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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants projected electricity

2

THE BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY The first time that electricity was generated from nuclear energy occurred in an experimental breeder reactor in Idaho in 1951. The idea for a breeder reactor (a reactor that could produce more fuel than it uses) first occurred to scientists working on the nation's wartime atomic energy program in the early 1940's. Experimental evidence indicated that the breeding of nuclear fuel was possible in a properly designed reactor, but time and resources were not then available to pursue the idea After the war, the newly established Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy) assigned some of the nation's nuclear skills and resources to developing peaceful uses of the atom. The large bodies of uranium ore found in the 1950's were

3

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate? ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

4

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants ...

5

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: July 25, 2013 Data for : May 2013 Next Release: August 2013 Contacts: Michael Mobilia Phone: 202-287-6318 E-mail:...

6

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

7

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables (Information and data on nuclear power reactors Generation: by State and Reactor. Annual Energy Review, ...

8

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (kWh). There were 65 nuclear power plants with 104 operating nuclear reactors that generated a total of 790 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh), ...

9

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Clearance and Tagging Guideline for Nuclear Electric Generating Stations, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clearance and tagging programs at nuclear electric generating facilities serve to protect personnel from injury and to protect equipment from damage. These programs are thus of vital importance from both a worker safety standpoint and an operations and maintenance cost standpoint. This guideline presents a clearance and tagging approach, developed with broad industry input, that nuclear electric generating companies can use as a basis for comparison with their own programs.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Potential growth of nuclear and coal electricity generation in the US  

SciTech Connect

Electricity demand should continue to grow at about the same rate as GNP, creating a need for large amounts of new generating capacity over the next fifty years. Only coal and nuclear at this time have the abundant domestic resources and assured technology to meet this need. However, large increase in both coal and nuclear usage will require solutions to many of the problems that now deter their increased usage. For coal, the problems center around the safety and environmental impacts of increased coal mining and coal combustion. For nuclear, the problems center around reactor safety, radioactive waste disposal, financial risk, and nuclear materials safeguards. This report assesses the impacts associated with a range of projected growth rates in electricity demand over the next 50 years. The resource requirements and waste generation resulting from pursuing the coal and nuclear fuel options to meet the projected growth rates are estimated. The fuel requirements and waste generation for coal plants are orders of magnitude greater than for nuclear. Improvements in technology and waste management practices must be pursued to mitigate environmental and safety concerns about electricity generation from both options. 34 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

Bloomster, C.H.; Merrill, E.T.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Temporary Grounding and Bonding Practices in Nuclear Electric Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correct written temporary grounding practices inside generating stations are an important industrial safety issue, as well as an important plant status control issue. An extraordinary amount of regulations, standards, and information is available for temporary grounding practices in transmission and delivery (T&D), but very little is written about inside plant practices.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market  

SciTech Connect

Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated electric plant. Depending on the process heat temperature and power needs, up to 80 % of the nuclear heat is converted into useful power. An important feature of the design is the standardization of the heat source, as independent as possible of the process heat application. This should expedite licensing. The essential conditions for success include: 1. Timely adapted licensing process and regulations, codes and standards for such application and design; 2. An industry oriented R and D program to meet the technological challenges making the best use of the international collaboration. Gen IV could be the vector; 3. Identification of an end user (or a consortium of) willing to fund a FOAK. (authors)

Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel [AREVA, 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, Virginia, 24506 (United States); Carre, Franck [CEA, Saclay (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation,...

22

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 1. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of a project on the health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. In addition to presenting an executive summary of the project, it sets forth the main results of the four tasks of the project: to review the health impacts (and related standards) of these forms of power generation, to review the status of standards related to plant safety (with an emphasis on nuclear power), to consider the role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission in selection of standards, and to set forth methodologies whereby that Commission may review the health and safety aspects of proposed sites and facilities.

Nero, A.V. Jr.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

25

Biomass for Electricity Generation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

Zia Haq

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Electrical generating plant availability  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of actions that can improve availability, including the following: the meaning of power plant availability; The organization of the electric power industry; some general considerations of availability; the improvement of power plant availability--design factors, control of shipping and construction, maintenance, operating practices; sources of statistics on generating plant availability; effects of reducing forced outage rates; and comments by electric utilities on generating unit availability.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Investment in nuclear generation in a restricted electricity market : an analysis of risks and financing options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the late 1970s, the US electric power industry has been undergoing major changes. The electric utility industry had mainly consisted of highly regulated, vertically integrated, local monopolies, providing customers ...

Berger, Raphael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Risk perception & strategic decision making :general insights, a framework, and specific application to electricity generation using nuclear energy.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to promote increased understanding of decision making processes and hopefully to enable improved decision making regarding high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological systems. This report brings together insights regarding risk perception and decision making across domains ranging from nuclear power technology safety, cognitive psychology, economics, science education, public policy, and neural science (to name a few). It forms them into a unique, coherent, concise framework, and list of strategies to aid in decision making. It is suggested that all decision makers, whether ordinary citizens, academics, or political leaders, ought to cultivate their abilities to separate the wheat from the chaff in these types of decision making instances. The wheat includes proper data sources and helpful human decision making heuristics; these should be sought. The chaff includes ''unhelpful biases'' that hinder proper interpretation of available data and lead people unwittingly toward inappropriate decision making ''strategies''; obviously, these should be avoided. It is further proposed that successfully accomplishing the wheat vs. chaff separation is very difficult, yet tenable. This report hopes to expose and facilitate navigation away from decision-making traps which often ensnare the unwary. Furthermore, it is emphasized that one's personal decision making biases can be examined, and tools can be provided allowing better means to generate, evaluate, and select among decision options. Many examples in this report are tailored to the energy domain (esp. nuclear power for electricity generation). The decision making framework and approach presented here are applicable to any high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological system.

Brewer, Jeffrey D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 9. Biomass-Fired Electricity Generation ...

31

Winning in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Should you be a buyer or a seller of generation? In general, spot buyers should do very well, while many generation owners will be fortunate to recover their stranded costs. Successful generators will capitalize on superior operating performance and market knowledge. The smartest natural gas strategy in the early 1980`s was to short natural gas. Will this lesson of restructuring be written again of the electricity generation business of the late 1990`s? The authors will examine whether and how winners might emerge in the generation business of the future. The U.S. electric generation market, already marked by intense competition for new capacity and industrial demand, will become even more competitive as it makes the transition from regulated local monopoly to marketbased commodity pricing. At risk is up to $150 billion of shareholder equity and the future viability of half of the country`s investor-owned utilities. The winners in year 2005 will be those who early on developed strategies that simultaneously recovered existing generation investments while restructuring their asset portfolios and repositioning their plants to compete in the new market. Losers will have spent the time mired in indecision, their strategies ultimately forced upon them by regulators or competitors.

Hashimoto, L. [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jansen, P. [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Geyn, G. van [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)] [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

THE ECONOMICS OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION IN QUEENSLAND AND THE POTENTIAL EMPLOYMENT OF NUCLEAR REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

An endeavor was made to fix a tentative date at which atomic energy is likely to compete with conventional forms of power generation and to indicate the sizes of plant required and cost figures that will be prevailing at that time. (M.H.R.)

Waldie, R.D.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Electrical pulse generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for generating high-voltage, wide dynamic range, shaped electrical pulses in the nanosecond range. Two transmission lines are coupled together by resistive elements distributed along the length of the lines. The conductance of each coupling resistive element as a function of its position along the line is selected to produce the desired pulse shape in the output line when an easily produced pulse, such as a step function pulse, is applied to the input line.

Norris, Neil J. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Generation of electrical power  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat-to-electricity converter is disclosed which includes a radioactive heat source and a thermoelectric element of relatively short overall length capable of delivering a low voltage of the order of a few tenths of a volt. Such a thermoelectric element operates at a higher efficiency than longer higher-voltage elements; for example, elements producing 6 volts. In the generation of required power, thermoelectric element drives a solid-state converter which is controlled by input current rather than input voltage and operates efficiently for a high signal-plus-noise to signal ratio of current. The solid-state converter has the voltage gain necessary to deliver the required voltage at the low input of the thermoelectric element.

Hursen, Thomas F. (Monroeville, PA); Kolenik, Steven A. (Leechburg, PA); Purdy, David L. (Indiana, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950°C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

Dr. David A. Petti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

39

EERE: Renewable Electricity Generation - Geothermal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Renewable Energy Search Search Search Help | A-Z Subject Index EERE Geothermal Renewable Electricity Generation EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all...

40

EERE: Renewable Electricity Generation - Solar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Renewable Electricity Generation EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all of the above" energy strategy, leading a large network of researchers and other partners to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Biomass for Electricity Generation - Table 3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Modeling and Analysis Papers> Biomass for Electricity Generation : Biomass for Electricity Generation. Table 3. Biomass Resources by Price: Quantities ...

43

OpenEI - Electricity Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Generation (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/878 Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA).

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44

Method for protecting an electric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for protecting an electrical generator which includes providing an electrical generator which is normally synchronously operated with an electrical power grid; providing a synchronizing signal from the electrical generator; establishing a reference signal; and electrically isolating the electrical generator from the electrical power grid if the synchronizing signal is not in phase with the reference signal.

Kuehnle, Barry W. (Ammon, ID); Roberts, Jeffrey B. (Ammon, ID); Folkers, Ralph W. (Ammon, ID)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

45

Electricity Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Generation world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_generation_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 46.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote

46

THERMO-ELECTRIC GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The conversion of heat energy into electrical energy by a small compact device is descrtbed. Where the heat energy is supplied by a radioactive material and thermopIIes convert the heat to electrical energy. The particular battery construction includes two insulating discs with conductive rods disposed between them to form a circular cage. In the center of the cage is disposed a cup in which the sealed radioactive source is located. Each thermopile is formed by connecting wires from two adjacent rods to a potnt on an annular ring fastened to the outside of the cup, the ring having insulation on its surface to prevent electrica1 contact with the thermopiles. One advantage of this battery construction is that the radioactive source may be inserted after the device is fabricated, reducing the radiation hazard to personnel assembling the battery.

Jordan, K.C.

1958-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

47

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fossil fuels in Canada account for 27 percent of the electricity generated. The combustion of these fuels is a major source of emissions which affect air quality and climate change. The Government...

48

nuclear electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nuclear electricity nuclear electricity Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world nuclear energy. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Source Earth Policy Institute Date Released January 12th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EU nuclear nuclear electricity world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Summary nuclear energy consumption data (xls, 68.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment "Reuse of our data is permitted. We merely ask that wherever it is listed, it be appropriately cited"

49

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Power's Development in Japan for a Zero-Carbon Electricity Generation System by 2100  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Education, Economics, and Sustainability / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Qi Zhang; Keiichi N. Ishihara; Benjamin McLellan; Tetsuo Tezuka

50

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dose Commitments from Nuclear Tests carried out beforeDose Commitments from Nuclear Tests carried out before 1968,of the dose from nuclear weapons test fallout. As indicated

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) Electric generating or transmission facility: determination...

53

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

54

Renewable Electricity Generation | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Geothermal Read more Solar Read more Water Read more Wind Read more Our nation has abundant solar, water, wind,...

55

Motor generator electric automotive vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A motor generator electric automotive vehicle is described comprising in combination, a traction drive motor coupled by a first drive shaft to a differential of an axle of the vehicle, a main battery bank electrically connected by wires to a small electric motor driving a large D.C. generator having a second drive shaft therebetween, an on-off switch in series with one of the wires to the small motor, a speed control unit attached to an accelerator pedal of the vehicle being coupled with a double pole-double throw reverse switch to the traction drive motor, a charger regulator electrically connected to the generator, a bank of solar cells coupled to the charge regulator, an electric extension cord from the charge regulator having a plug on its end for selective connection to an exterior electric power source, a plurality of pulleys on the second drive shaft, a belt unit driven by the pulley, one the belt unit being connected to a present alternator of the vehicle which is coupled to a present battery and present regulator of the vehicle, and other of the units being connected to power brakes and equipment including power steering and an air conditioner.

Weldin, W.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Diesel Generator Tanks 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power provides about 20 % of the total electricity generated in the United States. In 2005, this was about 782 Billion kWh of the total electricity generation (EIA 2006). 2 As with fossil-fueled electricity generating plants, electricity in a nuclear power plant is produced by heated steam that drives a turbine generator. In a nuclear power plant, however, nuclear fission reactions in the core produce heat that is absorbed by a liquid that flows through the system and is converted to steam. Nuclear power plants are highly efficient and have become more so over the last 25 years. Operational efficiency (also referred to as plant performance or electricity production) can be measured by the capacity factor. The capacity factor is the ratio of the actual amount of electricity generated to the maximum possible amount that could be generated in a given period of time – usually a year. Today, nuclear power plants operate at an average 90 % capacity factor (compared to 56 % in 1980) (EIA 2006a). Thus, although nuclear generating capacity has remained roughly constant since 1990, at about 99 gigawatts (or about 10 % of the total U.S. electric generating capacity), the amount of electricity produced has increased 33 % since that time because of increased capacity utilization. Nuclear plants have the highest capacity factors of

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants to Assess PlantStandards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applies, not only to the nuclear reactor, but also to otherdetailed de- sign of nuclear reactor power s tations is vgreat importance in nuclear reactor accidents. 3.2 Increase

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refabrication. through which nuclear fuel passes. Fusion.with the experience at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant (seecommitment from the nuclear fuel cycle; see Section 3.2.3. )

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Dresden Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Power Plant Data for Dresden Generating Station Author: DOE/EIA Keywords: Dresden Generating Station, Illinois, Nuclear, Plant, Reactor, Generation, Capacity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

"1. PSEG Salem Generating Station","Nuclear","PSEG Nuclear LLC...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey" "1. PSEG Salem Generating Station","Nuclear","PSEG Nuclear LLC",2370 "2. PSEG Linden Generating Station","Gas","PSEG Fossil LLC",1587 "3. Bergen Generating...

62

Role of Renewable Energy in a Sustainable Electric Generation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) Widely Available and Deployed After 2020 None Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Nuclear Generation 12.5 GWe by 2030 64 GWe by 2030

63

Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades.

Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

65

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report LBL-5287. "Power Plant Reliability-Availability andConunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Coal-fired electric generators continue to dominate electric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

More than 60% of electricity in the central region of the United States comes from coal-fired electric generators, down from 80% in the early part of ...

67

Definition: Electricity generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity generation Electricity generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electricity generation The process of producing electric energy or the amount of electric energy produced by transforming other forms of energy into electrical energy; commonly expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh) or megawatt-hours (MWh).[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electricity generation is the process of generating electrical power from other sources of primary energy. The fundamental principles of electricity generation were discovered during the 1820s and early 1830s by the British scientist Michael Faraday. His basic method is still used today: electricity is generated by the movement of a loop of wire, or disc of copper between the poles of a magnet. For electric utilities, it is the

68

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Radiation Control Program The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in Maine. The Legislature

69

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Generator Maintenance Guide for Emergency Diesel Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed this report to address maintenance and improve long-term reliability and availability of generators within nuclear power plant emergency diesel generator (EDG) systems.

2010-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

70

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MISCELLAN £OUS LlOUID STEAM GENERATOR ORAIH OE .. ,N[PALIZEAon the steam system and turbine generator units, as d~fined

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Annual Electricity Generation (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration...

72

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. NVLAP Lab Code: 100537-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. NVLAP Lab Code: 100537-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Electricity Generation By Electricity Generation Compare Activities by ... Electricity Generation Capability For commercial buildings as a whole, approximately 8 percent of buildings had the capability to generate electricity, and only 4 percent of buildings actually generated any electricity. Most all buildings generated electricity only for the purpose of emergency back-up. Inpatient health care and public order and safety buildings were much more likely to have the capability to generate electricity than other building types. Over half of all inpatient health care buildings and about one-third of public order and safety buildings actually used this capability. Electricity Generation Capability and Use by Building Type Top Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels

75

Electric Power Generation Expansion in Deregulated Markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The generation expansion problem involves increasing electric power generation capacity in an existing power network. In competitive environment, power producers, distributors, and consumers all make… (more)

KAYMAZ, PINAR

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility MunicipalPublic...

77

Definition: Electric generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generator generator Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electric generator A device for converting mechanical energy to electrical energy. Note: The EIA defines "electric generator" as a facility rather than as a device; per the EIA definition, examples include electric utilities and independent power producers.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electricity generation, an electric generator is a device that converts mechanical energy to electrical energy. A generator forces electric current to flow through an external circuit. The source of mechanical energy may be a reciprocating or turbine steam engine, water falling through a turbine or waterwheel, an internal combustion engine, a wind turbine, a hand crank, compressed air, or any other source of

78

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor prototype with the capability to produce process heat, electricity and/or hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor is based on research and development activities supported by DOE's Generation IV nuclear energy systems initiative.

79

Conditions on Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of the Effects of Drought An Analysis of the Effects of Drought Conditions on Electric Power Generation in the Western United States April 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1365 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

80

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

83

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor December 20, 1951 Arco, ID Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor

84

Water Use in Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use is increasingly viewed as an important sustainability metric for electricity generation technologies. Most of the attention on the link between electricity generation and water use focuses on the water used in cooling thermoelectric power plants during operations. This is warranted given the size of these withdrawals; however, all electricity generation technologies, including those that do not rely on thermoelectric generation, use water throughout their life cycles. Each life cycle stage cont...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 97, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into Texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, Midwest reliability council and Northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB)

86

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

87

Curtailing Intermittent Generation in Electrical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy generation from intermittent renewable sources introduces additional variability into electrical systems, resulting in a higher cost of balancing against the increased variabilities. Ways to balance demand and supply for electricity include using ... Keywords: economic curtailment, energy storage operations, flexible generation, intermittent generation, operations management practice, wind power

Owen Q. Wu, Roman Kapuscinski

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Generation, distribution and utilization of electrical energy  

SciTech Connect

An up-to-date account of electric power generation and distribution (including coverage of the use of computers in various components of the power system). Describes conventional and unconventional methods of electricity generation and its economics, distribution methods, substation location, electric drives, high frequency power for induction and heating, illumination engineering, and electric traction. Each chapter contains illustrative worked problems, exercises (some with answers), and a bibliography.

Wadhwa, C.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Permits for Electricity Generating Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All applicants for conditional permits for electricity generating facilities must provide opportunity for public participation and quantify expected air emissions from the proposed project.

90

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of the NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebook for Electricity Generation with information directing people to the Web site for more in-depth information.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

electric generation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(TCDB) advanced vehicles electric generation NREL OpenEI renewables tcdb This new web application collects cost and performance estimates and makes it available to everyone...

92

Vogtle Electric Generating Plant ETE Analysis Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)-Albuquerque reviewed the evacuation time estimate (ETE) analysis dated April 2006 prepared by IEM for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP). The ETE analysis was reviewed for consistency with federal regulations using the NRC guidelines in Review Standard (RS)-002, Supplement 2 and Appendix 4 to NUREG-0654, and NUREG/CR-4831. Additional sources of information referenced in the analysis and used in the review included NUREG/CR-6863 and NUREG/CR-6864. The PNNL report includes general comments, data needs or clarifications, and requests for additional information (RAI) resulting from review of the ETE analysis.

Diediker, Nona H.; Jones, Joe A.

2006-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

93

California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

94

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight… (more)

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 96, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, midwest reliability council and northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electricity generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 400.2 KiB) Quality Metrics

96

Fuels Used in Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

trillion kilowatthours 25% 19% 42% 13% 1% Nuclear Oil and other liquids Natural gas Coal Renewables 2011 Projections History 17% 16% 35% 30% 1% 1993 53% 13% 19% 11% 4%...

97

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

98

Program on Technology Innovation: Nuclear Power Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States and other countries are currently planning to expand their nuclear power electrical generation base in order to provide energy security and price stability while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Since the existing fleet of nuclear plants was built during or before the 1970s, new plants will incorporate more advanced designs. This report documents the current status and potential for advanced nuclear power technology development and/or commercialization over the next 5 to 15 years.

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

99

Program on Technology Innovation: The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Update documents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which will demonstrate the design, licensing, construction, and operation of a new nuclear energy source using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. This new non-emitting energy source is applicable to a broad range of uses, from generating electricity to providing high-temperature industrial process heat to producing hydrogen. The NGNP project is sponsored as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and envi...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

PRODCOST: an electric utility generation simulation code  

SciTech Connect

The PRODCOST computer code simulates the operation of an electric utility generation system. Through a probabilistic simulation the expected energy production, fuel consumption, and cost of operation for each plant are determined. Total system fuel consumption, energy generation by type, total generation costs, as well as system loss of load probability and expected unserved energy are also calculated.

Hudson, II, C. R.; Reynolds, T. M.; Smolen, G. R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

102

Nuclear electricity is the least-cost option  

SciTech Connect

The use of integrated resource planning (IRP) as a tool for selecting the means to satisfy the need for new electricity heavily favors those options that are evaluated to have the least cost. The least-cost option these days, generally combined cycle burning natural gas, can generate electricity for between 3.5 to 4.0 {cents}/kW {times} h. The average generating cost of nuclear electricity, by comparison, is {approximately} 7.0 {cents}/kW {times} h, indicative of the economic challenge facing the nuclear industry. The future for the nuclear option may be better, if you believe that natural gas prices will increase. Studies by General Electric (GE) show that if these prices escalate at 3.5% above inflation, as DRI and others forecast, advanced nuclear plants will be in an economic dead heat with coal and combined-cycle/natural-gas plants, the primary baseload options. The use of environmental externalities can also change the evaluation of these competing technology options. When the cost of pollution emissions from fossil plants are factored in, studies show that nuclear electricity generation is the best economic option.

Redding, J.R. [GE, San Jose, CA (United States); Yates, R. [GE, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Renewable Electricity Generation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Geothermal Read more Solar Read more Water Read more Wind Read more Our nation has abundant solar, water, wind, and geothermal energy resources, and many U.S. companies are developing, manufacturing, and installing cutting-edge, high-tech renewable energy systems. The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative technologies that will make renewable electricity generation cost competitive with traditional sources of energy. Working with our national laboratories and through these partnerships, we are catalyzing the transformation of the nation's energy system and building on a tradition of U.S. leadership in science and

104

Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

Schmalensee, Richard

105

Generation Trends in the Electricity Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key questions concerning the interaction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and the electricity grid is how the upstream emissions and energy use of power plants used to charge PEVs compare with the lifecycle emissions and energy use of conventional vehicles. This Update provides a look at recent data on trends in power generation in the United States from 1990 to 2013, including capacity, generation, capacity factor, energy use, and heat rate—emissions rates will be analyzed in ...

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which steam is raised. nuclear fuel generates heat that isattention to nuclear and fossil-fuel plants, and these areFor all the fossil-fuel and nuclear (However, categories,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Generator Maintenance Guide for Emergency Diesel Generators (Japanese Version)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a Japanese translation of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technical Report 1021479. EPRI developed this report to address maintenance and improve long-term reliability and availability of generators within nuclear power plant emergency diesel generator (EDG) systems. Maintenance of generator stators and rotors is the focus of this report, which highlights maintenance tasks and strategies that can be performed to identify generator degradation and prevent unforeseen failures. This ...

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

CO2 Intensity in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to the launch of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in 2005, the electricity sector was widely proclaimed to have more low-cost emission abatement opportunities than other sectors. If this were true, effects of the EU ETS on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions would likely be visible in the electricity sector. Our study looks at the effect of the price of emission allowances (EUA) on CO2 emissions from Swedish electricity generation, using an econometric time series analysis for the period 2004–2008. We control for effects of other input prices and hydropower reservoir levels. Our results do not indicate any link between the price of EUA and the CO2 emissions of Swedish electricity production. A number of reasons may explain this result and we conclude that other determinants of fossil fuel use in Swedish electricity generation probably diminished the effects of the EU ETS.

Anna Widerberg; Markus Wråke; Anna Widerberg; Markus Wråke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

WEB RESOURCE: Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2007 ... This web site provides offers a broad overview of the Department of Energy's activities in exploring the development of next generation nuclear ...

110

Natural gas and renewable shares of electricity generation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

111

The mix of fuels used for electricity generation in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... ...

112

Reference: Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station- Preconditioning of Emergency Diesel Generator Air Start Systems, Fuel Systems, and other Engine and Electrical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is twofold. First, to inform the NRC that Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station will not dispute the Non-Cited Violation (50-254/01-05-04; 50-265/01-05-04) of 10 CFR 50 Appendix B, Criterion XI, "Test Control, " described in the referenced NRC report. The station similarly concurs that the risk significance was very low (Green). Senior station management and station personnel understand the importance of scheduling and performing Technical Specifications required surveillances such that unacceptable preconditioning does not occur. The instances identified in the referenced NRC report have been entered into the station's corrective action program and corrective actions have been implemented or are scheduled for implementation. Second, given the importance of this subject and based upon our review of the NRC integrated inspection report, the station is providing an update on several of the issues discussed in section three, "Units 1 and 2 Emergency Diesel Generator Timed Test Preconditioning Concerns. " This is intended to update the NRC and supplement our shared understanding of the issues. The following specific points are provided: August 8, 2001 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

AN ALGORITHM FOR THE GENERATION OF NUCLEAR SPIN SPECIES AND NUCLEAR SPIN STATISTICAL WEIGHTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry AN ALGORITHM FOR THE GENERATION OF NUCLEAR SPINSPECIES AND NUCLEAR SPIN STATISTICAL WEIGHTS K.for the Generation of Nuclear Spin and Nuclear Spin

Balasubramanian, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT INSTRUCTIONS|Year: 2013 No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |PURPOSE|Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry.| |REQUIRED RESPONDENTS|Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT,

115

Operating strategy generators for nuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating strategy generators, i.e., the software intended for increasing the efficiency of work of nuclear power plant operators, are discussed. The possibilities provided by the domestic and foreign operating-strategy generators are analyzed.

Solovyev, D. A., E-mail: and@est.mephi.ru; Semenov, A. A.; Shchukin, N. V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

117

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and Transmission Facilities (Nebraska) Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and...

118

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? In 2012, the United States generated about 4,054 billion kilowatthours of electricity. About 68% ...

119

Category:Electricity Generating Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Electricity Generating Technologies Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B...

120

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

122

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet),...

123

Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of coal for electricity generation in the United States....

124

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Provides annual net electricity generation (thousand kilowatt-hours) from...

125

Pages that link to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies" Category:Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to:...

126

Changes related to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies" Category:Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to:...

127

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial...

128

Consumption of Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of natural gas for electricity generation in the...

129

"1. Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois" Illinois" "1. Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330 "2. Byron Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2300 "3. LaSalle Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2238 "4. Baldwin Energy Complex","Coal","Dynegy Midwest Generation Inc",1785 "5. Quad Cities Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",1774 "6. Dresden Generating Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",1734 "7. Powerton","Coal","Midwest Generations EME LLC",1538 "8. Elwood Energy LLC","Gas","Dominion Elwood Services Co",1350

130

Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills  

SciTech Connect

At present, the total installed electricity generating capacity of Thailand is 7500 MW. Because this level of investment will take an unacceptable large part of total foreign borrowing, the government plans to encourage participation of the private sector in electricity generation. Among the various technology options for power production, cogeneration appears to be the most promising technology due to its very high effectiveness of fuel utilization. Therefore, in the first phase of private power generation, the Thai government is encouraging cogeneration systems. This paper discusses sugar mills, where expertise and equipment for electricity generation already exist, appear to be in a particularly advantageous position to participate in the private power generation program. At present, there are 46 sugar mills in Thailand with a total capacity of 338,000 tons of cane per day. The fiber part delivered from the milling of sugarcane, bagasse, is normally used to produce steam for the process heat and electricity generation. The investment and operating costs for each of these alternatives have been evaluated. The internal rate of return is used to indicate the benefit of each alternative.

Therdyothin, A.; Bhattacharaya, S.C.; Chirarattananon, S. (Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

132

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

The rising cost of electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades. (author)

Winters, Tobey

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides an optimized LCM plan for the main generators and exciters at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station (PVNGS).

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

External Costs Associated to Electricity Generation Options in Brazil  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses external costs associated with electricity generation options in Brazil.

Jacomino, V.M.F.; Arrone, I.D.; Albo, J.; Grynberg, S.; Spadaro, J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

137

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

DRENNEN, THOMAS E.; KAMERY, WILLIAM

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercuty. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

Kamery, William (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing distributed generation sources are more difficultfrom all electricity generation sources using a standarda co-located distributed generation source. It reads in text

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Fourth Generation of Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect

The outlook for nuclear power in the U.S. is currently very bright. The economics, operations and safety performance of U.S. nuclear power plants is excellent. In addition, both the safety and economic regulation of nuclear power are being changed to produce better economic parameters for future nuclear plant operations and the licenses for plant operations are being extended to 60 years. There is further a growing awareness of the value of clean, emissions-free nuclear power. These parameters combine to form a firm foundation for continued successful U.S. nuclear plant operations, and even the potential In order to realize a bright future for nuclear power, we must respond successfully to five challenges: • Nuclear power must remain economically competitive, • The public must remain confident in the safety of the plants and the fuel cycle. • Nuclear wastes and spent fuel must be managed and the ultimate disposition pathways for nuclear wastes must be politically settled. • The proliferation potential of the commercial nuclear fuel cycle must continue to be minimized, and • We must assure a sustained manpower supply for the future and preserve the critical nuclear technology infrastructure. The Generation IV program is conceived to focus the efforts of the international nuclear community on responding to these challenges.

Lake, James Alan

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel — the "Power Ring" — with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing – a radial gap “shear-force levitator” – that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ties Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants. LBlr5921, Lawrencein U. S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants. WASH-1400. Octoberand Content of for Nuclear Power Plants. Regulatory Guide

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licens- ing. StandardCommission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regula- tion.Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan for Light Water Reactor

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Reg- ulation.Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licen- sing. StandardCommission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. Standard

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management, and proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

Marra, J.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generate steam to drive a steam turbine, giving rise to theValves and Pi~ing STEAM TURBINE COMPONENT OUTAGE CAUSESbasically of a steam-driven turbine, an electric generator

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

STEAM GENERATOR FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The steam generator described for use in reactor powergenerating systems employs a series of concentric tubes providing annular passage of steam and water and includes a unique arrangement for separating the steam from the water. (AEC)

Kinyon, B.W.; Whitman, G.D.

1963-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wind electric generator project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind generator is installed and connected at Iowa Western Community College. It is heating water through four hot water tanks and has proven to be an excellent demonstration project for the community. The college gets frequent inquiries about the wind mill and has been very cooperative in informing the public about the success. The windmill generates more electricity than is needed to heat four hot water heaters and future plans are to hook up more. The project requires very little maintenance. Attached is a date sheet on the project.

Not Available

1983-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

150

Compressed Air Storage for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Report focuses on the use of underground storage of natural gas as a means of leveling the load between supply and demand. The book presents a view of the way compressed air storage can reduce costs when constructing new facilities for generating peak load electricity. The primary emphasis given concerns underground storage of air in underground porous media, the vehicle utilized on a large scale for over 25 years by the natural gas industry.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population growth surrounding a nuclear power plant once thegrowth by requiring that certification of nuclear power plant

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population Evaluation Emergency Planning for Nuclear PowerPotential Definition of Nuclear Emergencies Developingan Emergency Plan . . . . Regulatory Review of Utilities!

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Case Study: Darlington Nuclear Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Darlington is a four-reactor nuclear plant east of Toronto. It is operated by Ontario Hydro. Each reactor has two independent shutdown systems: SDS1 drops neutron-absorbing rods into the core, while SDS2 injects liquid poison into the moderator. Both ... Keywords: Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada, Canada, Darlington nuclear generating station, Ontario Hydro, case study, certification, code quality, decision-making logic, documentation, fission reactor core control and monitoring, fission reactor safety, formal methods, formal model-based inspection, formal specification, licensing, liquid poison injection, neutron-absorbing rods, nuclear engineering computing, nuclear plant, safety, safety-critical systems, software driven shutdown systems, software reliability, specifications

Dan Craigen; Susan Gerhart; Ted Ralston

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Converting Site Electricity to Include Generation and Transmission...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Electricity Consumption in the Manufacturing Division The energy intensities presented in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation...

155

Fuel Use in Electricity Generation - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Use in Electricity Generation ... Cost of coal and natural gas delivered to electric power plants in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast, Jan 2007- April 2012 . 2

156

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because supply and demand for electricity must balance in real-time, rapid changes in demand create operational challenges for the electric system and generating unit ...

157

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Generating Capacity by Fuel...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual...

158

Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 69 Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation

159

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008,...

160

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ronald E. Hagen, John R. Moens, and Zdenek D. Nikodem Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy International Atomic Energy Agency Vienna, Austria November 6-9, 2001 iii Energy Information Administration/ Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contents Page I. The Electric Power Industry and the Greenhouse Gas Issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. The Current Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 III. The Future Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IV. Factors That Affect Nuclear Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 V. Conclusion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSING PROCESSPlanning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination of Accidentnuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . • . . . . .2.2.4.3.

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Gross System Electricity Production for 2001.CA. http://energy.ca.gov/electricity/gross_system_power.htmlCEC. 2002c. 1992-2001 Electricity Generation By Fuel Type.

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection All electric generating facilities operating in the state, with the

168

KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting (Kentucky) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting (Kentucky) KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Kentucky Public Service Commission No person shall commence to construct a merchant electric generating facility until that person has applied for and obtained a construction certificate for the facility from the Kentucky State Board on Electric Generation and Transmission. The construction certificate shall be valid

169

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water May 26, 2010 - 12:11pm Addthis San...

170

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region...

171

Annual Renewable Electricity Net Generation by Country (1980...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Generation by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual renewable electricity net generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu)....

172

Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources varies ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

May 2, 2012 Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources varies by state. Wind accounted for most non-hydro renewable generation in 2011, but sources of ...

173

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of concern about such emissions has led to significant improvements in the polluting characteristics of electricity generation

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas generation capacity electricity. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

175

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight systems has been limited to low-power, ...

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Japanese power companies using more LNG to generate electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... which led to the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and subsequent outages at other plants.

177

Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James;PWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James Bushnell. Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James Bushnell and Steven Stoft

California at Berkeley. University of

178

Electrical Generating Capacities of Geothermal Slim Holes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations are presented to estimate the electrical generating capacity of the hot fluids discharged from individual geothermal wells using small wellhead generating equipment over a wide range of reservoir and operating conditions. The purpose is to appraise the possibility of employing slim holes (instead of conventional production-size wells) to power such generators for remote off-grid applications such as rural electrification in developing countries. Frequently, the generating capacity desired is less than one megawatt, and can be as low as 100 kilowatts; if slim holes can be usefully employed, overall project costs will be significantly reduced. This report presents the final results of the study. Both self-discharging wells and wells equipped with downhole pumps (either of the ''lineshaft'' or the ''submersible'' type) are examined. Several power plant designs are considered, including conventional single-flash backpressure and condensing steam turbines, binary plants, double-flash steam plants, and steam turbine/binary hybrid designs. Well inside diameters from 75 mm to 300 mm are considered; well depths vary from 300 to 1200 meters. Reservoir temperatures from 100 C to 240 C are examined, as are a variety of reservoir pressures and CO2 contents and well productivity index values.

Pritchett, J.W.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Facilities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

180

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Electricity Generation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation Electricity Generation Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Electricity Generation U.S. electricity consumption—including both purchases from electric power producers and on-site generation—increases steadily in the AEO2008 reference case, at an average rate of 1.3 percent per year. In comparison, electricity consumption grew by annual rates of 4.2 percent, 2.6 percent, and 2.3 percent in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, respectively. The growth rate in the AEO2008 projection is lower than in the AEO2007 reference case (1.5 percent per year), and it leads to lower projections of electricity generation. Figure 4. Electricity generation by fuel, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nuclear power: least cost option for base-load electricity in Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the outstanding operating experience and the low electricity production costs of the existing Finnish nuclear power plants, energy-intensive process industries in particular have a strong belief in nuclear power. There is a potential interest in building more nuclear capacity, the fifth unit, in order to guarantee for Finnish industry the availability of cheap electrical energy in the future. In any case more baseload generation capacity will be needed by 2010 to meet the future growth of electricity consumption in Finland. Nuclear power generation matches excellently with the long-duration load profile of the Finnish power system. The good performance of Finnish nuclear power has yielded benefits also to consumers through its contribution to decreasing the electricity price. Furthermore, the introduction of nuclear power has resulted in a clear drop in the carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation during the 1970s and 1980s, as shown in Figure 1. In 1999 the four Finnish nuclear power units at Loviisa and Olkiluoto generated 22.1 TWh of electricity, roughly equivalent to one third of the total

Risto Tarjanne; Sauli Rissanen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electric power transmission for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC)  

SciTech Connect

The original study of transmission for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC), which was completed in September 1975, was updated in June 1978. The present 1983 revision takes cognizance of recent changes in the electric power situation of the PNW with respect to: (1) forecasts of load growth, (2) the feasibility of early use of 1100 kV transmission, and (3) the narrowing opportunities for siting nuclear plants in the region. The purpose of this update is to explore and describe additions to the existing transmission system that would be necessary to accommodate three levels of generation at HNEC. Comparisons with a PNW system having new thermal generating capacity distributed throughout the marketing region are not made as was done in earlier versions.

Harty, H.; Dowis, W.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Current Electric Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Current Electric Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Current Electric Generator will create electricity in three different processes simultaniously by harnessing the motion of water current to rotate the generator Two forms of magnetic induction and solar cells on the outer housing will produce electricity very efficiently The generators will be wired up together in large fields on open waterways sumerged from harm The electricity will be sent back to mainland via an underwater wire for consumption The Current Electric Generator is designed with the environment in mind and will primarilly be constructed from recycled materials cutting emmisions cost

184

Automation and Optimization for Electrical Design of Hydro Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the author presents a software platform to conceptually design hydraulic generator, a typical complex manufacture.Applying this platform, the generator’s electrical design can be performed interactively through a friendly human-machine ...

Zhu Dianhua; Guo Wei; Ma Ruimin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Electric heater for nuclear fuel rod simulators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an electric cartridge-type heater for use as a simulator for a nuclear fuel pin in reactor studies. The heater comprises an elongated cylindrical housing containing a longitudinally extending helically wound heating element with the heating element radially inwardly separated from the housing. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of boron nitride electrically insulate the heating element from the housing while providing good thermal conductivity. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of magnesia or a magnesia-15 percent boron nitride mixture are disposed in the cavity of the helical heating element. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the magnesia or the magnesia-boron nitride mixture is higher than that of the boron nitride disposed about the heating element for urging the boron nitride radially outwardly against the housing during elevated temperatures to assure adequate thermal contact between the housing and the boron nitride.

McCulloch, Reginald W. (Knoxville, TN); Morgan, Jr., Chester S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dial, Ralph E. (Concord, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

187

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

188

International Coal Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria 45.70 52.67 64.47 81.28 87.52 92.75 96.24 122.10 120.10 Belgium 37.72 34.48 35.94 72.46 80.35 63.24 75.54 130.54 NA Canada 18.52 19.17 21.03 20.32 24.50 26.29 NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 31.29 31.43 31.18 47.75 57.70 54.68 70.17 118.49 NA Czech Republic3 8.05 8.52 C C C C C C C Denmark NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Finland 46.66 44.02 48.28 67.00 72.06 74.27 83.72 142.90 NA France 45.28 42.89 42.45 63.55 74.90 72.90 83.90 136.10 NA Germany 51.86 45.70 50.02 70.00 79.74 77.95 90.26 152.60 NA

189

Analyzing auxiliary system in nuclear generating stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design for most nuclear generating stations took place before the widespread use of computerized engineering tools. The manual design basis calculations that were performed vary in quantity from only a few feet of shelf space for some of the first stations to bookcases full for stations that are now receiving their operating licenses. Some of the following issues may apply to the manual calculation files of any nuclear station: Errors and lack of detail in hand calculations; Calculations that may not document the required safety functions; Calculations that lag behind the as-built condition of the station; Documentation that does not add up to a coherent whole; and incomplete auditability and traceability of data. The increasing use of computerized tools in nuclear generating station analysis has helped address the hand-calculation problems. The use of a master system model to study various scenarios also ensures that uniform assumptions are being used for all related analyses. This article presents an overview of how computerized tools are being used for both ac and dc auxiliary system calculations. Problems that may be created by the use of these tools are discussed, along with a review of those issues specific to nuclear generating stations.

Jancauskas, J.R. (Gilber/Commonwealth (US))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011). Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download February 17, 2012 EIS-0476: Notice of Adoption of Final Environmental Impact Statement Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4, Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Support Funding for Construction, Burke County, GA

191

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Aging assessment of large electric motors in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large electric motors serve as the prime movers to drive high capacity pumps, fans, compressors, and generators in a variety of nuclear plant systems. This study examined the stressors that cause degradation and aging in large electric motors operating in various plant locations and environments. The operating history of these machines in nuclear plant service was studied by review and analysis of failure reports in the NPRDS and LER databases. This was supplemented by a review of motor designs, and their nuclear and balance of plant applications, in order to characterize the failure mechanisms that cause degradation, aging, and failure in large electric motors. A generic failure modes and effects analysis for large squirrel cage induction motors was performed to identify the degradation and aging mechanisms affecting various components of these large motors, the failure modes that result, and their effects upon the function of the motor. The effects of large motor failures upon the systems in which they are operating, and on the plant as a whole, were analyzed from failure reports in the databases. The effectiveness of the industry`s large motor maintenance programs was assessed based upon the failure reports in the databases and reviews of plant maintenance procedures and programs.

Villaran, M.; Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT GRAPHITE PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing new nuclear grades of graphite used in the core of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the critical development activities being pursued within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. Graphite’s thermal stability (in an inert gas environment), high compressive strength, fabricability, and cost effective price make it an ideal core structural material for the HTGR reactor design. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermo-mechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. The NGNP graphite R&D program has selected a handful of commercially available types for research and development activities necessary to qualify this nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor. These activities fall within five primary areas; 1) material property characterization, 2) irradiated material property characterization, 3) modeling, and 4) ASTM test development, and 5) ASME code development efforts. Individual research and development activities within each area are being pursued with the ultimate goal of obtaining a commercial operating license for the nuclear graphite from the US NRC.

William E. Windes; Timothy D. Burchell; Robert L. Bratton

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Role of Future Generation Options for the U.S. Electric Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update documents efforts to enhance, update, and apply EPRI's financial model of the U.S. electric sector for generation capacity expansion and dispatch at the national and regional levels. The model evaluates the possible effects of various climate policy, renewable portfolio standard (RPS), technology, and market scenarios on the deployment and operation of nuclear, fossil, and renewable generation options and on electricity prices, emissions, fuel use, and other parameters. Within indiv...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the nuclear power plant, the Marine Corps base, thePower Plant Emergency Response Plan, July 1975. United States Marine

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could benefit, in terms of efficien

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Microstructural Characterization of Next Generation Nuclear Graphites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

Karthik Chinnathambi; Joshua Kane; Darryl P. Butt; William E. Windes; Rick Ubic

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Nuclear modules for space electric propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of interplanetary cargo and piloted missions requires calculations of the performances and masses of subsystems to be integrated in a final design. In a preliminary and scoping stage the designer needs to evaluate options iteratively by using fast computer simulations. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in the development of models and calculational procedures for the analysis (neutronic and thermal hydraulic) of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. The nuclear modules will be integrated into the whole simulation of the nuclear electric propulsion system. The vehicles use either a Brayton direct-conversion cycle, using the heated helium from a NERVA-type reactor, or a potassium Rankine cycle, with the working fluid heated on the secondary side of a heat exchanger and lithium on the primary side coming from a fast reactor. Given a set of input conditions, the codes calculate composition. dimensions, volumes, and masses of the core, reflector, control system, pressure vessel, neutron and gamma shields, as well as the thermal hydraulic conditions of the coolant, clad and fuel. Input conditions are power, core life, pressure and temperature of the coolant at the inlet of the core, either the temperature of the coolant at the outlet of the core or the coolant mass flow and the fluences and integrated doses at the cargo area. Using state-of-the-art neutron cross sections and transport codes, a database was created for the neutronic performance of both reactor designs. The free parameters of the models are the moderator/fuel mass ratio for the NERVA reactor and the enrichment and the pitch of the lattice for the fast reactor. Reactivity and energy balance equations are simultaneously solved to find the reactor design. Thermalhydraulic conditions are calculated by solving the one-dimensional versions of the equations of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum with compressible flow. 10 refs., 1 tab.

Difilippo, F.C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nuclear Georeactor Generation of Earth's Geomagnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this communication is to suggest that the mechanism for generating the geomagnetic field and the energy source for powering it are one and the same, a nuclear georeactor at the center of the Earth. Toward this end, I: i) Present evidence that the nuclear georeactor fission-product sub-shell is fluid; ii)Suggest that the geomagnetic field is generated within the georeactor sub-shell, rather than within Earth's iron-alloy fluid core; iii) Describe why convection appears more feasible within the georeactor sub-shell than within the iron-alloy core; iv) Disclose additional relative physical advantages for georeactor sub-shell dynamo operation; and, v) Outline briefly the research that should be conducted to advance the state of knowledge of georeactor-geomagnetic field generation. The concept of geomagnetic field production by the nuclear georeactor is presented specifically for the Earth. The concepts and principles, however, are generally applicable to planetary magnetic field production.

Herndon, J Marvin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear Georeactor Generation of Earth's Geomagnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this communication is to suggest that the mechanism for generating the geomagnetic field and the energy source for powering it are one and the same, a nuclear georeactor at the center of the Earth. Toward this end, I: i) Present evidence that the nuclear georeactor fission-product sub-shell is fluid; ii)Suggest that the geomagnetic field is generated within the georeactor sub-shell, rather than within Earth's iron-alloy fluid core; iii) Describe why convection appears more feasible within the georeactor sub-shell than within the iron-alloy core; iv) Disclose additional relative physical advantages for georeactor sub-shell dynamo operation; and, v) Outline briefly the research that should be conducted to advance the state of knowledge of georeactor-geomagnetic field generation. The concept of geomagnetic field production by the nuclear georeactor is presented specifically for the Earth. The concepts and principles, however, are generally applicable to planetary magnetic field production.

J. Marvin Herndon

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

202

Overview of nuclear MHD power conversion for multi-megawatt electric propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of recent research findings on space applications of nuclear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power for generation of multi klb f electric thrust at thousands of seconds of specific impulse is presented. The high operating temperatures of the nuclear MHD system and potential for direct coupling of the output power to the electric thruster system are characterizing features that allow for design of ultracompact and ultralight nuclear electric propulsion systems. Order of magnitude figures for some mission-critical parameters are collated from various engineering analyses. Specific mass and specific impulse values highlight the inherent benefits of further research and development investment in MHD power.

Blair M. Smith; Travis W. Knight; Samim Anghaie

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Integration of decentralized generators with the electric power grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report develops a new methodology for studying the economic interaction of customer-owned electrical generators with the central electric power grid. The purpose of the report is to study the reciprocal effects of the ...

Finger, Susan

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

205

Exotic Electricity Options and the Valuation of Electricity Generation and Transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exotic Electricity Options and the Valuation of Electricity Generation and Transmission Assets a methodology for valuing electricity deriva- tives by constructing replicating portfolios from electricity-storable nature of electricity, which rules out the traditional spot mar- ket, storage-based method of valuing

206

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOE’s project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Economics of Nuclear and Renewable Electricity Energy Science Coalition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear energy arose as a ‘spin-off ’ from nuclear weapons. Its use grew rapidly during the 1960s, nurtured by huge subsidies and the belief that nuclear electricity would soon become ‘too cheap to meter’. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency, at the end of 2009 there were 438 operating nuclear power reactors in the world, total

Dr Mark Diesendorf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20555. u. S. Nuclear U. S. NRC. Reactor Safety Study: AnNUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRC Regulatory Guide 1. 101. "Report on Current Activities NRC and the Federal Interagency

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plants. WASH~1400 (NUREG 75/014). October 1975. S.Power Plants -LWR Edison." NUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRCof Fixed Nuclear Facilities, NUREG-75/l1l (Reprint of WASH-

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-and RelatedStandards for Fossil-Fuel and Geothermal Power

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality After a proposed power plant has received approval from the State Corporation Commission (SCC) and location approval from the local government, it must apply for all applicable permits from the Virginia

212

Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Focus Area: Water power Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-renewable-energy-electricity-generatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-electricity-generati Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This video teaches the viewer about the current status and future

213

Electric generator dispatch depends on system demand and the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The type of generators with the lowest variable costs are nuclear, hydroelectric, and renewable power (wind and solar). For economic and technical reasons, ...

214

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal, People and Policy Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy11osti/49476.pdf Cost: Free References: Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation[1] Overview This guidebook is a short discussion on how to create policy that overcomes challenges to geothermal implementation. The document follows a five step

215

Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating capacity, 1949-2040 (index, 1949 = 1.0) Subject: Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Author

216

Figure 15. Renewable electricity generation in three cases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 15. Renewable electricity generation in three cases, 2005-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Extended Policies No Sunset ...

217

Figure 17. Electricity generation from natural gas in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 17. Electricity generation from natural gas in three cases, 2005-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Extended Policies No Sunset

218

Electrical motor/generator drive apparatus and method - Energy ...  

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple currents and ...

219

High Strength Undiffused Brushless Electric Motors and Generators  

A brushless electric motor/generator with enhanced air-gap flux density and simplified field weakening. Inventor HSU, JOHN S Engineering Science & Technology Div

220

NREL: Energy Analysis - Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Over the last 30 years, researchers have conducted hundreds of life cycle assessments of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Most electric generating capacity additions in the last decade ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report, and Form EIA-860M (see Table ES3 in the March 2011 ...

222

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of...

223

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council Northwest Power Pool Area This...

224

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Jersey" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

225

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Illinois" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

226

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

227

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Texas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

228

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Washington" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

229

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Montana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,199...

230

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Maine" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

231

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "South Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,199...

232

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Kansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999...

233

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "West Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

234

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Louisiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1...

235

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Hampshire" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

236

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is from renewable energy? EIA estimates that about 10% of world marketed energy consumption is from ...

237

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Electricity generation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Electricity generation by fuel, 1970-2025 (billion kilowatthours). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy...

238

Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, including combined heat and power, 2012-2040 (gigawatts) Coal

239

ELECTRICAL MOTOR/GENERATOR DRIVE APPARATUS AND METHOD - Energy ...  

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple ...

240

Emission Cuts Realities – Electricity Generation Cost and CO2 emissions projections for different electricity generation options for Australia to 2050 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five options for cutting CO2 emissions from electricity generation in Australia are compared with a „Business as Usual ? option over the period 2010 to 2050. The six options comprise combinations of coal, gas, nuclear, wind and solar thermal technologies. The conclusions: The nuclear option reduces CO2 emissions the most, is the only option that can be built quickly enough to make the deep emissions cuts required, and is the least cost of the options that can cut emissions sustainably. Solar thermal and wind power are the highest cost of the options considered. The cost of avoiding emissions is lowest with nuclear and highest with solar and wind power.

Peter Lang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NIST Processes to Help Build Next-Generation Nuclear Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Processes to Help Build Next-Generation Nuclear Power Plants. From NIST Tech Beat: June 2, 2009. ...

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

242

Arizona Public Service Co., Palo Verde Nuclear Generating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arizona Public Service Co., Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. NVLAP Lab Code: 100536-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Mechanical Performance for Current and Next-Generation Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Mechanical Performance for Current and Next-Generation Nuclear ...

244

Estimating Water Needs to Meet 2025 Electricity Generating Capacity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(fossil, nuclear, or biomass) to heat water to steam that is used to drive a turbine-generator. Steam exhausted from the turbine is condensed and recycled to a steam generator or...

245

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Ohio Power Siting Board Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility. An applicant for a certificate to site a wind-powered electric generation

246

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volume 1: Electric Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Wind Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% Provider Office of the State Tax Commissioner Electrical generating facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes in North Dakota. The exemption is granted for the purchase of building materials, production equipment, and any other tangible personal property that is used for constructing or expanding the facility. In order to qualify, the facility must have at least one electrical generation unity

248

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption.
2011-07-25T20:15:39Z...

250

A rotating suspended liquid film as an electric generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed that a rotating liquid film generates electricity when a large external electric field is applied in the plane of the film. In our experiment suspended liquid film (soap film) is formed on a circular frame positioned horizontally on a rotating motor. This devise is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply external electric field in X-direction.The produced electric energy is piked up by two brushes in Y-direction of the suspended liquid film. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this letter we report that the same system can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to an electric energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed in very small scales like micro scales applicable in lab on a chip. The device is comparable to commercial DC electric motors or DC electric generators. but there is a significant difference in their working principle; in a DC electric motor or generator the Lorence force is the driving force, while in an LFEG the Coulomb force is the deriving force. So in despite to usual electric generators, this generator does not use a magnetic field and is purely electrical, which brings a similarity to bio mechanisms. We have investigated the characteristics of such a generator experimentally. This investigation sheds light on the physics of Electrohydrodynamics on liquid films.

Ahmad Amjadi; Sadegh Feiz; Reza Montazeri Namin

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.1,1.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

252

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,0.8,1.1,1.3

253

Financing arrangements and industrial organisation for new nuclear build in electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Finnish and French plants under construction –, but rising fossil fuel and CO2 prices are reviving interest in nuclear power. A potential nuclear power renaissance in liberalised electricity markets will face a number of hurdles associated... with the CO2 price in Europe. The attractiveness of carbon free technologies such as nuclear plant for a power producer is reinforced by the additional cost placed on fossil fuel generation technologies by climate policies and CO2 emissions pricing...

Finon, Dominique; Roques, Fabien A

254

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Kansas Corporation Commission This legislation permits the KCC to determine rate-making principles that will apply to a utility's investment in generation or transmission before constructing a facility or entering into a contract for purchasing power. There is no restriction on the type or the size of electric generating unit

255

Global Potential for Wind-Generated Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... free, non-urban areas and operating at as little as 20% of their rated capacity, could supply >40 times current worldwide consumption of electricity ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

257

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

258

Axial Current Generation from Electric Field: Chiral Electric Separation Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the Chiral Electric Separation Effect (CESE). On very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to $\\mu_V\\mu_A$ with $\\mu_V$ and $\\mu_A$ the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable of CESE in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

Xu-Guang Huang; Jinfeng Liao

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

259

THE EFFICIENCY OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION IN THE US AFTER RESTRUCTURING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

segments of the electricity industry, such as transmission and distribution, which are likely to remainTHE EFFICIENCY OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION IN THE US AFTER RESTRUCTURING Catherine Wolfram· UC Berkeley, NBER and UCEI June 2003 · Prepared for the 2003 Electricity Deregulation Conference at Bush

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

260

Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO Xinmin Hu Daniel Ralph to model markets for delivery of electrical power on looped transmission networks. It analyzes in transmission capacity mean the ISO potentially sets a different electricity price at each node of the trans

Ferris, Michael C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and Transmission Facilities (Nebraska) Elimination of Competition and Duplication of Electricity Generation and Transmission Facilities (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info

262

The Economic Value of Temperature Forecasts in Electricity Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every day, the U.S. electricity-generating industry decides how to meet the electricity demand anticipated over the next 24 h. Various generating units are available to meet the demand, and each unit may have its own production lead time, start-...

Thomas J. Teisberg; Rodney F. Weiher; Alireza Khotanzad

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was established under the Energy Policy Act in August 2005 (EPACT-2005). EPACT-2005 defined an overall plan and timetable for NGNP research, design, licensing, construction and operation by the end of FY 2021. At the time that EPACT-2005 was passed, it was envisioned that key aspects of the project included: NGNP is based on R&D activities supported by the Gen-IV Nuclear Energy initiative; ï‚· NGNP is to be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen or (to do) both; ï‚· The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be the lead national lab for the project; ï‚· NGNP will be sited at the INL in

264

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

265

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

266

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 07/01/2011 Expiration Date 10/01/2013 State Connecticut Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider Connecticut Department of Revenue Services In 2011, Connecticut created a new tax requiring electric power plants in the state that generate and upload electricity to the regional bulk power grid to pay $2.50 per megawatt hour. Renewable energy facilities and customer-sited facilities are exempt from the tax. The tax and related

267

NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

268

Nuclear electric dipole moment of 3He  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the no-core shell model (NCSM) framework, we calculate the {sup 3}He electric dipole moment (EDM) generated by parity- and time-reversal violation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. While the results are somehow sensitive to the interaction model chosen for the strong two- and three-body interactions, we demonstrate the pion-exchange dominance to the EDM of {sup 3}He, if the coupling constants for {pi}, {rho} and {omega}-exchanges are of comparable magnitude, as expected. Finally, our results suggest that a measurement of {sup 3}He EDM would be complementary to the currently planned neutron and deuteron experiments, and would constitute a powerful constraint to the models of the pion P- and T-violating interactions.

Stetcu, Ionel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friar, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hayes, A C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, C P [UNIV WISCONSIN; Navratil, P [LIVERMORE NAT LAB

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Property Damage Risk Assessment Scoping Study: for South Texas Project Electric Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS), EPRI assessed the financial risks of on-site property damage from component failures and accidents and the effectiveness of available insurance in mitigating such risks. This report quantifies the risks of nuclear and nonnuclear accidents and the resulting property damage incurred. The report is a companion document to EPRI's Nuclear Property Insurance Study (TR-108061), which discusses five options for alternate insurance co...

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

271

La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Wind Maximum Rebate PV 10 kW or smaller: $4,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV 10 kW-DC or smaller: Upfront incentive of $0.40 per watt DC PV greater than 10 kW-DC: Performance-based incentive of $44.91/MWh ($0.04491/kWh) paid every 6 months for 10 years Provider La Plata Electric Association La Plata Electric Association (LPEA) offers a one-time rebate, not to exceed the cost of the system, to residential and small commercial customers who install a photovoltaic (PV), wind or hydropower facility. To

272

Can I generate and sell electricity to an electric utility? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles are there in the U.S.? How much U.S. energy consumption and electricity generation comes from renewable sources?

273

Renewable electricity generation in California includes variable ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power produced by geothermal, biomass, biogas, and small hydro generators can be easily dispatched, meaning it can be either increased, decreased, ...

274

The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to… (more)

Hagerty, John Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative September 09, 2008 Washington, DC NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

276

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

277

Joint electric power alternatives study. Appendix G. Joint parallel nuclear alternatives study for Russia. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Joint Parallel Nuclear Alternatives Study for Russia (JPNAS) is a parallel study to the Joint Electric Power Alternatives Study (JEPAS). The JPNAS assessed the costs of enhancing the safety level of Russian nuclear power plants (NPPs), decommissioning of RBMK-1000 and first generation VVER-440 units, completion of NPP construction, NPP repowering into fossil fuel plants, and construction of new generation NPPs. In the framework of the JEPAS, the JPNAS provides data on the nuclear sector which is needed to formulate an integrated resources plan and schedule for investments for the development of Russia`s power sector.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

2001 EPRI International Maintenance Conference: Maintaining Reliable Electric Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Energy Conversion Division organized and presented a three-day conference on fossil and nuclear generation plant maintenance during August 2001, in Houston, Texas. This CD presents the proceedings of that conference.

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning January 14, 2014 2:00PM to 3:00PM EST Online Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV "ownership" are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies, especially PV. In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes. Analysts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Solar Electric Power

280

DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage March 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a cooperative agreement to Summit Texas Clean Energy LLC (STCE) for the Texas Clean Energy Project to design, build, and demonstrate an integrated gasification combined cycle electric generating facility, complete with co-production of high-value products and carbon capture and storage. The project was a third round selection under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a cost-shared collaboration between the Federal Government and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage March 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a cooperative agreement to Summit Texas Clean Energy LLC (STCE) for the Texas Clean Energy Project to design, build, and demonstrate an integrated gasification combined cycle electric generating facility, complete with co-production of high-value products and carbon capture and storage. The project was a third round selection under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a cost-shared collaboration between the Federal Government and

282

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Utah" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

283

INSTRUCTION MANUAL--SNAP-7C ELECTRIC GENERATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A description of SNAP-7C isotope-fueled electric generation system is presented. The operational limits and transportation, handling, installation, and adjustment procedures are described. Maintenance instructions and emergency and safety precautions are included. (M.C.G.)

Blazek, E.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Iowa" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

285

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the...

286

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Ohio" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

287

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New York" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

288

Applications for Certificates for Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An applicant for a certificate to site an electric power generating facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a...

289

Climate Impact on Water Availability for Electricity Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Impact on Water Availability for Electricity Generation Speaker(s): Denis Aelbrecht Date: April 11, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Europe and France experienced a huge...

290

Alternative electric generation impact simulator : final summary report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a short summary of three related research tasks that were conducted during the project "Alternative Electric Generation Impact Simulator." The first of these tasks combines several different types of ...

Gruhl, Jim

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States

Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual...

292

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001...

293

Evaluating Policies to Increase Electricity Generation from Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building on a review of experience in the United States and the European Union, this article advances four main propositions concerning policies aimed at increasing electricity generation from renewable energy. First, who ...

Schmalensee, Richard

294

Competitive electricity markets and investment in new generating capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Fees Provider Montana Department of Revenue This Act reforms taxes paid by electricity generators to reduce tax rates and imposes replacement taxes in response to the 1997 restructuring of the

296

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems February 28, 2005 - 10:33am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC-The Bush Administration today took a major step in advancing international efforts to develop the next generation of clean, safe nuclear energy systems. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined representatives from Canada, France, Japan, and the United Kingdom to sign the first multilateral agreement in history aimed at the development of next generation nuclear energy systems. The work of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is essential to advancing an important component of the Bush Administration's comprehensive energy strategy in the development of next generation nuclear energy technologies.

299

Intelligence in Electricity Networks for Embedding Renewables and Distributed Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Over the course of the 20 th century, the electrical power systems of industrialized economies have become one of the most complex systems created by mankind. In the same period, electricity made a transition from a novelty, to a convenience, to an advantage, and finally to an absolute necessity. World-wide electricity use has been ever-growing. The electricity infrastructure consists of two highlyinterrelated and complex subsystems for commodity trade and physical delivery. To ensure the infrastructure is up and running in the first place, the increasing electricity demand poses a serious threat. Additionally, there are a number of other trends that are forcing a change in infrastructure management. Firstly, there is a shift to intermittent sources: a larger share of renewables in the energy mix means a higher influence of weather patterns on generation. At the same time, introducing more combined heat and power generation (CHP) couples electricity production to heat demand patterns. Secondly, the location of electricity generation relative to the load centers is changing. Large-scale generation from wind is migrating towards and into the seas and oceans, away from the locations of high electricity demand. On

J. K. Kok; M. J. J. Scheepers; I. G. Kamphuis; J. K. Kok; M. J. J. Scheepers; I. G. Kamphuis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Composition of Electricity Generation Portfolios, Pivotal Dynamics, and Market Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use simulations to study how the diversification of electricity generation portfolios influences wholesale prices. We find that the relationship between technological diversification and market prices is mediated by the supply-to-demand ratio. In ... Keywords: electricity, market power, simulations, technology diversification

Albert Banal-Estaòol; Augusto Rupérez Micola

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Voltaic Cells: Using Chemical Reactions to Generate Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Voltaic Cells: Using Chemical Reactions to Generate Electricity Project Overview: Middle and high electricity. A voltaic cell allows for the transfer of electrons through a wire as a result of chemical where the increase in zinc ions creates a demand for them. Lab preparation: 1. Pour the sulfate

Weston, Ken

303

Handbook for Utility Participation in Biogas-Fueled Electric Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is a methane-rich gas produced from the controlled biological degradation of organic wastes. Biogas is produced as part of the treatment of four general classes of wet waste streams: Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge Animal Manure Industrial Wastes Municipal Solid Waste in Sealed Landfills. The high methane content of biogas makes it suitable for fueling electric power generation. As energy prices increase, generation of electric power form biogas becomes increasingly attractive and the number of ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nuclear-renewables energy system for hydrogen and electricity production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change concerns and expensive oil call for a different mix of energy technologies. Nuclear and renewables attract attention because of their ability to produce electricity while cutting carbon emissions. However ...

Haratyk, Geoffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XXXXX XXXXX Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 PNNL-XXXXX Electrical Generation for More- Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 iii Summary This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate

306

Some noise control problems peculiar to nuclear generating facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to confidently predict the noise environment in a nuclear generating facility presently under construction is complicated by the design constraints of physical layout

Robert A. Putnam

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Spark Plasma Sintering of Next Generation Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Spark Plasma Sintering of Next Generation Nuclear Materials. Author(s), Daniel Osterberg, Jeff Perkins, Matt Luke, Brian Jaques, Michael F Hurley, Darryl Butt.

308

Water Use for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes how thermoelectric plants use water and the strengths, limitations, and costs of available technologies for increasing water use efficiency (gal/MWh). The report will be of value to power company strategic planners, environmental managers, and generation managers as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

A rotating suspended liquid film as an electric generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed that a rotating liquid film generates electricity when a large external electric field is applied in the plane of the film. In our experiment suspended liquid film (soap film) is formed on a circular frame positioned horizontally on a rotating motor. This devise is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply external electric field in X-direction.The produced electric energy is piked up by two brushes in Y-direction of the suspended liquid film. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this letter we report that the same system can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to an electric energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed in very small scales like micro scales applicable in lab on a chip. The device is comparable to commercial DC ele...

Amjadi, Ahmad; Namin, Reza Montazeri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60 Million to Train Next Generation 60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology September 20, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to continue America's leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure. The 91 awards announced today will help train and educate the next generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative

311

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology September 20, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to continue America's leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure. The 91 awards announced today will help train and educate the next generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative

312

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience forResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OUTAGES COMPONENT NUCLEAR REACTOR General Primary CoolingAsh Disposal Trouble NUCLEAR REACTOR COMPONENT OUTAGE CAUSESconsisting of a Nuclear units use a reactor in which burner

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charges Relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety," 1976, availableissues impor tant to nuclear reactor safety. This report wasstudies of overall nuclear reactor safety have been

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been restricted core. Nuclear tests are not scheduled untilnuclear NRC, the non-nuclear tests are proceedingInstitute test reactor - megawatts - megawatts - Nuclear

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Insufficient Incentives for Investment in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contracts, which are typically only signed once in a lifetime, with large commissions involved, and therefore require strict regulation. An institutional change, which would create a credible counterpart for generators to sign long-term contracts... . In our calculations we assume an open cycle gas turbine with investment costs of £300/kw.13,14 If contractual arrangements ensure constant revenue streams, then such peak units could be financed at weighted...

Neuhoff, Karsten; de Vries, Laurens

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

317

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

Mark Holbrook

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NP-263, October 1976. Edison Electric Institute, "Report onREGULATION Data from the Edison Electric Institute annualpower plants. However, the Edison Electric Institute, in its

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

SUBJECT: PRAIRIE ISLAND NUCLEAR GENERATING PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating Plant. The enclosed report documents the inspection findings which were discussed on February 22, 2001, with you and other members of your staff. This inspection examined activities conducted under your license as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commission’s rules and regulations and with the conditions of your license. The inspectors reviewed selected procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. Based on the results of this inspection, the inspectors identified two issues of very low safety significance (Green). One of these issues was determined to involve a violation of NRC requirements. However, because of its very low safety significance and because it has been entered into your corrective action program, the NRC is treating the issue as a non-cited violation, in accordance with Section VI.A.1 of the NRC’s Enforcement Policy. If you deny the non-cited violation, you should provide a response with the basis for your denial, within 30 days of the date of this inspection report, to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ATTN: Document Control Desk, Washington DC 20555-0001; with copies to the Regional Administrator,

Dear Mr. Sorensen; Roger D. Lanksbury

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Application of field-modulated generator systems to dispersed solar thermal electric generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Parabolic Dish-Electric Transport concept for dispersed solar thermal generation is considered. In this concept the power generated by 15 kWe Solar Generation Units is electrically collected in a large plant. Various approaches are possible for the conversion of mechanical shaft output of the heat engines to electricity. This study focuses on the Application of Field Modulated Generation System (FMGS) for that purpose. Initially the state-of-the-art of FMGS is presented, and the application of FMGS to dispersed solar thermal electric generation is investigated. This is followed by the definition of the control and monitoring requirements for solar generation system. Then comparison is made between FMGS approach and other options. Finally, the technology developmental needs are identified.

Ramakumar, R.; Bahrami, K.

1979-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as intermittent) output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units Operable Units,1 1957-2011 Nuclear Net Summer Capacity Change, 1950-2011 Status of All Nuclear Generating Units, ...

325

On Low-Frequency Electric Power Generation With PZT Ceramics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piezoelectric materials have long been used as sensors and actuators, however their use as electrical generators is less established. A piezoelectric power generator has great potential for some remote applications such as in vivo sensors, embedded MEMS devices, and distributed networking. Such materials are capable of converting mechanical energy into electrical energy, but developing piezoelectric generators is challenging because of their poor source characteristics (high voltage, low current, high impedance) and relatively low power output. In the past these challenges have limited the development and application of piezoelectric generators, but the recent advent of extremely low power electrical and mechanical devices (e.g., MEMS) make such generators attractive. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of piezoelectric power generation that is verified with simulation and experimental results. Several important considerations in designing such generators are explored, including parameter identification, load matching, form factors, efficiency, longevity, energy conversion and energy storage. Finally, an application of this analysis is presented where electrical energy is generated inside a prototype Total Knee Replacement (TKR) implant.

Stephen R. Platt; et al.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Market concentration and marketing power among electricity generators in Texas  

SciTech Connect

Policy initiatives designed to foster competition among electricity generators in Texas face a special challenge due to the relative isolation of that system. This isolation contributes to high levels of market concentration and market power that could hinder the development of a truly competitive market. This paper examines market concentration and market power in the ERCOT market for electricity generation by calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI) under various assumptions to gauge the degree of market concentration among generators in ERCOT. In addition, some ongoing studies of market power in ERCOT are discussed. The distinction between market concentration and market power is highlighted.

Zarnikau, J.; Lam, A. [Planergy Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 118, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. This dataset contains data for the northwest power pool area of the U.S. Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Northwest Power Pool Area Renewable Energy Generation WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area - Reference (xls, 119.3 KiB)

328

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 116, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest (xls, 119.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

329

AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Capacity Generating Capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

330

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

331

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new installations in the short term. DOE needs to give those immediate objectives the highest priority and any additional support they require to assure their success. DOE is pursuing two initiatives to encourage a greater use of nuclear energy systems. The initiatives have been reviewed by NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning (GRNS) and they are: * A Near Term Development (NTD) Roadmap which is in the process of being

332

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at Callaway Nuclear Plant: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides Ameren UE with an optimized LCM plan for the main generator and exciter at Callaway Plant.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Washington Nuclear Profile - Columbia Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Columbia Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

334

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

335

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor...

336

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

337

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Dresden Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dresden Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

338

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

339

Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal early market for nuclear hydrogen.

Forsberg, C.W.

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue. This report provides information and forecasts important to the domestic and world nuclear and uranium industries. 1997 represents the most recent publication year.

Dr. Zdenek D.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Investment under Regulatory Uncertainty: U.S. Electricity Generation Investment Since 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand. North American Electricity Reliability Council.Regulatory Risk in U.K. Electricity Distribution. ” JournalAn Empirical Model of Electricity Generation Investment

Ishii, Jun; Yan, Jingming

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generate electricity and thermal energy to serve heating andenergy source for thermal energy loads and the generation of2 emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Distributed Generation and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation and Generation and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector Ed Torrero Cooperative Research Network (CRN) National Rural Electric Cooperative Association September 22, 2004 Co-op Basics  Customer owned  Serve 35 million people in 47 states  75 percent of nation's area  2.3 million miles of line is close to half of nation's total  Growth rate twice that of IOU Electrics  Six customers per line-mile vs 33 for IOU  Co-ops view DP as a needed solution; not as a "problem" Broad Range of Technologies Chugach EA 1-MW Fuel Cell Installation Post Office in Anchorage, AK Chugach EA Microturbine Demo Unit at Alaska Village Electric Co-op CRN Transportable 200kW Fuel Cell at Delta- Montrose EA in Durango, CO Plug Power Fuel Cell at Fort Jackson, SC

345

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

346

The Need for Deployment of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research, development, design, construction, and operation of a prototype nuclear reactor to produce electricity and hydrogen. The NGNP is intended to be a collaborative effort among the U.S. Department of Energy, the Idaho National Laboratory, and appropriate industrial partners. It is also intended to include international technology exchanges. The NGNP will utilize what is commonly referred to as a Generation IV design. Generation III designs are the latest reactor designs licensed or certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Generation III+ includes the new designs currently under review by the NRC and anticipated to begin operation during the next 10 to 20 years. Generation IV designs are more advanced and are expected to be ready for commercial construction after 2020. The Generation IV designs may include new or additional features such as the following: • capability for hydrogen production 2 • use of recycled fuel • use of plutonium and other fission by-products • a more efficient fuel cycle with lower generation of waste products • higher safety and physical protection levels • higher reliability • better economic performance. The ANS also supports the federal government efforts in support of a robust Generation IV development program in parallel with current Generation III+ efforts. 3 Sequential utilization of new or different designs and technologies will ensure ever-increasing safety levels and will help nuclear energy fulfill its vital role in worldwide electricity generation.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Place Yancheng, Jiangsu Province, China Sector Biomass Product A biomass project developer in China. Coordinates 33.583°, 113.983009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.583,"lon":113.983009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

348

Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

761 761 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142263761 Varnish cache server Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-860 is a generator-level survey that collects specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. The survey data is summarized in reports such as the Electric Power Annual. The survey data is also available for download here. The data are compressed into a self-extracting (.exe) zip folder containing .XLS data files and record layouts. The current file structure (starting with 2009 data) consists

349

Unalaska geothermal exploration project. Electrical power generation analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the most cost-effective power cycle for utilizing the Makushin Volcano geothermal resource to generate electricity for the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. It is anticipated that the geothermal power plant would be intertied with a planned conventional power plant consisting of four 2.5 MW diesel-generators whose commercial operation is due to begin in 1987. Upon its completion in late 1988, the geothermal power plant would primarily fulfill base-load electrical power demand while the diesel-generators would provide peak-load electrical power and emergency power at times when the geothermal power plant would be partially or completely unavailable. This study compares the technical, environmental, and economic adequacy of five state-of-the-art geothermal power conversion processes. Options considered are single- and double-flash steam cycles, binary cycle, hybrid cycle, and total flow cycle.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Agency/Company /Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Agriculture, Energy Efficiency, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.iaea.org/OurWork/ST/NE/Pess/PESSenergymodels.shtml References: Overview of IAEA PESS Models [1] Related Tools DNE21+ Integrated Global System Modeling Framework Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS

351

Main Generator and Exciter Life Cycle Management Plans at STARS Nuclear Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This CD is a compilation of six optimum LCM plans for the main generators and exciters at the six STARS plants and also contains a generic LCM information "sourcebook" for generators.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to increased scrutiny of the public policies ...

Hagerty, John Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 5,666 5,414 81 171 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3,494 3,491 Q 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3,213 3,211 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,382 1,319 64 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 336 325 Q * 3115 Dairy Products 38 36 1 1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 19 Q Q 14 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 342 238 Q 7 3121 Beverages 308 204 Q 7 3122 Tobacco 34

354

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 119, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region of WECC. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Rockies WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB)

355

Decarbonizing the Electric Sector: Combining Renewable and Nuclear Energy using Thermal Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both renewable and nuclear energy can provide significant contributions to decarbonizing the electric sector. However, a grid employing large amounts of wind and solar energy requires the balance of the system to be highly flexible to respond to the increased variability of the net load. This makes deployment of conventional nuclear power challenging both due to the technical challenges of plant cycling and economic limits of reduced capacity factor. In the United States nuclear power plants generally provide constant, base load power and are most economic when operated at constant power levels. Operating nuclear power plants in load-following modes decreases the plants' annual energy output and increases the levelized cost of energy, decreasing economic competitiveness. One possible solution is to couple thermal energy storage to nuclear power plants. This would enable the reactor to remain at nearly constant output, while cycling the electrical generator in response to the variability of the net load. This paper conceptually explores combinations of wind, solar, and nuclear that can provide a large fraction of a system's electricity, assuming the use of thermal energy storage that would allow nuclear power to provide load following and cycling duty while operating at a constant reactor power output.

Denholm, P.; King, J.; Kutscher, C.; Wilson, P.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Generation IV (Gen IV) - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation IV (Gen Generation IV (Gen IV) Generation IV Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Major Programs Generation IV (Gen IV) Development of next generation nuclear systems featuring significant advances in sustainability, economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Bookmark and Share Generation IV Fact Sheet (73 KB) Overview Generation IV nuclear energy systems target significant advances over current-generation and evolutionary systems in the areas of sustainability, safety and reliability, and economics. These systems are to be deployable by 2030 in both industrialized and developing countries. Development of Generation IV systems is an international initiative. A

357

Cost of New Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Coal Electricity Generation...................... 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Future demand for electricity can be met with a range of technologies, with fuels including coal, nuclear, natural gas, biomass and other renewables, as well as with energy efficiency and demand management approaches. Choices among options will depend on factors including capital cost, fuel cost, market and regulatory uncertainty, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts. This paper estimates the costs of new electricity generation. The approach taken here is to provide a transparent and verifiable analysis based mainly on recent data provided

Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas; Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Spanish Experience in Electric Generation Capacity Turnover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an authoritative review of the recent changes in Spain's electric generation, capacity additions and regulation. Concerns about energy security and environmental performance motivated these changes and the scale is dramatic, certainly on a par with changes that other countries may elicit to reduce CO2 emissions. First motivated to reduce oil use and coal generation, Spain turned to natural gas combustion turbine combined cycle plants. Since this occurred at a time of extraordinary ec...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

360

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O& #39; Connell, R.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Wave Pipe Generating Wave Pipe < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Generating Wave Pipe.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Able Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The EGWAP incorporates a specially designed environmentally sound hollow noncorroding pipe also known as a tube or container whose total height is from the ocean floor to above the highest wave peak The pipe is anchored securely beneath the ocean floor When the water level in the pipe rises due to wave action a float rises and a counterweight descends This action will empower a main drive gear and other gearings to turn a generator to produce electricity The mechanism also insures that either up or down movement of the float will turn the generator drive gear in the same direction Electrical output of the generator is fed into a transmission cable

362

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for managing the R&D program elements; (2) Developing a specific work package for the R&D activities to be performed during each government fiscal year; (3) Reporting the status and progress of the work based on committed deliverables and milestones; (4) Developing collaboration in areas of materials R&D of benefit to the NGNP with countries that are a part of the Generation IV International Forum; and (5) Ensuring that the R&D work performed in support of the materials program is in conformance with established Quality Assurance and procurement requirements. The objective of the NGNP Materials R&D Program is to provide the essential materials R&D needed to support the design and licensing of the reactor and balance of plant, excluding the hydrogen plant. The materials R&D program is being initiated prior to the design effort to ensure that materials R&D activities are initiated early enough to support the design process and support the Project Integrator. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge; thus, new materials and approaches may be required.

G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

without steam gen. ) Steam generator Control Rods Refuelingcooling system, steam generator, and auxiliary coolingcooling system and steam generator. A brief look at tables

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

HAS222d Intro to Energy and Environement: 40% off energy use in US goes into generating electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_power_transmission#Losses http goes into generating electricity generation efficiency: 33% electric power loss: plant to consumer 7 fuel power generation plants that dominate our electricity production. Remember that electricity

365

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under VariousElectricity Tariffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The on-site generation of electricity can offer buildingowners and occupiers financial benefits as well as social benefits suchas reduced grid congestion, improved energy efficiency, and reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. Combined heat and power (CHP), or cogeneration,systems make use of the waste heat from the generator for site heatingneeds. Real-time optimal dispatch of CHP systems is difficult todetermine because of complicated electricity tariffs and uncertainty inCHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads. Typically,CHP systems use simple heuristic control strategies. This paper describesa method of determining optimal control in real-time and applies it to alight industrial site in San Diego, California, to examine: 1) the addedbenefit of optimal over heuristic controls, 2) the price elasticity ofthe system, and 3) the site-attributable greenhouse gas emissions, allunder three different tariff structures. Results suggest that heuristiccontrols are adequate under the current tariff structure and relativelyhigh electricity prices, capturing 97 percent of the value of thedistributed generation system. Even more value could be captured bysimply not running the CHP system during times of unusually high naturalgas prices. Under hypothetical real-time pricing of electricity,heuristic controls would capture only 70 percent of the value ofdistributed generation.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Co-generation of electricity and heat from biogas  

SciTech Connect

Biogas powered co-generation of electricity and hot water is being documented in a full scale demonstration with a 25 kW capacity system. The performance characteristics and effects of operating on biogas for 1400 hours are presented in this paper.

Koelsch, R.K.; Cummings, R.J.; Harrison, C.E.; Jewell, W.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

Erin Boedecker

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

368

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Use of a thermophotovoltaic generator in a hybrid electric vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Viking 29 is the World’s first thermophotovoltaic (TPV) powered automobile. The prototype was funded by the Department of Energy and designed and built by students and faculty at the Vehicle Research Institute (VRI) at Western Washington University. Viking 29 is a series hybrid electric vehicle that utilizes TPV generators to charge its battery pack. Acceleration

Orion Morrison; Michael Seal; Edward West; William Connelly

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 19-20, 2011 April 19-20, 2011 Editors: Joseph H. Eto Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Robert J. Thomas Cornell University Proceedings Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid LBNL-5105E Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings April 19-20, 2011 Editors: Joseph H. Eto, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Robert J. Thomas, Cornell University The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the

371

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Treatment of Solar Generation Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning John Sterling Solar Electric Power Association Joyce McLaren National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mike Taylor Solar Electric Power Association Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-60047 October 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

372

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

47 47 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281847 Varnish cache server Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB)

373

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo

374

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo

375

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

None

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Commercial Nuclear Electric Power in the United States: Problems and Prospects  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article briefly reviews the origins of commercial nuclear electric power, the efforts to dispose of high-level nuclear waste, the costs of building and operating nuclear electric power plants, and other energy-related developments pertinent to the future of nuclear electric power.

Information Center

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Decommissioning San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 1 (SONGS-1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear power plant and termination of the plant license requires the removal of highly activated materials from inside the nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Such a task presents a major challenge in terms of technology, project management, and worker exposure. This report documents the approach taken by Southern California Edison (SCE) in their highly successful reactor vessel internals (RVI) segmentation of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 1 (SONGS-1). The report detail...

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990s. Based on current information, the next group of plants whose license will expire will not begin decommissioning for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one plant, the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, in order to capture its experience for future plants.

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

379

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.Fuel and Geo- thermal Power Plants," by G.D. Case, T.A.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Power Reactors PROTECTION AGAINST SABOTAGE Protection Against Industrial Sabotage I1C-4 Decominarion and Decommissioning

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating ... electric power companies have announced the retirement of five nuclear reactors at four power plants.

382

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects of growth of population around power plant These arenuclear power plants (3000 MWt electrical). of growth in

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

385

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity from Steam Turbine-Generators: A System-level2. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics3. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Washington Nuclear Profile - Columbia Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3wa371 1,097 9,241 96.2 BWR Columbia Generating Station Unit Type Data for 2010 BWR = Boiling Water Reactor. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to ...

387

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3ks210 1,160 9,556 94.0 PWR Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit Type Data for 2010 PWR = Pressurized Light Water Reactor. Note: Totals may not ...

388

1 The Price Elasticity of Supply of Renewable Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many states have adopted policies aimed at promoting the growth of renewable electricity within their state. The most salient of these policies is a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) which mandates that retail electricity providers purchase a predetermined fraction of their electricity from renewable sources. Renewable portfolio standards are a policy tool likely to persist for many decades due to the long term goals of many state RPSs and the likely creation of a federal RPS alongside any comprehensive climate change bill. However, there is little empirical evidence about the costs of these RPS policies. I take an instrumental variables approach to estimate the long-run price elasticity of supply of renewable generation. To instrument for the price paid to renewable generators I use the phased-in implementation of RPSs over time. Using this IV strategy, my preferred estimate of the supply elasticity is 2.7. This parameter allows me to measure the costs of carbon abatement in the electricity sector and to compare those costs with the costs of a broader based policy. Using my parameter estimates, I find that a policy to reduce the CO2 emissions in the northeastern US electricity sector by 2.5 % using only an RPS would cost at least six times more than the regional cap-and-trade system (Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative). The marginal cost of CO2 abatement is $12 using the most optimistic assumptions for an RPS compared to a marginal cost of abatement of $2 in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.

Erik Johnson; Erik Johnson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Main Generator Seal Oil Supply Reliability Improvements at Southern California Edison's San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the justification for the approach, details and results of the Main Generator Seal Oil System reliability enhancements on the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, SONGS. The SONGS, Unit 3 experienced substantial turbine damage in early 2001 after the turbine bearings lubrication oil supply failed. During a loss of off-site power incident, power was lost to the two AC powered turbine lubrication oil pumps due to a breaker failure in the switchgear and the DC powered emergency bearing lubricating oil pump failed to start due to a breaker trip. The SONGS turbine generators coasted down from full speed to a full stop without lubricating oil. This resulted in significant bearing, journal and steam path damage that required a four-month duration repair outage during a time period where electricity was in short supply in the State of California. The generator hydrogen sealing system remained operable during this event, however it was recognized during the event follow up investigation that this system had vulnerabilities to failure similar to the bearing lubrication system. In order to prevent a reoccurrence of this extremely costly event, SONGS has taken actions to modify both of these critical turbine generator systems by adding additional, continuously operating pumps with a new, independent power source and independently routed cables. The main challenge was to integrate the additional equipment into the existing lubrication and seal oil systems. The lubrication Oil System was the first system to be retro-fitted and these results already have been presented. Reference 2. This paper provides the result of the reliability enhancements for the Main Generator Seal Oil System, which concludes the turbine/generator critical oil systems reliability improvements, performed by SONGS. It is worth noting that the design team discovered and corrected a number of other significant operational issues, which had been present from the early days and also learned a great deal of detailed information about this vital system during the project. The SONGS approach and findings are discussed in this paper, as well as a summary of the work performed. This technical paper will be of interest to utilities with a need to improve turbine generator reliability issues. (authors)

Simma, Fred Y.; Chetwynd, Russell J. [Southern California Edison, P.O. Box 800, Rosemead, CA 91770 (United States); Rowe, Stuart A. [Alstom Power Service (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Generation Risk Assessment (GRA) at Cooper Nuclear Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previous EPRI guide described how generating plants can implement various forms of component and system models for generation risk assessment (GRA). This report describes a trial application of GRA modeling at the Cooper Nuclear Station and evaluates the usefulness and accuracy of the EPRI GRA guide.

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

391

Present and future nuclear power generation as a reflection of individual countries' resources and objectives  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear reactor industry has been in a state of decline for more than a decade in most of the world. The reasons are numerous and often unique to the energy situation of individual countries. Two commonly cited issues influence decisions relating to construction of reactors: costs and the need, or lack thereof, for additional generating capacity. Public concern has ''politicized'' the nuclear industry in many non-communist countries, causing a profound effect on the economics of the option. The nuclear installations and future plans are reviewed on a country-by-country basis for 36 countries in the light of the resources and objectives of each. Because oil and gas for power production throughout the world are being phased out as much as possible, coal-fired generation currently tends to be the chosen alternative to nuclear power production. Exceptions occur in many of the less developed countries that collectively have a very limited operating experience with nuclear reactors. The Chernobyl accident in the USSR alarmed the public; however, national strategies and plans to build reactors have not changed markedly in the interim. Assuming that the next decade of nuclear power generation is uneventful, additional electrical demand would cause the nuclear power industry to experience a rejuvenation in Europe as well as in the US. 80 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

Borg, I.Y.

1987-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

392

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Flushing, NY); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven, NY); Todosow, Michael (Miller Place, NY)

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

394

Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

395

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plant Reliability-Availability and State Regulation,"Report on Equipment Availability: Fossil and NuclearBasic Definitions* Availability: Reliability: Base Loading:

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Electricity generation and environmental externalities: Case studies, September 1995  

SciTech Connect

Electricity constitutes a critical input in sustaining the Nation`s economic growth and development and the well-being of its inhabitants. However, there are byproducts of electricity production that have an undesirable effect on the environment. Most of these are emissions introduced by the combustion of fossil fuels, which accounts for nearly 70 percent of the total electricity generated in the United States. The environmental impacts (or damages) caused by these emissions are labeled environmental ``externalities.`` Included in the generic term ``externality`` are benefits or costs resulting as an unintended byproduct of an economic activity that accrue to someone other than the parties involved in the activity. This report provides an overview of the economic foundation of externalities, the Federal and State regulatory approaches, and case studies of the impacts of the externality policies adopted by three States.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect

The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

Timothy J. Leahy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

CDCA Final EIS for Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA DESERT CONSERVATION AREA PLAN CALIFORNIA DESERT CONSERVATION AREA PLAN AMENDMENT / FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR IVANPAH SOLAR ELECTRIC GENERATING SYSTEM FEIS-10-31 JULY 2010 BLM/CA/ES-2010-010+1793 In Reply Refer To: In reply refer to: 1610-5.G.1.4 2800lCACA-48668 Dear Reader: Enclosed is the proposed California Desert Conservation Area Plan Amendment and Final Environmental Impact Statement (CDCA Plan Amendment/FEIS) for the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS) project. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) prepared the CDCA Plan Amendment/FEIS for the ISEGS project in consultation with cooperating agencies and California State agencies, taking into account public comments received during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. The proposed plan amendment adds the Ivanpah

399

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

400

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

87 87 January 2010 The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation Paul Denholm, Erik Ela, Brendan Kirby, and Michael Milligan National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-47187 January 2010 The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation Paul Denholm, Erik Ela, Brendan Kirby, and Michael Milligan Prepared under Task No. WER8.5005 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

402

Annual Electric Generator data - EIA-860 data file  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

60 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B) 60 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B) Release Date: October 10, 2013 for Final 2012 data Next Release Date: September 2014 Re-Release 2012 data: December 4, 2013 (CORRECTION) The survey Form EIA-860 collects generator-level specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. Summary level data can be found in the Electric Power Annual. Detailed data are compressed (zip) and contain the following files: LayoutYyy – Provides a directory of all (published) data elements collected on the Form EIA-860 together with the related description, specific file location(s), and, where appropriate, an explanation of codes.

403

Microgrids in the Evolving Electricity Generation and DeliveryInfrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The legacy paradigm for electricity service in most of the electrified world today is based on the centralized generation-transmission-distribution infrastructure that evolved under a regulated environment. More recently, a quest for effective economic investments, responsive markets, and sensitivity to the availability of resources, has led to various degrees of deregulation and unbundling of services. In this context, a new paradigm is emerging wherein electricity generation is intimately embedded with the load in microgrids. Development and decay of the familiar macrogrid is discussed. Three salient features of microgrids are examined to suggest that cohabitation of micro and macro grids is desirable, and that overall energy efficiency can be increased, while power is delivered to loads at appropriate levels of quality.

Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: New Zealand Energy Authority Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____45553.aspx Country: New Zealand Cost: Free Australia and New Zealand Coordinates: -40.900557°, 174.885971°

405

BUILDOUT AND UPGRADE OF CENTRAL EMERGENCY GENERATOR SYSTEM, GENERATOR 3 AND 4 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SECTION 01000—SUMMARY OF WORK PART 1—GENERAL 1.1 SUMMARY The work to be performed under this project consists of providing the labor, equipment, and materials to perform "Buildout and Upgrade of Central Emergency Generator System, Generator 3 and 4 Electrical Installation" for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Dryden Flight Research Center (NASA/DFRC), Edwards, California 93523. All modifications to existing substations and electrical distribution systems are the responsibility of the contractor. It is the contractor’s responsibility to supply a complete and functionally operational system. The work shall be performed in accordance with these specifications and the related drawings. The work of this project is defined by the plans and specifications contained and referenced herein. This work specifically includes but is not limited to the following: Scope of Work - Installation 1. Install all electrical wiring and controls for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing electrical installation for generators 1 and 2 and in accordance with drawings. Contractor shall provide as-built details for electrical installation. 2. Install battery charger systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing battery charging equipment and installation for generators 1 and 2. This may require exchange of some battery charger parts already on-hand. Supply power to new battery chargers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 3. Install electrical wiring for fuel/lube systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Supply power to lube oil heaters and fuel system (day tanks) from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to fuel systems. 4. Install power to new dampers/louvers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Wiring shall be similar to installation to existing dampers/louvers. Utilize existing conduits already routed to louver areas to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to new dampers/louvers. 5. Install power to jacket water heaters for new generators 3 and 4 from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 6. Install new neutral grounding resistor and associated parts and wiring for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Grounding resistors will be Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). 7. Install two new switchgear sections, one for generator #3 and one for generator #4, to match existing generator #1 cubicle design and installation and in accordance with drawings and existing parts lists. This switchgear will be provided as GFE. 8. Ground all new switchgear, generators 3 and 4, and any other new equipment to match existing grounding connections for generators 1 and 2, switchgear and other equipment. See drawings for additional details. Grounding grid is already existing. Ensure that all grounding meets National Electrical Code requirements. 9. Cummins DMC control for the generator and switchgear syste

Gary D. Seifert; G. Shawn West; Kurt S. Myers; Jim Moncur

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Pricing Carbon for Electricity Generation: National and International Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CO2 equivalent). This is equivalent to specifying a stock of GHGs, or a quantity limit on the amount of fossil fuel that can be burned over the next 100-200 years. The argument for choosing this quantity target, loosely stated, is that mitigation... treatment), but it is the combination of long timescales and policy risk that is damaging, - While fossil-fuel generation is at the margin and setting the electricity price, conventional generators will be largely hedged against both fuel and carbon price...

Grubb, Michael; Newbery, David

407

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

P. E. MacDonald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Review of Electricity Generation Technology Lifecycle GHG Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a selection of published cross-technology assessments and two recent meta-analyses evaluating life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from different electricity generation technologies. Differences in life-cycle GHG estimates reflect differing assessment methodologies, plant and equipment construction practices, power plant conversion efficiencies, power plant size and operating characteristics, practices in fuel preparation and transport, and system boundary as...

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

409

Role of Renewable Energy in Sustainable Electricity Generation Portfolios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update describes the use of energy system and capacity planning models and alternative scenarios of the future to evaluate the potential role of renewable energy in a sustainable electricity generation portfolio. Base case runs of the three models considered in this study all forecast growing contributions from renewables over a range of scenarios, but predictions vary widely due to differing modeling approaches and differing assumptions about future market, policy, technology, and other c...

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Economic Modeling of Mid-Term Electric Generation Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The type and stringency of environmental mandates and carbon regulation in the next 10 years continue to be a topic of substantial uncertainty and debate. This study applies a model-based approach for exploring the potential magnitude of shifts in electric generation trends that could occur over a broad range of future environmental regulatory outcomes. Cases examined include a path of stringent environmental regulations, a high cost carbon policy, and their combination. This study is a follow-on modelin...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Clearance and Tagging Guideline for Fossil Electric Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In their trips to more than a dozen plants in the past three years, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teams observed that clearance and tagging processes have ranged from comprehensive to less than adequate. In plants with detailed procedures and plants with less than adequate procedures, activities have been observed that were not as safe as they should have been. EPRI and fossil generating advisors determined that a clearance and tagging guideline was needed. EPRI and the industry advisors decid...

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Firestone,Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Table of3 2.1 Electricity Tariff

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Very High Efficiency Reactor (VHER) Concepts for Electrical Power Generation and Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Very High Efficiency Reactor study was to develop and analyze concepts for the next generation of nuclear power reactors. The next generation power reactor should be cost effective compared to current power generation plant, passively safe, and proliferation-resistant. High-temperature reactor systems allow higher electrical generating efficiencies and high-temperature process heat applications, such as thermo-chemical hydrogen production. The study focused on three concepts; one using molten salt coolant with a prismatic fuel-element geometry, the other two using high-pressure helium coolant with a prismatic fuel-element geometry and a fuel-pebble element design. Peak operating temperatures, passive-safety, decay heat removal, criticality, burnup, reactivity coefficients, and material issues were analyzed to determine the technical feasibility of each concept.

PARMA JR.,EDWARD J.; PICKARD,PAUL S.; SUO-ANTTILA,AHTI JORMA

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal, People and Policy Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Guide/manual, Case studies/examples, Templates, Technical report User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/geothermal/publications.html Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel and Geo­ thermal Power Plants," by G.D. Case, T.A.produces thermal energy, from the nuclear power plant, whichthermal, or the study "large" plants about one about 1000 sixth MW size of current The large nuclear power plants (

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

Dwyer, O.E.

1958-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

417

Assessment of next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made an assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. A detailed thermal hydraulic analysis, using models developed at ANL, was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop. Two IHX designs namely, shell and straight tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in an earlier assessment. Helical coil heat exchangers were analyzed in the current report and the results were compared with the performance features of designs from industry. In addition, a comparative analysis is presented between the shell and straight tube, helical, and printed circuit heat exchangers from the standpoint of heat exchanger volume, primary and secondary sides pressure drop, and number of tubes. The IHX being a high temperature component, probably needs to be designed using ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, assuming that the IHX will be classified as a class 1 component. With input from thermal hydraulic calculations performed at ANL, thermal conduction and stress analyses were performed for the helical heat exchanger design and the results were compared with earlier-developed results on shell and straight tube and printed circuit heat exchangers.

Majumdar, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Natesan, K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth… (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Decentralized control techniques applied to electric power distributed generation in microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Distributed generation of electric energy has become part of the current electric power system. In this context a new scenario is arising in which small… (more)

Vásquez Quintero, Juan Carlos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Impacts of Electric Industry Restructuring on Electric Generation and Fuel Markets: Analytical and Business Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Restructuring and increasing competition are likely to have a major impact on electric generating companies and the individuals and organizations that buy, transport, market, or supply fuels. Restructuring may also affect the patterns of coal and gas use. This report, the first in a series by EPRI and the Gas Research Institute (GRI), describes the scope of these potential impacts.

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies Volume 2 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai, T. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Arent, D. Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Porro, G. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Meshek, M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sandor, D. National Renewable

423

Nuclear steam-generator transplant total rises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several utilities with pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are replacing leaking and corroded steam generators. Over half the PWRs face corrosion problems that will cost $50 million to $100 million per unit to correct. An alternative approach of installing new tube sleeves has only had one application. Corrosion prevention still eludes utilities, whose problems differ. Westinghouse units were the first to experience corrosion problems because they have almost all operated for a decade or more. Some advances in condenser and steam-generator technology should extend the component life of younger units, and some leaking PWR tubes can be plugged. Operating differences may explain why PWRs have operated for over 20 years on submarines using phosphate water chemistry, while the use of de-aerators in the secondary-systems of foreign PWRs may explain their better performance. Among the corrective steps recommended by Stone and Webster are tighter chemistry control, better plant layup practices, revamping secondary-system hardware, condensate polishing, and de-aerators. Research continues to find the long-term preventative. 2 tables. (DCK)

Smock, R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. (e) "Facility" means one or all generating units at an electric generating station. (f) "Fuel (b)(3)(C) of section 1392. (g) "Generating facility output" means the electrical energy and/or fuel1 Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure

425

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a. b. c. Pump Ap S(WDB) OK NT(NC) W(WDB) Steam generatorsuperheat Steam generator tube leaks D. Core thermaland radial models Steam generator tube leaks Critical heat

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

Bowman, C.D.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

428

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California retail industrial electricity price, as reportedindustrial customers, 2005 source: CAISO (2006) 2005 TOU electricity prices

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric  vehicles  and appliances.   For  coordination  and  organization  purposes,  most  of  the  electricity  industry 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Increased use of reject heat from electric generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to determine existing barriers to greater use of reject heat by electric power producers, including utilities and cogenerators. It includes analytical studies of the technical and economic issues and a survey of several electric power producers. The core analytic findings of the study are that although electric utility- based, cogenerated district heating is sometimes cost competitive with currently common furnaces and boilers, it is not clearly less expensive, and is often more expensive. Since market penetration by a new technology depends on strong perceived advantages, district heating will remain at a disadvantage unless its benefits, such as lowered emissions and decreased reliance on foreign oil, are given overt financial form through subsidies or tax incentives. The central finding from the survey was that electric utilities have arrived at the same conclusion by their own routes; we present a substantial list of their reasons for not engaging in district heating or for not pursuing it more vigorously, and many of them can be summarized as the lack of a clear cost advantage for district heat. We also note that small-scale district heating systems, based on diesel generators and located near the thermal load center, show very clear cost advantages over individual furnaces. This cost advantage is consistent with the explosive growth currently observed in private cogeneration systems.

Leigh, R.W. [Leigh (Richard W.), New York, NY (United States); Piraino, M. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

NUCLEAR ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

could improve the economic and safety performance of these advanced reactors. Nuclear power can reduce GHG emissions from electricity production and possibly in co-generation...

434

Generation of electricity with fuel cell using alcohol fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for generating electricity in a fuel cell, the fuel cell comprising a cathode, an electrolyte, an anode comprising a first, fluid-permeable face and a second face in contact with the electrolyte, and an external circuit connecting the cathode and the anode. It comprises bringing a lower primary alcohol into contact with the first fluid-permeable face of the anode, thereby permitting the lower primary alcohol to penetrate into the cross-section of the anode toward the second face; oxidizing the lower primary alcohol essentially to carbon dioxide and water at the second face of the anode, reducing a reducible gas at the cathode, and obtaining electricity from the fuel cell.

Reddy, N.R.K.V.; Taylor, E.J.

1992-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

Strongly coupled copper plasma generated by underwater electrical wire explosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of theoretical approaches to the analysis of the parameters of a discharge channel consisting of strongly coupled plasma generated in the process of underwater electrical wire explosion are presented. The analysis is based on experimental results obtained from discharges employing Cu wire. The obtained experimental data included electrical measurements and optical observations from which information about the dynamics of the water flow was extrapolated. Numerical calculation based on a 1D magnetohydrodynamic model was used to simulate the process of underwater wire explosion. A wide range conductivity model was applied in this calculation and good agreement with a set of experimental data was obtained. A method of determining the average temperature of the discharge channel based on this model and experimental results is proposed, and the limits of this method's applicability are discussed.

Grinenko, A.; Gurovich, V.Tz.; Saypin, A.; Efimov, S.; Krasik, Ya.E.; Oreshkin, V.I. [Physics Department, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAN, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

BRUSLIB and NETGEN: the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library and nuclear network generator for astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear reaction rates are quantities of fundamental importance in astrophysics. Substantial efforts have been devoted in the last decades to measure or calculate them. The present paper presents for the first time a detailed description of the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library BRUSLIB and of the nuclear network generator NETGEN so as to make these nuclear data packages easily accessible to astrophysicists for a large variety of applications. BRUSLIB is made of two parts. The first one contains the 1999 NACRE compilation based on experimental data for 86 reactions with (mainly) stable targets up to Si. The second part of BRUSLIB concerns nuclear reaction rate predictions calculated within a statistical Hauser-Feshbach approximation, which limits the reliability of the rates to reactions producing compound nuclei with a high enough level density. These calculations make use of global and coherent microscopic nuclear models for the quantities entering the rate calculations. The use of such models is utterly important, and makes the BRUSLIB rate library unique. A description of the Nuclear Network Generator NETGEN that complements the BRUSLIB package is also presented. NETGEN is a tool to generate nuclear reaction rates for temperature grids specified by the user. The information it provides can be used for a large variety of applications, including Big Bang nucleosynthesis, the energy generation and nucleosynthesis associated with the non-explosive and explosive hydrogen to silicon burning stages, or the synthesis of the heavy nuclides through the s-, alpha- and r-, rp- or p-processes.

M. Aikawa; M. Arnould; S. Goriely; A. Jorissen; K. Takahashi

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

437

Magnetic Field Generation in Planets and Satellites by Natural Nuclear Fission Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most fundamental problems in physics has been to understand the nature of the mechanism that generates the geomagnetic field and the magnetic fields of other planets and satellites. For decades, the dynamo mechanism, thought to be responsible for generating the geomagnetic field and other planetary magnetic fields, has been ascribed to convection in each planet's iron-alloy core. Recently, I described the problems inherent in Earth-core convection and proposed instead that the geomagnetic field is produced by a dynamo mechanism involving convection, not in the fluid core, but in the electrically conductive, fluid, fission-product sub-shell of a natural nuclear fission reactor at the center of the Earth, called the georeactor. Here I set forth in detail the commonality in the Solar System of the matter like that of the inside of the Earth, which is my basis for generalizing the concept of planetary magnetic field generation by natural planetocentric nuclear fission reactors.

J. Marvin Herndon

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

438

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and T. O’Brien. 2003. Free Electricity from Steam Turbine-plants and sites that need electricity and heat (i.e. steam)of the Potential for Electricity Generation Owen Bailey and

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MWe l. l. l. l. l. l. l. CONDENSER o. o. o. o. GENERATOR o.Code BOILER TURBINE CONDENSER MWe MWe MWe 600 & Above MWe O.3) pE rcentage of total CONDENSER l. 23l. O. GENERATOR l.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

THE IMPACTS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATING CAPACITY .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources has increased rapidly in the last decade. For example, Renewable Energy Sources for Electricity (RES-E) generating capacity in the… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Optimization of Piezoelectric Electrical Generators Powered by Random Vibrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper compares the performances of a vibrationpowered electrical generators using PZT piezoelectric ceramic associated to two different power conditioning circuits. A new approach of the piezoelectric power conversion based on a nonlinear voltage processing is presented and implemented with a particular power conditioning circuit topology. Theoretical predictions and experimental results show that the nonlinear processing technique may increase the power harvested by a factor up to 4 compared to the Standard optimization technique. Properties of this new technique are analyzed in particular in the case of broadband, random vibrations, and compared to those of the Standard interface.

Lefeuvre, E; Richard, C; Petit, L; Guyomar, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Electrical motor/generator drive apparatus and method  

SciTech Connect

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple currents and thus the volume and cost of a capacitor. The drive methodology is based on a segmented drive system that does not add switches or passive components but involves reconfiguring inverter switches and motor stator winding connections in a way that allows the formation of multiple, independent drive units and the use of simple alternated switching and optimized Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) schemes to eliminate or significantly reduce the capacitor ripple current.

Su, Gui Jia

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

443

Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants  

SciTech Connect

A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.

Reed, S.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Electricity from Steam Turbine-Generators: A System-scale back-pressure steam turbine. Several manufactures2. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... Energy sources and percent share of total electricity generation in 2012 were:

446

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of  Electrical Power & Energy Systems,  27 (2005), Journal  of  Electrical  Power  &  Energy  Systems Journal of Electrical Power & Energy  Systems, 27 (2005), 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and relatively high electricity prices, capturing 97% of thecases, real-time electricity prices. Smaller DG installerselectric, and heating), electricity prices, DG availability,

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under Various Electricity Tariffs Firestone, R. , Creighton,Under Various Electricity Tariffs Table of Contents Table of3 2.1 Electricity Tariff

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and tools related to the electric power  industry and its 2003.   American Electric Power.  Interstate transmission by  Means  of  Enhanced  Electric  Power  Systems  Control: 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

domains.  The electricity industry is well poised to evolution  of  the  electricity  industry.   This  paper Behavior  The  electricity  industry  is  in  the  midst 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications  

SciTech Connect

Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Emergency Diesel Generator Condition- Based Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condition-based maintenance practices that were developed in the United States in the 1990s for emergency diesel generators (EDGs) have not been fully adopted by international nuclear plant operators. To encourage broader use of such practices, NMAC formed a technical advisory group of international utilities interested in learning more about condition-based EDG maintenance practices.

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station - Unit 1 Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides detailed information on the successful decommissioning activities of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS 1). The report describes their experiences and lessons learned for managers of US and international plants beginning or currently engaged in decommissioning.

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

456

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entry are u Table 4-6 GAS TURBINE FOR 1965-1974 (OUTAGES)AVERAGE utage Cause Code GAS TURBINE GENERATOR FORCED OUTAGEof fossil units, and for gas turbine units, the basic data

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Effect of Hurricane Andrew on the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station from August 20--30, 1992. [Final report  

SciTech Connect

On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Turkey Point Electrical Generating Station with sustained winds of 145 mph (233 km/h). This is the report of the team that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) jointly sponsored (1) to review the damage that the hurricane caused the nuclear units and the utility`s actions to prepare for the storm and recover from it, and (2) to compile lessons that might benefit other nuclear reactor facilities.

Hebdon, F.J. [Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Smartgrids and distributed generation: the future electricity networks of the European union  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new concept for the European electrical system is emerging where a portion of the electricity generated by large conventional plants will be displaced by a great number of small generators disseminated throughout the territory. In this scenario, each ... Keywords: distributed generation, electrical distribution systems, energy and environment

Francesco Muzi

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation at high ionic strength in microbial fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation at high ionic strength in microbial fuel cell organic matter using elec- trochemically active bacteria as catalysts to generate electrical energy of the most exciting applications of MFCs is their use as benthic unattended generators to power electrical

Sun, Baolin

460

Executive Summary: Research in Nuclear Power—Workshop on the Needs of the Next Generation of Nuclear Power Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Fission Reactor

A. David Rossin; Kunmo Chung; K. L. Peddicord

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461

El Paso County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal Resource Potential at Ft. Bliss Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title El Paso County Geothermal Electric Generation Project: Innovative Research Technologies Applied to the Geothermal Resource Potential at Ft. Bliss Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description A dynamic and technically capable project team has been assembled to evaluate the commercial viability of geothermal resources on the Ft. Bliss Military Reservation with a focus on the McGregor Test Range. Driving the desire of Ft. Bliss and El Paso County to assess the commercial viability of the geothermal resources are four factors that have converged in the last several years. The first is that Ft. Bliss will be expanding by nearly 30,000 additional troops, an expansion which will significantly increase utilization of energy resources on the facility. Second is the desire for both strategic and tactical reasons to identify and control a source of power than can directly provide the forward fire bases with "off grid" electricity in the event of a major power outage. In the worst case, this power can be sold to the grid and be used to reduce energy costs at the main Ft. Bliss installation in El Paso. Finally, Congress and the Department of Defense have mandated that Ft. Bliss and other military reservations obtain specified percentages of their power from renewable sources of production. The geothermal resource to be evaluated, if commercially viable, could provide Ft. Bliss with all the energy necessary to meet these goals now and in the future. To that end, the garrison commander has requested a target of 20 megawatts as an initial objective for geothermal resources on the installation. Finally, the County government has determined that it not only wishes to facility this effort by Ft. Bliss, but would like to reduce its own reliance on fossil based energy resources to provide power for current and future needs.

462

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

463

International Natural Gas Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per 107 Kilocalories - Gross Calorific Value2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium C C C C C C C C C Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Canada 145.5 144.7 174.9 171.9 225.2 NA NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 244.7 252.1 258.6 281.0 326.2 348.5 400.8 499.3 NA

464

Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria 83.0 96.4 146.4 153.3 182.2 226.1 220.3 342.3 248.3 Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium 155.1 160.4 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Canada 115.7 117.8 180.4 141.5 198.4 222.4 NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Cuba NA NA NA 183.4 NA NA NA NA NA

465

Quantum read-out and fast initialization of nuclear spin qubits with electric currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear spin qubits have the longest coherence times in the solid state, but their quantum read-out and initialization is a great challenge. We present a theory for the interaction of an electric current with the nuclear spins of donor impurities in semiconductors. The theory yields a sensitivity criterion for quantum detection of nuclear spin states using electrically detected magnetic resonance, as well as an all electrical method for fast nuclear spin qubit initialization.

Noah Stemeroff; Rogerio de Sousa

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

466

National need for utilizing nuclear energy for process heat generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors are potential sources for generating process heat, and their applications for such use economically competitive. They help satisfy national needs by helping conserve and extend oil and natural gas resources, thus reducing energy imports and easing future international energy concerns. Several reactor types can be utilized for generating nuclear process heat; those considered here are light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), gas-cooled reactors (GCRs), and liquid metal reactors (LMRs). LWRs and HWRs can generate process heat up to 280/sup 0/C, LMRs up to 540/sup 0/C, and GCRs up to 950/sup 0/C. Based on the studies considered here, the estimated process heat markets and the associated energy markets which would be supplied by the various reactor types are summarized.

Gambill, W.R.; Kasten, P.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prevent serious damage to the nuclear fuel, since it is thetransportation: for nuclear plants, fuel handling is carriedSpecific Fossil Fuel Geothermal Nuclear Solid Waste Disposal

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Unbundling generation and transmission services for competitive electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

Ancillary services are those functions performed by the equipment and people that generate, control, and transmit electricity in support of the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) defined such services as those `necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.` The nationwide cost of ancillary services is about $12 billion a year, roughly 10% of the cost of the energy commodity. More important than the cost, however, is the necessity of these services for bulk-power reliability and for the support of commercial transactions. FERC`s landmark Order 888 included a pro forma tariff with provision for six key ancillary services. The Interconnected Operations Services Working Group identified another six services that it felt were essential to the operation of bulk-power systems. Several groups throughput the United States have created or are forming independent system operators, which will be responsible for reliability and commerce. To date, the electricity industry (including traditional vertically integrated utilities, distribution utilities, power markets and brokers, customers, and state and federal regulators) has paid insufficient attention to these services. Although the industry had made substantial progress in identifying and defining the key services, much remains to be doe to specify methods to measure the production, delivery, and consumption of these services; to identify the costs and cost-allocation factors for these services; and to develop market and operating rules for their provision and pricing. Developing metrics, determining costs, and setting pricing rules are important because most of these ancillary services are produced by the same pieces of equipment that produce the basic electricity commodity. Thus, the production of energy and ancillary services is highly interactive, sometimes complementary and sometimes competing. In contrast to today`s typical time-invariant, embedded-cost prices, competitive prices for ancillary services would vary with system loads and spot prices for energy.

Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Distributed Electrical Power Generation: Summary of Alternative Available Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000ABSTRACT: The Federal government is the greatest consumer of electricity in the nation. Federal procurement and installation of higher efficiency energy sources promises many benefits, in terms of economy, employment, export, and environment. While distributed generation (DG) technologies offer many of the benefits of alternative, efficient energy sources, few DG systems can currently be commercially purchased “off the shelf, ” and complicated codes and standards deter potential users. Federal use of distributed generation demonstrates the technology, can help drive down costs, and an help lead the general public to accept a changing energy scheme. This work reviews and describes various distributed generation technologies, including fuel cells, microturbines, wind turbines, photovoltaic arrays, and Stirling engines. Issues such as fuel availability, construction considerations, protection controls are addressed. Sources of further information are provided. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents.

Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik; Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Exotic electricity options and the valuation of electricity generation and transmission assets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: capacity valuation, electricity derivatives, electricity futures contract, exchange option, mean reversion, real options, spark spread

Shi-Jie Deng; Blake Johnson; Aram Sogomonian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Assessment of high temperature nuclear energy storage systems for the production of intermediate and peak-load electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased cost of energy, depletion of domestic supplies of oil and natural gas, and dependence on foreign suppliers, have led to an investigation of energy storage as a means to displace the use of oil and gas presently being used to generate intermediate and peak-load electricity. Dedicated nuclear thermal energy storage is investigated as a possible alternative. An evaluation of thermal storage systems is made for several reactor concepts and economic comparisons are presented with conventional storage and peak power producing systems. It is concluded that dedicated nuclear storage has a small but possible useful role in providing intermediate and peak-load electric power.

Fox, E. C.; Fuller, L. C.; Silverman, M. D.

1977-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

472

Dynamic Analysis of a Grid-Connected Wind Electric Generator with Embedded Static VAR Compensator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes modeling and simulation of Wind Electric Generator (WEG) comprising a pitch controlled Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) coupled to squirrel cage induction generator through a gear. The generic issue of VAR drain from the grid ... Keywords: Wind turbine, induction generator, two mass model - drive train, SVC, wind electric generator dynamics

Vishnuvardhanan V.; Sasi K. Kottayil

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-54447. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimizationrelated work. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization3 2.2 Distributed Generation

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Air Quality Impact of Distributed Generation of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality impact of distributed generation. California Energyquality impacts of distributed generation, Proceedings ofquality impacts of distributed generation, Proceedings of

Jing, Qiguo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefits of Distributed Generation. Unpublished draftto Establish a Distributed Generation Certification Program.Order: Establish a Distributed Generation Certification

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The April 2011 DOE workshop, 'Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid', was the culmination of a year-long process to bring together some of the Nation's leading researchers and experts to identify computational challenges associated with the operation and planning of the electric power system. The attached papers provide a journey into these experts' insights, highlighting a class of mathematical and computational problems relevant for potential power systems research. While each paper defines a specific problem area, there were several recurrent themes. First, the breadth and depth of power system data has expanded tremendously over the past decade. This provides the potential for new control approaches and operator tools that can enhance system efficiencies and improve reliability. However, the large volume of data poses its own challenges, and could benefit from application of advances in computer networking and architecture, as well as data base structures. Second, the computational complexity of the underlying system problems is growing. Transmitting electricity from clean, domestic energy resources in remote regions to urban consumers, for example, requires broader, regional planning over multi-decade time horizons. Yet, it may also mean operational focus on local solutions and shorter timescales, as reactive power and system dynamics (including fast switching and controls) play an increasingly critical role in achieving stability and ultimately reliability. The expected growth in reliance on variable renewable sources of electricity generation places an exclamation point on both of these observations, and highlights the need for new focus in areas such as stochastic optimization to accommodate the increased uncertainty that is occurring in both planning and operations. Application of research advances in algorithms (especially related to optimization techniques and uncertainty quantification) could accelerate power system software tool performance, i.e. speed to solution, and enhance applicability for new and existing real-time operation and control approaches, as well as large-scale planning analysis. Finally, models are becoming increasingly essential for improved decision-making across the electric system, from resource forecasting to adaptive real-time controls to online dynamics analysis. The importance of data is thus reinforced by their inescapable role in validating, high-fidelity models that lead to deeper system understanding. Traditional boundaries (reflecting geographic, institutional, and market differences) are becoming blurred, and thus, it is increasingly important to address these seams in model formulation and utilization to ensure accuracy in the results and achieve predictability necessary for reliable operations. Each paper also embodies the philosophy that our energy challenges require interdisciplinary solutions - drawing on the latest developments in fields such as mathematics, computation, economics, as well as power systems. In this vein, the workshop should be viewed not as the end product, but the beginning of what DOE seeks to establish as a vibrant, on-going dialogue among these various communities. Bridging communication gaps among these communities will yield opportunities for innovation and advancement. The papers and workshop discussion provide the opportunity to learn from experts on the current state-of-the-art on computational approaches for electric power systems, and where one may focus to accelerate progress. It has been extremely valuable to me as I better understand this space, and consider future programmatic activities. I am confident that you too will enjoy the discussion, and certainly learn from the many experts. I would like to thank the authors of the papers for sharing their perspectives, as well as the paper discussants, session recorders, and participants. The meeting would not have been as successful without your commitment and engagement. I also would like to thank Joe Eto and Bob Thomas for their vision and leadership in bringing together su

Birman, Kenneth; Ganesh, Lakshmi; Renessee, Robbert van; Ferris, Michael; Hofmann, Andreas; Williams, Brian; Sztipanovits, Janos; Hemingway, Graham; University, Vanderbilt; Bose, Anjan; Stivastava, Anurag; Grijalva, Santiago; Grijalva, Santiago; Ryan, Sarah M.; McCalley, James D.; Woodruff, David L.; Xiong, Jinjun; Acar, Emrah; Agrawal, Bhavna; Conn, Andrew R.; Ditlow, Gary; Feldmann, Peter; Finkler, Ulrich; Gaucher, Brian; Gupta, Anshul; Heng, Fook-Luen; Kalagnanam, Jayant R; Koc, Ali; Kung, David; Phan, Dung; Singhee, Amith; Smith, Basil

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

477

Framing Scenarios of Electricity Generation and Gas Use: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a systematic appraisal of trends in electric generation and demands for gas for power generation. Gas-fired generation is the leading driver of forecasted growth in demand for natural gas in the United States, and natural gas is a leading fuel for planned new generating capacity. The report goes behind the numbers and forecasts to quantify key drivers and uncertainties.

1996-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

478

Space nuclear power system and the design of the nuclear electric propulsion OTV  

SciTech Connect

Payload increases of three to five times that of the Shuttle/Centaur can be achieved using nuclear electric propulsion. Various nuclear power plant options being pursued by the SP-100 Program are described. These concepts can grow from 100 kW/sub e/ to 1MW/sub e/ output. Spacecraft design aspects are addressed, including thermal interactions, plume interactions, and radiation fluences. A baseline configuration is described accounting for these issues. Safety aspects of starting the OTV transfer from an altitude of 300 km indicate no significant additional risk to the biosphere.

Buden, D.; Garrison, P.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Microgrids in the Evolving Electricity Generation and Delivery Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

progress of the electricity industry is here described inpractical and the electricity industry because a highlyIndustry An Update. Available: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/

Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear electricity generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Economics of geothermal electricity generation from hydrothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most important factors affecting the economics of geothermal electricity production are the wellhead temperature or enthalpy, the well flow rate, and the cost of the wells. The capital cost of the powerplant is significant, but not highly sensitive to these resource characteristics. The optimum geothermal plant size will remain small, usually in the 50-100 MWe range. Therefore, the opportunities for achieving significant cost reductions through ''economies of scale'' are small. The steam and binary power cycles are closely competitive; the binary cycle appears better when the brine temperature is below 200-230/sup 0/C, and the flashed steam cycle appears better above this range. Geothermal electricity production is capital intensive; over 75 percent of the generation costs are fixed costs related to capital investment. Technological advances are needed to reduce costs from marginal geothermal resources and thus to stimulate geothermal energy development. Significant reduction in power costs would be achieved by reducing well drilling costs, stimulating well flow rates, reducing powerplant capital costs, increasing powerplant efficiency and utilization, and developing more effective exploration techniques for locating and assessing high-quality resources. (auth)

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1976-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

482

Parallel electric field generation by Alfven wave turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

{This work aims to investigate the spectral structure of the parallel electric field generated by strong anisotropic and balanced Alfvenic turbulence in relation with the problem of electron acceleration from the thermal population in solar flare plasma conditions.} {We consider anisotropic Alfvenic fluctuations in the presence of a strong background magnetic field. Exploiting this anisotropy, a set of reduced equations governing non-linear, two-fluid plasma dynamics is derived. The low-$\\beta$ limit of this model is used to follow the turbulent cascade of the energy resulting from the non-linear interaction between kinetic Alfven waves, from the large magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) scales with $k_{\\perp}\\rho_{s}\\ll 1$ down to the small "kinetic" scales with $k_{\\perp}\\rho_{s} \\gg 1$, $\\rho_{s}$ being the ion sound gyroradius.} {Scaling relations are obtained for the magnitude of the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations, as a function of $k_{\\perp}$ and $k_{\\parallel}$, showing that the electric field develops ...

Bian, N H; Brown, J C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z