel costs much less for subsequent core reloads (< LWR fuel) if all spent fuel feedstock is from the fast reactor (i.e., Breeding Ratio =1). 4) Yucca Mountain storage of unprocessed LWR spent fuel is estimated as $360,000/MTHM. But this fuel can be processed to remove TRU for use as fast reactor fuel. The remaining fission products repository costs are only one fifth that of the original fuel. Storage of short half life fission products alone requires less storage time and long term integrity than LWR spent fuel (300 years storage versus 100,000 years.) 5) LWR decommissioning costs are estimated to be $0.3 x 10{sup 6}/MWe. The annual cost for a 40 year licensed plant would be 2.5 % of this or less if interest is taken into account. All plants will eventually have to replace those components which become radiation damaged. FR's should be designed to replace parts rather than decommission. The LWR costs are estimated to be 2.65 cents/kWh. FR costs are 2.99 cents/kWh for the first 7.5 years and 2.39 cents/kWh for the next 32.5 years. The average cost over forty years is 2.50 cents/kWh which is less than the LWR costs. These power costs are similar to coal power, are lower than gas, oil, and much lower than renewable power.(authors)

Solbrig, Charles W.; Benedict, Robert W. [Fuel Cycle Programs Division, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

13

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

14

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

15

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

16

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

17

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

18

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

19

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

20

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

22

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

23

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

24

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

25

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

26

Manuscript to appear in Environment, Systems and Decisions CALCULATING NUCLEAR ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manuscript to appear in Environment, Systems and Decisions CALCULATING NUCLEAR ACCIDENT there is no authoritative, comprehensive and public historical record of nuclear power plant accidents, we reconstructed a nuclear accident dataset from peer-reviewed and other literature. We found that, in a sample of five

Boyer, Edmond

27

Managerial information behaviour: Relationships among Total Quality Management orientation, information use environments, and managerial roles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production process and customer information Low Total Quality Learning: continuous innovation and learning: exploration

Simard, C; Rice, Ronald E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and DOE’s Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and DOE’s Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security.

29

3822 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 51, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2004 High Total Dose Tolerance of Prototype Silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3822 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 51, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2004 High Total Dose Tolerance). Alternative technologies that are being developed for the general market are also under eval- uation

Atwater, Harry

30

Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment Environment Environment LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 LANL has a strategy to clean up the past, control current operations, and move toward a sustainable future in which waste is minimized and other effects on the environment are reduced or eliminated. We work safely, securely, ethically, and in a manner that protects the environment We understand that the health and viability of the Laboratory depend in part on a record of environmental performance, building confidence of the public and our regulators. To gain the right to do what we do, we must work

31

5Calculating Total Radiation Dosages at Mars The NASA, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) measured the daily  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation for astronauts orbiting Mars. The biggest uncertainty is in the SPE dose estimate. We had important than GCRs as a source of radiation? Explain why or why not in terms of estimation uncertainties5Calculating Total Radiation Dosages at Mars The NASA, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE

32

The Use of Smart Materials Technologies in Radiation Environment and Nuclear Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Use of Smart Materials Technologies in Radiation Environment and Nuclear Industry Victor ABSTRACT Application of smart materials technology in nuclear industry offer new opportunities a unique challenge to the testing, qualification and use of smart materials. The present study assesses

Giurgiutiu, Victor

33

Nuclear Proliferation And The Nuclear Deterrent: Will The Non-Proliferation Treaty Ever Achieve Total Nuclear Disarmament? Is The Nuclear Deterrent Worth Keeping?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In 2009 President Obama outlined his utopic vision of a nuclear-free world, admitting that this would not be possible within his lifetime he claimed that while… (more)

Eckford, James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC : evaluation and selection of tools for the quality environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Nuclear Waste Management Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. These M&S capabilities are to be managed, verified, and validated within the NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC quality environment. M&S capabilities and the supporting analysis workflow and simulation data management tools will be distributed to end-users from this same quality environment. The same analysis workflow and simulation data management tools that are to be distributed to end-users will be used for verification and validation (V&V) activities within the quality environment. This strategic decision reduces the number of tools to be supported, and increases the quality of tools distributed to end users due to rigorous use by V&V activities. This report documents an evaluation of the needs, options, and tools selected for the NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC quality environment. The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Nuclear Waste Management Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC) program element is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to assess quantitatively the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. This objective will be fulfilled by acquiring and developing M&S capabilities, and establishing a defensible level of confidence in these M&S capabilities. The foundation for assessing the level of confidence is based upon the rigor and results from verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification (V&V and UQ) activities. M&S capabilities are to be managed, verified, and validated within the NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC quality environment. M&S capabilities and the supporting analysis workflow and simulation data management tools will be distributed to end-users from this same quality environment. The same analysis workflow and simulation data management tools that are to be distributed to end-users will be used for verification and validation (V&V) activities within the quality environment. This strategic decision reduces the number of tools to be supported, and increases the quality of tools distributed to end users due to rigorous use by V&V activities. NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC V&V and UQ practices and evidence management goals are documented in the V&V Plan. This V&V plan includes a description of the quality environment into which M&S capabilities are imported and V&V and UQ activities are managed. The first phase of implementing the V&V plan is to deploy an initial quality environment through the acquisition and integration of a set of software tools. An evaluation of the needs, options, and tools selected for the quality environment is given in this report.

Bouchard, Julie F.; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Vigil, Dena M.; Edwards, Harold Carter (Org. 1444 : Multiphysics Simulation Technology)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy utilities, government organizations and various branches of industry - including the nuclear, financial services and medical sectors

Lindken, Ralph

36

Charged particle assisted nuclear reactions in solid state environment: renaissance of low energy nuclear physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The features of electron assisted neutron exchange processes in crystalline solids are survayed. It is stated that, contrary to expectations, the cross section of these processes may reach an observable magnitude even in the very low energy case because of the extremely huge increment caused by the Coulomb factor of the electron assisted processes and by the effect of the crystal-lattice. The features of electron assisted heavy charged particle exchange processes, electron assisted nuclear capure processes and heavy charged particle assisted nuclear processes are also overviewed. Experimental observations, which may be related to our theoretical findings, are dealt with. The anomalous screening phenomenon is related to electron assisted neutron and proton exchange processes in crystalline solids. A possible explanation of observations by Fleischmann and Pons is presented. The possibility of the phenomenon of nuclear transmutation is qualitatively explained with the aid of usual and charged particle assisted r...

Kálmán, Péter

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On December 15, Matt Moury, Associate Under Secretary, Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS DOE) and EHSS Office of Nuclear Safety staff met with the NRC Executive Director for Operations, the Deputy Executive Director for Operations, and the Director, Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards to sign a nuclear safety information exchange agreement between NRC Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards and the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security.

38

Charged particle assisted nuclear reactions in solid state environment: renaissance of low energy nuclear physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The features of electron assisted neutron exchange processes in crystalline solids are survayed. It is stated that, contrary to expectations, the cross section of these processes may reach an observable magnitude even in the very low energy case because of the extremely huge increment caused by the Coulomb factor of the electron assisted processes and by the effect of the crystal-lattice. The features of electron assisted heavy charged particle exchange processes, electron assisted nuclear capure processes and heavy charged particle assisted nuclear processes are also overviewed. Experimental observations, which may be related to our theoretical findings, are dealt with. The anomalous screening phenomenon is related to electron assisted neutron and proton exchange processes in crystalline solids. A possible explanation of observations by Fleischmann and Pons is presented. The possibility of the phenomenon of nuclear transmutation is qualitatively explained with the aid of usual and charged particle assisted reactions. The electron assisted neutron exchange processes in pure $Ni$ and $Li-Ni$ composite systems (in the Rossi-type E-Cat) are analyzed and it is concluded that these reactions may be responsible for recent experimental observations.

Péter Kálmán; Tamás Keszthelyi

2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

Centring radiological protection on today's global challenges in energy, climate change, environment and health—with nuclear energy playing a key role  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......environment and health-with nuclear energy playing a key role Sylvain Saint-Pierre...greater challenges than increasing nuclear energy. International Energy Agency's...exposure to ionising radiation from nuclear energy continues to pose a serious hindrance......

Sylvain Saint-Pierre

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Small modular HTGR nuclear power plant concept to meet the total energy needs of the developing nations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a small modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is described that can support the total energy needs of the developing nations by supplying electrical power, process steam, low-grade heat for desalination, and hydrogen production. Major features of the nuclear power plant concept, currently under development by GA Technologies Inc. (GA), are discussed with emphasis on (1) plant simplicity, (2) inherent safety, (3) ease of operation, (4) design and licensing standardization, and (5) acceptable power generation economics.

McDonald, C.F.

1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nuclear EMP simulation for large-scale urban environments. FDTD for electrically large problems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In case of a terrorist nuclear attack in a metropolitan area, EMP measurement could provide: (1) a prompt confirmation of the nature of the explosion (chemical or nuclear) for emergency response; and (2) and characterization parameters of the device (reaction history, yield) for technical forensics. However, urban environment could affect the fidelity of the prompt EMP measurement (as well as all other types of prompt measurement): (1) Nuclear EMP wavefront would no longer be coherent, due to incoherent production, attenuation, and propagation of gamma and electrons; and (2) EMP propagation from source region outward would undergo complicated transmission, reflection, and diffraction processes. EMP simulation for electrically-large urban environment: (1) Coupled MCNP/FDTD (Finite-difference time domain Maxwell solver) approach; and (2) FDTD tends to be limited to problems that are not 'too' large compared to the wavelengths of interest because of numerical dispersion and anisotropy. We use a higher-order low-dispersion, isotropic FDTD algorithm for EMP propagation.

Smith, William S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bull, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilcox, Trevor [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Randall J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shao, Xuan-Min [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costigan, Keeley R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of sup 58 Ni and nuclear models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive experimental and theoretical study of the fast-neutron interaction with {sup 58}Ni was undertaken. The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 Mev intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to {approx} 4.8 Mev. The measured results, combined with lower-energy values previously obtained at this laboratory and with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical and coupled-channels models using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results and their interpretation are discussed. The considerations are being extended to collective vibrational nuclei generally, exploring the potential for utilizing electro-magnetic matrix elements, deduced from experiment or predicted by the shell model, to determine the strengths of the neutron interaction. Detailed aspects of this work are given in the Laboratory Report, ANL/NDM-120 (in press). 9 refs., 10 figs.

Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.; Lawson, R.D.; Chiba, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the operating envelope of both fission and fusion reactors. In advanced fission reactors composite materials are being designed in an effort to extend the life and improve the reliability of fuel rod cladding as well as structural materials. Composites are being considered for use as core internals in the next generation of gas-cooled reactors. Further, next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will rely on the capabilities of advanced composites to safely withstand extremely high neutron fluxes while providing superior thermal shock resistance.

Simos, N.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Radioactive Releases Impact from Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant, Bulgaria into the Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present a general overview of the radioactive releases impact generated by Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP), Bulgaria to the environment and public. The liquid releases presented are known as the so called controlled water discharges, that are generated after reprocessing of the inevitable accumulated liquid radioactive waste in the plant operation process. The radionuclides containing in the liquid releases are given in the paper as a result of systematic measuring. Database for radiation doses evaluation on the public around Kozloduy NPP site is developed using IAEA LADTAP computerized program. The computer code LADTAP represents realization of a model that evaluates the public dose as a result of NPP releases under normal operation conditions. The results of this evaluation were the basic licensing document for a new liquid release limit.

Genchev, G. T.; Kuleff, I.; Tanev, N. T.; Delistoyanova, E. S.; Guentchev, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

MEMORANDUM FOR SEAN LEV DEPUTY GENERAL COUNSEL FOR ENVIRONMENT AND NUCLEAR PROGRAMS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4,20 1 1 4,20 1 1 MEMORANDUM FOR SEAN LEV DEPUTY GENERAL COUNSEL FOR ENVIRONMENT AND NUCLEAR PROGRAMS FROM: FRANK MARCINOWSKI 4d.Lhf-d DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR TECHNICAL AND REGULATORY SUPPORT SUBJECT: Annual National Environmental Policy Act Planning Summaries for 201 1 In response to Office of General Counsel's memorandum of December 8,2010, regarding the Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Planning Summaries (APS) and in accordance with Department of Energy Order 45 1.1 B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, I am transmitting our 201 1 APSs. The attached Summaries cover the NEPA projects within the Office of Environmental Management's purview, recognizing that some sites have submitted their Summaries directly to you, as provided

46

Release of Pu Isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the Marine Environment Was Negligible  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of Pu Isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the Marine Environment Was Negligible ... On 11 March 2011, a massive earthquake with a magnitude of M 9.0 occurred in the western North Pacific about 180 km off the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in the northeast coast of Japan and it was followed by gigantic tsunami. ... Since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (1FNPP), significant levels of anthropogenic radionuclides have been detected in seabed sediments off the east coast of Japan. ...

Wenting Bu; Miho Fukuda; Jian Zheng; Tatsuo Aono; Takashi Ishimaru; Jota Kanda; Guosheng Yang; Keiko Tagami; Shigeo Uchida; Qiuju Guo; Masatoshi Yamada

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

47

Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CLIMATE C 24 ( 1979 ). BOLIN, B.B., GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE 3 ( 1979...CHEM ENV NEWS 0406 ( 1976 ). FISCHHOFF, B, HANDLING HAZARDS, ENVIRONMENT...1978 ). LOWRANCE, W.W., ACCEPTABLE RISK ( 1976 ). MARSH, G.P., EARTH...

Gilbert F. White

1980-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

48

Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment Environment Environment Photo Gallery A repository for images showing environmental cleanup and protection efforts around the Lab. Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Shipment #159 of TRU waste from LANL to WIPP, 2011 Shipment #159 of TRU waste from LANL to WIPP, 2011 Kathy Johns-Hughes oversees Los Alamos National Laboratory's TRU Waste Program Kathy Johns-Hughes oversees Los Alamos National Laboratory's TRU Waste Program Worker moves drums of transuranic (TRU) waste at a staging area

49

DNA Radiation Environments Program Spring 1991 2-meter box experiments and analyses. [DEfense Nuclear Agency (DNA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Spring 1991 2-m Box experiments that were performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) at Aberdeen Proving Ground. These studies were sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) under the Radiation Environments Program to obtain measured data for benchmarking the Adjoint Monte Carlo Code System, MASH, Version 1.0. The MASH code system was developed for the Department of Defense and NATO for calculating neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields and shielding protection factors for armored vehicles and military structures against nuclear weapon radiation. In the 2-m Box experiments, neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors were measured in the free-field and as a function of position on an anthropomorphic phantom that was placed outside and inside a borated polyethylene lined steel-walled 2-m box. The data were acquired at a distance of 400-m from the APRF reactor. The purpose of these experiments was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray dose rates as a function of detector location on the phantom for cases when the phantom was in the free-field and inside of the box. Neutron measurements were made using a BD-100R bubble detector and gamma-ray measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). Calculated and measured data were compared in terms of the C/M ratio. The calculated and measured neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors agreed on the average within the [plus minus]20% limits mandated by DNA and demonstrate the capability of the MASH code system in reproducing measured data in nominally shielded assemblies.

Santoro, R.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Whitaker, S.Y. (Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

73 Federal Register 73 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 48 / Monday, March 12, 2012 / Rules and Regulations adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. This rule does not use technical standards. Therefore, we did not consider the use of voluntary consensus standards. Environment We have analyzed this rule under Department of Homeland Security Management Directive 023-01 and Commandant Instruction M16475.lD, which guide the Coast Guard in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321-4370f), and have concluded this action is one of a category of actions that do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment. This rule is categorically excluded, under figure 2-1, paragraph (34)(g), of the Instruction. This rule

51

Miscibility gap in the U-Nd-O phase diagram: a new approach of nuclear oxides in the environment?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To some extent, rare-earth-doped UO{sub 2} is representative of an irradiated nuclear fuel. The two phases we observed previously in neodymium-doped UO{sub 2} are now interpreted as the existence of a miscibility gap in the U-Nd-O phase diagram using new results obtained with Raman spectroscopy. Extrapolating the miscibility gap in the U-Nd-O phase diagram to irradiated UO{sub 2} opens the path to a new understanding of nuclear oxides in the environment. (authors)

Desgranges, L.; Pontillon, Y.; Matheron, P.; Marcet, M. [CEA DEN DEC, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France); Simon, P.; Guimbretiere, G. [CEMHTI, CNRS UPR 3079, F-45071 Orleans 2, (France); Porcher, F. [Ctr Etud Saclay, CEA DSM IRAMIS, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Parametric study of the total system life cycle cost of an alternate nuclear waste management strategy using deep boreholes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Department of Energy recently submitted a license application for the Yucca Mountain repository to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, yet even the most optimistic timetable projects that the repository will not now ...

Moulton, Taylor Allen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hydrothermal leaching of rhyolite glass in the environment has implications for nuclear waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and the Department of Geology and Mineralogy for financial support. International Nuclear Information System (INIS) Atomindex Vol. 11, Part 5, 305 (Subject index of abstracts on vitrification) ...

A. P. Dickin

1981-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

54

Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that devastated the Fuku- shima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant resulted in the largest accidental release of cesium and following Tsunami off the east coast of Japan on March 11, 2011 severely damaged three nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant (NPP). The total direct release of 137 Cs to the marine environment

Buesseler, Ken

55

Public views on multiple dimensions of security : nuclear waepons, terrorism, energy, and the environment : 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze and compare findings from identical national surveys of the US general public on nuclear security and terrorism administered by telephone and Internet in mid-2007. Key areas of investigation include assessments of threats to US security; valuations of US nuclear weapons and nuclear deterrence; perspectives on nuclear proliferation, including the specific cases of North Korea and Iran; and support for investments in nuclear weapons capabilities. Our analysis of public views on terrorism include assessments of the current threat, progress in the struggle against terrorism, preferences for responding to terrorist attacks at different levels of assumed casualties, and support for domestic policies intended to reduce the threat of terrorism. Also we report findings from an Internet survey conducted in mid 2007 that investigates public views of US energy security, to include: energy supplies and reliability; energy vulnerabilities and threats, and relationships among security, costs, energy dependence, alternative sources, and research and investment priorities. We analyze public assessments of nuclear energy risks and benefits, nuclear materials management issues, and preferences for the future of nuclear energy in the US. Additionally, we investigate environmental issues as they relate to energy security, to include expected implications of global climate change, and relationships among environmental issues and potential policy options.

Herron, Kerry Gale (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nuclear Physics A 772 (2006) 113–137 Total prompt energy release in the neutron-induced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study addresses, for the first time, the total prompt energy release and its components for the fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu as a function of the kinetic energy of the neutron inducing the fission. The components are extracted from experimental measurements, where they exist, together with model-dependent calculation, interpolation, and extrapolation. While the components display clear dependencies upon the incident neutron energy, their sums display only weak, yet definite, energy dependencies. Also addressed is the total prompt energy deposition in fission for the same three systems. Results are presented in equation form. New measurements are recommended as a consequence of this study.

D. G. Madland

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nuclear and Non-Ionizing Energy-Loss for Coulomb Scattered Particles from Low Energy up to Relativistic Regime in Space Radiation Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the space environment, instruments onboard of spacecrafts can be affected by displacement damage due to radiation. The differential scattering cross section for screened nucleus--nucleus interactions - i.e., including the effects due to screened Coulomb nuclear fields -, nuclear stopping powers and non-ionization energy losses are treated from about 50\\,keV/nucleon up to relativistic energies.

Boschini, M J; Gervasi, M; Giani, S; Grandi, D; Ivantchenko, V; Pensotti, S; Rancoita, P G; Tacconi, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

59

Management of nuclear materials in an R D environment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary R D organization and, as such, its nuclear materials inventory is diverse. Accordingly, major inventories of isotopes such as Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-242, U-235, Th, tritium, and deuterium, and lesser amounts of isotopes of Am, Cm, Np and exotic isotopes such as berkelium must be managed in accordance with Department of Energy Orders and Laboratory policies. Los Alamos also acts as a national resource for many one-of-a-kind materials which are supplied to universities, industry, and other government agencies within the US and throughout the world. Management of these materials requires effective interaction and communication with many nuclear materials custodians residing in over forty technical groups as well as effective interaction with numerous outside organizations. This paper discusses the role, philosophy, and organizational structure of Nuclear Materials Management at Los Alamos and also briefly presents results of two special nuclear materials management projects: 1- Revision of Item Description Codes for use in the Los Alamos nuclear material data base and 2- The recommendation of new economic discard limits for Pu-239. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Behrens, R.G.; Roth, S.B.; Jones, S.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nuclear and Non-Ionizing Energy-loss of Electrons with Low and Relativistic Energies in Materials and Space Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The treatment of the electron-nucleus interaction based on the Mott differential cross section was extended to account for effects due to screened Coulomb potentials, finite sizes and finite rest masses of nuclei for electrons above 200 keV and up to ultra high energies. This treatment allows one to determine both the total and differential cross sections, thus, subsequently to calculate the resulting nuclear and non-ionizing stopping powers. Above a few hundreds of MeV, neglecting the effect due to finite rest masses of recoil nuclei the stopping power and NIEL result to be largely underestimated; while, above a few tens of MeV the finite size of the nuclear target prevents a further large increase of stopping powers which approach almost constant values.

Boschini, M J; Gervasi, M; Giani, S; Grandi, D; Ivanchenko, V; Nieminem, P; Pensotti, S; Rancoita, P G; Tacconi, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nuclear and Non-Ionizing Energy-loss of Electrons with Low and Relativistic Energies in Materials and Space Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The treatment of the electron-nucleus interaction based on the Mott differential cross section was extended to account for effects due to screened Coulomb potentials, finite sizes and finite rest masses of nuclei for electrons above 200 keV and up to ultra high energies. This treatment allows one to determine both the total and differential cross sections, thus, subsequently to calculate the resulting nuclear and non-ionizing stopping powers. Above a few hundreds of MeV, neglecting the effect due to finite rest masses of recoil nuclei the stopping power and NIEL result to be largely underestimated; while, above a few tens of MeV the finite size of the nuclear target prevents a further large increase of stopping powers which approach almost constant values.

M. J. Boschini; C. Consolandi; M. Gervasi; S. Giani; D. Grandi; V. Ivanchenko; P. Nieminem; S. Pensotti; P. G. Rancoita; M. Tacconi

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

62

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nature of the nuclear recipient’s security environment. ThisKeywords: Nuclear weapons proliferation; security; securitynature of the nuclear recipient’s security environment. This

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

American perspectives on security : energy, environment, nuclear weapons, and terrorism : 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report findings from an Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone among the American public in mid-2010 on US energy and environmental security. Key areas of investigation include public perceptions shaping the context for debate about a comprehensive national energy policy, and what levels of importance are assigned to various prospective energy technologies. Additionally, we investigate how public views on global climate change are evolving, how the public assesses the risks and benefits of nuclear energy, preferences for managing used nuclear fuel, and public trust in sources of scientific and technical information. We also report findings from a national Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone in mid-2010 on public views of the relevance of US nuclear weapons today, support for strategic arms control, and assessments of the potential for nuclear abolition. Additionally, we analyze evolving public views of the threat of terrorism, assessments of progress in the struggle against terrorism, and tolerance for intrusive antiterror policies. Where possible, findings from each survey are compared with previous surveys in this series for analyses of trends.

Herron, Kerry Gale (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Silva, Carol L. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Remote-Controlled Inspection Robot for Nuclear Facilities in Underwater Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A remote-controlled inspection robot for nuclear facilities was developed. This is a underwater robot technology combined with inspection and flaw removal technologies. This report will describe the structure and performance of this robot. The inspection robot consists of two parts. The one is driving equipment, and the other is inspection and grinding units. It can swim in the tank, move around the tank wall, and stay on the inspection area. After that it starts inspection and flaw removal with a special grinding wheel. This technology had been developed to inspect some Radioactive Waste (RW) tanks in operating nuclear power plants. There are many RW tanks in these plants, which human workers can be hard to access because of a high level dose. This technology is too useful for inspection works of human-inaccessible areas. And also, in conventional inspection process, some worker go into the tank and set up scaffolding after full drainage and decontamination. It spends too much time for these preparations. If tank inspection and flaw removal can be performed in underwater, the outage period will be reduced. Remote-controlled process can be performed in underwater. This is the great advantage for plant owners. Since 1999 we have been applying this inspection robot to operating nuclear 11 facilities in Japan. (authors)

Yasuhiro Miwa; Syuichi Satoh; Naoya Hirose [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Company Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakaharacho, Isogoku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

AN EVALUATION OF HYDROGEN INDUCED CRACKING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF TITANIUM ALLOYS IN US HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) susceptibility of titanium alloys in environments anticipated in the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository with particular emphasis on the. effect of the oxide passive film on the hydrogen absorption process of titanium alloys being evaluated. The titanium alloys considered in this review include Ti 2, 5 , 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 24 and 29. In general, the concentration of hydrogen in a titanium alloy can increase due to absorption of atomic hydrogen produced from passive general corrosion of that alloy or galvanic coupling of it to a less noble metal. It is concluded that under the exposure conditions anticipated in the Yucca Mountain repository, the HIC of titanium drip shield will not occur because there will not be sufficient hydrogen in the metal even after 10,000 years of emplacement. Due to the conservatisms adopted in the current evaluation, this assessment is considered very conservative.

G. De; K. Mon; G. Gordon; D. Shoesmith; F. Hua

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Multicriteria decision analysis based on analytic hierarchy process in GIS environment for siting nuclear power plant in Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to increasing demand of electrical energy and freshwater in Egypt, it is safe to assume that the decision makers will turn to nuclear power as the feasible alternative for energy. However, as time goes by, fewer sites will be available and suitable for nuclear power plant development. Site selection is a key phase of the siting process of a nuclear plant and may significantly affect the safety and cost of the facility during its entire life cycle. The siting of nuclear power plants is one of multi-criteria problems, which makes it complex. Many interrelated factors affect the process. Six constraints and twenty-two factors corresponding to safety, environment and socio-economy were considered in the siting study presented in this paper. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis was applied during the selection of nuclear power plants site using GIS software. Three spatial decision making models were applied in this paper during site selection stage. The binary overlay (Boolean logic) with Low Risk approach in which the logical OR operator is used to determine the candidate areas. All constraints were represented in binary maps, combined and a masking layer was created to eliminate the lands considered as constraints in Arc GIS Software. The 22 factors were represented in normalized maps after unifying all of them to 0–1 score scales based on the philosophy of suitability criteria (factors) using the Weighted Linear Combination (WLC) method. The relative scores and weight of factors which were used in the maps conducted by pairwise comparison were fed into Expert choice software that runs the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Final composite map of potential site priorities were represented by several polygons produced in MCDA add-in as an open source tool in Arc GIS 10.1. Four sites, all located along the North western and the Red Sea coasts were chosen as Candidate sites after eliminating the lowest scoring sites The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) was used to select a suitable site by pairwise comparison and by calculating eigenvectors using Expert Choice software. The sites were ranked to determine the most desirable site. The El Dabaa site was found to be most suitable, followed by the East El Negila site on the Mediterranean Sea.

A.M. Abudeif; A.A. Abdel Moneim; A.F. Farrag

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Screening tests of representative nuclear power plant components exposed to secondary environments created by fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of screening tests to determine component survivability in secondary environments created by fires, specifically increased temperatures, increased humidity, and the presence of particulates and corrosive vapors. Additionally, chloride concentrations were measured in the exhaust from several of the tests used to provide fire environments. Results show actual failure or some indication of failure for strip chart recorders, electronic counters, an oscilloscope amplifier, and switches and relays. The chart recorder failures resulted from accumulation of particulates on the pen slider mechanisms. The electronic counter experienced leakage current failures on circuit boards after the fire exposure and exposure to high humidity. The oscillosocpe amplifier experienced thermal-related drift as high as 20% before thermal protective circuitry shut the unit down. In some cases, switches and relays experienced high contact resistances with the low voltages levels used for the mesurements. Finally, relays tested to thermal failure experienced various failures, all at temperatures ranging from 150/sup 0/C to above 350/sup 0/C. The chloride measurements show that most of the hydrogen chloride generated in the test fires is combined with particulate by the time it reaches the exhaust duct, indicating that hydrogen chloride condensation may be less likely than small scale data implies. 13 refs., 36 figs.

Jacobus, M.J.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Assessment of uncertainties in measurement of pH in hostile environments characteristic of nuclear repositories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on evaluation and characteristics of sputtered thin film pH electrodes which can be used to assess the corrosivity of hot (100{degree}C) aqueous solutions present in nuclear repositories. Sputtered thin films have the advantages of high temperature capability, ruggedness, and low cost. The iridium oxide films were found to have a linear, 58 mV/pH, response to changes in pH. They had little hysteresis but drifted approximately 0.2 V over a period of two days exposure to pH 2--12 solutions. The films were found to be insensitive to interference from most ions such as alkali ions but had redox sensitivity to ferri-/ferrocyanide ions. Although special surface treatments were needed for the films for good adherence at 200{degree}C the films were not degraded after 20 hours exposure at pH 4, 7, and 10 at 200{degree}C. Ruthenium oxide sputtered films performed equally well to the iridium oxide films in parallel tests. The report also contains information on electrochemistry and testing of thin film electrodes and the characterization of the thin films by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, and ion scattering spectroscopy. 123 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

Kreider, K.G.; Tarlov, M.J.; Huang, P.H. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Overpressure prediction by mean total stress estimate using well logs for compressional environments with strike-slip or reverse faulting stress state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional compaction theory and depend on a relationship between porosity and vertical effective stress. Strike-slip or reverse faulting environments especially require a different way to determine pore-pressure, since the overburden is not the maximum stress...

Ozkale, Aslihan

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

73

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

74

Does nuclear energy have a future in Europe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Half of the world's nuclear-generated electricity is consumed in Europe. If only Western Europe is considered, the figure is 36%. Obviously, nuclear energy is an important source of energy in Europe. However, this situation varies from one country to another. Using the percentage of nuclear energy in total electricity generation as an indicator, nuclear energy represents 75% of the total electricity generation in France and 61% in Belgium, but 0% in several countries such as Austria, Italy, and Poland. The reasons for this variance result from several different circumstances, including the economy, energy resources, politics, the decision-making process, the environment, and public opinion. These few considerations show that electrical utilities and all the parties concerned with nuclear energy have to support public relations campaigns on nuclear topics to help and favor the development of this source of energy, guaranteeing each country a greater energy independence and a reasonable impact on the environment.

Pollier, P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

76

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Proposals for Nuclear Cooperation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bilateral nuclear and security agreement between theThe bilateral nuclear and security agreement between thein East Asia's security, nuclear energy, and environment. It

Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Choi, Jor-Shan; Fei, Edward

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

TVA chooses nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TVA chooses nuclear power ... In giving the nod to a nuclear (over a coal) power generating station 10 days ago, TVA probably gave nuclear power its biggest boost to date. ... The $247 million nuclear power plant—a dual boiling-water reactor unit with a total capacity of 2.2 million kw(e).—will ...

1966-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Deposition and resuspension of antimony-125 and cesium-137 in the soil-plant system in the environment of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies were conducted during the summer of 1987 to characterize the levels of {sup 125}Sb and {sup 137}Cs releases and the distribution of the two radionuclides in vegetation and soil at distances of 0.45 and 0.75 km from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant stack. Samples were collected of sagebrush, wheatgrass, and rabbitbrush and their leaves, stems, roots, and litter were separated. Vegetation samples were dried at 70{degree}C for 48 hours, ground, and concentrations of {sup 125}Sb and {sup 137}Cs were determined by gamma spectrometry. Soil samples were collected from the surface to a depth of 18 cm (at 3 cm increments), dried at 45{degree}C, and the concentrations of {sup 125}Sb and {sup 137}Cs measured in the same manner as for vegetation samples. Results showed that the activity of {sup 125}Sb was higher in the leaves than in the stem and roots. Total activity of {sup 125}Sb (1041.77 Bq m{sup {minus}2}) was distributed as 33.4% in vegetation and 66.6% in soil. Deposition of airborne {sup 125}Sb measured through absorption by transplanted vegetation was about one Bq m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}. The resuspension rate of {sup 125}Sb from vegetation determined by an air-flux chamber positioned over sagebrush plants was less than 61 x 10{sup {minus}11} sec{sup {minus}1}. Cesium-137 concentrations were lower in the leaves than in the stems and roots indicating slow movement through plant tissues.

Ghuman, G.S. [Savannah State Coll., GA (United States); Motes, B.G.; Fernandez, S.J.; Weesner, F.J.; McManus, G.J.; Wilcox, C.M. [Idaho Research Center, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Nuclear and Environmental Measurements Section

1989-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy...

80

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

82

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

83

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

84

German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

map References: German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety1 German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and...

85

Centring radiological protection on today's global challenges in energy, climate change, environment and health—with nuclear energy playing a key role  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from nuclear energy continues to...International Atomic Energy Agency Basic...electricity while reducing the climate...impacts of the energy sources supplying...pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. This paper...demand and on related climate change......

Sylvain Saint-Pierre

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Nuclear Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy ... A brief summary of the history and key concepts of nuclear energy. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Charles D. Mickey

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nuclear batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear batteries ... Describes the structure, operation, and application of nuclear batteries. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Alfred B. Garrett

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locating–dominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater [186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locating–total dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nuclear Energy Papers and Presentations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PapersPresentations View Nuclear Energy papers & presentations. Skip Navigation Links Home Newsroom About INL Careers Research Programs Energy and Environment National and...

92

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

93

Nuclear Forensics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear...

94

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

95

Wildfires in Chernobyl-contaminated forests and risks to the population and the environment: A new nuclear disaster about to happen?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildfires in Chernobyl-contaminated forests and risks to the population and the environment: A new June 2014 Accepted 20 August 2014 Available online xxxx Keywords: Chernobyl accident Forest fires Redistribution Radionuclides Risks Radioactive contamination in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia after the Chernobyl

96

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

98

Issues for New Nuclear Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Explore * Idaho's energy picture * Nuclear power in the U.S. * Potential for a nuclear power plant in Idaho 0 5 10 15 20 25 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Million Megawatt-Hours Total...

99

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

100

Nuclear Induction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic moments of nuclei in normal matter will result in a nuclear paramagnetic polarization upon establishment of equilibrium in a constant magnetic field. It is shown that a radiofrequency field at right angles to the constant field causes a forced precession of the total polarization around the constant field with decreasing latitude as the Larmor frequency approaches adiabatically the frequency of the r-f field. Thus there results a component of the nuclear polarization at right angles to both the constant and the r-f field and it is shown that under normal laboratory conditions this component can induce observable voltages. In Section 3 we discuss this nuclear induction, considering the effect of external fields only, while in Section 4 those modifications are described which originate from internal fields and finite relaxation times.

F. Bloch

1946-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and DOE's Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and...

102

Nuclear Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Advanced Materials Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Biology and Soft Matter Chemical and Engineering Materials Quantum Condensed Matter Computational Chemistry Nuclear Sciences More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Chemistry | Nuclear Sciences SHARE Nuclear Sciences In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies and systems to improve human health; explore safer, more environmentally friendly power; and better understand the structure of matter. Thanks to its nuclear heritage, ORNL is a world leader in the production of isotopes for medical purposes and research. The lab's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC)

103

Michigan Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","3,947",13.2,"29,625",26.6 "Coal","11,531",38.7,"65,604",58.8 "Hydro and Pumped...

104

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,594",10.8,"13,478",25.1 "Coal","4,789",32.5,"28,083",52.3 "Hydro and Pumped...

105

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,584",8.9,"13,281",20.7 "Coal","8,063",45.2,"40,169",62.5 "Hydro and Pumped...

106

Washington Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,097",3.6,"9,241",8.9 "Coal","1,340",4.4,"8,527",8.2 "Hydro and Pumped...

107

Virginia Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","3,501",14.5,"26,572",36.4 "Coal","5,868",24.3,"25,459",34.9 "Hydro and Pumped...

108

Solving the Nuclear Waste Problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solving the Nuclear Waste Problem ... Of the many problems that beset the nuclear power industry, none has proved as perplexing as taking out the trash. ... Nuclear waste will remain a potential threat to man and the environment for as long as 10,000 years. ...

1988-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for nuclear cooperation with Russia", The Nonproliferationof nuclear energy see for Russia, Trenin Dmitri. "Russia`s Nuclear Policy in the 21 st Century Environment",

Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

111

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

112

Comprehensive Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M. [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke [Osaka University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

114

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

115

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

117

Contribution of atom-probe tomography to a better understanding of glass alteration mechanisms: application to a nuclear glass specimen altered 25 years in a granitic environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report and discuss results of atom probe tomography (APT) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) applied to a borosilicate glass sample of nuclear interest altered for nearly 26 years at 90°C in a confined granitic medium in order to better understand the rate-limiting mechanisms under conditions representative of a deep geological repository for vitrified radioactive waste. The APT technique allows the 3D reconstruction of the elemental distribution at the reactive interphase with sub-nanometer precision. Profiles of the B distribution at pristine glass/hydrated glass interface obtained by different techniques are compared to show the challenge of accurate measurements of diffusion profiles at this buried interface on the nanometer length scale. Our results show that 1) Alkali from the glass and hydrogen from the solution exhibit anti-correlated 15 ± 3 nm wide gradients located between the pristine glass and the hydrated glass layer, 2) boron exhibits an unexpectedly sharp profile located just at the outside of the alkali/H interdiffusion layer; this sharp profile is more consistent with a dissolution front than a diffusion-controlled release of boron. The resulting apparent diffusion coefficients derived from the Li and H profiles are DLi = 1.5 × 10-22 m2.s-1 and DH = 6.8 × 10-23 m2.s-1. These values are around two orders of magnitude lower than those observed at the very beginning of the alteration process, which suggests that interdiffusion is slowed at high reaction progress by local conditions that could be related to the porous structure of the interphase. As a result, the accessibility of water to the pristine glass could be the rate-limiting step in these conditions. More generally, these findings strongly support the importance of interdiffusion coupled with hydrolysis reactions of the silicate network on the long-term dissolution rate, contrary to what has been suggested by recent interfacial dissolution-precipitation models for silicate minerals.

Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule DTCD SECM LCLT, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schreiber, Daniel K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cabie, M. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CP2M, Marseille (France)

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Nuclear Data | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Science Computer Science Theory, Modeling and Simulation Cyber Security Bioinformatics Climate & Environment Systems Biology Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Nuclear Data Nuclear Systems Modeling and Simulation Supercomputing and Computation More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Computer Science | Nuclear Data SHARE Nuclear Data Nuclear Data ORNL is a recognized, international leader in nuclear data research and development (R&D) to support nuclear applications analyses. For more than 40 years, ORNL has provided neutron resonance region nuclear data evaluations to the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B) database, and many of the key ORNL resonance evaluations have also been adopted by international nuclear databases in Europe, Japan, China, and Russia. ORNL

119

User Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Environment Environment on Genepool When you log into the Genepool system you will land in your $HOME directory on NERSC's "global homes" file system. The global homes file system is mounted across all NERSC computation systems with the exception of PDSF. The $HOME directory has quota of 40GB and 1,000,000 inodes. To customize your environment, by setting environment variables or aliases, you will need to modify one of the "dot" files that NERSC has created for you. You may NOT modify the .bashrc or .cshrc files. These are set to read-only on NERSC systems and specify system specific customizations. Instead you should modify a file called .bashrc.ext or .cshrc.ext. Learn more about the global homes user environment. Important Environment Variables

120

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6...

122

Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Programs >> Nuclear Energy Error Error Nuclear Energy Home - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Energy Home - RCC * Increasing...

123

Nuclear weapon detection categorization analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This statement of work is for the Proof of Concept for nuclear weapon categories utility in Arms control. The focus of the project will be to collect, analyze and correlate Intrinsic Radiation (INRAD) calculation results for the purpose of defining measurable signatures that differentiate categories of nuclear weapons. The project will support START III negotiations by identifying categories of nuclear weapons. The categories could be used to clarify sub-limits on the total number of nuclear weapons.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

125

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

126

STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION, HAZARDOUS WASTE BUREAU, Complainant, v. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, and NUCLEAR WASTE PARTNERSHIP,...

127

Nuclear Debate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Debate ... This month, the Senate will consider the nominations of two women to serve on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ... Svinicki is a nuclear engineer with experience in the Department of Energy’s nuclear energy programs. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

129

Evaluation of protective measures for tropical environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......The Integrated System for Emergency...SIEM (Integrated System for Emergency...Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, in Angra...S. UK Recovery Handbook for radiation incidents...Environmental Aspects. Restoration of Environments...The Integrated System for Emergency......

D. N. G. Silva; E. R. R. Rochedo; M. A. V. Wasserman; L. F. C. Conti

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cesium in the Savannah River Site environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cesium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fourth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium, iodine, and uranium. Documents on plutonium, strontium, carbon, and technetium will be published in the future. These are dynamic documents and current plans call for revising and updating each one on a two-year schedule.Radiocesium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Radiocesium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. Several hundred curies of [sup 137]Cs was released into streams in the late 50s and 60s from leaking fuel elements. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 1400 Ci of [sup 137]Cs was released to seepage basins where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A much smaller quantity, about four Ci. was released to the atmosphere. Radiocesium concentration and mechanisms for atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 033 mrem (atmospheric) and 60 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Isotope [sup 137]Cs releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

Carlton, W.H.; Bauer, L.R.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Cesium in the Savannah River Site environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cesium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fourth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium, iodine, and uranium. Documents on plutonium, strontium, carbon, and technetium will be published in the future. These are dynamic documents and current plans call for revising and updating each one on a two-year schedule.Radiocesium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Radiocesium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. Several hundred curies of {sup 137}Cs was released into streams in the late 50s and 60s from leaking fuel elements. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 1400 Ci of {sup 137}Cs was released to seepage basins where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A much smaller quantity, about four Ci. was released to the atmosphere. Radiocesium concentration and mechanisms for atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 033 mrem (atmospheric) and 60 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Isotope {sup 137}Cs releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

Carlton, W.H.; Bauer, L.R.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

133

Nuclear Facility Design  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design Design FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: Headquarters and Field organizations and their contractors ensure that nuclear facilities are designed to assure adequate protection for the public, workers, and the environment from nuclear hazards. REQUIREMENTS: ï‚· 10 CFR 830.120 ï‚· 10 CFR 830 subpart B ï‚· DOE O 413.3 ï‚· DOE O 420.1B ï‚· DOE O 414.1C ï‚· DOE O 226.1 ï‚· DOE M 426.1 ï‚· DEAR 970-5404-2 Guidance: ï‚· DOE G 420.1-1 ï‚· Project Management Practices, Integrated Quality ( Rev E, June 2003) ï‚· DOE Implementation Plan for DNSB Recommendation 2004-2 Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation Contracts between and the contractors who operate nuclear facilities contain adequate requirements concerning the conduct of nuclear facility safety design for nuclear facility capital projects and major modifications and the

134

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) Nuclear electricity generation remains flat in the IEO99 reference case, representing a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption. Net reductions in nuclear capacity are projected for most industrialized nations. In 1997, a total of 2,276 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated from nuclear power worldwide, providing 17 percent of the worldÂ’s electricity generation. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear power for electricity varies greatly (Figure 53). Ten countries met at least 40 percent of their total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of worldwide electricity generation are uncertain, despite projected growth of

135

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

Environment, Safety & Health | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and Health Program; oversees the Environmental Management System, and provides oversight and direction for SNL waste management, water, air, and pollution prevention programs....

137

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

138

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

139

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

140

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear Power’s Benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Power’s Benefits ... Using nuclear power in place of fossil-fuel energy sources, such as coal, has prevented some 1.8 million air-pollution-related deaths and 64 gigatons of carbon emissions globally over the past four decades, a study concludes. ... These estimates suggest policymakers should continue to rely on and expand nuclear power in place of fossil fuels to mitigate climate change, the authors say (Environ. ...

MARK SCHROPE

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

142

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Jeff Tappen; M.A. Wasiolek; D.W. Wu; J.F. Schmitt

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

143

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Tappen, J. J.; Wasiolek, M. A.; Wu, D. W.; Schmitt, J. F.; Smith, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

144

Nuclear Fabrication Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

Levesque, Stephen

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

145

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - April 2014 | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

April 2014 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - April 2014 News Updates On February 20, Secretary Moniz announced the issuance of loan guarantees totalling approximately 6.5...

146

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nuclear photonics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

148

Neutron Total Cross Sections at 20 Mev  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the T(d, n)He4 reaction as a monoenergetic source of neutrons of about 20 Mev, the total cross sections of 13 elements have been measured by a transmission experiment. These cross sections vary approximately as A23 as is to be expected from the continuum theory of nuclear reactions. The cross section for hydrogen at 19.93 Mev is 0.504±0.01 barn. This result, together with other results at lower energies, seems to require a Yukawa potential in both the singlet and triplet n-p states and a singlet effective range that is lower than that obtained from p-p scattering data.

Robert B. Day and Richard L. Henkel

1953-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nuclear Returns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Returns ... For the first time since 1978, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has given the green light for a new U.S. nuclear power plant. ... NRC granted a license to Southern Co. to build and operate twin 1,100-MW reactors adjacent to two operating nuclear power plants at its Vogtle nuclear facility, near Waynesboro, Ga. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

150

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

151

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Nuclear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear Power Nuclear Power picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Nuclear power is projected to represent a growing share of the developing worldÂ’s electricity consumption from 1999 through 2020. New plant construction and license extensions for existing plants are expected to produce a net increase in world nuclear capacity. Nuclear power plants generated electricity in 29 countries in 1999. A total of 433 nuclear power reactors were in operation (Figure 61), including 104 in the United States, 59 in France, and 53 in Japan. The largest national share of electricity from nuclear power was in France, at 75 percent (Figure 62). Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Lithuania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Sweden, Ukraine, and South Korea depended on nuclear power for at least 40

152

Nuclear power: the threat to personal freedom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... nuclear capacity will increase debate on the long term impact of nuclear power on civil liberties. This issue has already become central to the debate in other European countries.The ... Royal Commission on Environ-mental Pollution first raised the issue of nuclear power and civil liberties in its sixth report (Cmnd 6618) in 1976. Together with subsequent independent studies, ...

Robin Grove White

1979-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nuclear Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although not yet developed at the commercial stage, nuclear fusion technology is still being considered as a ... used in nuclear warfare. Since research in nuclear fusion for the production of energy started abou...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; José Manuel Martínez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation As more countries embrace nuclear power as a cost-effective and clean alternative to fossil fuels, the need exists to ensure that the nuclear fuel cycle is...

155

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear, and neutron spectra. The NE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) capabilities are based on a staff with decades

Kemner, Ken

156

Quality In-Plant Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Quality of In-plant Envi~onment. How can employees be expected to p~oduce Wo~ld-class quality pa~ts with a "di~ty" plant? Obviously, the wo~k environment has an effect on the attitude of the wo~k force. Quality of In-plant Environment con sists... reduced to .87 years. CONCLUSION The changing business climate can present opportunities for dramatic energy savings. Concepts such as Quality of Work LiEe and Quality In-Plant Environment may initially appear to have a very negative efE~ct on total...

Petzold, M. A.

157

NUCLEAR REACTORS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nuclear reactors are devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain… (more)

Belachew, Dessalegn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a complex atomic apparatus used to obtain energy from nuclear fission chain reaction. Used to produce nuclear energy, radioactive isotopes, and artificial elements.... atomic pile ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy Idaho National Laboratory is the Department of Energy's lead nuclear energy research and development facility. Building upon its legacy responsibilities,...

160

Nuclear Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Error Error Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC * Increasing your portlet timeout setting. *...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nuclear Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

162

International Nuclear Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

Doyle, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nuclear Medium Modifications of Hadrons from Generalized Parton Distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the structure of generalized parton distributions in spin 0 nuclei within a microscopic approach for nuclear dynamics. GPDs can be used on one side as tools to unravel the deep inelastic transverse structure of nuclei in terms of both transverse spatial and transverse momentum degrees of freedom. On the other, one can obtain information on GPDs themselves by observing how they become modified in the nuclear environment. We derive the structure of the nuclear deeply virtual Compton scattering tensor and generalized parton distributions at leading order in $Q$ in a field-theoretical framework. The nuclear generalized parton distributions are calculated using a two step process -- the convolution approach -- where the scattering process happens from a quark inside a nucleon, itself inside a nucleus, disregarding final state interactions with both the nuclear and nucleon debris. We point out that details of the nuclear long range interactions such as two-body currents, can be disregarded compared to the deep inelastic induced modifications of the bound GPDs. We show how the pattern of nuclear modifications predicted, and in particular the deviations of off-shell effects from the longitudinal convolution provide clear signals to be sought in experimental measurements. Finally, we find interesting relationships by studying Mellin moments in nuclei: in particular we predict the $A$-dependence for the $D$-term of GPDs within a microscopic approach, and the behavior with $t$ of the total momentum carried by quarks in a nucleus. The latter provides an important element for the evaluation of nuclear hadronization phenomena which are vital for interpreting current and future data at RHIC, HERMES and Jefferson Lab.

S. Liuti; S. K. Taneja

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

164

Radiation effects in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

166

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

169

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

170

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

171

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

172

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

173

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

174

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

175

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

176

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

177

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

178

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

179

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

180

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

182

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

183

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

184

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

185

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

186

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

187

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

188

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

189

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

190

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

191

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

192

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

193

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

194

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

195

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

196

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

197

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

198

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

199

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

200

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

202

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

203

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

204

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

205

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

206

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

207

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

208

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

209

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

210

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

211

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

212

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

213

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

214

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

215

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

216

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

217

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

218

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

219

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

220

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

222

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

223

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

224

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

225

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

226

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

227

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

228

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

229

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

230

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

231

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

232

Nuclear choices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains part of the series New Liberal Arts, which is intended to make science and technology more accessible to students of the liberal arts. Volume in hand provides a comprehensive, multifaceted examination of nuclear energy, in nontechnical terms. Wolfson explains the basics of nuclear energy and radiation, nuclear power..., and nuclear weapons..., and he invites readers to make their own judgments on controversial nuclear issues. Illustrated with photos and diagrams. Each chapter contains suggestions for additional reading and a glossary. For policy, science, and general collections in all libraries. (ES) Topics contained include Atoms and nuclei. Effects and uses of radiation. Energy and People. Reactor safety. Nuclear strategy. Defense in the nuclear age. Nuclear power, nuclear weapons, and nuclear futures.

Wolfson, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

234

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

235

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

236

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

237

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

238

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

239

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

240

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

242

Confronting Nuclear Risks: Counter-Expertise as Politics Within  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Confronting Nuclear Risks: Counter-Expertise as Politics Within the French Nuclear Energy Debate of knowledge and expertise on the environ- mental and health risks of nuclear energy in France. From-expertise, environmental activism, France, lay knowledge, nuclear power, scientists' mobilization, social studies

Gutkin, Boris

243

What Will it Take to Revive Nuclear Energy ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Will it Take to Revive Nuclear Energy ? [Assuming you want to] Andrew C. Kadak Professor;Present Situation · It doesn't get any better than this for nuclear energy! ­ Very Good Nuclear Regulatory rhetoric from the President and Congress about need for nuclear energy for environment, security

244

Our Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Programs Home > About Us > Our Programs Our Programs NNSA's program support is divided into several key program areas including Defense, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, Emergency Operations, Infrastructure and Environment, Nuclear Security, Management and

245

LANL Data Profile 20122013 Total: 10,407  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Community Programs Office (505) 665% Environmental management 6% Safeguards and security 5% DOE Office of Science 4% Energy and related programs.......................$534,756,599 New Mexico total procurement..........$338,725,405 Los Alamos County

246

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Annual Report, December...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

This document is the first annual report of DOE's Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program, managed by the Office of Nuclear Safety in the Office of Environment,...

247

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

248

Office of Nuclear Safety - Directives  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives The HSS Office of Nuclear Safety is the responsible office for the development, interpretation, and revision of the following Department of Energy (DOE) directives. Go to DOE's Directives Web Page to view these directives. DOE Order (O) 252.1A, Technical Standards Program DOE O 252.1A promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. HS-30 Contact: Jeff Feit DOE Policy (P) 420.1, Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy DOE P 420.1, documents the Department's nuclear safety policy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment.

249

THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: Greater Energy Security in a Cleaner, Safer World The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S. and global energy security, encourage clean development around the world, reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation, and improve the environment. A plentiful, reliable supply of energy is the cornerstone of sustained economic growth and prosperity. Nuclear power is the only proven technology that can provide abundant supplies of base load electricity reliably and without air pollution or emissions of greenhouse gasses. In order to help meet growing demand for energy at home and encourage the growth of prosperity around the globe, GNEP provides for the safe, extensive expansion of clean nuclear power.

250

defense nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

251

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

252

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

253

Nuclear Power 2010 Unveiled update 3.04.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010 Unveiled Bush plan for new nuclear reactors maps out monstrous subsidies Updated: March 2004 Critical Mass Energy and Environment Program Public Citizen is a nonprofit...

254

Assessment of strontium in the Savannah River Site environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document on strontium is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the sixth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of SRS (Savannah River Site) operations. Strontium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Strontium has been produced at SRS during the operation of 5 production reactors. About 300 curies of radiostrontium were released into streams in the late 50s and 60s, primarily from leaking fuel elements in reactor storage basins. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 400 Ci were released to seepage basins. A much smaller quantity, about 2 Ci, was released to the atmosphere. The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 6.2 mrem (atmospheric) and 1.4 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Radiostrontium releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

Carlton, W.H.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Strom, R.N.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In 1998, a total of 2,291 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated by nuclear power worldwide, providing 16 percent of the worldÂ’s total generation[1]. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear energy for electricity varies greatly. Nine countries met at least 40 percent of total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. Figure 68. Nuclear Shares of National Electricity Generation, 1998 [Sources] The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of

256

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

257

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

258

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nuclear Science  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

260

Nuclear reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Much reference has been made in the last chapter to nuclear energy levels and their various properties (e.g ... ways of doing this — the use of nuclear reactions, and studies of how excited nuclei...

R. J. Blin-Stoyle FRS

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

nuclear security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3%2A en Shaping the future of nuclear detection http:nnsa.energy.govblogshaping-future-nuclear-detection

262

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

263

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

264

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

265

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

266

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

267

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

268

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

269

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

270

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

271

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

272

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

273

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

274

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

275

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

276

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

277

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

278

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

279

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

280

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

282

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

283

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

284

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

285

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

286

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

287

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

288

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

289

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

290

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

291

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

292

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

293

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

294

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

295

Nuclear Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR - Your article (Nature 365, 599; 1993) on the US-Ukraine stalemate over nuclear weapons prompts the following remarks. The United States made a mistake ... nuclear weapons prompts the following remarks. The United States made a mistake in not recognizing Ukraine as a legitimate successor state to the Soviet nuclear arsenal and is still insisting that ...

Arno Arrak

1994-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

296

Assessment of plutonium in the Savannah River Site environment. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fifth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. These are living documents, each to be revised and updated on a two-year schedule. This document describes the sources of plutonium in the environment, its release from SRS, environmental transport and ecological concentration of plutonium, and the radiological impact of SRS releases to the environment. Plutonium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite SNAP 9-A, plane crashes involving nuclear weapons, and small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants. Plutonium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors and released in small quantities during the processing of fuel and targets in chemical separations facilities. Approximately 0.6 Ci of plutonium was released into streams and about 12 Ci was released to seepage basins, where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A smaller quantity, about 3.8 Ci, was released to the atmosphere. Virtually all releases have occurred in F- and H-Area separation facilities. Plutonium concentration and transport mechanisms for the atmosphere, surface water, and ground water releases have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases to the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by a total dose of 15 mrem (atmospheric) and 0.18 mrem (liquid), compared with the dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time (1954--1989). Plutonium releases from SRS facilities have resulted in a negligible impact to the environment and the population it supports.

Carlton, W.H.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nuclear Engineer (Nuclear Safety Specialist)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate of this position will serve as a Nuclear Engineer (Nuclear Safety Specialist) responsible for day-to-day technical monitoring, and evaluation of aspects of authorization...

298

Beta Dosimetry at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......function of gamma dose and energy of the beta rays. Measurements...radiation and effective beta energy obtained in the working environment at nuclear power plants during the shut-down...decommissioning. The effective beta energy is most frequently between......

P. Carný; M. Lieskovsky

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

It is the policy of the Department of Energy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Cancels SEN-35-91.

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nuclear Deterrence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Charlie McMillan, Director: "For the last 70 years there has not been a world war, and I have to think that our strong deterrent has something to do with that fact." Mission nuclear weapons Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:06 Director McMillan on nuclear deterrence While the role and prominence of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

In vitro nuclear interactome of the HIV-1 Tat protein  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our approach resulted in the identification of a total of 183 candidates as Tat nuclear partners, 90% of which have not...in silico analysis, to validate and characterise our dataset which revealed that the Tat nuclear

Virginie W Gautier; Lili Gu; Niaobh O'Donoghue; Stephen Pennington…

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Nuclear Energy-Depend On It Helping  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy-Depend On It Helping to Power America for More Than Five Decades Past, Present, and Future ... The United States introduced nuclear energy into our domestic electricity production in 1957 and now produces approximately 20 percent of our total electricity and 70 percent of our low-carbon electricity from nuclear energy, according to the Energy Information Administration. More than 100 U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors provide reliable, affordable electricity in 31 states. Nuclear energy can help meet our Nation's need for dependable electricity into the future. The use of nuclear power is increasing around the world: z 29 countries worldwide operate a total of 437 nuclear reactors for electricity generation, with 55 new nuclear reactors under construction in 14 countries.

303

The virtual digital nuclear power plant: A modern tool for supporting the lifecycle of VVER-based nuclear power units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article describes the “Virtual Digital VVER-Based Nuclear Power Plant” computerized system comprising a totality of verified ... a model intended for describing the behavior of nuclear power plant (NPP) syste...

G. V. Arkadov; A. P. Zhukavin; A. E. Kroshilin; I. A. Parshikov…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nuclear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Nuclear Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 82. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity Table 96. Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Table 97. Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, nuclear power capacity increases from 101.0 gigawatts in 2009 to 110.5 gigawatts in 2035 (Figure 82), including 3.8 gigawatts of expansion at existing plants and 6.3 gigawatts of new capacity. The new capacity includes completion of a second unit at the Watts Bar site, where construction on a partially completed plant has

305

Fusion of Incomplete Sensor Data for Mobile Robot Environment Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and inspection of haz- ardous or inhospitable environments (e.g. the reactor of a nuclear power plant applications. For example, virtual exploration of remote locations, either for safety, automatic rescue

306

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

307

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

308

Ecology and environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and environment Essentials Courses MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment (research placement) BSc (Hons) in Ecology and Environment Foundation year for UK for the MSci in Ecology and Environment (research placement): AAA Typical A level offer range for the other

Sussex, University of

309

Section 44 - Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The category entitled Environment refers to the impact on the natural world of energy use in all forms. This section is complemented by two others, Ecology and Health and Safety, both of which focus on effects on organismal life rather than the physical environment. Ecology deals with energy effects on nonhuman organisms and Health and Safety covers effects on humans. Energy use did affect the environment to some extent in the preindustrial era through the clearing of forests for wood fuel, and through the urban air pollution resulting from burning of this fuel for processes such as ironmaking and brewing. However, it was not until the Industrial Revolution created an intensive demand for fuel to power engines and machines that the natural world was greatly impacted by energy use. This realization of human impact on the environment was associated with the Industrial Revolution because prior to that the concept of “Nature” as an entity distinct from civilization was not fully developed. When the landscape of Europe and North America began to be transformed on a large scale by industry in the 1800s, this created public awareness that the natural world was being degraded and diminished. The English novelist Charles Dickens wrote in 1840 that in the London of a half century earlier, “Nature was not so far removed, or hard to get at, as in these days.” In addition to the fundamental idea of Nature as an entity in itself, the 19th century saw the establishment of various other concepts of modern environmental science, such as the heat island effect, the phenomenon of acid rain, the fact of anthropomorphic influence on the physical landscape, and the role of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas. Also occurring during this period were the first study of environmental problems, the first formal pollution control measures, the beginnings of the practice of recycling, and the founding of the first environmental advocacy organization (Sierra Club). The development of motor vehicle transportation in the twentieth century brought with it major environmental impacts through air pollution from engine exhaust. This came to a crisis point in the postwar era with major smog events in urban areas such as London and Los Angeles. Disposal of nuclear wastes also became an issue during this time, and remains so today. The 1960s saw the first major commercial oil spill, one of numerous such events to occur since the industry began to use huge supertankers to transport oil from distant sites. Coal mining, always associated with environmental impact since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, became even more significant in this respect in the late twentieth century, through the controversial practice of mountaintop removal mining. In today’s world fossil fuel sources that involve relatively little intrusion on the environment have been depleted, and the energy industry has been required to turn to other resources that are more difficult to extract and thus require more intrusive techniques; e.g., the use of fracking (hydraulic fracturing) to remove natural gas from rock formations far below the Earth’s surface. Increased use of alternative energy sources will reduce the environmental impact associated with fossil fuels, but the challenge is how to maintain a balance between supplying society’s vast energy needs and maintaining the quality of the natural environment.

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A Safer Nuclear Enterprise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2012 at the Nuclear Security...leadership in nuclear enterprise...multinational assessment of emerging risks and consequences...to assess nuclear risks in...or nuclear terrorism. States...and nuclear power. Since 1945...nuclear power plant can mean...

Sidney D. Drell; George P. Shultz; Steven P. Andreasen

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nuclear astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

Haxton, W.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Nuclear astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

Haxton, W.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nuclear Counterterrorism  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Cancels DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

315

Nuclear Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Power ... THIS WEEK’S issue contains six letters on nuclear power, a representative sample of the letters C&EN received in response to the editorial, “Resist Hysteria,” I wrote shortly after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan devastated the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (C&EN, March 21, page 5). ... Four of the six letters take sharp issue with the primary point I made in the editorial, which was that, despite the severity of the situation in Japan, nuclear power remains an essential component of our overall energy mix for the near to mid-term because it will help us avert the worst impacts of global climate disruption. ...

RUDY M. BAUM

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

NUCLEAR STUDIES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Japanese nuclear power plant crisis sparks examination of U.S. REACTORS ... Calls are particularly zeroing in on reactors similar in location and design to those in Japan. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

317

Primer on nuclear exchange models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basic physics is applied to nuclear force exchange models between two nations. Ultimately, this scenario approach can be used to try and answer the age old question of 'how much is enough?' This work is based on Chapter 2 of Physics of Societal Issues: Calculations on National Security, Environment and Energy (Springer, 2007 and 2014)

Hafemeister, David [Physics Department, Cal Poly University, San Luis Obispo, California (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

318

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

319

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

320

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

322

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

June 2010, Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Nuclear Safety, Quality Assurance and Environment Information Notice June 2010 1 BACKGROUND & PURPOSE: On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009-1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. This recommendation focused on the need for clear direction on use of quantitative risk assessments in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently analyzing directives, standards, training, and other tools that may support more effective development and use of

324

Nuclear radiation electronic gear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear ... Examines the line of nuclear radiation instrumentation offered by Nuclear-Chicago Corporation and Victoreen Instrument Company. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Nuclear Weapons Journal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal x The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2,...

326

Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forces and Nuclear Systems Forces and Nuclear Systems Our goal is to achieve a description of nuclear systems ranging in size from the deuteron to nuclear matter and neutron stars using a single parameterization of the nuclear forces. Our work includes both the construction of two- and three-nucleon potentials and the development of many-body techniques for computing nuclear properties with these interactions. Detailed quantitative, computationally intense studies are essential parts of this work. In the last decade we have constructed several realistic two- and three-nucleon potential models. The NN potential, Argonne v18, has a dominant charge-independent piece plus additional charge-dependent and charge-symmetry-breaking terms, including a complete electromagnetic interaction. It fits 4301 pp and np elastic scattering data with a chi**2

327

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

328

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

329

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

330

Nuclear options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... sad if transient commercial expediency led the country to take risks now by adopting nuclear reactor designs from abroad which are in some respects technically less sound than those produced at ... much lower priority. It can be anticipated, however; that although the types of nuclear reactor selected as the best that Britain could build next may be suitable for unit designs ...

G. R. Bainbridge

1974-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Annual Report, December 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is the first annual report of DOE’s Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program, managed by the Office of Nuclear Safety in the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security. The report includes a description of the program and summaries of R&D projects related to DOE (including NNSA) nuclear facility and operational safety.

332

Inexpensive Near-IR Sun Photometer for Measuring Total Column Water Vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An inexpensive two-channel near-IR sun photometer for measuring total atmospheric column water vapor (precipitable water) has been developed for use by the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) environmental science ...

David R. Brooks; Forrest M. Mims III; Richard Roettger

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nuclear Reactor Materials and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor materials and fuels can be classified into six categories: Nuclear fuel materials Nuclear clad materials Nuclear coolant materials Nuclear poison materials Nuclear moderator materials

Dr. James S. Tulenko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program Nuclear Furnace 1 test?reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen?gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

Herbert R. Zweig; Stanley Fischler; William R. Wagner

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

Zweig, H.R.; Fischler, S.; Wagner, W.R. (Rocketdyne Division, Rockwell International Corporation, 6633 Canoga Avenue, P.O. Box 7922, Canoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States))

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

337

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

339

(Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

Haxton, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier than iron, and neutron stars. Big-bang nucleosynthesis is concerned with the formation of elements with A nuclear physics inputs required are few-nucleon reaction cross sections. The nucleosynthesis of heavier elements involves a variety of proton-, alpha-, neutron-, and photon-induced reactions, coupled with radioactive decay. The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities has opened an important new avenue for studying these processes, as many involve radioactive species. Nuclear physics also plays an important role in neutron stars: both the nuclear equation of state and cooling processes involving neutrino emission play a very important role. Recent developments and also the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be highlighted.

Carl R. Brune

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

security | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

342

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing...

343

nuclear navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

navy | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

344

nuclear threat science | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

threat science | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing...

345

Nuclear Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

346

Nuclear Radius and Nuclear Forces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The difference between the radius of the nuclear matter distribution and the nuclear force radius, RN?1.4A13×10-13 cm, for heavy nuclei (A>100) is interpreted as a consequence of the finite range of nuclear forces. Assuming that the nuclear matter distribution coincides with the charge distribution as determined at Stanford (RC=1.12A13×10-13 cm is the distance at which the charge density falls to one half value) we sum up the nuclear interactions of an incident nucleon for various proposed internucleon potentials, V(r). We also evaluate contributions from the spin, charge, and matter polarizations induced in the nuclear distributions by the incident nucleon as a test of the convergence of these calculations. The aim here is to infer some features of nuclear forces which satisfy saturation requirements and at the same time give rise to an appreciable nuclear attraction for an incident nucleon at RN. Analyses of the scattering of neutrons and protons by heavy nuclei suggest a nuclear attraction ?14 Mev at a distance RN.These considerations are primarily sensitive to the long range behavior of the direct, central part of V(r). The key point which emerges from them is that the nuclear forces must contain long range (~ meson Compton wavelength) direct, central attractions which will be felt by an incident nucleon at RN before the shorter range repulsions (hard cores, many-body forces, or exchange interactions), which are responsible for saturation, become effective. Such interactions can be constructed phenomenologically, but are not found in recent meson-theoretically deduced potentials.

S. D. Drell

1955-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

348

Nuclear condensation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work draws an analogy between a heated nucleus breaking up into clusters and a liquid undergoing a phase transition to a gas in which droplets appear. The critical temperature and density in the nucleus are investigated using a Skyrme effective interaction and finite temperature Hartree-Fock theory. The energy and pressure as a function of density are calculated. The effects of compressibility, effective mass, and binding energy per particle on the critical temperature and critical density of nuclear systems is developed. In some cases, analytic expressions for these quantities can be obtained.NUCLEAR REACTIONS Phase transitions in hot nuclear matter.

H. Jaqaman; A. Z. Mekjian; L. Zamick

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Nuclear War  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several chapters in Last Aid warrant the attention of the medical profession. What is known and not known about acute biologic effects following a nuclear explosion is described. The social, physical, and environmental impact of nuclear war on urban population centers is described. How nuclear weapons could affect the composition of the ozone layer and the effects this could have on human survival, including possible interruption of the aquatic ecosystem to produce single-cell organisms for the food cycle, especially seafood is noted.

MacLeod, G.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

352

Contact Us | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration The National Nuclear Security Administration Contact Us Home > Field Offices > Welcome to the Sandia Field Office > Contact Us Contact Us If you have questions about activities at the Sandia Field Office, please contact the SFO Public Affairs Director at (505) 845-5264. Our mailing address is: U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Sandia Field Office, P.O. Box 5400, Albuquerque, NM 87185. Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr General Information About SFO Contact Us Contract Administration & Business Management Emergency Information Facilities & Projects Nuclear Operations Environment, Safety & Health Public Affairs Safeguards & Security Performance and Quality Assurance

353

Nuclear Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear medicine is the branch of medicine that is concerned with the use of in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of disease. It usually uses small amounts of radioactive materials or , substances th...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Nuclear viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The decay rate of momentum in a nuclear reaction is given by an exact formula expressed in terms of the T matrix. A special case, where a viscosity coefficient can be estimated, is considered.

B. Giraud; J. Le Tourneux; E. Osnes

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Nuclear Golf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadcast Transcript: Pay no attention to that nuclear warhead behind the 18th hole; just shout "Fore!" and drive your Titleist down the fairway. In a development that is bizarre even by North Korean standards, the country ...

Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nuclear Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The core of a nuclear reactor is composed of a controlled critical configuration of a fissile material, which in strict a sense is the fuel. This fissile material is contained in a matrix, normally a ceramic c...

Rudy J. M. Konings; Thierry Wiss…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nuclear Energy!  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

driver, see the Nuclear Clean Air Energy race car and receive a special clean energy patch on October 21 from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Space is limited RSVP by October 4 Hands-on...

359

Nuclear forces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

Machleidt, R. [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nuclear Physics for Nuclear Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear fusion data for deuteron-triton resonance near 100 keV are found to be consistent with the selective resonant tunneling model. The feature of this selective resonant tunneling is the selectivity. It selects not only the energy level, but also the damping rate (nuclear reaction rate). When the Coulomb barrier is thin and low, the resonance selects the fast reaction channel; however, when the Coulomb barrier is thick and high, the resonance selects the slow reaction channel. This mechanism might open an approach toward fusion energy with no strong nuclear radiation.

Li Xingzhong [Tsinghua University (China)

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

363

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas profile Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

364

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

365

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

366

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

367

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism Home > Our Mission > Countering Nuclear Terrorism Countering Nuclear Terrorism NNSA provides expertise, practical tools, and technically informed policy

368

Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations - Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Reports Review Reports 2010 Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, October 2010 Site Visit Report - Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility, June 2010 Independent Oversight Inspection of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, June 2010 Site Visit Report - Review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Fire Protection Design Review Process, May 2010 Independent Oversight Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, May 2010 Independent Oversight Focus Area Review of Specific Administrative Controls at DOE Nuclear Facilities, April 2010

369

Evaluation of Indian input to the international nuclear information system database  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study is aimed at analysing the INIS bibliographic records of publications in India during the period 2000-2008. The analysis includes the inputting trend, time-lag, contributing journals, country collaboration, content analysis through the classification and keywords. India has a total number of 14,697 records input to the database with an yearly average of 1631 records. The timeliness of input is very noteworthy as 29.15% of all articles are input in the same publication year, 52.57% articles are of only one year delay in inputting. Pramana, Journal of Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Environment are found as the most contributed Indian journals. Scientists from USA, Germany, Japan, etc., are the main contributors. Nuclear physics and radiation physics, specific nuclear reactors and associated plants, particle accelerators, inorganic, organic, physical and analytical chemistry, etc., are main areas of the Indian input.

Anil Kumar; E.R. Prakasan; Sandeep Kadam; Nita Bhaskar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

371

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

372

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

373

Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV`s) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG and G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin).

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nuclear excitation energy in muon capture: A reply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The parametrization of total muon capture rates in terms of a mean nuclear excitation energy E¯?, recently proposed by Christillin, Dellafiore, and Rosa-Clot, is reexamined in view of recent criticisms. The previously obtained results are reconfirmed.NUCLEAR REACTIONS ?-+A(N, Z)??+A(N+1, Z-1); muon capture; closure approximation; mean nuclear excitation energies.

P. Christillin, A. Dellafiore, and M. Rosa-Clot

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Method to Improve Total Dose Radiation Hardness in a CMOS dc-dc Boost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a wide range of radiation environment, with increasing total dose radiation, The efticieney also greatlyMethod to Improve Total Dose Radiation Hardness in a CMOS dc-dc Boost Converter Huadian Pan to natural radiation in space. Among the effects of ionizing radiation are shiftsin threshold voltageand

Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

376

Sensitivity of UO2 Stability in a Reducing Environment on Radiolysis Model Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results for a radiolysis model sensitivity study of radiolytically produced H2O2 are presented as they relate to Spent (or Used) Light Water Reactor uranium oxide (UO2) nuclear fuel (UNF) oxidation in a low oxygen environment. The model builds on previous reaction kinetic studies to represent the radiolytic processes occurring at the nuclear fuel surface. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the dominant oxidant for spent nuclear fuel in an O2-depleted water environment.

Wittman, Richard S.; Buck, Edgar C.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Global nuclear-structure calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The revival of interest in nuclear ground-state octupole deformations that occurred in the 1980's was stimulated by observations in 1980 of particularly large deviations between calculated and experimental masses in the Ra region, in a global calculation of nuclear ground-state masses. By minimizing the total potential energy with respect to octupole shape degrees of freedom in addition to {epsilon}{sub 2} and {epsilon}{sub 4} used originally, a vastly improved agreement between calculated and experimental masses was obtained. To study the global behavior and interrelationships between other nuclear properties, we calculate nuclear ground-state masses, spins, pairing gaps and {Beta}-decay and half-lives and compare the results to experimental qualities. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the microscopic contributions calculated in a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential.

Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

1990-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

Chapter 17 - Nuclear heat energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter delves into the important heating processes within a nuclear power plant. Applying Fourier’s law of heat conduction permits determining temperature distributions within the nuclear fuel rods. In contrast, convective cooling occurs on the rod surface. The coolant, cladding and fuel temperature distributions through a reactor are determined. Besides heat transfer in the reactor core, some power plants employ heat exchangers to generate steam that is fed to a turbine-generator to produce electricity. As a consequence of the second law of thermodynamics, thermal power plants reject condenser heat to the environment through mechanisms such as cooling towers.

Raymond L. Murray; Keith E. Holbert

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

380

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nuclear shadowing and ? photoproduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

? photoproduction on complex nuclei is reexamined using a generalized vector dominance model which succesfully predicts the oberved nuclear shadowing in real photoabsorption and deep inelastic scattering. This model is shown to give a good fit to ? photoproduction data on both nucleons and complex nuclei, in which the disagreement between the measured ?-? coupling and the ?-? coupling required by the simple vector dominance model is eliminated. The ?N total cross sections required are similar to those predicted by the additive quark model, and the magnitude of the correction to simple vector dominance is consistent with that inferred from the analysis of real photoabsorption and deep inelastic scattering.

A. Pautz and G. Shaw

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,251",8.0,"9,643",17.7 "Coal","2,526",16.1,"13,629",25.0 "Natural Gas","11,640",74.2,"29,619",54.4 "Other1",4,"*",10,"*" "Other Renewable1",235,1.5,"1,504",2.8 "Petroleum",35,0.2,81,0.1 "Total","15,691",100.0,"54,487",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

383

Iowa Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",601,4.1,"4,451",7.7 "Coal","6,956",47.7,"41,283",71.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",144,1.0,948,1.6 "Natural Gas","2,299",15.8,"1,312",2.3 "Other Renewable1","3,584",24.6,"9,360",16.3 "Petroleum","1,007",6.9,154,0.3 "Total","14,592",100.0,"57,509",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

384

Texas Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,966",4.6,"41,335",10.0 "Coal","22,335",20.6,"150,173",36.5 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",689,0.6,"1,262",0.3 "Natural Gas","69,291",64.0,"186,882",45.4 "Other1",477,0.4,"3,630",0.9 "Other Renewable1","10,295",9.5,"27,705",6.7 "Petroleum",204,0.2,708,0.2 "Total","108,258",100.0,"411,695",100.0

385

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","9,540",20.9,"77,828",33.9 "Coal","18,481",40.6,"110,369",48.0 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","2,268",5.0,"1,624",0.7 "Natural Gas","9,415",20.7,"33,718",14.7 "Other1",100,0.2,"1,396",0.6 "Other Renewable1","1,237",2.7,"4,245",1.8 "Petroleum","4,534",9.9,571,0.2 "Total","45,575",100.0,"229,752",100.0

386

California Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,390",6.5,"32,201",15.8 "Coal",374,0.6,"2,100",1.0 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","13,954",20.7,"33,260",16.3 "Natural Gas","41,370",61.4,"107,522",52.7 "Other1",220,0.3,"2,534",1.2 "Other Renewable1","6,319",9.4,"25,450",12.5 "Petroleum",701,1.0,"1,059",0.5 "Total","67,328",100.0,"204,126",100.0

387

Arizona Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (nw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",3937,14.9,"31,200",27.9 "Coal","6,233",23.6,"43,644",39.1 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","2,937",11.1,"6,831",6.1 "Natural Gas","13,012",49.3,"29,676",26.6 "Other1","-","-",15,"*" "Other Renewable1",181,0.7,319,0.3 "Petroleum",93,0.4,66,0.1 "Total","26,392",100.0,"111,751",100.0

388

Vermont Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",620,55.0,"4,782",72.2 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",324,28.7,"1,347",20.3 "Natural Gas","-","-",4,0.1 "Other Renewable1",84,7.5,482,7.3 "Petroleum",100,8.9,5,0.1 "Total","1,128",100.0,"6,620",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

389

Ohio Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","2,134",6.5,"15,805",11.0 "Coal","21,360",64.6,"117,828",82.1 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",101,0.3,429,0.3 "Natural Gas","8,203",24.8,"7,128",5.0 "Other1",123,0.4,266,0.2 "Other Renewable1",130,0.4,700,0.5 "Petroleum","1,019",3.1,"1,442",1.0 "Total","33,071",100.0,"143,598",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

390

Maryland Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,705",13.6,"13,994",32.1 "Coal","4,886",39.0,"23,668",54.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",590,4.7,"1,667",3.8 "Natural Gas","2,041",16.3,"2,897",6.6 "Other1",152,1.2,485,1.1 "Other Renewable1",209,1.7,574,1.3 "Petroleum","2,933",23.4,322,0.7 "Total","12,516",100.0,"43,607",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

391

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","2,142",8.0,"18,639",18.1 "Coal","3,417",12.8,"23,924",23.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",192,0.7,"1,109",1.1 "Natural Gas","19,574",73.2,"51,344",49.9 "Other1",213,0.8,"2,120",2.1 "Other Renewable1",325,1.2,"2,468",2.4 "Petroleum",881,3.3,"3,281",3.2 "Total","26,744",100.0,"102,885",100.0

392

Illinois Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","11,441",25.9,"96,190",47.8 "Coal","15,551",35.2,"93,611",46.5 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",34,0.1,119,0.1 "Natural Gas","13,771",31.2,"5,724",2.8 "Other1",145,0.3,461,0.2 "Other Renewable1","2,078",4.7,"5,138",2.6 "Petroleum","1,106",2.5,110,0.1 "Total","44,127",100.0,"201,352",100.0

393

Kansas Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,160",9.2,"9,556",19.9 "Coal","5,179",41.3,"32,505",67.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",3,"*",13,"*" "Natural Gas","4,573",36.5,"2,287",4.8 "Other Renewable1","1,079",8.6,"3,459",7.2 "Petroleum",550,4.4,103,0.2 "Total","12,543",100.0,"47,924",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

394

Alabama Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","5,043",15.6,"37,941",24.9 "Coal","11,441",35.3,"63,050",41.4 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","3,272",10.1,"8,704",5.7 "Natural Gas","11,936",36.8,"39,235",25.8 "Other1",100,0.3,643,0.4 "Other Renewable1",583,1.8,"2,377",1.6 "Petroleum",43,0.1,200,0.1 "Total","32,417",100.0,"152,151",100.0

395

Florida Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (nw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","3,924",6.6,"23,936",10.4 "Coal","9,975",16.9,"59,897",26.1 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",55,0.1,177,0.1 "Natural Gas","31,563",53.4,"128,634",56.1 "Other1",544,0.9,"2,842",1.2 "Other Renewable1","1,053",1.8,"4,487",2.0 "Petroleum","12,033",20.3,"9,122",4.0 "Total","59,147",100.0,"229,096",100.0

396

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,835",11.5,"15,023",24.6 "Coal","4,535",28.4,"28,152",46.2 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","1,369",8.6,"3,658",6.0 "Natural Gas","7,894",49.4,"12,469",20.4 "Other1","-","-",28,"*" "Other Renewable1",326,2.0,"1,624",2.7 "Petroleum",22,0.1,45,0.1 "Total","15,981",100.0,"61,000",100.0

397

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","2,103",25.4,"16,750",50.2 "Coal",564,6.8,"2,604",7.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",151,1.8,400,1.2 "Natural Gas","2,292",27.7,"11,716",35.1 "Other1",27,0.3,730,2.2 "Other Renewable1",159,1.9,740,2.2 "Petroleum","2,989",36.1,409,1.2 "Total","8,284",100.0,"33,350",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

398

Missouri Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,190",5.5,"8,996",9.7 "Coal","12,070",55.5,"75,047",81.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","1,221",5.6,"2,427",2.6 "Natural Gas","5,579",25.7,"4,690",5.1 "Other1","-","-",39,"*" "Other Renewable1",466,2.1,988,1.1 "Petroleum","1,212",5.6,126,0.1 "Total","21,739",100.0,"92,313",100.0

399

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","1,245",15.8,"11,054",30.2 "Coal","3,932",50.0,"23,363",63.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",278,3.5,"1,314",3.6 "Natural Gas","1,849",23.5,375,1.0 "Other Renewable1",165,2.1,493,1.3 "Petroleum",387,4.9,31,0.1 "Total","7,857",100.0,"36,630",100.0 "1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable."

400

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, smmer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, smmer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear",685,5.0,"5,918",13.8 "Coal","1,669",12.2,"8,306",19.4 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","1,942",14.2,659,1.5 "Natural Gas","6,063",44.3,"25,582",59.8 "Other1",3,"*",771,1.8 "Other Renewable1",304,2.2,"1,274",3.0 "Petroleum","3,031",22.1,296,0.7 "Total","13,697",100.0,"42,805",100.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Georgia Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","4,061",11.1,"33,512",24.4 "Coal","13,230",36.1,"73,298",53.3 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","3,851",10.5,"3,044",2.2 "Natural Gas","12,668",34.6,"23,884",17.4 "Other1","-","-",18,"*" "Other Renewable1",637,1.7,"3,181",2.3 "Petroleum","2,189",6.0,641,0.5 "Total","36,636",100.0,"137,577",100.0

402

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","3,401",15.9,"27,739",33.7 "Coal","8,805",41.1,"43,670",53.0 "Hydro and Pumped Storage","4,277",20.0,"7,416",9.0 "Natural Gas","4,655",21.7,"2,302",2.8 "Other1","-","-",16,"*" "Other Renewable1",222,1.0,988,1.2 "Petroleum",58,0.3,217,0.3 "Total","21,417",100.0,"82,349",100.0

403

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Environment and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

Galles, David

405

Enterococci in the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...review-article Reviews Enterococci in the Environment Muruleedhara N. Byappanahalli a Meredith...understanding of their ecology in natural environments, as well as their roles as opportunistic...interactions that occur in aquatic environments. Furthermore, the use of single laboratory-grown...

Muruleedhara N. Byappanahalli; Meredith B. Nevers; Asja Korajkic; Zachery R. Staley; Valerie J. Harwood

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

407

The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Collaborating Organizations - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collaborating Organizations Collaborating Organizations Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program Collaborating Organizations Bookmark and Share National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network, coordinated by IAEA, Vienna, Austria Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Group, Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. Nuclear Spectroscopy Group, Department of Nuclear Physics,

409

Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Program Data Program Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program We contribute to the development of comprehensive nuclear reactions and nuclear structure databases, including nuclear data measurement, analysis, modeling and evaluation methodologies, that are implemented in basic science research and advanced nuclear technologies. Bookmark and Share Recent Events Nuclear Structure 2012 Conference Argonne National Laboratory hosted the

410

Nuclear Science & Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

411

NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

Randrup, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs SHARE Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs image Oak Ridge National Laboratory covers the entire spectrum of nuclear nonproliferation work, from...

413

Nuclear Data | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Data SHARE Nuclear Data Nuclear Data ORNL is a recognized, international leader in nuclear data research and development (R&D) to support nuclear applications analyses. For...

414

Nuclear Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Facilities Locator Map Numerical map data points indicate two or more nuclear facilities in the same geographic location. Nuclear...

415

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

60 60 Vermont Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable 1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 - = No data reported. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

416

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

417

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Nebraska Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,363 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,849 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable 1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

418

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee profile Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

419

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

420

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Iowa Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable 1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100.0 Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

422

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20 20 Kansas Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable 1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

423

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Iowa Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable 1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100.0 Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

424

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

425

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20 20 Kansas Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable 1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

426

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

427

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

428

NERSC Modules Software Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment » Modules Environment Environment » Modules Environment Modules Software Environment NERSC uses the module utility to manage nearly all software. There are two huge advantages of the module approach: NERSC can provide many different versions and/or installations of a single software package on a given machine, including a default version as well as several older and newer versions; and Users can easily switch to different versions or installations without having to explicitly specify different paths. With modules, the MANPATH and related environment variables are automatically managed. Users simply ``load'' and ``unload'' modules to control their environment. The module utility consists of two parts: the module command itself and the modulefiles on which it operates. Module Command

429

Thermodynamics of a desalination system at nuclear power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power engineering is developing steadily in industrial countries. This is caused by features of using nuclear fuel and high environmental safety of nuclear power stations. At the same time, the thermodynamic efficiency of nuclear power stations is lower than indices of thermal power stations operating on gas, coal or oil fuel. This efficiency does not usually exceed 30â??35%. Hence more than 60% of the energy of nuclear fuel being used escapes into the environment through turbine condensers at nuclear power stations. Cogeneration turbines that reduce heat loss by 20â??30% are used at thermal power stations for efficiency upgrading. However, cogeneration schemes have not found wide utility at nuclear power stations due to safety conditions. Thus, it is possible to use, in addition, a major part of nuclear fuel energy for desalination at nuclear power stations located on the coast. In this case, some main problems are solved: production of fresh water consumed by nuclear power station for technological purposes and sold to external consumers; upgrading of effectiveness of using nuclear fuel including the cost of steady operation of nuclear power stations at high loads; reduction of non-productive thermal pollutants from nuclear power stations into the environment. It is required to provide maximum upgrading of power station heat efficiency and high capacity of distillers when connecting desalination installations to the thermal scheme of nuclear power stations. The use of energy of the heat carrier's low-temperature flows being emitted by turbine condensers into the environment is of particular value. In this case, different thermodynamic analysis methods are used for the justification of optimal engineering solutions In the article under consideration some results of research of thermodynamics of cycles of nuclear power stations where thermal schemes includes different types of thermal desalination installations are given. From the analysis of thermodynamic processes carried out at nuclear power stations, recommendations related to improvement of desalination installations' thermal schemes providing power system efficiency upgrading have been obtained.

V.V. Slesarenko

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

431

National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

None

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nuclear “waffles”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and inside neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases, often referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts.

A. S. Schneider; D. K. Berry; C. M. Briggs; M. E. Caplan; C. J. Horowitz

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

434

Nuclear cheap?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... account of the fact that if there had been no nuclear contribution the additional fossil fuel supplies would have had to come from expanded output at the marginal and most expensive ... a perfectly proper accountancy basis, including allowance for costs yet to be incurred, the price we would be paying for electricity would be higher now had fossil stations been preferred ...

P.M.S. JONES

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nuclear electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... p.344-6) and referred to in my letter of 23 October. The retail price index (RPI) has been used to correct for inflation and a uniform interest rate ... as given by historic costs, and if a previously unconsidered effect of inflation on nuclear fuel costs is included, the margin becomes 34 per cent above that for coal.

J.W. JEFFERY

1981-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

436

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculations for them.

H. Ejiri; A. I. Titov; M. Boswell; A. Young

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

437

Nuclear Power Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Onofre Nuclear Generating Station San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Bob Ashe-Everest Southern California Edison 10 Incoming New Fuel Inspecting New Fuel SONGS Unit 1 Fuel Storage SONGS Unit 1 Fuel Storage History History u Shipped 270 Fuel Assemblies (F/A) from Unit 1 to Morris, Illinois. u Transshipped 70 U1 F/As to U2 spent fuel pool (SFP). u Transshipped 118 U1 F/As to U3 SFP. SONGS ISFSI Loading SONGS ISFSI Loading u Moved 5 dry shielded canisters (DSC) from U3 SFP to the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Each DSC contains up to 24 F/As. u Moved 9 DSCs from U1 SFP to the ISFSI. u At total of 325 U1 F/As have been moved into dry storage to date. u Scheduled to move 3 DSCs from U2 SFP to the ISFSI May 2005. Canister into Cask FA being loaded into canister

438

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on programs and performance in protecting our workers, the public and environment from radiological hazards with a focus on hazardous nuclear facilities and operations. This information provides assurance to our stakeholders and identifies areas for improvement to our leadership to support the safe performance of the Department’s mission.

439

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

440

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use Level 2 proficiency in performing and interpreting cardiac nuclear imaging tests. Progression

Ford, James

442

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Forensics Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security

443

Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions | Argonne Leadership...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the production Automatic Dynamic Load Balancing (ADLB) library on the BGP. Steve Pieper, Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions PI Name: James Vary PI...

444

Audit Report National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons Systems Configuration Management DOEIG-0902 March 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of...

445

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to learn MCNPX and nuclear safeguards, Bill B. , Steve K. ,Introduction 1.1 Nuclear Safeguards . . . . . . . . . . . .Programme to IAEA Safeguards. STUK-YTO-TR 170. Helsinki

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

447

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

448

Theory of nuclear reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book presents a theory of nuclear reaction. An account is given of the nonrelativistic nuclear reaction theory. The R - matrix description of nuclear reactions is considered and the dispersion method is formulated. Mechanisms of nuclear reactions and their relationship are studied in detail. Attention is paid to nuclear reactions involving the compound nuclear formation and to direct nuclear processes. The optical model the diffraction approach and high - energy diffraction nuclear processes involving composite particles are discussed.

Sitenko, A.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

STAR Test Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment These instructions describe how to set up the STAR environment independent of the production environment in order to test different installations in $OPTSTAR and $GROUP_DIR. If you want to modify those installations you will need access to the starofl account. Bypass STAR envionment login Edit your ~/.pdsf_setup file changing the STAR_LINUX_SETUP to "use_none" and start a new session. You should not see all the STAR environmental variables defined when you do this (and it will probably be much quicker than usual, too). Do a manual STAR login If you want to modify what test environment you use copy the test login scripts to your own working area: cp -r /common/star/startest /path/to/myworkdir/. If you don't want to modify these files you can source them directly from

450

Energy/Environment/Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

//NESTECNESTEC Nobuo NakaharaNobuo Nakahara ICEBO/APCBCAsia Pacific Conference on Building Commissioning 2006.11.7 Opening AddressOpening AddressEnergy/Environment/CommissioningEnergy/Environment/Commissioning Call for Call... Commissioning PrincipleCommissioning Principle Evaluation PrincipleEvaluation Principle How Building & Urban Energy System How Building & Urban Energy System shall be completed and maintained?shall be completed and maintained? Mechanism of Urban Environment...

Nakahara, N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Statement of Dr. Peter Lyons, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Peter Lyons, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy Energy and Commerce Committee U.S. House of...

452

Accelerating Innovation: How Nuclear Physics Benefits Us All  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Innovation has been accelerated by nuclear physics in the areas of improving our health; making the world safer; electricity, environment, archaeology; better computers; contributions to industry; and training the next generation of innovators.

2011-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

453

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

454

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

455

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

456

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

457

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

458

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

459

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

460

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

462

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

463

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

464

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

465

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

466

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

467

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

468

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

469

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

470

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

471

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

472

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

473

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

474

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

475

Indoor Environment Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment Group Indoor Environment Group The Indoor Environment Group performs research that aims to maintain healthy and productive indoor environments while buildings are made more energy efficient. We study the links between indoor environmental quality, building ventilation, building energy efficiency and occupants' health, performance and comfort. We undertake experiments in laboratory and field settings and employ modeling to characterize indoor environmental conditions and evaluate the fate, transport and chemical transformations of indoor pollutants. We elucidate pathways of pollutant exposure, evaluate and develop energy efficient means of controlling indoor environmental quality, and provide input for related guidelines and standards. Contacts William Fisk WJFisk@lbl.gov (510) 486-5910

476

Climate Change, Drought & Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

477

Modeling the indoor environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling the indoor environment ... Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research2007 46 (23), 7489-7496 ... Environmental Science & Technology2007 41 (6), 2028-2035 ...

Barbara S. Austin; Stanley M. Greenfield; Bruce R. Weir; Gerald E. Anderson; Joseph V. Behar

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Virtual Control System Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Control System Environment Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin...

479

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. NDP-052 (1995) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-052 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-052 image Contributed by Marilyn F. Lamb and Richard A. Feely Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Seattle, Washington and Lloyd Moore and Donald K. Atwood Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Miami, Florida Prepared by Alexander Kozyr* Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. *Energy, Environment, and Resources Center The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4420 Date Published: September 1995

480

Does Dissipation in AGN Disks Couple to the Total Pressure?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent work on the transport of angular momentum in accretion disks suggests that the Velikhov-Chandrasekhar instability, in which a large scale magnetic field generates small scale eddys in a shearing environment, may be ultimately responsible for this process. Although there is considerable controversy about the origin and maintenance of this field in accretion disks, it turns out that it is possible to argue, quite generally, using scaling arguments, that this process is sensitive to the total pressure in an AGN disk, rather than the pressure contributed by gas alone. We conclude that the resolution of the conceptual difficulties implied by the presence of strong thermal and viscous instabilities in radiation pressure and electron scattering dominated does not lie in models that couple the total dissipation rate to the gas pressure alone, or to some weighted mean of the gas and radiation pressures.

E. T. Vishniac

1993-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear environment total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

482

Nuclear Structure and Simple Nuclear Reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently it has become increasingly evident that some assumptions in the nuclear model used for the Monte Carlo calculations yield cross section values which are not in accord with experiment. In particular, calculations of (p, pn)-reaction cross sections in the Bev energy range give values which are low by factors of two to nine when compared to experimental values. The calculated cross sections also show a smooth variation with the target atomic weight whereas the experimental values show quite an erratic variation. Reasons which have been advanced to account for this lack of agreement are the lack of a nuclear surface and failure to account for shell effects in the nuclear model used.In this work a theory is developed to take account of surface and shell effects and thereby describe the observed magnitude and variation of the cross sections for simple nuclear reactions as exemplified by the (p, pn) reaction. At multi-Bev energies to which this treatment is restricted, the main contribution to the (p, pn)-reaction cross section comes from inelastic collisions between the incident protons and target neutrons, with all the p-n collision products escaping without further interaction. Approximations and assumptions used include the impulse approximation, 0° lab scattering angle for the inelastic p-n collision products, classical trajectories for the incident and scattered particles, and a quantum-mechanical treatment for the target nucleons. The multi-Bev, n-p, cloud-chamber data was used to determine the average total exit cross section for the inelastically scattered particles. The only neutron shells in the target nucleus contributing to the (p, pn) reaction are those for which the instantaneous knocking out of a neutron creates a product-neutron hole state stable to particle emission. The combination of these assumptions gives integral expressions which, when evaluated on the IBM-701 computer for the independent particle harmonic-oscillator shell model, give the (p, pn) reaction cross sections as a function of the nuclear density distribution and the number of available shells.For the low Z nuclei where the available shells can be unambiguously determined, the results give a half-central-density radius parameter, r0, (r0=R12A13), of about 1.2 fermis compared to 1.03 fermis for the charge half radius from the electron-scattering work. Use of reasonable limits on the value of r0 allows one to set the minimum number of shells available for some targets. For example, the Zn64, Cu65, and Cu63 (p, pn) cross sections require that a large part or all the 1f72 neutrons be available, or, equivalently, that a 1f72 neutron hole state (across a major shell) in the product nucleus have less than 8- to 9-Mev excitation energy. The results also show that the energy associated with nuclear rearrangement to particle-stable product states must be less than 8 to 9 Mev. In several cases, the upper limit can be lowered considerably (to 1.5 Mev and 0 Mev in the cases of O16 and N14, respectively).

Paul A. Benioff

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

484

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

485

The Future of Energy from Nuclear Fission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is an important part of our current global energy system, and contributes to supplying the significant demand for electricity for many nations around the world. There are 433 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries with an installed capacity of 367 GWe as of October 2011 (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Nuclear electricity generation totaled 2630 TWh in 2010 representing 14% the world’s electricity generation. The top five countries of total installed nuclear capacity are the US, France, Japan, Russia and South Korea at 102, 63, 45, 24, and 21 GWe, respectively (WNA, 2012a). The nuclear capacity of these five countries represents more than half, 68%, of the total global nuclear capacity. The role of nuclear power in the global energy system today has been motivated by several factors including the growing demand for electric power, the regional availability of fossil resources and energy security concerns, and the relative competitiveness of nuclear power as a source of base-load electricity. There is additional motivation for the use of nuclear power because it does not produce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or local air pollutants during its operation and contributes to low levels of emissions throughout the lifecycle of the nuclear energy system (Beerten, J. et. al., 2009). Energy from nuclear fission primarily in the form of electric power and potentially as a source of industrial heat could play a greater role for meeting the long-term growing demand for energy worldwide while addressing the concern for climate change from rising GHG emissions. However, the nature of nuclear fission as a tremendously compact and dense form of energy production with associated high concentrations of radioactive materials has particular and unique challenges as well as benefits. These challenges include not only the safety and cost of nuclear reactors, but proliferation concerns, safeguard and storage of nuclear materials associated with nuclear fuel cycles. In March of 2011, an unprecedented earthquake of 9 magnitude and ensuing tsunami off the east coast of Japan caused a severe nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan (Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 2011). The severity of the nuclear accident in Japan has brought about a reinvestigation of nuclear energy policy and deployment activities for many nations around the world, most notably in Japan and Germany (BBC, 2011; Reuter, 2011). The response to the accident has been mixed and its full impact may not be realized for many years to come. The nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan has not directly affected the significant on-going nuclear deployment activities in many countries. China, Russia, India, and South Korea, as well as others, are continuing with their deployment plans. As of October 2011, China had the most reactors under construction at 27, while Russia, India, and South Korea had 11, 6, and 5 reactors under construction, respectively (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Ten other nations have one or two reactors currently under construction. Many more reactors are planned for future deployment in China, Russia, and India, as well as in the US. Based on the World Nuclear Association’s data, the realization of China’s deployment plan implies that China will surpass the US in total nuclear capacity some time in the future.

Kim, Son H.; Taiwo, Temitope

2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

486

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Massachusetts Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable 1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

487

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Mississippi Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable 1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 81 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

488

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Illinois Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable 1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

489

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

63 63 Wisconsin Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable 1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

490

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Georgia Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.4 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 53.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.2 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 17.4 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable 1 637 1.7 3,181 2.3 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 137,577 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1

491

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Tennessee Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable 1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

492

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Arizona Total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable 1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

493

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Illinois Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable 1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

494

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable 1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

495

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

48 48 Pennsylvania Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable 1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

496

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other 1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable 1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

497

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

41 41 New Jersey New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by source, 2010 Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable 1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

498

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Michigan Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable 1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

499

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Ohio Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable 1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

500

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Missouri Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable 1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal