National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nuclear electric generating

  1. U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: August 25, 2016 Data for: June 2016 Next Release: September 2016 Year Capacity and Generation by State and Reactor 2016 P XLS 2015 P XLS 2014 P XLS 2013 XLS 2012 XLS 2011 XLS 2010 XLS 2009 XLS 2008 XLS 2007 XLS 2006 XLS 2005 XLS 2004 XLS 2003 XLS P = Preliminary U.S. Nuclear Generation: 1957 to latest available EIA final data information in the Annual Energy Review, table 9.2. U. S. Nuclear power plants projected electricity

  2. The Birth of Nuclear-Generated Electricity

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    1999-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-I (EBR-I), built in Idaho in 1949, generated the first usable electricity from nuclear power on December 20, 1951. More importantly, the reactor was used to prove that it was possible to create more nuclear fuel in the reactor than it consumed during operation -- fuel breeding. The EBR-I facility is now a National Historic Landmark open to the public.

  3. Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

    1987-06-01

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

  4. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S.; Wilson, James R.; McDonald, Jr., Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  5. Impact of the proposed energy tax on nuclear electric generating technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunds, T.A.; Lamont, A.D.; Pasternak, A.D.; Rousseau, W.F.; Walter, C.E.

    1993-05-01

    The President`s new economic initiatives include an energy tax that will affect the costs of power from most electric generating technologies. The tax on nuclear power could be applied in a number of different ways at several different points in the fuel cycle. These different approaches could have different effects on the generation costs and benefits of advanced reactors. The Office of Nuclear Energy has developed models for assessing the costs and benefits of advanced reactor cycles which must be updated to take into account the impacts of the proposed tax. This report has been prepared to assess the spectrum of impacts of the energy tax on nuclear power and can be used in updating the Office`s economic models. This study was conducted in the following steps. First, the most authoritative statement of the proposed tax available at this time was obtained. Then the impacts of the proposed tax on the costs of nuclear and fossil fueled generation were compared. Finally several other possible approaches to taxing nuclear energy were evaluated. The cost impact on several advanced nuclear technologies and a current light water technology were computed. Finally, the rationale for the energy tax as applied to various electric generating methods was examined.

  6. Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Durst, Bruce M.

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

  7. Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Durst, Bruce M.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

  8. Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel; Carre, Franck

    2007-07-01

    Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated

  9. The effect of availability improvement of a nuclear power plant on the cost of generating electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nejat, S.M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to study the economic benefits in operating a nuclear power plant as a result of improving the availabilitty of the secondary (steam) loop of the plant. A new method has been developed to obtain availability, frequency of failure, probability and frequency of operation, cycle time, and uptime for different capacity states of a parallel-series system having components with failure and repair rates distributed exponentially. The method has been applied to different subsystems, systems, and the seconary loop as a whole. The effect of having spare parts for several components, as measured by savings in the generation of electricity, is also studied. The Kettelle algorithm was applied to determine optimal spare part allocation in order to achieve maximum availability or minimum cost of electricity, subject to a fixed spare parts budget. It has been shown that the optimum spare parts allocation and the budget level which gives optimum availability, do not necessarily give minimum electricity cost. The savings per year for optimal spare parts allocation and different spare parts budgets were obtained. The results show that the utilty will save its customers a large amount of money if spare parts are purchased, especially at the beginning of the plant operation, and are allocated judiciously.

  10. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

  11. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010 XLS XLS XLS 2009 XLS XLS XLS 2008 XLS XLS XLS 2007 XLS XLS XLS 2006 XLS XLS XLS 2005 XLS XLS XLS 2004 XLS XLS XLS 2003 XLS XLS XLS Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." Related links Electric Power Monthly Electric Power Annual Form EIA-860 Source Data

  12. Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  13. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-11-16

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  14. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1986-01-01

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  15. Generating electricity from viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2013-10-31

    Berkeley Lab's Seung-Wuk Lee discusses "Generating electricity from viruses" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas.

  16. Generating electricity from viruses

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2014-06-23

    Berkeley Lab's Seung-Wuk Lee discusses "Generating electricity from viruses" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas.

  17. Biomass for Electricity Generation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

  18. Keeping Nuclear as a Viable Option for Electric Power Generation in the Brazilian Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, F.

    2004-10-06

    This paper discusses all alternatives that are part of the general solution for the electric energy problem in Brazil.

  19. US Central Station Nuclear Electric Generating Units: significant milestones. (Status as of April 1, 1980)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Construction and operational milestones are tabulated for US nuclear power plants. Data are presented on nuclear steam supply system orders. A schedule of commercial operation through 1990 is given.

  20. Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A.

    1997-09-01

    This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

  1. Risk perception & strategic decision making :general insights, a framework, and specific application to electricity generation using nuclear energy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, Jeffrey D.

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this report is to promote increased understanding of decision making processes and hopefully to enable improved decision making regarding high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological systems. This report brings together insights regarding risk perception and decision making across domains ranging from nuclear power technology safety, cognitive psychology, economics, science education, public policy, and neural science (to name a few). It forms them into a unique, coherent, concise framework, and list of strategies to aid in decision making. It is suggested that all decision makers, whether ordinary citizens, academics, or political leaders, ought to cultivate their abilities to separate the wheat from the chaff in these types of decision making instances. The wheat includes proper data sources and helpful human decision making heuristics; these should be sought. The chaff includes ''unhelpful biases'' that hinder proper interpretation of available data and lead people unwittingly toward inappropriate decision making ''strategies''; obviously, these should be avoided. It is further proposed that successfully accomplishing the wheat vs. chaff separation is very difficult, yet tenable. This report hopes to expose and facilitate navigation away from decision-making traps which often ensnare the unwary. Furthermore, it is emphasized that one's personal decision making biases can be examined, and tools can be provided allowing better means to generate, evaluate, and select among decision options. Many examples in this report are tailored to the energy domain (esp. nuclear power for electricity generation). The decision making framework and approach presented here are applicable to any high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological system.

  2. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1986-07-08

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator is described comprising a magnet having a magnetic field, an elongate hollow housing containing an electrically conductive liquid and a thermoacoustic structure positioned in the liquid, heat exchange means thermally connected to the thermoacoustic structure for inducing the liquid to oscillate at an acoustic resonant frequency within the housing. The housing is positioned in the magnetic field and oriented such that the direction of the magnetic field and the direction of oscillatory motion of the liquid are substantially orthogonal to one another, first and second electrical conductor means connected to the liquid on opposite sides of the housing along an axis which is substantially orthogonal to both the direction of the magnetic field and the direction of oscillatory motion of the liquid, an alternating current output signal is generated in the conductor means at a frequency corresponding to the frequency of the oscillatory motion of the liquid.

  3. Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-25

    The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GENSIM) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration ofmore » a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emission trade-offs. The base case results using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax

  4. Hydro-electric generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vauthier, P.

    1980-06-03

    The efficiency of a hydro-electric generator is improved by providing open-ended hollow tubes having influx ends proximate the axis and efflux ends proximate the periphery of a fan-bladed turbine. The jets of water developed by rotation of the fanbladed turbine are directed against turbine vanes at the periphery of the fan blades. The device is particularly suitable for mounting in a water current such as in an ocean current or river.

  5. Electrical pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norris, Neil J.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for generating high-voltage, wide dynamic range, shaped electrical pulses in the nanosecond range. Two transmission lines are coupled together by resistive elements distributed along the length of the lines. The conductance of each coupling resistive element as a function of its position along the line is selected to produce the desired pulse shape in the output line when an easily produced pulse, such as a step function pulse, is applied to the input line.

  6. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  7. Electricity Generation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generation Electricity Generation The United States of America continues to generate the most geothermal electricity in the world: more than 3.5 gigawatts, predominantly from the western United States. That's enough to power about three and half million homes! Pictured above, the Raft River geothermal plant is located in Idaho. Source: Geothermal Resources Council The United States of America continues to generate the most geothermal electricity in the world: more than 3.5 gigawatts,

  8. Generation of electrical power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hursen, Thomas F.; Kolenik, Steven A.; Purdy, David L.

    1976-01-01

    A heat-to-electricity converter is disclosed which includes a radioactive heat source and a thermoelectric element of relatively short overall length capable of delivering a low voltage of the order of a few tenths of a volt. Such a thermoelectric element operates at a higher efficiency than longer higher-voltage elements; for example, elements producing 6 volts. In the generation of required power, thermoelectric element drives a solid-state converter which is controlled by input current rather than input voltage and operates efficiently for a high signal-plus-noise to signal ratio of current. The solid-state converter has the voltage gain necessary to deliver the required voltage at the low input of the thermoelectric element.

  9. ELECTRIC PULSE GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buntenbach, R.W.

    1959-06-01

    S>An electro-optical apparatus is described which produces electric pulses in programmed sequences at times and durations controlled with great accuracy. An oscilloscope CRT is supplied with signals to produce a luminous spot moving in a circle. An opaque mask with slots of variable width transmits light from the spot to a photoelectric transducer. For shorter pulse decay times a CRT screen which emits UV can be used with a UVtransmitting filter and a UV- sensitive photoelectric cell. Pulses are varied by changing masks or by using masks with variable slots. This device may be used in multiple arrangements to produce other pulse aT rangements, or it can be used to trigger an electronic pulse generator. (T.R.H.)

  10. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

  11. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  12. Method for protecting an electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuehnle, Barry W.; Roberts, Jeffrey B.; Folkers, Ralph W.

    2008-11-18

    A method for protecting an electrical generator which includes providing an electrical generator which is normally synchronously operated with an electrical power grid; providing a synchronizing signal from the electrical generator; establishing a reference signal; and electrically isolating the electrical generator from the electrical power grid if the synchronizing signal is not in phase with the reference signal.

  13. THERMO-ELECTRIC GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jordan, K.C.

    1958-07-22

    The conversion of heat energy into electrical energy by a small compact device is descrtbed. Where the heat energy is supplied by a radioactive material and thermopIIes convert the heat to electrical energy. The particular battery construction includes two insulating discs with conductive rods disposed between them to form a circular cage. In the center of the cage is disposed a cup in which the sealed radioactive source is located. Each thermopile is formed by connecting wires from two adjacent rods to a potnt on an annular ring fastened to the outside of the cup, the ring having insulation on its surface to prevent electrica1 contact with the thermopiles. One advantage of this battery construction is that the radioactive source may be inserted after the device is fabricated, reducing the radiation hazard to personnel assembling the battery.

  14. Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Arco, ID The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 located at the National Reactor Testing ...

  15. Electricity Generating Portfolios with Small Modular Reactors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Portfolios with Small Modular Reactors Electricity Generating Portfolios with Small Modular Reactors This paper provides a method for estimating the ...

  16. Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity Generation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation AgencyCompany Organization:...

  17. Liupanshui Shuiliandong Electricity Generation Co Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Liupanshui Shuiliandong Electricity Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Liupanshui Shuiliandong Electricity Generation Co.Ltd. Place: Liupanshui City, Guizhou...

  18. Solar energy electric generating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, J.

    1988-03-01

    A solar energy electric generating system is described comprising in combination: (a) an array of photocells; (b) means for gating the electrical direct current energy produced by the array of photocells; (c) means for transforming the electrical direct current energy at an output of the array of photocells whereby an alternating current at the output of the transforming means is produced, and which is controlled by a control device for controlling the rate and duty cycle of the gating means; and (d) a photosensitive sampler which samples light incident upon the photocell array and outputs a proportional signal.

  19. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

  20. NMR data feature: 1995 world nuclear electricity production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    World-wide nuclear electricity generation data is presented for 1995. Total nuclear power reactors in operation and under construction are listed for each country, along with MW(e) output totals and percentages of total electrical production. Detailed data is presented for the regions of Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Commonwealth of Independent States. This data includes electricity generation by source (fossil fuel, nuclear power, and hydro power and other), net electricity consumption, and percent changes since 1994. Very brief summaries of electricity production in Canada, the United States, and the Far East are also provided.

  1. Carbon pricing, nuclear power and electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, R.; Keppler, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    In 2010, the NEA in conjunction with the International Energy Agency produced an analysis of the Projected Costs of Electricity for almost 200 power plants, covering nuclear, fossil fuel and renewable electricity generation. That analysis used lifetime costs to consider the merits of each technology. However, the lifetime cost analysis is less applicable in liberalised markets and does not look specifically at the viewpoint of the private investor. A follow-up NEA assessment of the competitiveness of nuclear energy against coal- and gas-fired generation under carbon pricing has considered just this question. The economic competition in electricity markets is today between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power generation not being competitive as soon as even modest carbon pricing is introduced. Whether nuclear energy or natural gas comes out ahead in their competition depends on a number of assumptions, which, while all entirely reasonable, yield very different outcomes. The analysis in this study has been developed on the basis of daily data from European power markets over the last five-year period. Three different methodologies, a Profit Analysis looking at historic returns over the past five years, an Investment Analysis projecting the conditions of the past five years over the lifetime of plants and a Carbon Tax Analysis (differentiating the Investment Analysis for different carbon prices) look at the issue of competitiveness from different angles. They show that the competitiveness of nuclear energy depends on a number of variables which in different configurations determine whether electricity produced from nuclear power or from CCGTs generates higher profits for its investors. These are overnight costs, financing costs, gas prices, carbon prices, profit margins (or mark-ups), the amount of coal with carbon capture and electricity prices. This paper will present the outcomes of the analysis in the context of a liberalised

  2. Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

    2013-08-06

    Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

  3. Electricity Generation, Transmission and Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation, Transmission and Energy Storage Systems Utilities and other electricity and transmission providers and regulators often require that equipment be proven safe and reliable before it is permitted on the grid. However, energy storage manufacturers and integrators are often unable to afford or provide the logistics necessary for this long-term testing and monitoring. The Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) in conjunction with the Energy Storage Analysis Laboratory (ESAL) provides trusted,

  4. Mini-biomass electric generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, G.

    1997-12-01

    Awareness of the living standards achieved by others has resulted in a Russian population which is yearning for a higher standard of living. Such a situation demands access to affordable electricity in remote areas. Remote energy requirements creates the need to transport power or fossil fuels over long distances. Application of local renewable energy resources could eliminate the need for and costs of long distance power supply. Vast forest resources spread over most of Russia make biomass an ideal renewable energy candidate for many off-grid villages. The primary objective for this preliminary evaluation is to examine the economic feasibility of replacing distillate and gasoline fuels with local waste biomass as the primary fuel for village energy in outlying regions of Russia. Approximately 20 million people live in regions where Russia`s Unified Electric System grid does not penetrate. Most of these people are connected to smaller independent power grids, but approximately 8 million Russians live in off-grid villages and small towns served by stand-alone generation systems using either diesel fuel or gasoline. The off-grid villages depend on expensive distillate fuels and gasoline for combustion in small boilers and engines. These fuels are used for both electricity generation and district heating. Typically, diesel generator systems with a capacity of up to 1 MW serve a collective farm, settlement and their rural enterprises (there are an estimated 10,000 such systems in Russia). Smaller gasoline-fueled generator systems with capacities in the range of 0.5 - 5 kW serve smaller farms or rural enterprises (there are about 60,000 such systems in Russia).

  5. Generators for Small Electrical and Thermal Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    build and test improved electric-power generators for use in residential Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems, which capture the generator's heat output for space and water...

  6. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Second Installment Electricity: Generation to End-Use ... Power Generation and Transmission: How Can We Plan, ... recent announcement represents a 3.6 billion investment. ...

  7. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation to End Use ... Midwest and Florida Regions, Duke Energy Corporation * Mike Langford, National ...

  8. Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

  9. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 PNNL-XXXXX Electrical Generation for More- Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick ...

  10. NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

    1962-09-01

    A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

  11. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet) (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal. ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 24 POWER ...

  12. Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    This document provides an overview of the NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebook for Electricity Generation with information directing people to the Web site for more in-depth information.

  13. Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity More Documents & Publications THE VALUE OF ECONOMIC DISPATCH A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1234 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 ...

  14. Electricity Generating Portfolios with Small Modular Reactors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A paper by Geoffrey Rothwell, Ph.D., Stanford University (retired), and Francesco Ganda, Ph.D., Argonne National Laboratory on "Electricity Generating Portfolios with Small Modular Reactors".

  15. Quadrennial Energy Review - Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Second Installment Electricity: Generation to End-Use Stakeholder Meeting Number 3: ... ancillary service, day-ahead energy, and unit commitment markets while becoming the balancing ...

  16. Vogtle Electric Generating Plant ETE Analysis Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diediker, Nona H.; Jones, Joe A.

    2006-12-09

    Under contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)-Albuquerque reviewed the evacuation time estimate (ETE) analysis dated April 2006 prepared by IEM for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP). The ETE analysis was reviewed for consistency with federal regulations using the NRC guidelines in Review Standard (RS)-002, Supplement 2 and Appendix 4 to NUREG-0654, and NUREG/CR-4831. Additional sources of information referenced in the analysis and used in the review included NUREG/CR-6863 and NUREG/CR-6864. The PNNL report includes general comments, data needs or clarifications, and requests for additional information (RAI) resulting from review of the ETE analysis.

  17. Technical-evaluation report on the adequacy of station electric-distribution-system voltages for the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 1 and 2. (Docket Nos. 50-282, 50-306)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selan, J C

    1982-09-17

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 1 and 2. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system in conjunction with the offsite power sources has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The evaluation finds that with some minor transformer loading modifications, hardware changes and the results of equipment testing and manufacturer data, the offsite sources were demonstrated to supply adequate voltage to the Class 1E equipment under worst case conditions.

  18. NAFTA opportunities: Electrical equipment and power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provides significant commercial opportunities in Mexico and Canada for the United States electric equipment and power generation industries, through increased goods and services exports to the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) and through new U.S. investment in electricity generation facilities in Mexico. Canada and Mexico are the United States' two largest export markets for electrical equipment with exports of $1.53 billion and $1.51 billion, respectively, in 1992. Canadian and Mexican markets represent approximately 47 percent of total U.S. exports of electric equipment. The report presents an economic analysis of the section.

  19. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

  20. Potential nuclear safeguards applications for neutron generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindquist, L.O.

    1980-01-01

    Many nuclear safeguards inspection instruments use neutron sources to interrogate the fissile material (commonly /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu) to be measured. The neutron sources currently used in these instruments are isotopics such as Californium-252, Americium-Lithium, etc. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to transport isotopic sources from one measurement location to another. This represents a significant problem for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspectors because they must take their safeguards instruments with them to each nuclear installation to make an independent measurement. Purpose of this paper is to review the possibility of replacing isotopic neutron sources now used in IAEA safeguards instruments with electric neutron sources such as deuterium-tritium (D-T, 14-MeV neutrons) or deuterium-deuterium (D-D, 2-MeV neutrons). The potential for neutron generators to interrogate spent-light water reactor fuel assemblies in storage pools is also reviewed.

  1. Electricity market design for generator revenue sufficiency with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity market design for generator revenue sufficiency with increased variable generation Title Electricity market design for generator revenue sufficiency with increased...

  2. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown Fact 844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while ...

  3. electric generation | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 2 August, 2012 - 13:30 The Transparent Cost Database (TCDB) advanced vehicles electric generation NREL OpenEI renewables tcdb This...

  4. Renewable Electricity Generation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Geothermal Geothermal Read more Solar Solar Read more Water Water Read more Wind Wind Read more Our nation has abundant solar, water, wind, and geothermal energy resources, and many U.S. companies are developing, manufacturing, and installing cutting-edge, high-tech renewable energy systems. The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative

  5. Interdisciplinary Engineer (Electrical/Electronics/Nuclear/Computer)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    THIS IS AN INTERDISCIPLINARY POSITION AND MAY BE FILLED WITH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING OCCUPATIONS: Electrical Engineer, GS-0850-12 Electronics Engineer, GS-0855-12 Nuclear Engineer, GS-0840-12 Computer...

  6. Interdisciplinary Engineer (Electrical/Electronics/Nuclear/Computer)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    THIS IS AN INTERDISCIPLINARY POSITION AND MAY BE FILLED WITH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING OCCUPATIONS: Electrical Engineer, GS-0850-13 Electronics Engineer, GS-0855-13 Nuclear Engineer, GS-0840-13 Computer...

  7. EXTENDING NUCLEAR ENERGY TO NON-ELECTRICAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Boardman; M. McKellar; D. Ingersoll; Z. Houghton; , R. Bromm; C. Desportes

    2014-09-01

    Electricity represents less than half of all energy consumed in the United States and globally. Although a few commercial nuclear power plants world-wide provide energy to non-electrical applications such as district heating and water desalination, nuclear energy has been largely relegated to base-load electricity production. A new generation of smaller-sized nuclear power plants offers significant promise for extending nuclear energy to many non-electrical applications. The NuScale small modular reactor design is especially well suited for these non-traditional customers due to its small unit size, very robust reactor protection features and a highly flexible and scalable plant design. A series of technical and economic evaluation studies have been conducted to assess the practicality of using a NuScale plant to provide electricity and heat to a variety of non-electrical applications, including water desalination, oil refining, and hydrogen production. The studies serve to highlight the unique design features of the NuScale plant for these applications and provide encouraging conclusions regarding the technical and economic viability of extending clean nuclear energy to a broad range of non-electrical energy consumers.

  8. Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells The primary objective of this ...

  9. EERE FY 2016 Budget Overview -- Renewable Electricity Generation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Renewable Electricity Generation EERE FY 2016 Budget Overview -- Renewable Electricity Generation Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FY 2016 Budget Overview --...

  10. Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Principal ... Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells 3 | US DOE ...

  11. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), ...

  12. New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency...

  13. Yun Xingfu Electricity Generation and Supply Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xingfu Electricity Generation and Supply Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Yun Xingfu Electricity Generation and Supply Co., Ltd Place: Lincang City, Yunnan Province, China...

  14. Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Place: Yancheng, Jiangsu Province,...

  15. Category:Electricity Generating Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Electricity Generating Technologies Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B...

  16. Zhenkang County Jineng Electricity Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zhenkang County Jineng Electricity Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhenkang County Jineng Electricity Generation Co., Ltd Place: Lincang, Yunnan Province, China...

  17. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board ...

  18. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0476: ...

  19. Yangbi Puping Electric Power Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Puping Electric Power Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Yangbi Puping Electric Power Generation Co., Ltd Place: Yunnan Province, China Zip: 672500 Sector: Hydro...

  20. electricity | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Wind farm generating more renewable energy than expected for Pantex The Texas Panhandle has some of the world's best winds for creating renewable energy, and the Wind Farm at the ...

  1. Utilities' Use of Nuclear Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Harold B.

    2002-09-30

    This PowerPoint presentation was given at the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee meeting, held 30 September 2002 in Arlington, VA.

  2. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder Karim, Samsul Ariffin A.; Sivapalan, Subarna; Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep

    2014-10-24

    Under the 10{sup th} Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  3. Biomass Fired Electricity Generation Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fired Electricity Generation Market Home There are currently no posts in this category. Syndicate...

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

    2004-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

  5. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown - Dataset Fact 844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while ...

  6. Electrical power systems for distributed generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, T.A.; Huval, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    {open_quotes}Distributed Generation{close_quotes} has become the {open_quotes}buzz{close_quotes} word of an electric utility industry facing deregulation. Many industrial facilities utilize equipment in distributed installations to serve the needs of a thermal host through the capture of exhaust energy in a heat recovery steam generator. The electrical power generated is then sold as a {open_quotes}side benefit{close_quotes} to the cost-effective supply of high quality thermal energy. Distributed generation is desirable for many different reasons, each with unique characteristics of the product. Many years of experience in the distributed generation market has helped Stewart & Stevenson to define a range of product features that are crucial to most any application. The following paper will highlight a few of these applications. The paper will also examine the range of products currently available and in development. Finally, we will survey the additional services offered by Stewart & Stevenson to meet the needs of a rapidly changing power generation industry.

  7. Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and ...

  8. Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-26

    Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a

  10. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.

    2010-09-29

    Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management, and

  11. EIS-0416: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in San Bernardino...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (07-AFC-5) Project, Proposal to Construct a 400-m Megawatt Concentrated Solar Power Tower, Thermal-Electric Power Plant, San Bernardino ...

  12. STEAM GENERATOR FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kinyon, B.W.; Whitman, G.D.

    1963-07-16

    The steam generator described for use in reactor powergenerating systems employs a series of concentric tubes providing annular passage of steam and water and includes a unique arrangement for separating the steam from the water. (AEC)

  13. Electricity generator cost data from survey form EIA-860

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy Comprehensive data ... capacity estimates that use direct current (DC) ratings of PV panels. ...

  14. Fact #885: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retirements - Dataset | Department of Energy 5: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and Retirements - Dataset Fact #885: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and Retirements - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and Retirements fotw#885_web.xlsx (429.24 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #874: May 25, 2015 Number of Electric Stations and Electric Charging Units Increasing - Dataset Fact #886:

  15. Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas Wells Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas ...

  16. The Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning NREL Webinar ... benefits and challenges of incorporating solar generation into the resource planning ...

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

  18. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - nuclear section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors.

  19. Secured electrical supply at least cost: Coal, gas, nuclear, hydro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavor, J.; Stary, O.; Vasicek, J.

    1995-12-01

    Electric power sector in East Central European countries finds in a difficult period. In the situation of demand stagnation, enormous investments must be realized in a very short time. Today`s decisions in the development strategy will influence the long term future of the industry. The optimal structure of the sources is one of the most important problem to be solved. Paper describes the current structure of the sources in electric power sector in the Czech Republic. The importance of coal, oil and gas, nuclear and hydro in electric power generation is compared. Taking into account the different position in the load coverage, economy of individual sources is evaluated and basic results of discounted cash flow calculations are presented. Information on specific investment programs and projects are included and further trends are estimated.

  20. Electric heater for nuclear fuel rod simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCulloch, Reginald W.; Morgan, Jr., Chester S.; Dial, Ralph E.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an electric cartridge-type heater for use as a simulator for a nuclear fuel pin in reactor studies. The heater comprises an elongated cylindrical housing containing a longitudinally extending helically wound heating element with the heating element radially inwardly separated from the housing. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of boron nitride electrically insulate the heating element from the housing while providing good thermal conductivity. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of magnesia or a magnesia-15 percent boron nitride mixture are disposed in the cavity of the helical heating element. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the magnesia or the magnesia-boron nitride mixture is higher than that of the boron nitride disposed about the heating element for urging the boron nitride radially outwardly against the housing during elevated temperatures to assure adequate thermal contact between the housing and the boron nitride.

  1. Electric power transmission for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, H.; Dowis, W.J.

    1983-06-01

    The original study of transmission for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC), which was completed in September 1975, was updated in June 1978. The present 1983 revision takes cognizance of recent changes in the electric power situation of the PNW with respect to: (1) forecasts of load growth, (2) the feasibility of early use of 1100 kV transmission, and (3) the narrowing opportunities for siting nuclear plants in the region. The purpose of this update is to explore and describe additions to the existing transmission system that would be necessary to accommodate three levels of generation at HNEC. Comparisons with a PNW system having new thermal generating capacity distributed throughout the marketing region are not made as was done in earlier versions.

  2. Optimized Hydrogen and Electricity Generation from Wind

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several optimizations can be employed to create hydrogen and electricity from a wind energy source. The key element in hydrogen production from an electrical source is an electrolyzer to convert water and electricity into hydrogen and oxygen.

  3. EIS-0416: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in San Bernardino

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    County, CA | Department of Energy 6: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in San Bernardino County, CA EIS-0416: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in San Bernardino County, CA Documents Available for Download October 22, 2010 EIS-0416: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (07-AFC-5) Project, Proposal to Construct a 400-m Megawatt Concentrated Solar Power Tower, Thermal-Electric Power Plant, San Bernardino

  4. California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 2,"1,070","6,989",74.6,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  5. Aging assessment of large electric motors in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villaran, M.; Subudhi, M.

    1996-03-01

    Large electric motors serve as the prime movers to drive high capacity pumps, fans, compressors, and generators in a variety of nuclear plant systems. This study examined the stressors that cause degradation and aging in large electric motors operating in various plant locations and environments. The operating history of these machines in nuclear plant service was studied by review and analysis of failure reports in the NPRDS and LER databases. This was supplemented by a review of motor designs, and their nuclear and balance of plant applications, in order to characterize the failure mechanisms that cause degradation, aging, and failure in large electric motors. A generic failure modes and effects analysis for large squirrel cage induction motors was performed to identify the degradation and aging mechanisms affecting various components of these large motors, the failure modes that result, and their effects upon the function of the motor. The effects of large motor failures upon the systems in which they are operating, and on the plant as a whole, were analyzed from failure reports in the databases. The effectiveness of the industry`s large motor maintenance programs was assessed based upon the failure reports in the databases and reviews of plant maintenance procedures and programs.

  6. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  7. Lincoln Electric System - Renewable Generation Rate (Nebraska...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Applicable Sector Commercial, Industrial Eligible Technologies Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Anaerobic Digestion, Small...

  8. Electric Power Generation and Water Use Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff Electric Kettle Takes Down Microwave in Final Round of #EnergyFaceoff November 24, 2014 - 12:13pm Addthis The electric kettle wins the final round of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The electric kettle wins the final round of #EnergyFaceoff. | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL How can

  9. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Technology for Greener Airplanes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power System Development at PNNL Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power ...

  10. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid System Economic Basis for Electricity, Fuel, and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Forsberg; Steven Aumeier

    2014-04-01

    Concerns about climate change and altering the ocean chemistry are likely to limit the use of fossil fuels. That implies a transition to a low-carbon nuclear-renewable electricity grid. Historically variable electricity demand was met using fossil plants with low capital costs, high operating costs, and substantial greenhouse gas emissions. However, the most easily scalable very-low-emissions generating options, nuclear and non-dispatchable renewables (solar and wind), are capital-intensive technologies with low operating costs that should operate at full capacities to minimize costs. No combination of fully-utilized nuclear and renewables can meet the variable electricity demand. This implies large quantities of expensive excess generating capacity much of the time. In a free market this results in near-zero electricity prices at times of high nuclear renewables output and low electricity demand with electricity revenue collapse. Capital deployment efficiency—the economic benefit derived from energy systems capital investment at a societal level—strongly favors high utilization of these capital-intensive systems, especially if low-carbon nuclear renewables are to replace fossil fuels. Hybrid energy systems are one option for better utilization of these systems that consumes excess energy at times of low prices to make some useful product.The economic basis for development of hybrid energy systems is described for a low-carbon nuclear renewable world where much of the time there are massivequantities of excess energy available from the electric sector.Examples include (1) high-temperature electrolysis to generate hydrogen for non-fossil liquid fuels, direct use as a transport fuel, metal reduction, etc. and (2) biorefineries.Nuclear energy with its concentrated constant heat output may become the enabling technology for economically-viable low-carbon electricity grids because hybrid nuclear systems may provide an economic way to produce dispatachable variable

  11. Renewable Electricity Generation Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electricity Generation Success Stories Renewable Electricity Generation Success Stories Renewable Electricity Generation Success Stories The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) successes in converting tax dollars into more affordable, effective, and deployable renewable energy sources make it possible to use these technologies in more ways each day. Learn how EERE's investments in geothermal, solar, water, and wind energy translate into more efficient, affordable

  12. Notice of Intent (NOI): Next Generation of Electric Machines | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Notice of Intent (NOI): Next Generation of Electric Machines Notice of Intent (NOI): Next Generation of Electric Machines February 4, 2015 - 12:20pm Addthis The purpose of this Notice of Intent is to provide potential applicants advance notice that the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), on behalf of the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Next Generation of Electric Machines"

  13. Low-temperature Stirling Engine for Geothermal Electricity Generation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Low-temperature Stirling Engine for Geothermal Electricity Generation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-temperature Stirling Engine for Geothermal Electricity Generation Up to 2700 terawatt-hours per year of geothermal electricity generation capacity has been shown to be available within North America, typically with wells drilled into geologically active regions of the earth's crust where this energy is concentrated (Huttrer, 2001). Of this

  14. Monthly Electric Generator data - EIA-860M data file

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory (based on Form EIA-860M as a supplement to Form EIA-860) Release Date: August 24, 2016 Next Release Date: September 2016 The monthly survey Form EIA-860M, ‘Monthly Update to Annual Electric Generator Report’ supplements the annual survey form EIA-860 data with monthly information that monitors the current status of existing and proposed generating units at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. EIA

  15. Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coproduced from Oil and/or Gas Wells | Department of Energy Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil and/or Gas Wells Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil and/or Gas Wells Chena Hot Springs Resort project presentation at the 2013 peer review meeting in Colorado. chenahotsprings_peerreview2013.pdf (798.26 KB) More Documents & Publications Electrical Power Generation Using

  16. Edison Electric Institute State Generation and Transmission Siting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Edison Electric Institute State Generation and Transmission Siting...

  17. Perry Wyoming manure to electricity generation plant | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    will build and operate anaerobic digestion systems to convert animal manure into methane for electricity generation. Coordinates: 42.895849, -89.760231 Show Map Loading...

  18. Electric Power Generation Systems | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Power Generation Systems Coal gasification-based power plants Coal combustion-based power plants Natural gas-fueled power plants Turbines Fuel cells Existing power plants...

  19. Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and...

  20. Adapting On-site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Internal combustion reciprocating engine generators (gensets) are regularly deployed at distribution centers, small municipal utilities, and public institutions to provide on-site electricity...

  1. Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    The current and future projected cost and performance characteristics of new electric generating capacity are a critical input into the development of energy projections and analyses.

  2. MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    harnessing the motion of water current to rotate the generator Two forms of magnetic induction and solar cells on the outer housing will produce electricity very efficiently The...

  3. Next Generation Electric Machines: Megawatt Class Motors FOA Informational Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Next Generation Electric Machines: Megawatt Class Motors FOA Informational Webinar will discuss standard procedures regarding the EERE Office and FOA process.

  4. Renewable Electricity Generation and Delivery at the Sacramento...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Generation and Delivery at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District Renewable ... change, is captured and destroyed Manure wastes are stabilized, reducing odor and flies ...

  5. Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas - Fact Sheet, April 2014 The University of Minnesota, Morris, in collaboration with the University of Minnesota ...

  6. The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation Paul Denholm, Erik Ela, Brendan Kirby, and Michael Milligan National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole ...

  7. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" ...onal",289246,247510,254831,273445,260203 "Solar",508,612,864,891,1212 ...

  8. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Remarks at Vogtle Electric Generating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ernest Moniz Remarks at Vogtle Electric Generating Plant Loan Guarantee Announcement in Waynesboro, GA - As Delivered February 20, 2014 - 2:00pm Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. ...

  9. EERE FY 2016 Budget Overview-- Renewable Electricity Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FY 2016 Budget Overview -- Renewable Electricity Generation, a presentation with Doug Hollett, Deputy Assistant Secretary, March 2015.

  10. DOE Announces Webinars on Next Generation Electric Machines,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Announces Webinars on Next Generation Electric ... energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to training ... highlight the process for site registration and ...

  11. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Thousand Megawatthours)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 ...

  12. MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Description The O H E...

  13. Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wigeland; K. Hamman

    2009-09-01

    Suggested for Track 7: Advances in Reactor Core Design and In-Core Management _____________________________________________________________________________________ Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency R. Wigeland and K. Hamman Idaho National Laboratory Given the ability of fast reactors to effectively transmute the transuranic elements as are present in spent nuclear fuel, fast reactors are being considered as one element of future nuclear power systems to enable continued use and growth of nuclear power by limiting high-level waste generation. However, a key issue for fast reactors is higher electricity cost relative to other forms of nuclear energy generation. The economics of the fast reactor are affected by the amount of electric power that can be produced from a reactor, i.e., the thermal efficiency for electricity generation. The present study is examining the potential for fast reactor subassembly design changes to improve the thermal efficiency by increasing the average coolant outlet temperature without increasing peak temperatures within the subassembly, i.e., to make better use of current technology. Sodium-cooled fast reactors operate at temperatures far below the coolant boiling point, so that the maximum coolant outlet temperature is limited by the acceptable peak temperatures for the reactor fuel and cladding. Fast reactor fuel subassemblies have historically been constructed using a large number of small diameter fuel pins contained within a tube of hexagonal cross-section, or hexcan. Due to this design, there is a larger coolant flow area next to the hexcan wall as compared to flow area in the interior of the subassembly. This results in a higher flow rate near the hexcan wall, overcooling the fuel pins next to the wall, and a non-uniform coolant temperature distribution. It has been recognized for many years that this difference in sodium coolant temperature was detrimental to achieving

  14. Funding Opportunity: Next Generation Electric Machines: Megawatt...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    speed, direct drive, megawatt (MW) class electric motors for efficiency and power density improvements in three primary areas: (1) chemical and petroleum refining industries; (2) ...

  15. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... North America with a wide array of strategic and ... Northwestern University. 6 Panel 2: Electricity Distribution ... largest distributed solar installation project and ...

  16. Next Generation Electric Machines | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In 2013, electricity accounted for approximately 40% of primary energy consumption in the United States and ... manufacturing was responsible for more than a quarter of end-use. ...

  17. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Denton Municipal Electric * Jennifer Smith, Executive Director, Congregation Beth Israel * Tonya Baer, Public Counsel, Texas Office of Public Utility Counsel * Michelle Foss, ...

  18. Energy Intensity Indicators: Electricity Generation Energy Intensity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    As shown in the figure, in 1950, central power plants producing only electricity required ... decade the overall performance of the plants in this sector has steadily improved and ...

  19. Flying Electric Generators | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by this Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers paper handle high power density winds, and are theoretically capable of delivering a constant 30 MW to the grid. At...

  20. North Dakota: EERE-Funded Project Recycles Energy, Generates Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEP-funded project in Williston, North Dakota, places generators at oil production well sites to transform wellhead flare gas into high-quality, three-phase electricity,which is then sold to the local rural electric cooperatives. The modern, natural gas-fueled generators burn cleanly with ultra-low emissions ratings that exceed state and federal emissions standards.

  1. Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table ... Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 6 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar PV 9 Wind Total ...

  2. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Today I would like to address, at a high level, the scope, pace, opportunities and challenges of the expected evolution of an electric utility system with high levels of DER ...

  3. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Today, our member cooperatives provide electricity to over 42 million people in 47 states, many of whom are in "persistent poverty" counties, and they do so in an environment of ...

  4. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 1:30 - 2:45 PM Panel 3 Cyber- and Physical Security and Resilience Utilities and other owners and operators of electricity sector assets must provide reliable service in the face ...

  5. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... demand response; distributed generation; digital communications, sensors and control ... Product Management and Product Marketing, Energy Management, Smart Grid Solutions ...

  6. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... demand response; distributed generation; digital communications, sensors and control ... Cheryl Roberto, Partner, Utility Transformation & Regulation, Twenty First Century ...

  7. Electric Power Generation and Water Use Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Generation and Water Use Data - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home ... Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ...

  8. Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology September 29, 2014 - 11:06am Addthis Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology Peter W. Davidson Peter W. Davidson Former Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office (LPO) What are the key facts? If finalized, this solicitation would make available $12.6 billion in loan guarantees for advanced nuclear energy technologies. Learn more about the draft

  9. NNSA Completes Fourth International Meeting on Next Generation Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) NNSA Completes Fourth International Meeting on Next Generation Nuclear Safeguards July 12, 2012 HANOI, VIETNAM - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), together with the Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, announced today the successful completion of the Fourth International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards. Organized by NNSA's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

  10. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Mr. Kelley became an Eagle Scout in 1990. Panel 1: Bulk Power Generation and Transmission: ... He also helped develop a new method for assessing the economic benefits of proposed ...

  11. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Prior to joining MISO, Ms. Curran was Manager of Power Generation & Supply Strategy for the Mid-Atlantic and Mid-Continent Regions at Reliant Resources. She holds a Bachelor of ...

  12. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil

  13. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning John Sterling Solar Electric Power Association Joyce McLaren National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mike Taylor Solar Electric Power Association Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-60047 October 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is

  14. Maine: Energy Efficiency Program Helps Generate Town's Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency program helps municipalities with their energy bills. Thomaston, Maine, was able to install solar panels to generate 13% of the electricity used by the wastewater treatment facility.

  15. 1,"Elm Road Generating Station","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Elm Road Generating Station","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power Co",1268 2,"Point Beach ...

  16. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On-Board Commercial Airplanes | Department of Energy Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes This report, prepared by Sandia National Laboratories, is an initial investigation of the use of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells on-board commercial aircraft. The report examines whether on-board airplane fuel cell systems are

  17. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Remarks at Vogtle Electric Generating Plant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Loan Guarantee Announcement in Waynesboro, GA - As Delivered | Department of Energy Remarks at Vogtle Electric Generating Plant Loan Guarantee Announcement in Waynesboro, GA - As Delivered Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Remarks at Vogtle Electric Generating Plant Loan Guarantee Announcement in Waynesboro, GA - As Delivered February 20, 2014 - 2:00pm Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Well, thank you, Tom [Fanning] and Paul [Bowers], and Buzz [Miller] as well. It's

  18. DOE Announces Webinars on Next Generation Electric Machines, Zero Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings, and More | Department of Energy Next Generation Electric Machines, Zero Energy Buildings, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Next Generation Electric Machines, Zero Energy Buildings, and More March 26, 2015 - 8:44am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can

  19. Concentrating Solar Power Projects - Palen Solar Electric Generating System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL Palen Solar Electric Generating System This page provides information on the Palen Solar Power Project, a concentrating solar power (CSP) project, with data organized by background, participants, and power plant configuration. Status Date: April 4, 2013 Project Overview Project Name: Palen Solar Electric Generating System Country: United States Location: Desert Center, California Owner(s): BrightSource Energy (100%) Technology: Power tower Turbine Capacity:

  20. Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident conditions IDAHO FALLS - A safer and more efficient nuclear fuel is on the horizon. A team of researchers at the ...

  1. Fact #885: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retirements | Department of Energy 5: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and Retirements Fact #885: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and Retirements SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week Between April 2015 and March 2016, there is a cumulative total of 88,953 megawatts of new electric utility capacity planned. This new capacity will add to the current U.S. capacity of about 1,071,000 megawatts. Over half (53%) of the new capacity that is planned

  2. Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as intermittent) output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

  3. Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems | Department of Energy Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems February 28, 2005 - 10:33am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC-The Bush Administration today took a major step in advancing international efforts to develop the next generation of clean, safe nuclear energy systems. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined representatives from Canada, France, Japan, and the United Kingdom to

  4. Mix and mingle: Networking for the next nuclear generation |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mix and mingle: Networking ... Mix and mingle: Networking for the next nuclear generation Posted: February 25, 2016 ... for science, technology, engineering and math employees. ...

  5. NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Holbrook

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

  6. Distributed electrical generation technologies and methods for their economic assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreider, J.F.; Curtiss, P.S.

    2000-07-01

    A confluence of events in the electrical generation and transmission industry has produced a new paradigm for distributed electrical generation and distribution in the US Electrical deregulation, reluctance of traditional utilities to commit capital to large central plants and transmission lines, and a suite of new, efficient generation hardware have all combined to bring this about. Persistent environmental concerns have further stimulated several new approaches. In this paper the authors describe the near term distributed generation technologies and their differentiating characteristics along with their readiness for the US market. In order to decide which approaches are well suited to a specific project, an assessment methodology is needed. A technically sound approach is therefore described and example results are given.

  7. Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2005-01-20

    Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J; Burchell, Timothy D; Corwin, William R; Fisher, Stephen Eugene; Forsberg, Charles W.; Morris, Robert Noel; Moses, David Lewis

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  9. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  10. Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, ... See Note 3, "Electricity Imports and Exports," at end of section. 3Natural gas, plus a ...

  11. Yonggwang nuclear power plant units 3 and 4; Bridging the gap to the next generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heider, R.C.; Daley, T.J.; Green, K.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of nuclear energy since the oil embargo of 1973 has displaced the use of 4.3 billion barrels of imported oil, which helped conserve 1 billion tons of coal and 6.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas for future generations, and helped protect the environment by reducing utility emissions of carbon dioxide by 20% a year. The current 112 operating nuclear energy plants generate more electricity than those of France, Japan, and the Soviet Union-nations that have made a national commitment to nuclear energy-combined. Yet it has been over 10 years since the last construction permit was issued for a nuclear power plant in the United States. Considering a projected shortfall in baseload electric generation capacity in the mid-1990s, new requirements for costly air pollution controls on coal plants, the concern over increased dependence on oil imports from the unstable Middle East region, and the increased concern over the possible long-term effects of greenhouse gas emissions, the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), the governing organization for the commercial nuclear energy industry, has developed a strategic plan with the goal of being able to order new nuclear power plants by the mid-1990s. The strategic plan, which contains 14 enabling conditions or building blocks, outlines an integrated effort to address the range of institutional and technical issues on which significant progress must be achieved to make nuclear power attractive in the United States for the 1990s.

  12. Washington Nuclear Profile - Columbia Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Columbia Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration ...

  13. DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage | Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Innovative Electric Generation Facility with Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture and Storage March 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a cooperative agreement to Summit Texas Clean Energy LLC (STCE) for the Texas Clean

  14. Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho

  15. NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative January 02, 2009 International safeguards are a central pillar of the nuclear nonproliferation regime. Administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), international safeguards serve to monitor nuclear activities under the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and are the primary vehicle for verifying compliance with peaceful use and nuclear nonproliferation undertakings. The Department of Energy's National Nuclear

  16. Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 Fact #799: September 30, 2013 Electricity Generation by Source, 2003-2012 With the increase in market penetration for electric vehicles, the upstream emissions from electricity generation become important. Those emissions are dependent upon the source of electricity generation. Although the generation of electricity varies greatly by region, the overall use of coal declined by about 24% from 2008 to 2012.

  17. Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row"

  18. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

    2008-06-09

    The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

  19. Development of Nuclear Renewable Oil Shale Systems for Flexible Electricity and Reduced Fossil Fuel Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Curtis; Charles Forsberg; Humberto Garcia

    2015-05-01

    We propose the development of Nuclear Renewable Oil Shale Systems (NROSS) in northern Europe, China, and the western United States to provide large supplies of flexible, dispatchable, very-low-carbon electricity and fossil fuel production with reduced CO2 emissions. NROSS are a class of large hybrid energy systems in which base-load nuclear reactors provide the primary energy used to produce shale oil from kerogen deposits and simultaneously provide flexible, dispatchable, very-low-carbon electricity to the grid. Kerogen is solid organic matter trapped in sedimentary shale, and large reserves of this resource, called oil shale, are found in northern Europe, China, and the western United States. NROSS couples electricity generation and transportation fuel production in a single operation, reduces lifecycle carbon emissions from the fuel produced, improves revenue for the nuclear plant, and enables a major shift toward a very-low-carbon electricity grid. NROSS will require a significant development effort in the United States, where kerogen resources have never been developed on a large scale. In Europe, however, nuclear plants have been used for process heat delivery (district heating), and kerogen use is familiar in certain countries. Europe, China, and the United States all have the opportunity to use large scale NROSS development to enable major growth in renewable generation and either substantially reduce or eliminate their dependence on foreign fossil fuel supplies, accelerating their transitions to cleaner, more efficient, and more reliable energy systems.

  20. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under VariousElectricity Tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-05-01

    The on-site generation of electricity can offer buildingowners and occupiers financial benefits as well as social benefits suchas reduced grid congestion, improved energy efficiency, and reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. Combined heat and power (CHP), or cogeneration,systems make use of the waste heat from the generator for site heatingneeds. Real-time optimal dispatch of CHP systems is difficult todetermine because of complicated electricity tariffs and uncertainty inCHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads. Typically,CHP systems use simple heuristic control strategies. This paper describesa method of determining optimal control in real-time and applies it to alight industrial site in San Diego, California, to examine: 1) the addedbenefit of optimal over heuristic controls, 2) the price elasticity ofthe system, and 3) the site-attributable greenhouse gas emissions, allunder three different tariff structures. Results suggest that heuristiccontrols are adequate under the current tariff structure and relativelyhigh electricity prices, capturing 97 percent of the value of thedistributed generation system. Even more value could be captured bysimply not running the CHP system during times of unusually high naturalgas prices. Under hypothetical real-time pricing of electricity,heuristic controls would capture only 70 percent of the value ofdistributed generation.

  1. Clean coal technologies in electric power generation: a brief overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos Beer; Karen Obenshain

    2006-07-15

    The paper talks about the future clean coal technologies in electric power generation, including pulverized coal (e.g., advanced supercritical and ultra-supercritical cycles and fluidized-bed combustion), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and CO{sub 2} capture technologies. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01

    Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

  3. Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

  4. 1,"Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    LLC",1628 8,"Powerton","Coal","Midwest Generations EME LLC",1538 9,"Elwood Energy LLC","Natural gas","Elwood Energy LLC",1350 10,"Newton","Coal","Illinois Power Generating Co",119

  5. Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood Economic Total Onsite and Characteristic(a) Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,406 632 Q 746 20-49 2,466 1,907 535 25 50-99 2,593 2,513 45 36 100-249 11,375 10,771

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2. Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, Chad; Bain, Richard; Chapman, Jamie; Denholm, Paul; Drury, Easan; Hall, Douglas G.; Lantz, Eric; Margolis, Robert; Thresher, Robert; Sandor, Debra; Bishop, Norman A.; Brown, Stephen R.; Felker, Fort; Fernandez, Steven J.; Goodrich, Alan C.; Hagerman, George; Heath, Garvin; O'Neil, Sean; Paquette, Joshua; Tegen, Suzanne; Young, Katherine

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  9. Market Potential for Non-electric Applications of Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konishi, T.; Kononov, S.; Kupitz, J.; McDonald, A.; Rogner, H.H.; Nisan, S.

    2002-07-01

    The paper presents results of a recent IAEA study to assess the market potential for non-electric applications of nuclear energy in the near (before 2020) and long term (2020-2050). The applications covered are district heating, desalination, industrial heat supply, ship propulsion, energy supply for spacecraft, and, to a lesser extent, 'innovative' applications such as hydrogen production, coal gasification, etc. While technical details are covered only briefly, emphasis is placed on economics and other factors that may promote or hinder the penetration of nuclear options in the markets for non-electric energy services. The study makes a distinction between the market size (demand for a given service) and the market potential for nuclear penetration (which may be smaller because of technical or non-technical constraints). Near-term nuclear prospects are assessed on the basis of on-going projects in the final stages of design or under construction. For the long term, use has been made of a qualitative scale ranging from 0 to 2 for five critical areas: market structure, demand pressure, technical basis, economic competitiveness, and public acceptance. The paper presents the resulting evaluation of long-term prospects for nuclear energy entering into non-electric markets. (authors)

  10. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From 2002 to 2012, most states have reduced their reliance on coal for electricity generation. The figure below shows the percent change in electricity generated by coal and natural gas for each...

  11. Potential for electricity generation from biomass residues in Cuba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lora, E.S.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is the study of the availability of major biomass residues in Cuba and the analysis of the electricity generation potential by using different technologies. An analysis of the changes in the country`s energy balance from 1988 up to date is presented, as well as a table with the availability study results and the energy equivalent for the following biomass residues: sugar cane bagasse and trash, rice and coffee husk, corn an cassava stalks and firewood. A total equivalent of 4.42 10{sup 6} tons/year of fuel-oil was obtained. Possible scenarios for the electricity production increase in the sugar industry are presented too. The analysis is carried out for a high stream parameter CEST and two BIG/GT system configurations. Limitations are introduced about the minimal milling capacity of the sugar mills for each technology. The calculated {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} electricity generation potential for BIG/GT systems, based on GE LM5000 CC gas turbines, an actual cane harvest of 58.0 10{sup 6} tons/year, half the available trash utilization and an specific steam consumption of 210 kg/tc, was 18601,0 GWh/year. Finally different alternatives are presented for low-scale electricity generation based on the other available agricultural residues.

  12. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" ...0","9,556",94.0,"PWR","applicationvnd.ms-excel","applicationvnd.ms-excel" ...

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2010 Existing Capacity, by Energy Source (GW) Number of Generator Nameplate Net Summer Net Winter Plant Fuel Type Generators Capacity Capacity Capacity Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Pumped Storage Other Total Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010, Feb. 2012, Table 1.2. 51 1.0 0.9 0.9 18,150 1,138.6 1,039.1 1,078.7 1,574 5.0 4.4 4.4 151 20.5 22.2 22.1 346 7.9

  14. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown – Dataset

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #844: Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented

  16. Identification and definition of unbundled electric generation and transmission services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.; Vancoevering, J.

    1995-03-01

    State and federal regulators, private and public utilities, large and small customers, power brokers and marketers, and others are engaged in major debates about the future structure of the electric industry. Although the outcomes are far from certain, it seems clear that customers will have much greater choices about the electric services they purchase and from whom they buy these services. This report examines the ``ancillary`` services that are today buried within the typical vertically integrated utility. These ancillary services support and make possible the provision of the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. These ancillary services include: Management of generating units; reserve generating capacity to follow variations in customer loads, to provide capacity and energy when generating units or transmission lines suddenly fall, to maintain electric-system stability, and to provide local-area security; transmission-system monitoring and control; replacement of real power and energy losses; reactive-power management and voltage regulation; transmission reserves; repair and maintenance of the transmission network; metering, billing, and communications; and assurance of appropriate levels of power quality. Our focus in this report, the first output from a larger Oak Ridge National Laboratory project, is on identification and definition of these services. Later work in this project will examine more closely the costs and pricing options for each service.

  17. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01

    This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

  18. The National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator Activities OAS-L-14-11 August 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 20, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, SANDIA FIELD OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo Director, Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's Neutron Generator Activities"

  19. Electricity generation and environmental externalities: Case studies, September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-28

    Electricity constitutes a critical input in sustaining the Nation`s economic growth and development and the well-being of its inhabitants. However, there are byproducts of electricity production that have an undesirable effect on the environment. Most of these are emissions introduced by the combustion of fossil fuels, which accounts for nearly 70 percent of the total electricity generated in the United States. The environmental impacts (or damages) caused by these emissions are labeled environmental ``externalities.`` Included in the generic term ``externality`` are benefits or costs resulting as an unintended byproduct of an economic activity that accrue to someone other than the parties involved in the activity. This report provides an overview of the economic foundation of externalities, the Federal and State regulatory approaches, and case studies of the impacts of the externality policies adopted by three States.

  20. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,178","9,197",89.1,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  1. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,164","10,337",101.4,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  2. Microgrids in the Evolving Electricity Generation and DeliveryInfrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri

    2006-02-01

    The legacy paradigm for electricity service in most of the electrified world today is based on the centralized generation-transmission-distribution infrastructure that evolved under a regulated environment. More recently, a quest for effective economic investments, responsive markets, and sensitivity to the availability of resources, has led to various degrees of deregulation and unbundling of services. In this context, a new paradigm is emerging wherein electricity generation is intimately embedded with the load in microgrids. Development and decay of the familiar macrogrid is discussed. Three salient features of microgrids are examined to suggest that cohabitation of micro and macro grids is desirable, and that overall energy efficiency can be increased, while power is delivered to loads at appropriate levels of quality.

  3. Distributed generation technology in a newly competitive electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeifenberger, J.P.; Ammann, P.R.; Taylor, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    The electric utility industry is in the midst of enormous changes in market structure. While the generation sector faces increasing competition, the utilities` transmission and distribution function is undergoing a transition to more unbundled services and prices. This article discusses the extent to which these changes will affect the relative advantage of distributed generation technology. Although the ultimate market potential for distributed generation may be significant, the authors find that the market will be very heterogeneous with many small and only a few medium-sized market segments narrowly defined by operating requirements. The largest market segment is likely to develop for distributed generation technology with operational and economical characteristics suitable for peak-shaving. Unbundling of utility costs and prices will make base- and intermediate-load equipment, such as fuel cells, significantly less attractive in main market segments unless capital costs fall significantly below $1,000/kW.

  4. Results from the OECD report on international projections of electricity generating costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffenbarger, J.A.; Bertel, E.

    1998-07-01

    The International Energy Agency and Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have periodically undertaken a joint study on electricity generating costs in OECD Member countries and selected non-Member countries. This paper presents key results from the 1998 update of this study. Experts from 19 countries drawn from electric utility companies and government provided data on capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and fuel costs from which levelized electricity generating costs (US cents/kWh) for baseload power plants were estimated in each country using a common set of economic assumptions. Light water nuclear power plants, pulverized coal plants, and natural gas-fired combined cycle gas turbines were the principal options evaluated. five and 10% discount rates, 40-year operating lifetime, and 75% annual load factor were the base assumptions, with sensitivity analyses on operating lifetime and load factor. Fuel costs and fuel escalation were provided individually by country, with a sensitivity case to evaluate costs assuming no real fuel price escalation over plant lifetimes. Of the three principal fuel/technology options, none is predominantly the cheapest option for all economic assumptions. However, fossil-fueled options are generally estimated to be the least expensive option. The study confirms that gas-fired combined cycles have improved their economic performance in most countries in recent years and are strong competitors to nuclear and coal-fired plants. Eleven out of the 18 countries with two or more options show gas-fired plants to be the cheapest option at 10% discount rate. Coal remains a strong competitor to gas when lower discount rates are used. Nuclear is the least expensive at both 5 and 10% discount rate in only two countries. Generally, with gas prices above 5 US$/GJ, nuclear plants constructed at overnight capital costs below 1 650 $/kWe have the potential to be competitive only at lower discount rates.

  5. BUILDOUT AND UPGRADE OF CENTRAL EMERGENCY GENERATOR SYSTEM, GENERATOR 3 AND 4 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Seifert; G. Shawn West; Kurt S. Myers; Jim Moncur

    2006-07-01

    SECTION 01000—SUMMARY OF WORK PART 1—GENERAL 1.1 SUMMARY The work to be performed under this project consists of providing the labor, equipment, and materials to perform "Buildout and Upgrade of Central Emergency Generator System, Generator 3 and 4 Electrical Installation" for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Dryden Flight Research Center (NASA/DFRC), Edwards, California 93523. All modifications to existing substations and electrical distribution systems are the responsibility of the contractor. It is the contractor’s responsibility to supply a complete and functionally operational system. The work shall be performed in accordance with these specifications and the related drawings. The work of this project is defined by the plans and specifications contained and referenced herein. This work specifically includes but is not limited to the following: Scope of Work - Installation 1. Install all electrical wiring and controls for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing electrical installation for generators 1 and 2 and in accordance with drawings. Contractor shall provide as-built details for electrical installation. 2. Install battery charger systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing battery charging equipment and installation for generators 1 and 2. This may require exchange of some battery charger parts already on-hand. Supply power to new battery chargers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 3. Install electrical wiring for fuel/lube systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Supply power to lube oil heaters and fuel system (day tanks) from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to

  6. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,160","9,556",94.0,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  7. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Dresden Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dresden Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 2,867,"7,727",101.7,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" 3,867,"6,866",90.4,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  8. Main Generator Seal Oil Supply Reliability Improvements at Southern California Edison's San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simma, Fred Y.; Chetwynd, Russell J.; Rowe, Stuart A.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the justification for the approach, details and results of the Main Generator Seal Oil System reliability enhancements on the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, SONGS. The SONGS, Unit 3 experienced substantial turbine damage in early 2001 after the turbine bearings lubrication oil supply failed. During a loss of off-site power incident, power was lost to the two AC powered turbine lubrication oil pumps due to a breaker failure in the switchgear and the DC powered emergency bearing lubricating oil pump failed to start due to a breaker trip. The SONGS turbine generators coasted down from full speed to a full stop without lubricating oil. This resulted in significant bearing, journal and steam path damage that required a four-month duration repair outage during a time period where electricity was in short supply in the State of California. The generator hydrogen sealing system remained operable during this event, however it was recognized during the event follow up investigation that this system had vulnerabilities to failure similar to the bearing lubrication system. In order to prevent a reoccurrence of this extremely costly event, SONGS has taken actions to modify both of these critical turbine generator systems by adding additional, continuously operating pumps with a new, independent power source and independently routed cables. The main challenge was to integrate the additional equipment into the existing lubrication and seal oil systems. The lubrication Oil System was the first system to be retro-fitted and these results already have been presented. Reference 2. This paper provides the result of the reliability enhancements for the Main Generator Seal Oil System, which concludes the turbine/generator critical oil systems reliability improvements, performed by SONGS. It is worth noting that the design team discovered and corrected a number of other significant operational issues, which had been present from the early days and also learned

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen

  10. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris; Ludewig, Hans; Todosow, Michael

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

  11. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

  12. POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dwyer, O.E.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

  13. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy J. Leahy

    2010-06-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated toolkit consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  14. Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W.

    2007-07-01

    A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

  15. Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conklin, Jim; Forsberg, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

  16. Significance of in-structure generated motion in seismic qualification electrical devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thinnes, G.; Glozman, V.

    1988-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been conducting a research study to assist the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) in determining susceptibility of electrical devices to in-structure generated motion sometimes present in electrical cabinets. In Phase I of this study, a survey of past seismic qualification tests conducted at Wyle Laboratories on various electrical and control equipment housed in nuclear grade cabinets was taken to identify components which experienced a rattling environment. The INEL has used several different methods to reduce that data and has determined the existence of a number of device anomalies in the presence of high frequency cabinet response to earthquake-type excitation motion. However, causality between the high frequency content and the malfunctions could not be conclusively confirmed. Phase II of the study consisted of shake table testing for the most prevalent malfunction discovered in the survey, relay chatter, with excitation frequency content in the seismic range and higher. This report will document the results of Phase I and II of the study. Insight into the susceptibility of electrical devices to rattling and characterization of relay chatter mechanisms offers guidance in addressing rattling effects during qualifications.

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies Volume 2 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M.

  18. Electrical motor/generator drive apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Gui Jia

    2013-02-12

    The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple currents and thus the volume and cost of a capacitor. The drive methodology is based on a segmented drive system that does not add switches or passive components but involves reconfiguring inverter switches and motor stator winding connections in a way that allows the formation of multiple, independent drive units and the use of simple alternated switching and optimized Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) schemes to eliminate or significantly reduce the capacitor ripple current.

  19. Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W; Conklin, Jim

    2007-09-01

    A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the

  20. Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, S.A.

    1981-02-01

    A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.

  1. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  2. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  3. NNSA Program Develops the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Experts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Disney, Maren V.

    2015-09-02

    NNSA is fostering the next generation of nuclear security experts is through its successful NNSA Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP). NGFP offers its Fellows an exceptional career development opportunity through hands-on experience supporting NNSA mission areas across policy and technology disciplines. The one-year assignments give tomorrow’s leaders in global nuclear security and nonproliferation unparalleled exposure through assignments to Program Offices across NNSA.

  4. Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field Fluids Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field Fluids Co-produced and low-temperature ...

  5. Big drop in coal-fired electricity generation during first half...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Big drop in coal-fired electricity generation during first half of 2016 The amount of U.S. electricity generated by coal continues to decline in 2016, as power plant operators turn ...

  6. Submerged electricity generation plane with marine current-driven motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dehlsen, James G.P.; Dehlsen, James B.; Fleming, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    An underwater apparatus for generating electric power from ocean currents and deep water tides. A submersible platform including two or more power pods, each having a rotor with fixed-pitch blades, with drivetrains housed in pressure vessels that are connected by a transverse structure providing buoyancy, which can be a wing depressor, hydrofoil, truss, or faired tube. The platform is connected to anchors on the seafloor by forward mooring lines and a vertical mooring line that restricts the depth of the device in the water column. The platform operates using passive, rather than active, depth control. The wing depressor, along with rotor drag loads, ensures the platform seeks the desired operational current velocity. The rotors are directly coupled to a hydraulic pump that drives at least one constant-speed hydraulic-motor generator set and enables hydraulic braking. A fluidic bearing decouples non-torque rotor loads to the main shaft driving the hydraulic pumps.

  7. Halbach array motor/generators: A novel generalized electric machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merritt, B.T.; Post, R.F.; Dreifuerst, G.R.; Bender, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    For many years Klaus Halbach has been investigating novel designs for permanent magnet arrays, using advanced analytical approaches and employing a keen insight into such systems. One of his motivations for this research was to find more efficient means for the utilization of permanent magnets for use in particle accelerators and in the control of particle beams. As a result of his pioneering work, high power free-electron laser systems, such as the ones built at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, became feasible, and his arrays have been incorporated into other particle-focusing systems of various types. This paper reports another, quite different, application of Klaus` work, in the design of high power, high efficiency, electric generators and motors. When tested, these motor/generator systems display some rather remarkable properties. Their success derives from the special properties which these arrays, which the authors choose to call {open_quotes}Halbach arrays,{close_quotes} possess.

  8. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 6: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, GA February 8, 2012 EIS-0476: Final Environmental Impact Statement Department of Energy Loan Guarantees for Proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Burke County, GA February 25, 2014 EIS-0476: Record of Decision Department of Energy Loan Guarantees for Proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Burke County, GA

  9. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  10. Unbundling generation and transmission services for competitive electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1998-01-01

    Ancillary services are those functions performed by the equipment and people that generate, control, and transmit electricity in support of the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) defined such services as those `necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.` The nationwide cost of ancillary services is about $12 billion a year, roughly 10% of the cost of the energy commodity. More important than the cost, however, is the necessity of these services for bulk-power reliability and for the support of commercial transactions. FERC`s landmark Order 888 included a pro forma tariff with provision for six key ancillary services. The Interconnected Operations Services Working Group identified another six services that it felt were essential to the operation of bulk-power systems. Several groups throughput the United States have created or are forming independent system operators, which will be responsible for reliability and commerce. To date, the electricity industry (including traditional vertically integrated utilities, distribution utilities, power markets and brokers, customers, and state and federal regulators) has paid insufficient attention to these services. Although the industry had made substantial progress in identifying and defining the key services, much remains to be doe to specify methods to measure the production, delivery, and consumption of these services; to identify the costs and cost-allocation factors for these services; and to develop market and operating rules for their provision and pricing. Developing metrics, determining costs, and setting pricing rules are important because most of these ancillary services are produced by the same pieces of equipment that

  11. Effect of Hurricane Andrew on the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station from August 20--30, 1992. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebdon, F.J.

    1993-03-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Turkey Point Electrical Generating Station with sustained winds of 145 mph (233 km/h). This is the report of the team that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) jointly sponsored (1) to review the damage that the hurricane caused the nuclear units and the utility`s actions to prepare for the storm and recover from it, and (2) to compile lessons that might benefit other nuclear reactor facilities.

  12. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birman, Kenneth; Ganesh, Lakshmi; Renessee, Robbert van; Ferris, Michael; Hofmann, Andreas; Williams, Brian; Sztipanovits, Janos; Hemingway, Graham; University, Vanderbilt; Bose, Anjan; Stivastava, Anurag; Grijalva, Santiago; Grijalva, Santiago; Ryan, Sarah M.; McCalley, James D.; Woodruff, David L.; Xiong, Jinjun; Acar, Emrah; Agrawal, Bhavna; Conn, Andrew R.; Ditlow, Gary; Feldmann, Peter; Finkler, Ulrich; Gaucher, Brian; Gupta, Anshul; Heng, Fook-Luen; Kalagnanam, Jayant R; Koc, Ali; Kung, David; Phan, Dung; Singhee, Amith; Smith, Basil

    2011-10-05

    The April 2011 DOE workshop, 'Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid', was the culmination of a year-long process to bring together some of the Nation's leading researchers and experts to identify computational challenges associated with the operation and planning of the electric power system. The attached papers provide a journey into these experts' insights, highlighting a class of mathematical and computational problems relevant for potential power systems research. While each paper defines a specific problem area, there were several recurrent themes. First, the breadth and depth of power system data has expanded tremendously over the past decade. This provides the potential for new control approaches and operator tools that can enhance system efficiencies and improve reliability. However, the large volume of data poses its own challenges, and could benefit from application of advances in computer networking and architecture, as well as data base structures. Second, the computational complexity of the underlying system problems is growing. Transmitting electricity from clean, domestic energy resources in remote regions to urban consumers, for example, requires broader, regional planning over multi-decade time horizons. Yet, it may also mean operational focus on local solutions and shorter timescales, as reactive power and system dynamics (including fast switching and controls) play an increasingly critical role in achieving stability and ultimately reliability. The expected growth in reliance on variable renewable sources of electricity generation places an exclamation point on both of these observations, and highlights the need for new focus in areas such as stochastic optimization to accommodate the increased uncertainty that is occurring in both planning and operations. Application of research advances in algorithms (especially related to optimization techniques and uncertainty quantification) could accelerate power system software tool

  13. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, Rick; Bluestein, Joel; Rodriguez, Nick; Knoke, Stu

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  14. Deployment of GTHTR300 Cogeneration for Hydrogen and Electric Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazuhiko Kunitomi; Xing Yan; Isao Minatsuki

    2004-07-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) has started the design study on the GTHTR300-cogeneration (GTHTR300C) aiming at producing electricity by a helium gas turbine and hydrogen by a thermochemical water splitting method (IS process method). The GTHTR300C is a block type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) with its reactor thermal power of 600 MW and outlet coolant temperature of 950 deg. C. The Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) is located between the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and the gas turbine system. The heat capacity of the IHX is 170 MW and is used for hydrogen production. The balance of the reactor thermal power is used for electric generation. The GTHTR300C is designed based on existing technologies for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and the helium turbine power conversion technology under development for the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor (GTHTR300). This paper describes the deployment of the GTHTR300C together with the original design features and advantages of the system. (authors)

  15. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Chick, Lawrence A.

    2012-04-01

    This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate electricity and would operate continuously during flight. The focus of this study is on more-electric aircraft which minimize bleed air extraction from the engines and instead use electrical power obtained from generators driven by the main engines to satisfy all major loads. The increased electrical generation increases the potential fuel savings obtainable through more efficient electrical generation using a SOFCPU. However, the weight added to the aircraft by the SOFCPU impacts the main engine fuel consumption which reduces the potential fuel savings. To investigate these relationships the Boeing 787­8 was used as a case study. The potential performance of the SOFCPU was determined by coupling flowsheet modeling using ChemCAD software with a stack performance algorithm. For a given stack operating condition (cell voltage, anode utilization, stack pressure, target cell exit temperature), ChemCAD software was used to determine the cathode air rate to provide stack thermal balance, the heat exchanger duties, the gross power output for a given fuel rate, the parasitic power for the anode recycle blower and net power obtained from (or required by) the compressor/expander. The SOFC is based on the Gen4 Delphi planar SOFC with assumed modifications to tailor it to this application. The size of the stack needed to satisfy the specified condition was assessed using an empirically-based algorithm. The algorithm predicts stack power density based on the pressure, inlet temperature, cell voltage and anode and cathode inlet flows and compositions. The algorithm was developed by enhancing a model for a well-established material set operating at atmospheric pressure to reflect the

  16. EIA's Energy in Brief: How much U.S. electricity is generated from

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    renewable energy? much U.S. electricity is generated from renewable energy? Last Updated: May 5, 2016 U.S. power plants used renewable energy sources, including water, wind, biomass wood and waste, geothermal, and solar, to generate about 13% of the electricity produced in the United States during 2015. Sources of Renewable Electricity Generation, 2013; chart shaped like an outlet. Renewables are 13% of generation. Renewable breakout: hydropower, 52%; wind, 32%; biomass wood, 8%; biomass

  17. CASL - Westinghouse Electric Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Westinghouse Electric Company Cranberry Township, PA Westinghouse Electric Company provides fuel, services, technology, plant design and equipment for the commercial nuclear electric power industry. Westinghouse nuclear technology is helping to provide future generations with safe, clean and reliable electricity. Key Contributions Definition of CASL challenge problems Existing codes and expertise Data for validation Computatinoal fluid dynamics modeling and analysis Development of test stand for

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  19. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Beck II; Harold J. Heydt; Emmanuel O. Opare; Kyle B. Oswald

    2010-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  20. Nuclear electric propulsion for future NASA space science missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, Chen-wan L.

    1993-07-20

    This study has been made to assess the needs, potential benefits and the applicability of early (circa year 2000) Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology in conducting NASA science missions. The study goals are: to obtain the performance characteristics of near term NEP technologies; to measure the performance potential of NEP for important OSSA missions; to compare NEP performance with that of conventional chemical propulsion; to identify key NEP system requirements; to clarify and depict the degree of importance NEP might have in advancing NASA space science goals; and to disseminate the results in a format useful to both NEP users and technology developers. This is a mission performance study and precludes investigations of multitudes of new mission operation and systems design issues attendant in a NEP flight.

  1. Studies on electrical cable insulation for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.S.; Soo, P.; MacKenzie, D.R.; Blackburn, P.

    1989-12-01

    Two new polyethylene cable insulations have been formulated for nuclear applications, and have been tested under gamma radiation. Both insulations are based on low density polyethylene, one with PbO and the other with Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} as additives. The test results show that the concept of using inorganic anti-oxidants to retard radiation initiated oxidation is viable, and PbO is more effective than Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} in slowing down radiation initiated oxidation (RIO). Also, radiation degradation data for polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride at 60{degrees}C have been generated, which will be used to understand radiation initiated oxidation process on these materials combined with the 25{degrees}C data that will be generated in the future. 14 refs., 41 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 ... See Note 3, "Electricity Imports and Exports," at end of section. 3Natural gas, plus a ...

  3. Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant ... Plants Into Energy-Use Sectors," at end of section. * Totals may not equal sum ...

  4. Evaluation of glare at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ho, C. K.; Sims, C. A.; Christian, J. M.

    2015-06-05

    The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS), located on I-15 about 40 miles (60 km) south of Las Vegas, NV, consists of three power towers 459 ft (140 m) tall and over 170,000 reflective heliostats with a rated capacity of 390 MW. In addition, reports of glare from the plant have been submitted by pilots and air traffic controllers and recorded by the Aviation Safety Reporting System and the California Energy Commission since 2013. Aerial and ground-based surveys of the glare were conducted in April, 2014, to identify the cause and to quantify the irradiance and potential ocular impacts ofmore » the glare. Results showed that the intense glare viewed from the airspace above ISEGS was caused by heliostats in standby mode that were aimed to the side of the receiver. Evaluation of the glare showed that the retinal irradiance and subtended source angle of the glare from the heliostats in standby were sufficient to cause significant ocular impact (potential for after-image) up to a distance of ~6 miles (10 km), but the values were below the threshold for permanent eye damage. Glare from the receivers had a low potential for after-image at all ground-based monitoring locations outside of the site boundaries. A Letter to Airmen has been issued by the Federal Aviation Administration to notify pilots of the potential glare hazards. Additional measures to mitigate the potential impacts of glare from ISGES are also presented and discussed.« less

  5. Electrical generation using a vertical-axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R.N.

    1982-12-01

    Traditionally, windmills have been of the propeller or multiblade types, both of which have their rotational axis parallel to the flow of the wind. A vertical-axis wind turbine has its rotational axis perpendicular to the flow of wind and requires no orientation to keep the rotor in the windstream. The vertical-axis wind turbine operates on the same principle as an airfoil and produces lift and drag as any airfoil. A newly designed 100-kW vertical-axis wind turbine has been operated for one year at the USDA Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, TX. The turbine has an induction generator and supplies power to a sprinkler irrigation system with excess power being sold to the electric utility. The turbine begins producing power at 5.5 m/s windspeed and reaches its rated output of 100-kW at 15 m/s. The unit has obtained a peak efficiency of 48% at a windspeed of 8 m/s or 81% of theoretical maximum. Using 17 years of windspeed data from the National Weather Service, the annual energy output is estimated at 200,000 kWh. The unit has experienced several operational problems during its initial testing. Guy cables were enlarged to provide greater stiffness to reduce blade stress levels, lightning shorted the main contactor, and the brake system required a complete redesign and modification. The turbine was operational about 60% of the time.

  6. Evaluation of glare at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, C. K.; Sims, C. A.; Christian, J. M.

    2015-06-05

    The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS), located on I-15 about 40 miles (60 km) south of Las Vegas, NV, consists of three power towers 459 ft (140 m) tall and over 170,000 reflective heliostats with a rated capacity of 390 MW. In addition, reports of glare from the plant have been submitted by pilots and air traffic controllers and recorded by the Aviation Safety Reporting System and the California Energy Commission since 2013. Aerial and ground-based surveys of the glare were conducted in April, 2014, to identify the cause and to quantify the irradiance and potential ocular impacts of the glare. Results showed that the intense glare viewed from the airspace above ISEGS was caused by heliostats in standby mode that were aimed to the side of the receiver. Evaluation of the glare showed that the retinal irradiance and subtended source angle of the glare from the heliostats in standby were sufficient to cause significant ocular impact (potential for after-image) up to a distance of ~6 miles (10 km), but the values were below the threshold for permanent eye damage. Glare from the receivers had a low potential for after-image at all ground-based monitoring locations outside of the site boundaries. A Letter to Airmen has been issued by the Federal Aviation Administration to notify pilots of the potential glare hazards. Additional measures to mitigate the potential impacts of glare from ISGES are also presented and discussed.

  7. Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radulescu, Laura; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2010-01-21

    The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

  8. Nuclear | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Nuclear power is the use of sustained nuclear fission to generate heat and electricity. Nuclear power plants provide about 6 percent of the world's energy and 13-14 percent of the world's electricity. Featured Moving Forward to Address Nuclear Waste Storage and Disposal Three trucks transport nuclear waste

  9. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, Christi D.; Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United

  10. Nuclear qualified in-containment electrical connectors and method of connecting electrical conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear qualified in-containment electrical connection comprises an insulated, sheathed instrument lead having electrical conductors extending from one end thereof to provide two exposed lead wires, a watertight cable having electrical conducting wires therein and extending from one end of the cable to provide two lead wires therefrom, two butt splice connectors each connecting the ends of respective ones of the lead wires from the instrument lead and cable, a length of heat shrinkable plastic tubing positioned over each butt splice connector and an adjacent portion of a respective lead wire from the cable and heat shrunk into position, a length of heat shrinkable plastic tubing on the end portion of the instrument lead adjacent the lead wires therefrom and heat shrunk thereon and a length of outer heat shrinkable plastic tubing extending over the end portion of the instrument lead and the heat shrinkable tubing thereon and over the butt splice connectors and a portion of the cable adjacent the cable lead lines, the outer heat shrinkable tubing being heat shrunk into sealing position on the instrument lead and cable.