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Sample records for nuclear detonation nurse

  1. Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Research and Development Nuclear Detonation Detection The Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection (NDD) develops and provide continuous, global capabilities to detect foreign nuclear weapon detonations, including for test ban treaty monitoring needs and military requirements. These efforts are aligned along three functional areas: Space-based Detection of Nuclear Detonations: Develops and builds space sensors for the nation's operational nuclear test treaty monitoring and Integrated

  2. Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA builds the nation's operational sensors that monitor the entire planet from space to detect and report surface, atmospheric, or space nuclear detonations; produces and updates...

  3. Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the entire planet from space to detect and report surface, atmospheric, or space nuclear detonations; produces and updates the regional geophysical datasets enabling...

  4. From Glimmer to Fireball: Photographing Nuclear Detonations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From Glimmer to Fireball National Security Science Latest Issue:July 2015 past issues All Issues submit From Glimmer to Fireball: Photographing Nuclear Detonations How do you...

  5. Post detonation nuclear forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Jay

    2014-05-09

    The problem of working backwards from the debris of a nuclear explosion to attempt to attribute the event to a particular actor is singularly difficult technically. However, moving from physical information of any certainty through the political steps that would lead to national action presents daunting policy questions as well. This monograph will outline the operational and physical components of this problem and suggest the difficulty of the policy questions that remain.

  6. The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites You are ...

  7. detonation detection | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    detonation detection NNSA administrator visits NNSS to meet team, see national security work Last month, Department of Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.) visited NNSA's Nevada Field Office where he hosted an all-hands for NNSA-Nevada staff and presented several service awards. During the trip he visited the NNSA... Radiological Security The program collaborates with domestic and international partners to address the threat of illicit

  8. ORISE: Message Testing for a Nuclear Detonation | How ORISE is...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Message Testing for a Nuclear Detonation How ORISE is Making a Difference For the average person, radiological contamination is a confusing and fearful concept. To help prepare our ...

  9. Program to Prevent Accidental or Unauthorized Nuclear Explosive Detonations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1980-12-18

    The order establishes the DOE program to prevent accidental or unauthorized nuclear explosive detonations, and to define responsibilities for DOE participation in the Department of Defense program for nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system safety. Does not cancel other directives.

  10. Reducing the Consequences of a Nuclear Detonation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, B R

    2007-11-09

    The 2002 National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction states that 'the United States must be prepared to respond to the use of WMD against our citizens, our military forces, and those of friends and allies'. Scenario No.1 of the 15 Department of Homeland Security national planning scenarios is an improvised nuclear detonation in the national capitol region. An effective response involves managing large-scale incident response, mass casualty, mass evacuation, and mass decontamination issues. Preparedness planning activities based on this scenario provided difficult challenges in time critical decision making and managing a large number of casualties within the hazard area. Perhaps even more challenging is the need to coordinate a large scale response across multiple jurisdictions and effectively responding with limited infrastructure and resources. Federal response planning continues to make improvements in coordination and recommending protective actions, but much work remains. The most critical life-saving activity depends on actions taken in the first few minutes and hours of an event. The most effective way to reduce the enormous national and international social and economic disruptions from a domestic nuclear explosion is through planning and rapid action, from the individual to the federal response. Anticipating response resources for survivors based on predicted types and distributions of injuries needs to be addressed.

  11. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  12. The U.S. Nuclear Detonation Detection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Many believe it was a joint Israel-South Africa nuclear test, but the scarcity of corroborating evidence persuaded others that a sensor malfunction or meteor strike caused a false ...

  13. From Glimmer to Fireball: Photographing Nuclear Detonations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Federal Computer Week: Energy agency launches performance-based pay system By Richard W. Walker Published on March 27, 2008 The Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration has launched a new performance- based pay system involving about 2,000 of its 2,500 employees. NNSA officials described the effort as a pilot project that will test the feasibility of the new system, which collapses the traditional 15 General Schedule pay bands into broader pay bands. The new structure

  14. detonation detection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en US Air Force Launches Satellite Carrying NNSA-provided Nuclear Detonation Detection Sensors http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesafsatellite

  15. detonation detection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Satellite Carrying NNSA-provided Nuclear Detonation Detection Sensors http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesafsatellite

  16. US Air Force Launches Satellite Carrying NNSA-provided Nuclear Detonation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Detection Sensors | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) US Air Force Launches Satellite Carrying NNSA-provided Nuclear Detonation Detection Sensors May 22, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. - On Friday, May 16, with the support of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a U.S. Air Force Delta IV rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral. Hosted onboard was a GPS IIF navigation satellite and a Global Burst Detector (GBD) payload designed to detect, identify and precisely locate

  17. Russian Military and Security Forces: A Postulated Reaction to a Nuclear Detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, D

    2005-04-29

    In this paper, we will examine how Russia's military and security forces might react to the detonation of a 10-kiloton nuclear weapon placed next to the walls surrounding the Kremlin. At the time of this 'big bang,' Putin is situated outside Moscow and survives the explosion. No one claims responsibility for the detonation. No other information is known. Numerous variables will determine how events ultimately unfold and how the military and security forces will respond. Prior to examining these variables in greater detail, it is imperative to elucidate first what we mean by Russia's military and security forces.

  18. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a Chicago nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2011-09-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kt detonation in Chicago. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at selected exemplary points. For many Chicago neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

  19. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a national capital region nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2011-12-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kT detonation in the National Capital Region. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at one exemplary point. For most Washington, DC neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

  20. NNSA Deploys Nuclear Detonation Detection Equipment Aboard Air Force

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation April 01, 2016 WASHINGTON, D.C.-The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) today released the annual reports outlining the strategic direction for two of its vital and enduring missions-maintaining a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent and reducing the

  1. NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-11-01

    The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

  2. Process for estimating likelihood and confidence in post detonation nuclear forensics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.; Craft, Charles M.

    2014-07-01

    Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) must provide answers to questions of concern to the broader community, including an estimate of uncertainty. There is significant uncertainty associated with post-detonation TNF. The uncertainty consists of a great deal of epistemic (state of knowledge) as well as aleatory (random) uncertainty, and many of the variables of interest are linguistic (words) and not numeric. We provide a process by which TNF experts can structure their process for answering questions and provide an estimate of uncertainty. The process uses belief and plausibility, fuzzy sets, and approximate reasoning.

  3. Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentz, A

    2008-07-31

    While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation.

  4. Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for an urban nuclear detonation scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-05-01

    Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. This study examines shelter-evacuate policies and effectiveness focusing on a 10 kt scenario in Los Angeles. The goal is to provide technical insights that can support development of urban response plans. Results indicate that extended shelter-in-place can offer the most robust protection when high quality shelter exists. Where less effective shelter is available and the fallout radiation intensity level is high, informed evacuation at the appropriate time can substantially reduce the overall dose to personnel. However, uncertainties in the characteristics of the fallout region and in the exit route can make evacuation a risky strategy. Analyses indicate that only a relatively small fraction of the total urban population may experience significant dose reduction benefits from even a well-informed evacuation plan.

  5. Improved estimates of separation distances to prevent unacceptable damage to nuclear power plant structures from hydrogen detonation for gaseous hydrogen storage. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report provides new estimates of separation distances for nuclear power plant gaseous hydrogen storage facilities. Unacceptable damage to plant structures from hydrogen detonations will be prevented by having hydrogen storage facilities meet separation distance criteria recommended in this report. The revised standoff distances are based on improved calculations on hydrogen gas cloud detonations and structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures. Also, the results presented in this study do not depend upon equivalencing a hydrogen detonation to an equivalent TNT detonation. The static and stagnation pressures, wave velocity, and the shock wave impulse delivered to wall surfaces were computed for several different size hydrogen explosions. Separation distance equations were developed and were used to compute the minimum separation distance for six different wall cases and for seven detonating volumes (from 1.59 to 79.67 lbm of hydrogen). These improved calculation results were compared to previous calculations. The ratio between the separation distance predicted in this report versus that predicted for hydrogen detonation in previous calculations varies from 0 to approximately 4. Thus, the separation distances results from the previous calculations can be either overconservative or unconservative depending upon the set of hydrogen detonation parameters that are used. Consequently, it is concluded that the hydrogen-to-TNT detonation equivalency utilized in previous calculations should no longer be used.

  6. Detonating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    1. Apparatus for detonation of high explosive in uniform timing comprising in combination, an outer case, spark gap electrodes insulatedly supported in spaced relationship within said case to form a spark gap, high explosive of the class consisting of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and trimethylene trinitramine substantially free from material sensitive to detonation by impact compressed in surrounding relation to said electrodes including said spark gap under a pressure from about 100 psi to about 500 psi, said spark gap with said compressed explosive therein requiring at least 1000 volts for sparking, and means for impressing at least 1000 volts on said spark gap.

  7. Goals, Objectives, and Requirements (GOR) of the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team for the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    The goal, objectives, and requirements (GOR) presented in this document define a framework for describing research directed specifically by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The intent of this document is to provide a communication tool for the GNDD Team with NNSA management and with its stakeholder community. It describes the GNDD expectation that much of the improvement in the proficiency of nuclear explosion monitoring will come from better understanding of the science behind the generation, propagation, recording, and interpretation of seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic, and radionuclide signals and development of "game-changer" advances in science and technology.

  8. High temperature detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (Los Alamos, NM); Dinegar, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

  9. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  10. U.S. Nuclear Deterrent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments. ...

  11. Detonation command and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2015-11-10

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link therebetween. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  12. Detonation command and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2016-05-31

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link there between. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  13. Bidirectional slapper detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, Robert N.; Boyd, Melissa D.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a bidirectional slapper detonator. One embodiment utilizes a single bridge circuit to detonate a pair of opposing initiating pellets. A line generator embodiment uses a plurality of bridges in electrical series to generate opposing cylindrical wavefronts.

  14. Implications of an Improvised Nuclear Device Detonation on Command and Control for Surrounding Regions at the Local, State and Federal Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquale, David A.; Hansen, Richard G.

    2013-01-23

    This paper discusses command and control issues relating to the operation of Incident Command Posts (ICPs) and Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs) in the surrounding area jurisdictions following the detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). Although many aspects of command and control will be similar to what is considered to be normal operations using the Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS), the IND response will require many new procedures and associations in order to design and implement a successful response. The scope of this white paper is to address the following questions: Would the current command and control framework change in the face of an IND incident? What would the management of operations look like as the event unfolded? How do neighboring and/or affected jurisdictions coordinate with the state? If the target areas command and control infrastructure is destroyed or disabled, how could neighboring jurisdictions assist with command and control of the targeted jurisdiction? How would public health and medical services fit into the command and control structure? How can pre-planning and common policies improve coordination and response effectiveness? Where can public health officials get federal guidance on radiation, contamination and other health and safety issues for IND response planning and operations?

  15. Reverse slapper detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

  16. The world's first nuclear detonation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (and other Manhattan Project sites). It took them less than two years to change the world. July 10, 2015 x x "Highly accurate 3D computing is a Holy Grail of the Stockpile...

  17. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gash, A

    2005-12-21

    Many energetic systems can be activated via mechanical means. Percussion primers in small caliber ammunition and stab detonators used in medium caliber ammunition are just two examples. Current medium caliber (20-60mm) munitions are detonated through the use of impact sensitive stab detonators. Stab detonators are very sensitive and must be small, as to meet weight and size limitations. A mix of energetic powders, sensitive to mechanical stimulus, is typically used to ignite such devices. Stab detonators are mechanically activated by forcing a firing pin through the closure disc of the device and into the stab initiating mix. Rapid heating caused by mechanically driven compression and friction of the mixture results in its ignition. The rapid decomposition of these materials generates a pressure/temperature pulse that is sufficient to initiate a transfer charge, which has enough output energy to detonate the main charge. This general type of ignition mix is used in a large variety of primers, igniters, and detonators.[1] Common primer mixes, such as NOL-130, are made up of lead styphnate (basic) 40%, lead azide (dextrinated) 20%, barium nitrate 20%, antimony sulfide 15%, and tetrazene 5%.[1] These materials pose acute and chronic toxicity hazards during mixing of the composition and later in the item life cycle after the item has been field functioned. There is an established need to replace these mixes on toxicity, health, and environmental hazard grounds. This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic solgel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs), which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash

  18. A review of direct numerical simulations of astrophysical detonations and their implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parete-Koon, Suzanne T.; Smith, Christopher R.; Papatheodore, Thomas L.; Bronson Messer, O. E.

    2013-04-11

    Multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of astrophysical detonations in degenerate matter have revealed that the nuclear burning is typically characterized by cellular structure caused by transverse instabilities in the detonation front. Type Ia supernova modelers often use one- dimensional DNS of detonations as inputs or constraints for their whole star simulations. While these one-dimensional studies are useful tools, the true nature of the detonation is multi-dimensional. The multi-dimensional structure of the burning influences the speed, stability, and the composition of the detonation and its burning products, and therefore, could have an impact on the spectra of Type Ia supernovae. Considerablemore » effort has been expended modeling Type Ia supernovae at densities above 1x107 g∙cm-3 where the complexities of turbulent burning dominate the flame propagation. However, most full star models turn the nuclear burning schemes off when the density falls below 1x107 g∙cm-3 and distributed burning begins. The deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is believed to occur at just these densities and consequently they are the densities important for studying the properties of the subsequent detonation. In conclusion, this work reviews the status of DNS studies of detonations and their possible implications for Type Ia supernova models. It will cover the development of Detonation theory from the first simple Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation models to the current models based on the time-dependent, compressible, reactive flow Euler equations of fluid dynamics.« less

  19. Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Kopczewski, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Schwarz, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives.

  20. Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Kopczewski, M.R.; Schwarz, A.C.

    1985-01-04

    The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives. 3 figs.

  1. Low voltage nonprimary explosive detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinegar, Robert H.; Kirkham, John

    1982-01-01

    A low voltage, electrically actuated, nonprimary explosive detonator is disclosed wherein said detonation is achieved by means of an explosive train in which a deflagration-to-detonation transition is made to occur. The explosive train is confined within a cylindrical body and positioned adjacent to low voltage ignition means have electrical leads extending outwardly from the cylindrical confining body. Application of a low voltage current to the electrical leads ignites a self-sustained deflagration in a donor portion of the explosive train which then is made to undergo a transition to detonation further down the train.

  2. Performance characterization of the NASA standard detonator ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Performance characterization of the NASA standard detonator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Performance characterization of the NASA standard detonator ...

  3. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1999-01-19

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length. 3 figs.

  4. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Grubelich, Mark C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length.

  5. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

    1983-08-16

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

  6. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McWilliams, Roy A.; von Holle, William G.

    1983-01-01

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300.mu. seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture.

  7. Production Pathways and Separation Procedures for High-Diagnostic-Value Activation Species, Fission Products, and Actinides Required for Preparation of Realistic Synthetic Post-Detonation Nuclear Debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faye, S A; Shaughnessy, D A

    2015-08-19

    The objective of this project is to provide a comprehensive study on the production routes and chemical separation requirements for activation products, fission products, and actinides required for the creation of realistic post-detonation surrogate debris. Isotopes that have been prioritized by debris diagnosticians will be examined for their ability to be produced at existing irradiation sources, production rates, and availability of target materials, and chemical separation procedures required to rapidly remove the products from the bulk target matrix for subsequent addition into synthetic debris samples. The characteristics and implications of the irradiation facilities on the isotopes of interest will be addressed in addition to a summary of the isotopes that are already regularly produced.

  8. Detonation waves in pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarver, C.M.; Breithaupt, R.D.; Kury, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    Fabry{endash}Perot laser interferometry was used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of tantalum discs accelerated by detonating pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) charges and of the interfaces between PETN detonation products and lithium fluoride crystals. The experimental records were compared to particle velocity histories calculated using very finely zoned meshes of the exact dimensions with the DYNA2D hydrodynamic code. The duration of the PETN detonation reaction zone was demonstrated to be less than the 5 ns initial resolution of the Fabry{endash}Perot technique, because the experimental records were accurately calculated using an instantaneous chemical reaction, the Chapman{endash}Jouguet (C-J) model of detonation, and the reaction product Jones{endash}Wilkins{endash}Lee (JWL) equation of state for PETN detonation products previously determined by supracompression (overdriven detonation) studies. Some of the PETN charges were pressed to densities approaching the crystal density and exhibited the phenomenon of superdetonation. An ignition and growth Zeldovich{endash}von Neumann{endash}Doring (ZND) reactive flow model was developed to explain these experimental records and the results of previous PETN shock initiation experiments on single crystals of PETN. Good agreement was obtained for the induction time delays preceding chemical reaction, the run distances at which the initial shock waves were overtaken by the detonation waves in the compressed PETN, and the measured particle velocity histories produced by the overdriven detonation waves before they could relax to steady state C-J velocity and pressure. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Nuclear Effects in nu-C Interactions at Low Q

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NNSA) Research and Development Nuclear Detonation Detection The Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection (NDD) develops and provide continuous, global capabilities to detect foreign nuclear weapon detonations, including for test ban treaty monitoring needs and military requirements. These efforts are aligned along three functional areas: Space-based Detection of Nuclear Detonations: Develops and builds space sensors for the nation's operational nuclear test treaty monitoring and Integrated

  10. Detonation in TATB Hemispheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Druce, B; Souers, P C; Chow, C; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Hrousis, C

    2004-03-17

    Streak camera breakout and Fabry-Perot interferometer data have been taken on the outer surface of 1.80 g/cm{sup 3} TATB hemispherical boosters initiated by slapper detonators at three temperatures. The slapper causes breakout to occur at 54{sup o} at ambient temperatures and 42{sup o} at -54 C, where the axis of rotation is 0{sup o}. The Fabry velocities may be associated with pressures, and these decrease for large timing delays in breakout seen at the colder temperatures. At room temperature, the Fabry pressures appear constant at all angles. Both fresh and decade-old explosive are tested and no difference is seen. The problem has been modeled with reactive flow. Adjustment of the JWL for temperature makes little difference, but cooling to -54 C decreases the rate constant by 1/6th. The problem was run both at constant density and with density differences using two different codes. The ambient code results show that a density difference is probably there but it cannot be quantified.

  11. DETONATION PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS ON PETN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, L G; Lee, E L

    2006-06-23

    PETN is widely recognized as an example of nearly ideal detonation performance. The chemical composition is such that little or no carbon is produced in the detonation products. The reaction zone width is less than currently detectable. (<1 ns) Observations on PETN have thus become a baseline for EOS model predictions. It has therefore become important to characterize the detonation parameters as accurately as possible in order to provide the most exacting comparisons of EOS predictions with experimental results. We undertook a painstaking review of the detonation pressure measurements reported in an earlier work that was presented at the Fifth Detonation Symposium and found that corrections were required in determining the shock velocity in the PMMA witness material. We also refined the impedance calculation to account for the difference between the usual ''acoustic'' method and the more accurate Riemann integral. Our review indicates that the CJ pressures previously reported for full density PETN require an average lowering of about 6 percent. The lower densities require progressively smaller corrections. We present analysis of the records, supporting hydrodynamic simulations, the Riemann integral results, and EOS parameter values derived from the revised results.

  12. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-08-05

    The Order defines the Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  13. Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA reduces the threat to national security posed by nuclear weapons proliferation and possible detonation or the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials through the long-term...

  14. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The

  15. Far Field Modeling Methods For Characterizing Surface Detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, A.

    2015-10-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed particle samples collected during experiments that were designed to replicate tests of nuclear weapons components that involve detonation of high explosives (HE). SRNL collected the particle samples in the HE debris cloud using innovative rocket propelled samplers. SRNL used scanning electronic microscopy to determine the elemental constituents of the particles and their size distributions. Depleted uranium composed about 7% of the particle contents. SRNL used the particle size distributions and elemental composition to perform transport calculations that indicate in many terrains and atmospheric conditions the uranium bearing particles will be transported long distances downwind. This research established that HE tests specific to nuclear proliferation should be detectable at long downwind distances by sampling airborne particles created by the test detonations.

  16. The initiation and propagation of helium detonations in white dwarf envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Ken J. [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Moore, Kevin, E-mail: kenshen@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Detonations in helium-rich envelopes surrounding white dwarfs have garnered attention as triggers of faint thermonuclear '.Ia' supernovae and double detonation Type Ia supernovae. However, recent studies have found that the minimum size of a hotspot that can lead to a helium detonation is comparable to, or even larger than, the white dwarf's pressure scale height, casting doubt on the successful ignition of helium detonations in these systems. In this paper, we examine the previously neglected effects of C/O pollution and a full nuclear reaction network, and we consider hotspots with spatially constant pressure in addition to constant density hotspots. We find that the inclusion of these effects significantly decreases the minimum hotspot size for helium-rich detonation ignition, making detonations far more plausible during turbulent shell convection or during double white dwarf mergers. The increase in burning rate also decreases the minimum shell mass in which a helium detonation can successfully propagate and alters the composition of the shell's burning products. The ashes of these low-mass shells consist primarily of silicon, calcium, and unburned helium and metals and may explain the high-velocity spectral features observed in most Type Ia supernovae.

  17. Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security Council-sponsored policy initiative that establishes federal agency missions and institutionalizes roles and responsibilities to enable operational support for materials, pre-detonation device, and post-detonation nuclear or radiological forensics programs with the broader goal of attribution. Technical nuclear forensics utilizes the data from

  18. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1994-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  19. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1994-11-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  20. Optically triggered fire set/detonator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chase, Jay B.; Pincosy, Philip A.; Chato, Donna M.; Kirbie, Hugh; James, Glen F.

    2007-03-20

    The present invention is directed to a system having a plurality of capacitor discharge units (CDUs) that includes electrical bridge type detonators operatively coupled to respective explosives. A pulse charging circuit is adapted to provide a voltage for each respective capacitor in each CDU. Such capacitors are discharged through the electrical bridge type detonators upon receiving an optical signal to detonate respective operatively coupled explosives at substantially the same time.

  1. Major Effects in the Thermodynamics of Detonation Products: Phase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water (Hsub 2O) and nitrogen (Nsub 2) are major detonation products of high explosives ... enough temperatures and pressures to influence detonation properties of common explosives. ...

  2. From Glimmer to Fireball: Photographing Nuclear Detonations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    While EG&G was responsible for scientific photography, a secret Hollywood studio, Lookout Mountain Laboratory, made documentaries for military and government briefings and then for ...

  3. Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

    2009-01-16

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  4. Prompt detonation of secondary explosives by laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Secondary high explosives have been promptly detonated by directing a laser beam of various wavelengths from 266 nanometers to 1.06 micron on the surface of the explosives. For this paper ''prompt'' means the excess transit time through an explosive charge is /approximately/250 nanoseconds (or less) less than the accepted full detonation velocity time. Timing between laser pulse, explosive initiation and detonation velocity and function time have been recorded. The laser parameters studied include: wavelength, pulse length, energy and power density, and beam diameter (spot size). Explosives evaluated include: PETN, HNS, HMX, and graphited PETN, HNS, and HMX. Explosive parameters that have been correlated with optical parameters include: density, surface area, critical diameter (spot size), spectral characteristics and enhance absorption. Some explosives have been promptly detonated over the entire range of wavelengths, possibly by two competing initiating mechanisms. Other explosives could not be detonated at any of the wavelengths or power densities tested. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Shock and Detonation Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, David L; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Steve A

    2012-08-22

    WX-9 serves the Laboratory and the Nation by delivering quality technical results, serving customers that include the Nuclear Weapons Program (DOE/NNSA), the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security and other government agencies. The scientific expertise of the group encompasses equations-of-state, shock compression science, phase transformations, detonation physics including explosives initiation, detonation propagation, and reaction rates, spectroscopic methods and velocimetry, and detonation and equation-of-state theory. We are also internationally-recognized in ultra-fast laser shock methods and associated diagnostics, and are active in the area of ultra-sensitive explosives detection. The facility capital enabling the group to fulfill its missions include a number of laser systems, both for laser-driven shocks, and spectroscopic analysis, high pressure gas-driven guns and powder guns for high velocity plate impact experiments, explosively-driven techniques, static high pressure devices including diamond anvil cells and dilatometers coupled with spectroscopic probes, and machine shops and target fabrication facilities.

  6. Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    R&D is organized into two offices: Proliferation Detection develops technologies to detect ... Learn More Proliferation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection Related Topics ...

  7. Detonator comprising a nonlinear transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

    2014-12-30

    Detonators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the detonator includes a nonlinear transmission line that has a variable capacitance. Capacitance of the nonlinear transmission line is a function of voltage on the nonlinear transmission line. The nonlinear transmission line receives a voltage pulse from a voltage source and compresses the voltage pulse to generate a trigger signal. Compressing the voltage pulse includes increasing amplitude of the voltage pulse and decreasing length of the voltage pulse in time. An igniter receives the trigger signal and detonates an explosive responsive to receipt of the trigger signal.

  8. Printable sensors for explosive detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Matthew J. Cooling, Nathan A.; Elkington, Daniel C.; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C.; Muller, Elmar

    2014-10-06

    Here, we report the development of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based on printable solution processed polymers and employing a quantum tunnelling composite material as a sensor to convert the pressure wave output from detonation transmission tubing (shock tube) into an inherently amplified electronic signal for explosives initiation. The organic electronic detector allows detection of the signal in a low voltage operating range, an essential feature for sites employing live ordinances that is not provided by conventional electronic devices. We show that a 30-fold change in detector response is possible using the presented detector assembly. Degradation of the OTFT response with both time and repeated voltage scans was characterised, and device lifetime is shown to be consistent with the requirements for on-site printing and usage. The integration of a low cost organic electronic detector with inexpensive shock tube transmission fuse presents attractive avenues for the development of cheap and simple assemblies for precisely timed initiation of explosive chains.

  9. National Nuclear Security Administration's Space-Based Nuclear...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Nuclear Security Administration's Space-Based Nuclear Detonation Detection Program OAS-L-14-09 July 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of ...

  10. Initiation and Detonation Physics on Millimeter Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philllips, D F; Benterou, J J; May, C A

    2012-03-20

    The LLNL Detonation Science Project has a major interest in understanding the physics of detonation on a millimeter scale. This report summarizes the rate stick experiment results of two high explosives. The GO/NO-GO threshold between varying diameters of ultra-fine TATB (ufTATB) and LX-16 were recorded on an electronic streak camera and analyzed. This report summarizes the failure diameters of rate sticks for ufTATB and LX-16. Failure diameter for the ufTATB explosive, with densities at 1.80 g/cc, begin at 2.34 mm (not maintaining detonation velocity over the entire length of the rate stick). ufTATB rate sticks at the larger 3.18 mm diameter maintain a constant detonation velocity over the complete length. The PETN based and LLNL developed explosive, LX-16, with densities at 1.7 g/cc, shows detonation failure between 0.318 mm and 0.365 mm. Additional tests would be required to narrow this failure diameter further. Many of the tested rate sticks were machined using a femtosecond laser focused into a firing tank - in case of accidental detonation.

  11. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8?m), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  12. Structure and properties of detonation soot particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MalKOV, I.Y.; Titiov, V.M.

    1996-05-01

    The influence of TNT/RDX (50/50) detonation parameters and conservation conditions of detonation products during their expansion in hermetic detonation chamber on structure and phase composition of the detonation carbon has been considered. Systematic studies made it possible to establish the real structure of detonation carbon depending on experimental conditions. It has been shown that both during explosion in a chamber and thermal annealing in vacuum the nanoparticles of diamond have the tendency to transform not into graphite particles, as was assumed earlier, but into onionlike structures of fullerene series, composed of closed concentric carbon shells, the so-called carbon onions. The nanometer carbon particles have been obtained which comprise a diamond nucleus surrounded by a graphite-like mantle composed of quasi-spherical carbon shells which are the intermediate products of annealing of nanodiamond. The influence of initial sizes of the diamond particles and temperature on the annealing of diamond has been studied. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Precursor detonation wave development in ANFO due to aluminum confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Scott I; Klyanda, Charles B; Short, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Detonations in explosive mixtures of ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum allow for transport of detonation energy ahead of the detonation front due to the aluminum sound speed exceeding the detonation velocity. The net effect of this energy transport on the detonation is unclear. It could enhance the detonation by precompressing the explosive near the wall. Alternatively, it could decrease the explosive performance by crushing porosity required for initiation by shock compression or destroying confinement ahead of the detonation. At present, these phenomena are not well understood. But with slowly detonating, non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) systems becoming increasing prevalent, proper understanding and prediction of the performance of these metal-confined NIHE systems is desirable. Experiments are discussed that measured the effect of this ANFO detonation energy transported upstream of the front by a 76-mm-inner-diameter aluminum confining tube. Detonation velocity, detonation-front shape, and aluminum response are recorded as a function of confiner wall thickness and length. Detonation shape profiles display little curvature near the confining surface, which is attributed to energy transported upstream modifying the flow. Average detonation velocities were seen to increase with increasing confiner thickness, while wavefront curvature decreased due to the stiffer, subsonic confinement. Significant radial sidewall tube motion was observed immediately ahead of the detonation. Axial motion was also detected, which interfered with the front shape measurements in some cases. It was concluded that the confiner was able to transport energy ahead of the detonation and that this transport has a definite effect on the detonation by modifying its characteristic shape.

  14. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-11-17

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O within ?10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O productions.

  15. Detonation propagation in a high loss configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Scott I; Shepherd, Joseph E

    2009-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study of detonation wave propagation in tubes with inner diameters (ID) comparable to the mixture cell size. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in two test section tubes with inner diameters of 1.27 mm and 6.35 mm. For both test sections, the initial pressure of stoichiometric mixtures was varied to determine the effect on detonation propagation. For the 6.35 mm tube, the equivalence ratio {phi} (where the mixture was {phi} C{sub 3}H{sub 8} + 50{sub 2}) was also varied. Detonations were found to propagate in mixtures with cell sizes as large as five times the diameter of the tube. However, under these conditions, significant losses were observed, resulting in wave propagation velocities as slow as 40% of the CJ velocity U{sub CJ}. A review of relevant literature is presented, followed by experimental details and data. Observed velocity deficits are predicted using models that account for boundary layer growth inside detonation waves.

  16. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  17. Kinetic information from detonation front curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-15

    The time constants for time-dependent modeling may be estimated from reaction zone lengths, which are obtained from two sources One is detonation front curvature, where the edge lag is close to being a direct measure The other is the Size Effect, where the detonation velocity decreases with decreasing radius as energy is lost to the cylinder edge A simple theory that interlocks the two effects is given A differential equation for energy flow in the front is used, the front is described by quadratic and sixth-power radius terms The quadratic curvature comes from a constant power source of energy moving sideways to the walls Near the walls, the this energy rises to the total energy of detonation and produces the sixth-power term The presence of defects acting on a short reaction zone can eliminate the quadratic part while leaving the wall portion of the cuvature A collection of TNT data shows that the reaction zone increases with both the radius and the void fraction

  18. Insensitive detonator apparatus for initiating large failure diameter explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, III, William Leroy

    2015-07-28

    A munition according to a preferred embodiment can include a detonator system having a detonator that is selectively coupled to a microwave source that functions to selectively prime, activate, initiate, and/or sensitize an insensitive explosive material for detonation. The preferred detonator can include an explosive cavity having a barrier within which an insensitive explosive material is disposed and a waveguide coupled to the explosive cavity. The preferred system can further include a microwave source coupled to the waveguide such that microwaves enter the explosive cavity and impinge on the insensitive explosive material to sensitize the explosive material for detonation. In use the preferred embodiments permit the deployment and use of munitions that are maintained in an insensitive state until the actual time of use, thereby substantially preventing unauthorized or unintended detonation thereof.

  19. THE DETONATION MECHANISM OF THE PULSATIONALLY ASSISTED GRAVITATIONALLY CONFINED DETONATION MODEL OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, C.; Weide, K.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Reid, L. B.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the 'pulsationally assisted' gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and {sup 56}Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the 'classical' GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  20. A library of prompt detonation reaction zone data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Tables are given listing literature data that allows calculation of sonic reaction zones at or near steady-state for promptly detonating explosive cylinders. The data covers homogeneous, heterogeneous, composite, inorganic and binary explosives and allows comparison across the entire explosive field. Table 1 lists detonation front curvatures. Table 2 lists Size Effect data, i.e. the change of detonation velocity with cylinder radius. Table 3 lists failure radii and detonation velocities. Table 4 lists explosive compositions. A total of 51 references dating back into the 1950`s are given. Calculated reaction zones, radii of curvature and growth rate coefficients are listed.

  1. Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Coatings with Incorporated Detonationally Generated Nanodiamonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pramatarova, L.; Pecheva, E.; Hikov, T.; Fingarova, D.; Dimitrova, R.; Spassov, T.; Krasteva, N.; Mitev, D.

    2010-01-21

    We studied the effect of the substrate chemistry on the morphology of hydroxyapatite-detonational nanodiamond composite coatings grown by a biomimetic approach (immersion in a supersaturated simulated body fluid). When detonational nanodiamond particles were added to the solution, the morphology of the grown for 2 h composite particles was porous but more compact then that of pure hydroxyapatite particles. The nanodiamond particles stimulated the hydroxyapatite growth with different morphology on the various substrates (Ti, Ti alloys, glasses, Si, opal). Biocompatibility assay with MG63 osteoblast cells revealed that the detonational nanodiamond water suspension with low and average concentration of the detonational nanodiamond powder is not toxic to living cells.

  2. Exploring high temperature phenomena related to post-detonation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Exploring high temperature phenomena related to post-detonation by an electric arc Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring high temperature phenomena related to ...

  3. Safety and performance enhancement circuit for primary explosive detonators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Ronald W.

    2006-04-04

    A safety and performance enhancement arrangement for primary explosive detonators. This arrangement involves a circuit containing an energy storage capacitor and preset self-trigger to protect the primary explosive detonator from electrostatic discharge (ESD). The circuit does not discharge into the detonator until a sufficient level of charge is acquired on the capacitor. The circuit parameters are designed so that normal ESD environments cannot charge the protection circuit to a level to achieve discharge. When functioned, the performance of the detonator is also improved because of the close coupling of the stored energy.

  4. Nitrogen Oxides as a Chemistry Trap in Detonating Oxygen-Rich...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Nitrogen Oxides as a Chemistry Trap in Detonating Oxygen-Rich Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nitrogen Oxides as a Chemistry Trap in Detonating ...

  5. Meeting the Next Generation of Nuclear Nonproliferation Specialists...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... DNN R&D directs an integrated research and development portfolio in support of its mission to detect signs of nuclear proliferation and nuclear detonations. The DNN R&D-funded ...

  6. Detonation Reaction Zones in Condensed Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarver, C M

    2005-07-14

    Experimental measurements using nanosecond time resolved embedded gauges and laser interferometric techniques, combined with Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich--von Neumann--Doring (NEZND) theory and Ignition and Growth reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling, have revealed the average pressure/particle velocity states attained in reaction zones of self-sustaining detonation waves in several solid and liquid explosives. The time durations of these reaction zone processes is discussed for explosives based on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitromethane, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), triaminitrinitrobenzene(TATB) and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  7. Laser image recording on detonation nanodiamond films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikheev, G M; Mikheev, K G; Mogileva, T N; Puzyr, A P; Bondar, V S

    2014-01-31

    A focused He Ne laser beam is shown to cause local blackening of semitransparent detonation nanodiamond (DND) films at incident power densities above 600 W cm{sup -2}. Data obtained with a Raman spectrometer and low-power 632.8-nm laser source indicate that the blackening is accompanied by a decrease in broadband background luminescence and emergence of sharp Raman peaks corresponding to the structures of nanodiamond and sp{sup 2} carbon. The feasibility of image recording on DND films by a focused He Ne laser beam is demonstrated. (letters)

  8. Shock-to-Detonation Transition simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-07-14

    Shock-to-detonation transition (SDT) experiments with embedded velocity gauges provide data that can be used for both calibration and validation of high explosive (HE) burn models. Typically, a series of experiments is performed for each HE in which the initial shock pressure is varied. Here we describe a methodology for automating a series of SDT simulations and comparing numerical tracer particle velocities with the experimental gauge data. Illustrative examples are shown for PBX 9502 using the HE models implemented in the xRage ASC code at LANL.

  9. Computation of a diverging Comp-B detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bukiet, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    The expansion which occurs in diverging detonations weakens the wave and yields pressures and densities below those occurring in planar geometry. We study the problem of a spherically expanding detonation of Comp-B. The effect of varying the order of reaction as well as the rate law parameters (using an Arrhenius burn model) is studied. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Measuring In-Situ Mdf Velocity Of Detonation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horine, Frank M.; James, Jr., Forrest B.

    2005-10-25

    A system for determining the velocity of detonation of a mild detonation fuse mounted on the surface of a device includes placing the device in a predetermined position with respect to an apparatus that carries a couple of sensors that sense the passage of a detonation wave at first and second spaced locations along the fuse. The sensors operate a timer and the time and distance between the locations is used to determine the velocity of detonation. The sensors are preferably electrical contacts that are held spaced from but close to the fuse such that expansion of the fuse caused by detonation causes the fuse to touch the contact, causing an electrical signal to actuate the timer.

  11. Effect of prill structure on detonation performance of ANFO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salyer, Terry R; Short, Mark; Kiyanda, Charles B; Morris, John S; Zimmerly, Tony

    2010-01-01

    While the effects of charge diameter, fuel mix ratio, and temperature on ANFO detonation performance are substantial, the effects of prill type are considerable as well as tailorable. Engineered AN prills provide a means to improve overall performance, primarily by changing the material microstructure through the addition of features designed to enhance hot spot action. To examine the effects of prill type (along with fuel mix ratio and charge diameter) on detonation performance, a series of precision, large-scale, ANFO front-curvature rate-stick tests was performed. Each shot used standard No. 2 diesel for the fuel oil and was essentially unconfined with cardboard confinement. Detonation velocities and front curvatures were measured while actively maintaining consistent shot temperatures. Based on the experimental results, DSD calibrations were performed to model the detonation performance over a range of conditions, and the overall effects of prill microstructure were examined and correlated with detonation performance.

  12. Nuclear forensics: Soil content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beebe, Merilyn Amy

    2015-08-31

    Nuclear Forensics is a growing field that is concerned with all stages of the process of creating and detonating a nuclear weapon. The main goal is to prevent nuclear attack by locating and securing nuclear material before it can be used in an aggressive manner. This stage of the process is mostly paperwork; laws, regulations, treaties, and declarations made by individual countries or by the UN Security Council. There is some preliminary leg work done in the form of field testing detection equipment and tracking down orphan materials; however, none of these have yielded any spectacular or useful results. In the event of a nuclear attack, the first step is to analyze the post detonation debris to aid in the identification of the responsible party. This aspect of the nuclear forensics process, while reactive in nature, is more scientific. A rock sample taken from the detonation site can be dissolved into liquid form and analyzed to determine its chemical composition. The chemical analysis of spent nuclear material can provide valuable information if properly processed and analyzed. In order to accurately evaluate the results, scientists require information on the natural occurring elements in the detonation zone. From this information, scientists can determine what percentage of the element originated in the bomb itself rather than the environment. To this end, element concentrations in soils from sixty-nine different cities are given, along with activity concentrations for uranium, thorium, potassium, and radium in various building materials. These data are used in the analysis program Python.

  13. Bonfire-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lieberman, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it bonfire-safe includes a first layer of an explosive charge of CP, or a primary explosive, and a second layer of a secondary organic explosive charge, such as PETN, which has a degradation temperature lower than the autoignition temperature of the CP or primary explosives. The first layer is composed of a pair of increments disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to and in contact with an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The second layer is composed of a plurality of increments disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to and in contact with the first layer on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first layer is loaded under a sufficient high pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to achieve ignition, whereas the second layer is loaded under a sufficient low pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. Each increment of the first and second layers has an axial length-to-diameter ratio of one-half. 2 figs.

  14. Bonfire-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lieberman, Morton L.

    1990-01-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it bonfire-safe includes a first layer of an explosive charge of CP, or a primary explosive, and a second layer of a secondary organic explosive charge, such as PETN, which has a degradation temperature lower than the autoignition temperature of the CP or primary explosives. The first layer is composed of a pair of increments disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to and in contact with an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The second layer is composed of a plurality of increments disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to and in contact with the first layer on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first layer is loaded under a sufficient high pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to achieve ignition, whereas the second layer is loaded under a sufficient low pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. Each increment of the first and second layers has an axial length-to-diameter ratio of one-half.

  15. Spark-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lieberman, Morton L.

    1989-01-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it spark-safe ncludes an organic secondary explosive charge of HMX in the form of a thin pad disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The pad of secondary charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter. The explosive column also includes a first explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in the ignition region of the explosive column next to the secondary charge pad on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to provide mechanical confinement of the pad of secondary charge and physical coupling thereof with the ignition device. The explosive column further includes a second explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to the first CP charge on a side opposite from the pad of secondary charge. The second CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. The first explosive CP charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter, whereas the second explosive CP charge contains a series of increments (nominally 4) each of which has an axial thickness-to-diameter ratio of one to two.

  16. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-08-06

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.1C.

  17. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-09-20

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1B. Canceled by DOE O 452.1D

  18. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Canceled by DOE O 452.1D Admin Chg 1.

  19. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-01-17

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled by DOE O 452.1B.

  20. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Supersedes DOE O 452.1D.

  1. Theoretical solution of the minimum charge problem for gaseous detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostensen, R.W.

    1990-12-01

    A theoretical model was developed for the minimum charge to trigger a gaseous detonation in spherical geometry as a generalization of the Zeldovich model. Careful comparisons were made between the theoretical predictions and experimental data on the minimum charge to trigger detonations in propane-air mixtures. The predictions are an order of magnitude too high, and there is no apparent resolution to the discrepancy. A dynamic model, which takes into account the experimentally observed oscillations in the detonation zone, may be necessary for reliable predictions. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Spark-safe low-voltage detonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lieberman, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    A column of explosive in a low-voltage detonator which makes it spark-safe includes an organic secondary explosive charge of HMX in the form of a thin pad disposed in a bore of a housing of the detonator in an ignition region of the explosive column and adjacent to an electrical ignition device at one end of the bore. The pad of secondary charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter. The explosive column also includes a first explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in the ignition region of the explosive column next to the secondary charge pad on a side opposite from the ignition device. The first CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, 25 to 40 kpsi, to provide mechanical confinement of the pad of secondary charge and physical coupling thereof with the ignition device. The explosive column further includes a second explosive charge of CP disposed in the housing bore in a transition region of the explosive column next to the first CP charge on a side opposite from the pad of secondary charge. The second CP charge is loaded under sufficient pressure, about 10 kpsi, to allow occurrence of DDT. The first explosive CP charge has an axial thickness within the range of twenty to thirty percent of its diameter, whereas the second explosive CP charge contains a series of increments (nominally 4), each of which has an axial thickness-to-diameter ratio of one to two. 2 figs.

  3. Explosive Products EOS: Adjustment for detonation speed and energy release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-05

    Propagating detonation waves exhibit a curvature effect in which the detonation speed decreases with increasing front curvature. The curvature effect is due to the width of the wave profile. Numerically, the wave profile depends on resolution. With coarse resolution, the wave width is too large and results in a curvature effect that is too large. Consequently, the detonation speed decreases as the cell size is increased. We propose a modification to the products equation of state (EOS) to compensate for the effect of numerical resolution; i.e., to increase the CJ pressure in order that a simulation propagates a detonation wave with a speed that is on average correct. The EOS modification also adjusts the release isentrope to correct the energy release.

  4. Nuclear explosive safety study process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear explosives by their design and intended use require collocation of high explosives and fissile material. The design agencies are responsible for designing safety into the nuclear explosive and processes involving the nuclear explosive. The methodology for ensuring safety consists of independent review processes that include the national laboratories, Operations Offices, Headquarters, and responsible Area Offices and operating contractors with expertise in nuclear explosive safety. A NES Study is an evaluation of the adequacy of positive measures to minimize the possibility of an inadvertent or deliberate unauthorized nuclear detonation, high explosive detonation or deflagration, fire, or fissile material dispersal from the pit. The Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Group (NESSG) evaluates nuclear explosive operations against the Nuclear Explosive Safety Standards specified in DOE O 452.2 using systematic evaluation techniques. These Safety Standards must be satisfied for nuclear explosive operations.

  5. Simulations of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Reactive Gases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Simulations of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Reactive Gases PI Name: Alexei Khokhlov PI Email: ajk@oddjob.uchicago.edu Institution: University of Chicago Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 20,000,000 Year: 2012 Research Domain: Chemistry First-principles direct numerical simulations explain and predict high-speed combustion and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in hydrogen-oxygen gaseous mixtures. DDT and the

  6. Nonintrusive stabilization of a conical detonation wave for supersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrier, G.F.; Fendell, F.E.; Fink, S.F. IV

    1995-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies are undertaken of the feasibility of an air-breathing supersonic combustor based on a stabilized, conically configured (oblique) detonation wave. The conical wave is the result of the interaction of a train of spherical detonation waves, each directly initiated by a brief, localized deposition of energy from a very-rapidly-repeated pulsed laser. The laser is tightly focused on a fixed site (in the combustor) where there is a steady uniform supersonic stream of combustible gas. Simple analysis of the requirements for (nonintrusive) direct initiation of an individual spherical detonation wave by a single laser pulse relates the pulse-energy and pulse-duration parameters. Then, an estimate is given of the entropy production associated with the early-time interaction of spherical detonations created in a supersonic reactive stream by a train of laser pulses. The entropy production, which arises from reflected shocks in the already detonated mixture, is reduced by increasing the repetition rate of the laser. Finally, the fuel/air mixing is inevitably imperfect in practical high-speed combustors. The authors investigate that portion of the throughput which is compressed, but not reacted, during transit of the conical detonation wave, because of imperfect mixing. Specifically, they estimate the spatial scale of the cold-mixture inhomogeneity that still permits diffusive burnup, prior to exhaust from the nozzle of the combustor.

  7. The U.S. Nuclear Detonation Detection Syst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)'s Advanced Manufacturing Office partners with industry, small business, universities, and other stakeholders to identify and invest in emerging technologies with the potential to create high-quality domestic manufacturing jobs and enhance the global competitiveness of the United States. This document was prepared for DOE/EERE's AMO as a collaborative effort between DOE AMO and Energetics Incorporated, Columbia, MD. Disclaimer This

  8. NNSA Deploys Nuclear Detonation Detection Equipment Aboard Air...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    on the Air Force's new Space Based Infrared System satellites, as well as on a new block of GPS satellites. Working together, NNSA and the Air Force Space and Missile Systems ...

  9. The development of laser ignited deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) detonators and pyrotechnic actuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.

    1994-05-01

    The use of laser ignited explosive components has been recognized as a safety enhancement over existing electrical explosive devices (EEDs). Sandia has been pursuing the development of optical ordnance for many years with recent emphasis on developing optical deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) detonators and pyrotechnic actuators. These low energy optical ordnance devices can be ignited with either a semiconductor diode laser, laser diode arrays or a solid state rod laser. By using a semiconductor laser diode, the safety improvement can be made without sacrificing performance since the input energy required for the laser diode and the explosive output are similar to existing electrical systems. The use of higher powered laser diode arrays or rod lasers may have advantages in fast DDT applications or lossy optical environments such as long fiber applications and applications with numerous optical connectors. Recent results from our continued study of optical ignition of explosive and pyrotechnic materials are presented. These areas of investigation can be separated into three different margin categories: (1) the margin relative to intended inputs ( i.e. powder performance as a function of laser input variation), (2) the margin relative to anticipated environments (i.e. powder performance as a function of thermal environment variation), and (3) the margin relative to unintended environments (i.e. responses to abnormal environments or safety).

  10. The development of laser ignited deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) detonators and pyrotechnic actuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Harlan, J.G.

    1993-11-01

    The use of laser ignited explosive components has been recognized as a safety enhancement over existing electrical explosive devices (EEDs). Sandia has been pursuing the development of optical ordnance for many years with recent emphasis on developing optical deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) detonators and pyrotechnic actuators. These low energy optical ordnance devices can be ignited with either a semiconductor diode laser, laser diode arrays or a solid state rod laser. By using a semiconductor laser diode, the safety improvement can be made without sacrificing performance since the input energy required for the laser diode and the explosive output are similar to existing electrical systems. The use of higher powered laser diode arrays or rod lasers may have advantages in fast DDT applications or lossy optical environments such as long fiber applications and applications with numerous optical connectors. Recent results from our continued study of optical ignition of explosive and pyrotechnic materials are presented. These areas of investigation can be separated into three different margin categories: (1) the margin relative to intended inputs (i.e. powder performance as a function of laser input variation), (2) the margin relative to anticipated environments (i.e. powder performance as a function of thermal environment variation), and (3) the margin relative to unintended environments (i.e. responses to abnormal environments or safety).

  11. Investigations on detonation shock dynamics and related topics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, D.S.

    1993-11-01

    This document is a final report that summarizes the research findings and research activities supported by the subcontract DOE-LANL-9-XG8-3931P-1 between the University of Illinois (D. S. Stewart Principal Investigator) and the University of California (Los Alamos National Laboratory, M-Division). The main focus of the work has been on investigations of Detonation Shock Dynamics. A second emphasis has been on modeling compaction of energetic materials and deflagration to detonation in those materials. The work has led to a number of extensions of the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) and its application as an engineering design method for high explosive systems. The work also enhanced the hydrocode capabilities of researchers in M-Division by modifications to CAVEAT, an existing Los Alamos hydrocode. Linear stability studies of detonation flows were carried out for the purpose of code verification. This work also broadened the existing theory for detonation. The work in this contract has led to the development of one-phase models for dynamic compaction of porous energetic materials and laid the groundwork for subsequent studies. Some work that modeled the discrete heterogeneous behavior of propellant beds was also performed. The contract supported the efforts of D. S. Stewart and a Postdoctoral student H. I. Lee at the University of Illinois.

  12. Synthesis of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles by detonation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Guilei, E-mail: sunguilei@126.com [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China)] [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China); Li, Xiaojie, E-mail: dalian03@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Wang, Qiquan [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China)] [Department of Safety Engineering, China Institute of Industrial Relations, Beijing 100037 (China); Yan, Honghao [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by detonating a mixture of ferrocene, naphthalene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in an explosion vessel under low vacuum conditions (8.1 kPa). The RDX functioned as an energy source for the decomposition of ferrocene and naphthalene. The carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were formed as soot-like deposits on the inner surface of the reactor, which were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. And a portion of the detonation soot was treated with hydrochloric acid. The product was carbon-coated nanoparticles in perfect core-shell structures with graphitic shells and bcc-Fe cores. The detonation technique offers an energy-saving route to the synthesis of carbon-coated nanomaterials.

  13. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boberg, Ralph E. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Weingart, Richard C. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto.

  14. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boberg, R.E.; Lee, R.S.; Weingart, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto. 10 figs.

  15. Flying-plate detonator using a high-density high explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stroud, John R.; Ornellas, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    A flying-plate detonator containing a high-density high explosive such as benzotrifuroxan (BTF). The detonator involves the electrical explosion of a thin metal foil which punches out a flyer from a layer overlying the foil, and the flyer striking a high-density explosive pellet of BTF, which is more thermally stable than the conventional detonator using pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

  16. Chemical reaction and equilibration mechanisms in detonation waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarver, C. M., LLNL

    1997-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical evidence for the nonequilibrium Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation is presented. High density, high temperature transition state theory is used to calculate unimolecular reaction rate constants for the initial decomposition of gaseous norbornene, liquid nitromethane, and solid, single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate as functions of shock temperature. The calculated rate constants are compared to those derived from experimental induction time measurements at various shock and detonation states. Uncertainties in the calculated shock and von Neumann spike temperatures are the main drawbacks to calculating these reaction rates. Nanosecond measurements of the shock temperatures of unreacted explosives are necessary to reduce these uncertainties.

  17. nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2%2A en U.S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesu.s-japan-exchange-best-practices-nuclear-emergency-respon...

  18. Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Nonproliferation Research and Development The mission of the Office of Research and Development (R&D) is to support U.S. national and nuclear security objectives in reducing global nuclear security threats through the innovation of unilateral and multi-lateral technical capabilities to detect, identify, and characterize: 1) foreign nuclear weapons programs, 2) illicit diversion of special nuclear materials, and 3) global nuclear detonations. R&D is organized into two offices:

  19. Declassification of the Yields of 11 Nuclear Tests Conducted as Part

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Declassification of the Yields of 11 Nuclear Tests Conducted as Part of the Plowshare Peaceful Uses for Nuclear Explosives Program The Department of Energy and the Department of Defense have jointly declassified the specific yields of 11 nuclear tests conducted between 1962 and 1968 at the Nevada Test Site, including three tests that, as previously announced, leaked radioactivity. Also declassified are the yields of two detonations that, together with another detonation whose yield has already

  20. The role of cellular structure on increasing the detonability limits of three-step chain-branching detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, Mark; Kiyanda, Charles B; Quirk, James J; Sharpe, Gary J

    2011-01-27

    In [1], the dynamics of a pulsating three-step chain-branching detonation were studied. The reaction model consists of, sequentially, chain-initiation, chain-branching and chain-termination steps. The chain-initiation and chain-branching steps are taken to be thermally neutral, with chemical energy release occuring in the chain-termination stage. The purpose of the present study is to examine whether cellular detonation structure can increase the value of the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b} at which fully coupled detonation solutions are observed over those in 1 D. The basic concept is straightforward and has been discussed in [1] and [3]; if T{sub s} drops below T{sub b} at the lead shock, the passage of a transverse shock can increase both the lead shock temperature and the temperature behind the transverse wave back above T{sub b}, thus sustaining an unstable cellular detonation for values of T{sub b} for which a one-dimensional pulsating detonation will fail. Experiments potentially supporting this hypothesis with irregular detonations have been shown in [3] in a shock tube with acoustically absorbing walls. Removal of the transverse waves results in detonation failure, giving way to a decoupled shock-flame complex. A number of questions remain to be addressed regarding the possibility of such a mechanism, and, if so, about the precise mechanisms driving the cellular structure for large T{sub b}. For instance, one might ask what sets the cell size in a chain-branching detonation, particularly could the characteristic cell size be set by the chain-branching cross-over temperature T{sub b}: after a transverse wave shock collision, the strength of the transverse wave weakens as it propagates along the front. If the spacing between shock collisions is too large (cell size), then the transverse shocks may weaken to the extent that the lead shock temperature or that behind the transverse waves is not raised above T{sub b}, losing chemical energy to

  1. HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaugh, J E

    2011-11-22

    HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable

  2. Detonation equation of state at LLNL, 1995. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P.C.; Wu, B.; Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1996-02-01

    JWL`s and 1-D Look-up tables are shown to work for ``one-track`` experiments like cylinder shots and the expanding sphere. They fail for ``many-track`` experiments like the compressed sphere. As long as the one-track experiment has dimensions larger than the explosive`s reaction zone and the explosive is near-ideal, a general JWL with R{sub 1} = 4.5 and R{sub 2} = 1.5 can be constructed, with both {omega} and E{sub o} being calculated from thermochemical codes. These general JWL`s allow comparison between various explosives plus recalculation of the JWL for different densities. The Bigplate experiment complements the cylinder test by providing continuous oblique angles of shock incidence from 0{degrees} to 70{degrees}. Explosive reaction zone lengths are determined from metal plate thicknesses, extrapolated run-to-detonation distances, radius size effects and detonation front curvature. Simple theories of the cylinder test, Bigplate, the cylinder size effect and detonation front curvature are given. The detonation front lag at the cylinder edge is shown to be proportional to the half-power of the reaction zone length. By calibrating for wall blow-out, a full set of reaction zone lengths from PETN to ANFO are obtained. The 1800--2100 K freezing effect is shown to be caused by rapid cooling of the product gases. Compiled comparative data for about 80 explosives is listed. Ten Chapters plus an Appendix.

  3. In-Situ Continuous Detonation Velocity Measurements Using Fiber-optic Bragg Grating Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benterou, J; Udd, E; Wilkins, P; Roeske, F; Roos, E; Jackson, D

    2007-07-25

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation and detonation research requires continuous measurement of low order detonation velocities as the detonation runs up to full order detonation for a given density and initiation pressure pulse. A novel detector of detonation velocity is presented using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber with an integral chirped fiber Bragg grating as an intrinsic sensor. This fiber is embedded in the explosive under study and interrogated during detonation as the fiber Bragg grating scatters light back along the fiber to a photodiode, producing a return signal dependant on the convolution integral of the grating reflection bandpass, the ASE intensity profile and the photodetector response curve. Detonation velocity is measured as the decrease in reflected light exiting the fiber as the grating is consumed when the detonation reaction zone proceeds along the fiber sensor axis. This small fiber probe causes minimal perturbation to the detonation wave and can measure detonation velocities along path lengths tens of millimeters long. Experimental details of the associated equipment and preliminary data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within nitromethane and PBX-9502 are presented.

  4. A Study of Detonation Propagation and Diffraction with Compliant Confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, J; Schwendeman, D; Kapila, A; Henshaw, W

    2007-08-13

    A previous computational study of diffracting detonations with the ignition-and-growth model demonstrated that contrary to experimental observations, the computed solution did not exhibit dead zones. For a rigidly confined explosive it was found that while diffraction past a sharp corner did lead to a temporary separation of the lead shock from the reaction zone, the detonation re-established itself in due course and no pockets of unreacted material were left behind. The present investigation continues to focus on the potential for detonation failure within the ignition-and-growth (IG) model, but now for a compliant confinement of the explosive. The aim of the present paper is two fold. First, in order to compute solutions of the governing equations for multi-material reactive flow, a numerical method of solution is developed and discussed. The method is a Godunov-type, fractional-step scheme which incorporates an energy correction to suppress numerical oscillations that would occur near the material interface separating the reactive material and the inert confiner for standard conservative schemes. The numerical method uses adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on overlapping grids, and the accuracy of solutions is well tested using a two-dimensional rate-stick problem for both strong and weak inert confinements. The second aim of the paper is to extend the previous computational study of the IG model by considering two related problems. In the first problem, the corner-turning configuration is re-examined, and it is shown that in the matter of detonation failure, the absence of rigid confinement does not affect the outcome in a material way; sustained dead zones continue to elude the model. In the second problem, detonations propagating down a compliantly confined pencil-shaped configuration are computed for a variety of cone angles of the tapered section. It is found, in accord with experimental observation, that if the cone angle is small enough, the detonation fails

  5. Chemical processing in geothermal nuclear chimney

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1973-10-01

    A closed rubble filled nuclear chimney is provided in a subterranean geothermal formation by detonation of a nuclear explosive device therein, with reagent input and product output conduits connecting the chimney cavity with appropriate surface facilities. Such facilities will usually comprise reagent preparation, product recovery and recycle facilities. Proccsses are then conducted in the nuclear chimney which processes are facilitated by temperature, pressure, catalytic and other conditions existent or which are otherwise provided in the nuclear chimney. (auth)

  6. United States Nuclear Tests, July 1945 through September 1992, December 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-12-01

    This document list chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Revision 15, dated December 2000.

  7. Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1995-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  8. Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1995-05-09

    A simulator is disclosed which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  9. Simulations of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Reactive Gases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image Weak ignition behind a reflected Mach=1.5 shock in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture at 0.1 atm initial pressure. Picture shows a numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image of the onset of a detonation in a turbulent boundary layer. Alexei Khokhlov, University of Chicago; Charles Bacon, Argonne National Laboratory, Joanna Austin, Andrew Knisely, University of Illinois at Urbanna-Champaign Simulations

  10. Munitions having an insensitive detonator system for initiating large failure diameter explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, III, William Leroy

    2015-08-04

    A munition according to a preferred embodiment can include a detonator system having a detonator that is selectively coupled to a microwave source that functions to selectively prime, activate, initiate, and/or sensitize an insensitive explosive material for detonation. The preferred detonator can include an explosive cavity having a barrier within which an insensitive explosive material is disposed and a waveguide coupled to the explosive cavity. The preferred system can further include a microwave source coupled to the waveguide such that microwaves enter the explosive cavity and impinge on the insensitive explosive material to sensitize the explosive material for detonation. In use the preferred embodiments permit the deployment and use of munitions that are maintained in an insensitive state until the actual time of use, thereby substantially preventing unauthorized or unintended detonation thereof.

  11. NEW - DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  12. Shock temperature as a criterion for the detonability of LNG/LPG constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michels, H.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology); Rashidi, F. )

    1992-12-01

    Detonation limit data obtained at ambient conditions for some aliphatic LNG/LNG constituents with oxygen and nitrogen (air) have been analyzed in search of a single critical parameter for detonation propagation. It was established the shock, rather than C-J reaction temperatures, provides a firm basis for marginal detonability prediction and that, furthermore, classical reaction mechanisms and relatively simple calculation methods can be used for their reliable evaluation. In this paper the result is used to formulate a criterion, for predicting composition limits to detonation. For the systems investigated, this criterion is accurate to within approximately 0.2% for fuel-lean and around 1% for fuel-rich mixtures.

  13. Hydrogen loaded metal for bridge-foils for enhanced electric gun/slapper detonator operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osher, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides a more efficient electric gun or slapper detonator ich provides a higher velocity flyer by using a bridge foil made of a hydrogen loaded metal.

  14. National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingensmith, A. L.

    2012-03-21

    These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nations verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

  15. Experimental study on transmission of an overdriven detonation wave from propane/oxygen to propane/air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Lai, W.H.; Chung, K.; Lu, F.K.

    2008-08-15

    Two sets of experiments were performed to achieve a strong overdriven state in a weaker mixture by propagating an overdriven detonation wave via a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) process. First, preliminary experiments with a propane/oxygen mixture were used to evaluate the attenuation of the overdriven detonation wave in the DDT process. Next, experiments were performed wherein a propane/oxygen mixture was separated from a propane/air mixture by a thin diaphragm to observe the transmission of an overdriven detonation wave. Based on the characteristic relations, a simple wave intersection model was used to calculate the state of the transmitted detonation wave. The results showed that a rarefaction effect must be included to ensure that there is no overestimate of the post-transmission wave properties when the incident detonation wave is overdriven. The strength of the incident overdriven detonation wave plays an important role in the wave transmission process. The experimental results showed that a transmitted overdriven detonation wave occurs instantaneously with a strong incident overdriven detonation wave. The near-CJ state of the incident wave leads to a transmitted shock wave, and then the transition to the overdriven detonation wave occurs downstream. The attenuation process for the overdriven detonation wave decaying to a near-CJ state occurs in all tests. After the attenuation process, an unstable detonation wave was observed in most tests. This may be attributed to the increase in the cell width in the attenuation process that exceeds the detonability cell width limit. (author)

  16. Equation of state for high explosives detonation products with explicit polar and ionic species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastea, S; Glaesemann, K R; Fried, L E

    2006-06-28

    We introduce a new thermodynamic theory for detonation products that includes polar and ionic species. The new formalism extends the domain of validity of the previously developed EXP6 equation of state library and opens the possibility of new applications. We illustrate the scope of the new approach on PETN detonation properties and water ionization models.

  17. Method and system for making integrated solid-state fire-sets and detonators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Dennis W.; Druce, Robert L.; Johnson, Gary W.; Vogtlin, George E.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lee, Ronald S.

    1998-01-01

    A slapper detonator comprises a solid-state high-voltage capacitor, a low-jitter dielectric breakdown switch and trigger circuitry, a detonator transmission line, an exploding foil bridge, and a flier material. All these components are fabricated in a single solid-state device using thin film deposition techniques.

  18. Method and system for making integrated solid-state fire-sets and detonators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O`Brien, D.W.; Druce, R.L.; Johnson, G.W.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Lee, R.S.

    1998-03-24

    A slapper detonator comprises a solid-state high-voltage capacitor, a low-jitter dielectric breakdown switch and trigger circuitry, a detonator transmission line, an exploding foil bridge, and a flier material. All these components are fabricated in a single solid-state device using thin film deposition techniques. 13 figs.

  19. United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

  20. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.1D.

  1. Progress in measuring detonation wave profiles in PBX9501

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, R.L.; Sheffield, S.A.; Alcon, R.R.

    1998-12-31

    The authors have measured detonation wave profiles in PBX9501 (95 wt% HMX and 5 wt% binders) using VISAR. Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with projectiles launched in a 72 mm bore gas gun. Particle velocity wave profiles were measured at the explosive/window interface using two VISARs with different fringe constants. Windows with very thin vapor deposited aluminum mirrors were used for all experiments. PMMA windows provided an undermatch, and LiF (Lithium Fluoride) windows provided an overmatch to the explosive, reacted and unreacted. While the present experiments do not have adequate time resolution to adequately resolve the ZND spike condition, they do constrain it to lie between 38.7 and 53.4 Gpa or 2.4 and 3.3 km/s. Accurate knowledge of the CJ state places the reaction zone length at 35 {+-} 12 ns ({approx} 0.3 mm). The present experiments do not show any effect of the window on the reaction zone; both window materials result in the same reaction zone length.

  2. Theoretical and computer models of detonation in solid explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarver, C.M.; Urtiew, P.A.

    1997-10-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical advances in understanding energy transfer and chemical kinetics have led to improved models of detonation waves in solid explosives. The Nonequilibrium Zeldovich - von Neumann - Doring (NEZND) model is supported by picosecond laser experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of the multiphonon up-pumping and internal vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) processes by which the unreacted explosive molecules are excited to the transition state(s) preceding reaction behind the leading shock front(s). High temperature, high density transition state theory calculates the induction times measured by laser interferometric techniques. Exothermic chain reactions form product gases in highly excited vibrational states, which have been demonstrated to rapidly equilibrate via supercollisions. Embedded gauge and Fabry-Perot techniques measure the rates of reaction product expansion as thermal and chemical equilibrium is approached. Detonation reaction zone lengths in carbon-rich condensed phase explosives depend on the relatively slow formation of solid graphite or diamond. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model based on pressure dependent reaction rates and Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equations of state has reproduced this nanosecond time resolved experimental data and thus has yielded accurate average reaction zone descriptions in one-, two- and three- dimensional hydrodynamic code calculations. The next generation reactive flow model requires improved equations of state and temperature dependent chemical kinetics. Such a model is being developed for the ALE3D hydrodynamic code, in which heat transfer and Arrhenius kinetics are intimately linked to the hydrodynamics.

  3. Deflagration-to-detonation transition project: quarterly report for the period September through November 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieberman, M. L.

    1980-07-01

    The activities of the Sandia Laboratories project on deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) pertain primarily to the development of small, safe, low-voltage, hot-wire detonators. Its major goals are: the formulation of a modeling capability for DDT of the explosive 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaamminecobalt(III) perchlorate (CP); the development of improved DDT materials; the establishment of a data base for corrosion, compatibility, and reliability of CP-loaded detonators; and the design and development of advanced DDT components. Progress in this research is reported. The planned development of the MC3423 detonator has been completed and the final design review meeting has been held. Additional work must be performed to establish satisfactory output function. Ignition sensitivity data have also been obtained. Ignition and shock testing experiments for development of the MC3533 detonator have been planned. An initial version of the component will utilize available MC3423 headers, while the final design will incorporate a new header that has been designed and ordered. Detonator performance studies have been planned to optimize CP density-length factors. Feasibility studies on the MC3196A detonator have continued in an effort to obtain a reliable 50-200 ..mu..s function time.

  4. community | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    community NNSS celebrates its 65 anniversary The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) celebrates its 65th anniversary this year. The first on-site test occurred on January 27, 1951, when the Able Test was detonated on Frenchman Flat. Among the many activities NNSS officials are holding to commemorate the milestone is an open house for... Who's on FIRST? Inspiring STEM through robotics Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC, which runs the Y-12 National Security Complex and the Pantex Plant, plays an

  5. Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1997-07-15

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable is disclosed. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive. 11 figs.

  6. Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1997-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive.

  7. Hydrogen loaded metal for bridge-foils for enhanced electric gun/slapper detonator operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osher, J.E.

    1992-01-14

    The invention provides a more efficient electric gun or slapper detonator which provides a higher velocity flyer by using a bridge foil made of a hydrogen loaded metal. 8 figs.

  8. First-Principles Simulations of High-Speed Combustion and Detonation |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Picture shows a numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image of the onset of a detonation in a turbulent boundary layer. Weak ignition behind a reflected Mach=1.5 shock in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture at 0.1 atm initial pressure. Picture shows a numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image of the onset of a detonation in a turbulent boundary layer. Alexei Khokhlov, University of Chicago, Charles Bacon, Argonne National Laboratory, Joanna

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Fingerprint of element found by LANL/Japanese team. May 29, 2012 How would the detonation of a nuclear energy source afffect an incoming asteroid? Georgios Koutroulakis and H. Yasuoka in the condensed-matter NMR lab at Los Alamos National Laboratory after having observed the magnetic resonance signal of Pu 239 for the first time. Get Expertise Scientist Eric Bauer Condensed

  10. Recent papers from DX-1, detonation science and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    Over the past year members of DX-1 have participated in several conferences where presentations were made and papers prepared for proceedings. There have also been several papers published in or submitted to refereed journals for publication. Rather that attach all these papers to the DX-1 Quarterly Report, we decided to put them in a Los Alamos report that could be distributed to those who get the quarterly, as well as others that have an interest in the work being done in DX-1 both inside and outside the Laboratory. This compilation does not represent all the work reported during the year because some people have chosen not to include their work here. In particular, there were a number of papers relating to deflagration-to-detonation modeling that were not included. However, this group of papers does present a good picture of much of the unclassified work being done in DX-1. Several of the papers include coauthors from other groups or divisions at the Laboratory, providing an indication of the collaborations in which people in DX-1 are involved. Discussed topics of submitted papers include: shock compression of condensed matter, pyrotechnics, shock waves, molecular spectroscopy, sound speed measurements in PBX-9501, chemical dimerization, and micromechanics of spall and damage in tantalum.

  11. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    1995-01-01

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

  12. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-02-07

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

  13. Exploring high temperature phenomena related to post-detonation using an electric arc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Z. R. Crowhurst, J. C.; Grant, C. D.; Knight, K. B.; Tang, V.; Chernov, A. A.; Cook, E. G.; Lotscher, J. P.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2013-11-28

    We report a study of materials recovered from a uranium-containing plasma generated by an electric arc. The device used to generate the arc is capable of sustaining temperatures of an eV or higher for up to 100??s. Samples took the form of a 4??m-thick film deposited onto 8 pairs of 17??m-thick Cu electrodes supported on a 25??m-thick Kapton backing and sandwiched between glass plates. Materials recovered from the glass plates and around the electrode tips after passage of an arc were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Recovered materials included a variety of crystalline compounds (e.g., UO{sub 2}, UC{sub 2}, UCu{sub 5},) as well as mixtures of uranium and amorphous glass. Most of the materials collected on the glass plates took the form of spherules having a wide range of diameters from tens of nanometers to tens of micrometers. The composition and size of the spherules depended on location, indicating different chemical and physical environments. A theoretical analysis we have carried out suggests that the submicron spherules presumably formed by deposition during the arc discharge, while at the same time the glass plates were strongly heated due to absorption of plasma radiation mainly by islands of deposited metals (Cu, U). The surface temperature of the glass plates is expected to have risen to ?2300?K thus producing a liquefied glass layer, likely diffusions of the deposited metals on the hot glass surface and into this layer were accompanied by chemical reactions that gave rise to the observed materials. These results, together with the compact scale and relatively low cost, suggest that the experimental technique provides a practical approach to investigate the complex physical and chemical processes that occur when actinide-containing material interacts with the environment at high temperature, for example, during fallout formation following a nuclear detonation.

  14. Slang characterization and removal using pulse detonation technology during coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huque, Z.; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.; Zhou, J.

    1997-03-25

    Boiler slagging and fouling as a result of inorganic impurities in combustion gases being deposited on heat transfer tubes have caused severe problems in coal-fired power plant operation. These problems are fuel, system design, and operating condition dependent. Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. The detonation wave technique based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. These detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. The experimental results show that the single shot detonation wave is capable of removing the entire slag (types of slag deposited on economizer) even at a distance of 8 in. from the exit of a detonation engine tube. Wave strength and slag orientation also have different effects on the chipping off of the slag. This paper discusses about the results obtained in effectively removing the economizer slag.

  15. COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation, Cyber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Warfare and Terrorism | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 5, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MGB Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation, Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Dr. Bruce G. Blair Princeton University The United States and eight other countries that possess nuclear weapons run myriad risks every day -- risks of accidental detonations, of unauthorized launches caused by false warning, of provoking escalation between nuclear forces, and of nuclear

  16. CHARACTERIZING DETONATING LX-17 CHARGES CROSSING A TRANSVERSE AIR GAP WITH EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauderbach, L M; Souers, P C; Garcia, F; Vitello, P; Vandersall, K S

    2009-06-26

    Experiments were performed using detonating LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F by weight) charges with various width transverse air gaps with manganin peizoresistive in-situ gauges present. The experiments, performed with 25 mm diameter by 25 mm long LX-17 pellets with the transverse air gap in between, showed that transverse gaps up to about 3 mm could be present without causing the detonation wave to fail to continue as a detonation. The Tarantula/JWL{sup ++} code was utilized to model the results and compare with the in-situ gauge records with some agreement to the experimental data with additional work needed for a better match to the data. This work will present the experimental details as well as comparison to the model results.

  17. Deflagration-to-detonation transition project. Quarterly report, December 1979-February 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieberman, M.L.

    1980-09-01

    Progress in a project on deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) is reported. The activities of this project pertain primarily to the development of small, safe, low-voltage, hot-wire detonators. Its major goals are: the formulation of a modeling capability for DDT of the explosive 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaamminecobalt (III) perchlorate (CP); the development of improved DDT materials; the establishment of a data base for corrosion, compatibility, and reliability of CP-loaded detonators; and the design and development of advanced DDT components. Information is included on materials development, component development, and compatibility studies encompassing the thermal and chemical stability of CP in contact with the component materials. (LCL)

  18. THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W.; Meyer, B. S.

    2013-07-01

    A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned

  19. High temperature erosion and fatigue resistance of a detonation gun chromium carbide coating for steam turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quets, J.M.; Walsh, P.N.; Srinivasan, V.; Tucker, R.C. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Chromium carbide based detonation gun coatings have been shown to be capable of protecting steam turbine components from particle erosion. To be usable, however, erosion resistant coatings must not degrade the fatigue characteristics of the coated components. Recent studies of the fatigue properties of a detonation gun coated martensitic substrate at 538 C (1,000 F) will be presented with an emphasis on its long term performance. This study will show the retention of acceptable fatigue performance of coated substrates into the high cycle regime, and will include a discussion on the mechanism of fatigue.

  20. Simulations of flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transitions in methane-air systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, D.A.; Gamezo, V.N.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transitions (DDT) in large obstructed channels filled with a stoichiometric methane-air mixture are simulated using a single-step reaction mechanism. The reaction parameters are calibrated using known velocities and length scales of laminar flames and detonations. Calculations of the flame dynamics and DDT in channels with obstacles are compared to previously reported experimental data. The results obtained using the simple reaction model qualitatively, and in many cases, quantitatively match the experiments and are found to be largely insensitive to small variations in model parameters. (author)

  1. Limited Test Ban Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Limited Test Ban Treaty US Air Force Launches Satellite Carrying NNSA-provided Nuclear Detonation Detection Sensors WASHINGTON, D.C. - On Friday, May 16, with the support of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a U.S. Air Force Delta IV rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral. Hosted onboard was a GPS IIF navigation satellite and a Global Burst Detector (GBD) payload designed to detect, identify

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Nuclear Weapons:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety & Security Safety & Security Linux computer simulation Sandia is responsible for a variety of safety and security features of nuclear weapons. We design safety components and subsystems based on fundamental science-based principles to prevent energy from unintentionally reaching the nuclear explosives components. Weapons security requires denying adversaries access to the weapon and its internal features so that unauthorized detonation cannot be achieved. Because of evolving

  3. LX-17 and ufTATB Data for Corner-Turning, Failure and Detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P C; Lauderbach, L; Garza, R; Vitello, P; Hare, D E

    2010-02-03

    Data is presented for the size (diameter) effect for ambient and cold confined LX-17, unconfined ambient LX-17, and confined ambient ultrafine TATB. Ambient, cold and hot double cylinder corner-turning data for LX-17, PBX 9502 and ufTATB is presented. Transverse air gap crossing in ambient LX-17 is studied with time delays given for detonations that cross.

  4. Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250[degrees]C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

  5. Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

    1993-04-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250{degrees}C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

  6. Electrical modeling of semiconductor bridge (SCB) BNCP detonators with electrochemical capacitor firing sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marx, K.D.; Ingersoll, D.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.

    1998-11-01

    In this paper the authors describe computer models that simulate the electrical characteristics and hence, the firing characteristics and performance of a semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator for the initiation of BNCP [tetraammine-cis-bis (5-nitro-2H-tetrazolato-N{sup 2}) cobalt(III) perchlorate]. The electrical data and resultant models provide new insights into the fundamental behavior of SCB detonators, particularly with respect to the initiation mechanism and the interaction of the explosive powder with the SCB. One model developed, the Thermal Feedback Model, considers the total energy budget for the system, including the time evolution of the energy delivered to the powder by the electrical circuit, as well as that released by the ignition and subsequent chemical reaction of the powder. The authors also present data obtained using a new low-voltage firing set which employed an advanced electrochemical capacitor having a nominal capacitance of 350,000 {micro}F at 9 V, the maximum voltage rating for this particular device. A model for this firing set and detonator was developed by making measurements of the intrinsic capacitance and equivalent series resistance (ESR < 10 m{Omega}) of a single device. This model was then used to predict the behavior of BNCP SCB detonators fired alone, as well as in a multishot, parallel-string configuration using a firing set composed of either a single 9 V electrochemical capacitor or two of the capacitors wired in series and charged to 18 V.

  7. PBX 9404 detonation copper cylinder tests: a comparison of new and aged material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mier, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Briggs, Matthew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present detonation copper cylinder test results on aged PBX 9404 (94 wt% HMX, 3 wt% CEF, 2.9 wt% NC, 0.1 wt% DPA) explosive. The charges were newly pressed from 37.5 year-old molding powder. We compare these results to equivalent data performed on the same lot when it was 3.5 years old. Comparison of the detonation energy inferred from detonation speed to that inferred from wall motion suggests that the HMX energy is unchanged but the NC energy has decreased to {approx}25% of its original value. The degradation of explosives and their binders is a subject of continual interest. Secondary explosives such as HMX are sufficiently stable near room temperature that they do not measurably degrade over a period of at least several decades. For formulated systems the bigger concern is binder degradation, for which the three main issues are strength, initiation safety, and (if the binder is energetic) energy content. In this paper we examine the detonation energy of new and aged PBX 9404 (94 wt% HMX, 3 wt% tris-{beta} chloroethylphosphate (CEF), 2.9 wt% nitrocellulose (NC), 0.1 wt% diphenylamine (DPA) [1, 2]), measured via the detonation copper cylinder test. In 1959, two independent PBX 9404 accidents [3] raised serious concerns about the safety of the formulation. Over about a decade's time, Los Alamos pursued a safer, energetically equivalent replacement, which ultimately became PBX 9501. In order to accurately compare the performance of the PBX 9404 and PBX 9501 formulations, W. Campbell and R. Engelke (C & E) developed a stringent cylinder test protocol that they called the Los Alamos Precision Cylinder Test [4]. The present aging study is possible because excellent PBX 9404 data from those qualification tests endures.

  8. First-Principles Petascale Simulations for Predicting Deflagration to Detonation Transition in Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khokhlov, Alexei; Austin, Joanna

    2015-03-02

    Hydrogen has emerged as an important fuel across a range of industries as a means of achieving energy independence and to reduce emissions. DDT and the resulting detonation waves in hydrogen-oxygen can have especially catastrophic consequences in a variety of industrial and energy producing settings related to hydrogen. First-principles numerical simulations of flame acceleration and DDT are required for an in-depth understanding of the phenomena and facilitating design of safe hydrogen systems. The goals of this project were (1) to develop first-principles petascale reactive flow Navier-Stokes simulation code for predicting gaseous high-speed combustion and detonation (HSCD) phenomena and (2) demonstrate feasibility of first-principles simulations of rapid flame acceleration and deflagrationto- detonation transition (DDT) in stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture (2H2 + O2). The goals of the project have been accomplished. We have developed a novel numerical simulation code, named HSCD, for performing first-principles direct numerical simulations of high-speed hydrogen combustion. We carried out a series of validating numerical simulations of inert and reactive shock reflection experiments in shock tubes. We then performed a pilot numerical simulation of flame acceleration in a long pipe. The simulation showed the transition of the rapidly accelerating flame into a detonation. The DDT simulations were performed using BG/Q Mira at the Argonne National Laboratiory, currently the fourth fastest super-computer in the world. The HSCD is currently being actively used on BG/QMira for a systematic study of the DDT processes using computational resources provided through the 2014-2016 INCITE allocation ”First-principles simulations of high-speed combustion and detonation.” While the project was focused on hydrogen-oxygen and on DDT, with appropriate modifications of the input physics (reaction kinetics, transport coefficients, equation of state) the code has a much

  9. APPLICATION OF THE EMBEDDED FIBER OPTIC PROBE IN HIGH EXPLOSIVE DETONATION STUDIES: PBX-9502 AND LX-17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hare, D; Goosman, D; Lorenz, K; Lee, E

    2006-09-26

    The Embedded Fiber Optic probe directly measures detonation speed continuously in time, without the need to numerically differentiate data, and is a new tool for measuring time-dependent as well as steady detonation speed to high accuracy. It consists of a custom-design optical fiber probe embedded in high explosive. The explosive is detonated and a refractive index discontinuity is produced in the probe at the location of the detonation front by the compression of the detonation. Because this index-jump tracks the detonation front a measurement of the Doppler shift of laser light reflected from the jump makes it possible to continuously measure detonation velocity with high spatial and temporal resolution. We have employed this probe with a Fabry-Perot-type laser Doppler velocimetry system additionally equipped with a special filter for reducing the level of non-Doppler shifted light relative to the signal. This is necessary because the index-jump signal is relatively weak compared to the return expected from a well-prepared surface in the more traditional and familiar example of material interface velocimetry. Our observations were carried out on a number of explosives but this work is focused on our results on PBX-9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F) at varying initial charge density. Our measurements reveal a density dependence significantly lower than previous quoted values and lower than theoretical calculations. Our limited data on detonation speed dependence on wave curvature is in reasonable agreement with previous work using more standard methods and confirms deviation from the Wood-Kirkwood theoretical formula.

  10. Measurement of carbon condensates using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bagge-Hansen, M.; Lauderbach, L.; Hodgin, R.; Bastea, S.; Fried, L.; Jones, A.; van Buuren, T.; Hansen, D.; Benterou, J.; May, C.; et al

    2015-06-24

    In this study, the dynamics of carbon condensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation end station has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution,more » provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. The power-law slope is about -3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp2 sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.« less

  11. Measurement of carbon condensation using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagge-Hansen, M.; Lauderbach, L. M.; Hodgin, R.; Bastea, S.; Fried, L.; Jones, A.; van Buuren, T.; Hansen, D.; Benterou, J.; May, C.; Graber, T.; Jensen, B. J.; Ilavsky, J.; Willey, T. M.

    2015-06-24

    The dynamics of carboncondensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation endstation has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution, provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. As a result, the power-law slope is about –3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp2 sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.

  12. Anisotropic shock sensitivity and detonation temperature of pentaerythritol tetranitrate single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, C. S.; Holmes, N. C.; Souers, P. C.; Wu, C. J.; Ree, F. H.; Dick, J. J.

    2000-07-01

    Shock temperatures of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) single crystals have been measured by using a nanosecond time-resolved spectropyrometric system operated at six discrete wavelengths between 350 and 700 nm. The results show that the shock sensitivity of PETN is strongly dependent on the crystal orientation: Sensitive along the shock propagation normal to the (110) plane, but highly insensitive normal to the (100) plane. The detonation temperature of PETN is, however, independent from the crystal orientation and is determined to be 4140 ({+-}70) K. The time-resolved data yielding the detonation velocity 8.28 ({+-}0.10) mm/{mu}s can be interpreted in the context of a modified thermal explosion model. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Indexes of the Proceedings for the Ten International Symposia on Detonation 1951-93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, William E.; Ramsay, John B.; Roach, Alita M.; Takala, Bruce E.

    1998-09-01

    The Proceedings of the ten Detonation Symposia have become the major archival source of information of international research in explosive phenomenology, theory, experimental techniques, numerical modeling, and high-rate reaction chemistry. In many cases, they contain the original reference or the only reference to major progress in the field. For some papers, the information is more complete than the complementary article appearing in a formal journal; yet for others, authors elected to publish only an abstract in the Proceedings. For the large majority of papers, the Symposia Proceedings provide the only published reference to a body of work. This report indexes the ten existing Proceedings of the Detonation Symposia by paper titles, topic phrases, authors, and first appearance of acronyms and code names.

  14. JCZS: An Intermolecular Potential Database for Performing Accurate Detonation and Expansion Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; McGee, B.C.

    1998-11-03

    Exponential-13,6 (EXP-13,6) potential pammeters for 750 gases composed of 48 elements were determined and assembled in a database, referred to as the JCZS database, for use with the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler equation of state (JCZ3-EOS)~l) The EXP- 13,6 force constants were obtained by using literature values of Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential functions, by using corresponding states (CS) theory, by matching pure liquid shock Hugoniot data, and by using molecular volume to determine the approach radii with the well depth estimated from high-pressure isen- tropes. The JCZS database was used to accurately predict detonation velocity, pressure, and temperature for 50 dif- 3 Accurate predictions were also ferent explosives with initial densities ranging from 0.25 glcm3 to 1.97 g/cm . obtained for pure liquid shock Hugoniots, static properties of nitrogen, and gas detonations at high initial pressures.

  15. Direct Monte Carlo simulation of the chemical equilibrium composition of detonation products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, M.S.

    1993-06-01

    A new Monte Carlo simulation method has been developed by the author which gives the equilibrium chemical composition of a molecular fluid directly. The usual NPT ensemble (isothermal-isobaric) is implemented with N being the number of atoms instead of molecules. Changes in chemical composition are treated as correlated spatial moves of atoms. Given the interaction potentials between molecular products, ``exact`` EOS points including the equilibrium chemical composition can be determined from the simulations. This method is applied to detonation products at conditions in the region near the Chapman- Jouget state. For the example of NO, it is shown that the CJ detonation velocity can be determined to a few meters per second. A rather small change in cross potentials is shown to shift the chemical equilibrium and the CJ conditions significantly.

  16. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Air Blast Propagation from the Humble Redwood Chemical High Explosive Detonations Using GEODYN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipman, V D

    2011-09-20

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic models were developed using GEODYN to simulate the propagation of air blasts resulting from a series of high explosive detonations conducted at Kirtland Air Force Base in August and September of 2007. Dubbed Humble Redwood I (HR-1), these near-surface chemical high explosive detonations consisted of seven shots of varying height or depth of burst. Each shot was simulated numerically using GEODYN. An adaptive mesh refinement scheme based on air pressure gradients was employed such that the mesh refinement tracked the advancing shock front where sharp discontinuities existed in the state variables, but allowed the mesh to sufficiently relax behind the shock front for runtime efficiency. Comparisons of overpressure, sound speed, and positive phase impulse from the GEODYN simulations were made to the recorded data taken from each HR-1 shot. Where the detonations occurred above ground or were shallowly buried (no deeper than 1 m), the GEODYN model was able to simulate the sound speeds, peak overpressures, and positive phase impulses to within approximately 1%, 23%, and 6%, respectively, of the actual recorded data, supporting the use of numerical simulation of the air blast as a forensic tool in determining the yield of an otherwise unknown explosion.

  17. Detonation wave profiles measured in plastic bonded explosives using 1550 nm photon doppler velocimetry (PDV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Richard L; Bartram, Brian D; Sanchez, Nathaniel J

    2009-01-01

    We present detonation wave profiles measured in two TATB based explosives and two HMX based explosives. Profiles were measured at the interface of the explosive and a Lithium-Fluoride (LiF) window using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with a projectile launched in a gas-gun. The impact state was varied to produce varied distance to detonation, and therefore varied support of the Taylor wave following the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) or sonic state. Profiles from experiments with different support should be the same between the Von-Neumann (VN) spike and CJ state and different thereafter. Comparison of profiles with differing support, therefore, allows us to estimate reaction zone lengths. For the TATB based explosive, a reaction zone length of {approx} 3.9 mm, 500 ns was measured in EDC-35, and a reaction zone length of {approx} 6.3 mm, 800 ns was measured in PBX 9502 pre-cooled to -55 C. The respective VN spike state was 2.25 {+-} 0.05 km/s in EDC-35 and 2.4 {+-} 0.1 km/s in the cooled PBX 9502. We do not believe we have resolved either the VN spike state (> 2.6 km/s) nor the reaction zone length (<< 50 ns) in the HMX based explosives.

  18. Coupled pulsating and cellular structure in the propagation of globally planar detonations in free space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Wenhu; Gao, Yang; Wang, Cheng; Law, Chung K.

    2015-10-15

    The globally planar detonation in free space is numerically simulated, with particular interest to understand and quantify the emergence and evolution of the one-dimensional pulsating instability and the two-dimensional cellular structure which is inherently also affected by pulsating instability. It is found that the pulsation includes three stages: rapid decay of the overdrive, approach to the Chapman-Jouguet state and emergence of weak pulsations, and the formation of strong pulsations; while evolution of the cellular structure also exhibits distinct behavior at these three stages: no cell formation, formation of small-scale, irregular cells, and formation of regular cells of a larger scale. Furthermore, the average shock pressure in the detonation front consists of fine-scale oscillations reflecting the collision dynamics of the triple-shock structure and large-scale oscillations affected by the global pulsation. The common stages of evolution between the cellular structure and the pulsating behavior, as well as the existence of shock-front pressure oscillation, suggest highly correlated mechanisms between them. Detonations with period doubling, period quadrupling, and chaotic amplitudes were also observed and studied for progressively increasing activation energies.

  19. The effect of initial temperature on flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Tagawa, H.; Malliakos, A.

    1998-05-01

    The High-Temperature Combustion Facility at BNL was used to conduct deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) experiments. Periodic orifice plates were installed inside the entire length of the detonation tube in order to promote flame acceleration. The orifice plates are 27.3-cm-outer diameter, which is equivalent to the inner diameter of the tube, and 20.6-cm-inner diameter. The detonation tube length is 21.3-meters long, and the spacing of the orifice plates is one tube diameter. A standard automobile diesel engine glow plug was used to ignite the test mixture at one end of the tube. Hydrogen-air-steam mixtures were tested at a range of temperatures up to 650K and at an initial pressure of 0.1 MPa. In most cases, the limiting hydrogen mole fraction which resulted in DDT corresponded to the mixture whose detonation cell size, {lambda}, was equal to the inner diameter of the orifice plate, d (e.g., d/{lambda}=1). The only exception was in the dry hydrogen-air mixtures at 650K where the DDT limit was observed to be 11 percent hydrogen, corresponding to a value of d/{lambda} equal to 5.5. For a 10.5 percent hydrogen mixture at 650K, the flame accelerated to a maximum velocity of about 120 mIs and then decelerated to below 2 mIs. By maintaining the first 6.1 meters of the vessel at the ignition end at 400K, and the rest of the vessel at 650K, the DDT limit was reduced to 9.5 percent hydrogen (d/{lambda}=4.2). This observation indicates that the d/{lambda}=1 DDT limit criteria provides a necessary condition but not a sufficient one for the onset of DDT in obstacle laden ducts. In this particular case, the mixture initial condition (i.e., temperature) resulted in the inability of the mixture to sustain flame acceleration to the point where DDT could occur. It was also observed that the distance required for the flame to accelerate to the point of detonation initiation, referred to as the run-up distance, was found to be a function of both the hydrogen mole fraction

  20. Study of Buoyancy-Driven Turbulent Nuclear Burning and Validation of Type

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ia Supernova Models | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Four snapshots during a simulation of the explosion phase of the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) model of nuclear-powered (Type Ia) supernovae. The images show extremely hot matter (ash or unburned fuel) and the surface of the star (green). Ignition of the nuclear flame was assumed to occur simultaneously at 63 points randomly distributed inside a 128-km sphere at the center of the white dwarf star. The images show volume

  1. A glove-likeability study of specially-treated gloves in the detonator manufacturing and packaging industry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Lawton, Cindy M.; Lounsbury, James B.; Armijo, Mark A.

    2016-03-22

    We use hand gloves (hereafter referred to as gloves) in the detonator manufacturing and packaging operations. As part of a process improvement program, new glove formulations have been considered that lower the overall risk of detonator operations by reducing ergonomic injury factors. Gloves with a specially treated surface for extra grip and control are now commercially available and have been recommended for use in detonator operations. A Glove Likeability Study demonstrated that detonator manufacturing and packaging workers prefer gloves with a specially treated surface over currently approved gloves made from latex and nitrile formulations. Glove material compatibility tests indicate thatmore » the recommended gloves are as compatible if not more compatible as the currently approved gloves for working with secondary explosives. Thus, these gloves with a specially treated surface for extra grip and control are now available for tasks where sensitivity and fingertip control are crucial. Replacement of the current gloves with gloves with a specially treated surface improves the safety configuration of detonator manufacturing and packaging operations.« less

  2. On the Use of an ER-213 Detonator to Establish a Baseline for the ER-486

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Keith A.; Liechty, Gary H.; Jaramillo, Dennis C.; Munger, Alan C.; McHugh, Douglas C.; Kennedy, James E.

    2014-08-19

    This report documents a series of tests using a TSD-115 fireset coupled with an ER-213, a gold exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonator. These tests were designed to fire this EBW with a smaller fireset to obtain current and voltage data as well as timing information at voltage levels below, above, and throughout the threshold firing region. This study could then create a database for comparison to our current ER-486 EBW development, which is designed to be a lower voltage (<500V) device.

  3. A Study of Detonation Diffraction in the Ignition-and-Growth Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapila, A K; Schwendeman, D W; Bdzil, J B; Henshaw, W D

    2006-04-14

    Heterogeneous high-energy explosives are morphologically, mechanically and chemically complex. As such, their ab-initio modeling, in which well-characterized phenomena at the scale of the microstructure lead to a rationally homogenized description at the scale of observation, is a subject of active research but not yet a reality. An alternative approach is to construct phenomenological models, in which forms of constitutive behavior are postulated with an eye on the perceived picture of the micro-scale phenomena, and which are strongly linked to experimental calibration. Most prominent among these is the ignition-and-growth model conceived by Lee and Tarver. The model treats the explosive as a homogeneous mixture of two distinct constituents, the unreacted explosive and the products of reaction. To each constituent is assigned an equation of state, and a single reaction-rate law is prescribed for the conversion of the explosive to products. It is assumed that the two constituents are always in pressure and temperature equilibrium. The purpose of this paper is to investigate in detail the behavior of the model in situations where a detonation turns a corner and undergoes diffraction. A set of parameters appropriate for the explosive LX-17 is selected. The model is first examined analytically for steady, planar, 1-D solutions and the reaction-zone structure of Chapman-Jouguet detonations is determined. A computational study of two classes of problems is then undertaken. The first class corresponds to planar, 1-D initiation by an impact, and the second to corner turning and diffraction in planar and axisymmetric geometries. The 1-D initiation, although interesting in its own right, is utilized here as a means for interpretation of the 2-D results. It is found that there are two generic ways in which 1-D detonations are initiated in the model, and that these scenarios play a part in the post-diffraction evolution as well. For the parameter set under study the model

  4. X-ray diffraction study of the structure of detonation nanodiamonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozerin, A. N. Kurkin, T. S.; Ozerina, L. A.; Dolmatov, V. Yu.

    2008-01-15

    The spatial structure of aggregates formed by detonation nanodiamonds is investigated using the wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering techniques. The effective sizes of crystallites and the crystallite size distribution function are determined. The shape of scattering aggregates is restored from the small-angle X-ray scattering data. An analysis of the results obtained allowed the conclusion that the nanodiamond aggregates have an extended spatial structure composed of nine to ten clusters, each involving four to five crystallites with a crystal lattice of the diamond type.

  5. Delayed signatures of underground nuclear explosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Sun, Yunwei; Hunter, Steven L.; Ruddle, David G.; Wagoner, Jeffrey L.; Myers, Katherine B. L.; Emer, Dudley F.; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Chipman, Veraun D.

    2016-03-16

    Radionuclide signals from underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) are strongly influenced by the surrounding hydrogeologic regime. One effect of containment is delay of detonation-produced radioxenon reaching the surface as well as lengthening of its period of detectability compared to uncontained explosions. Using a field-scale tracer experiment, we evaluate important transport properties of a former UNE site. Here, we observe the character of signals at the surface due to the migration of gases from the post-detonation chimney under realistic transport conditions. Background radon signals are found to be highly responsive to cavity pressurization suggesting that large local radon anomalies may be anmore » indicator of a clandestine UNE. Computer simulations, using transport properties obtained from the experiment, track radioxenon isotopes in the chimney and their migration to the surface. They show that the chimney surrounded by a fractured containment regime behaves as a leaky chemical reactor regarding its effect on isotopic evolution introducing a dependence on nuclear yield not previously considered. This evolutionary model for radioxenon isotopes is validated by atmospheric observations of radioxenon from a 2013 UNE in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). In conclusion, our model produces results similar to isotopic observations with nuclear yields being comparable to seismic estimates.« less

  6. Photoionization in the Precursor of Laser Supported Detonation by Ultraviolet Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimamura, Kohei; Michigami, Keisuke; Wang, Bin; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-11-10

    The propagation mechanism of laser-supported detonation (LSD) is important for designing laser propulsion for a detonation type thruster. The purpose of this work to was to confirm that photo-ionization in precursor is the predominant LSD sustainment mechanism. First of all, we tried to investigate the dependency of LSD duration on ambient gas species, air and argon. We took a series of high-speed images using the laser shadow-graphy. Besides, to estimate the UV photons emitted from the plasma, we used plasma emission spectroscopy and determined the electron temperature and density. As a result, the LSD duration of argon plasma and air plasma are 0.7 {mu}s and 0.3 {mu}s, resp. Besides, argon plasma emitted 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 14} photons/seconds, which was higher than air plasma. These results reveal that LSD propagation depends on the photon-contributing photoionization. The threshold photon-emission rate of LSD termination gives the elucidation of the LSD termination condition.

  7. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-29

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX?s photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  8. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-05

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX's photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  9. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by

  10. Resettlement of Bikini Atoll U.S. Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.; Stoker, A.C.; Hamilton, T.F.

    1999-09-09

    The US conducted a nuclear testing program at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands from 1946 through 1958. Several atolls, including Bikini, were contaminated as a result of the nuclear detonations. Since 1974 the authors have conducted an extensive research and monitoring program to determine the radiological conditions at the atolls, identify the critical radionuclides and pathways, estimate the radiological dose to current or resettling populations, and develop remedial measures to reduce the dose to atoll populations. This paper describes exposure pathways and radionuclides; composition of atoll soils; radionuclide transport and dose estimates; remedial measures; and reduction in dose from a combined option.

  11. Characterization of structures and surface states of the nanodiamond synthesized by detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Q.; Li, Y.G.; Zou, L.H.; Wang, M.Z.

    2009-11-15

    Nanodiamond is a relatively new nanomaterial with broad prospects for application. In this paper, a variety of methods were used to analyze comprehensively the structures and the surface states of the nanodiamond synthesized by detonation, for example, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, energy diffraction spectroscopy (EDS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy (Raman) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The results show that, the nanodiamond particles are spherical or elliptical in shape. The average grain size is approximately 5 nm. The surfaces of the nanodiamond contain hydroxy, carbonyl, carboxyl, ether-based resin, and other functional groups. The initial oxidation temperature of the nanodiamond in the air is about 550 deg. C, which is lower than that of the bulk diamond.

  12. Stress state and nature of failure of detonation coatings based on alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anisimov, M.I.; Galeev, I.M.; Gol`dfain, V.N.

    1995-03-01

    Detonation coatings based on alumina are used on an increasing scale in industry for increasing the corrosion and wear resistance of materials. The physicomechanical and service characteristics of coatings are determined by the stress state . In this work, investigations were carried out into the distribution of residual phase stresses in the layer and the nature of failure of coatings in combined deformation with the substrate at T = 600{degrees}C. Coatings of electrocorundum powder of 24A grade with a grain size of M40 were deposited on a substrate of KhN78 alloy. In certain cases, an intermediate layer of PN85Yu15 powder was deposited on the substrate prior to spraying. Spraying was carried out in ADK Prometei equipment using an oxygen-acetylene mixture. The thickness of the coatings was 0.4-0.5 mm.

  13. Detonation reaction steps frozen by free expansion and analyzed by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, N.R.; Fry, H.A.; Blais, N.C.; Engelke, R.P.

    1993-05-01

    Detonation reactions in small pellets of explosive are frozen by free expansion into a large vacuum chamber and analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Sensitive explosives like PETN, RDX, and HMX show rapidly evolving reaction zones and mostly simple products like H{sub 2}O, CO, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. Less sensitive explosives like TATB, HNS, and TNT show slower evolution of the reaction zone, and more complex products in addition to the simple ones seen in PETN. Isotopic substitution shows that the more complex products contain moderate amounts of NH{sub 3}, HCN, NO, HNCO, and NO{sub 2}. Other observations include polymerization of aromatic explosive molecules, adducts to the explosive molecules, and explosive molecules with functional groups missing. The more complex products are reservoirs of unreleased energy that may affect performance.

  14. Detonation reaction steps frozen by free expansion and analyzed by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, N.R.; Fry, H.A.; Blais, N.C.; Engelke, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    Detonation reactions in small pellets of explosive are frozen by free expansion into a large vacuum chamber and analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Sensitive explosives like PETN, RDX, and HMX show rapidly evolving reaction zones and mostly simple products like H[sub 2]O, CO, N[sub 2], and CO[sub 2]. Less sensitive explosives like TATB, HNS, and TNT show slower evolution of the reaction zone, and more complex products in addition to the simple ones seen in PETN. Isotopic substitution shows that the more complex products contain moderate amounts of NH[sub 3], HCN, NO, HNCO, and NO[sub 2]. Other observations include polymerization of aromatic explosive molecules, adducts to the explosive molecules, and explosive molecules with functional groups missing. The more complex products are reservoirs of unreleased energy that may affect performance.

  15. Deflagration to detonation transition in mixtures of alkane LNG/LPG constituents with O/sub 2//N/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstedt, R.P.; Michels, H.J.

    1988-04-01

    Deflagration to detonation transitions (DDT) of methane, methane/ethane, ethane, propane, and butane in mixtures with increasing dilution of nitrogen have been studied in a smooth 2'' id detonation tube with a length/diameter ratio of 220. The results obtained demonstrate the presence of two regimes of DDT depending on the reactivity of the mixture. The first regime displays rapid acceleration to a stable detonation, while the second regime contains a quasistable, strong deflagration of rapidly increasing duration with decreasing mixture reactivity. It is established that the order of DDT under the conditions employed follows the order of autoignition temperatures for the fuels considered. The conditional use of transition parameters for estimates of relative detonabilities based on a qualitative similarity between induction times and times to transition is demonstrated to hold only for the first transition regime.

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory marks 20 years without full-scale nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    testing 20 years without full-scale nuclear testing Los Alamos National Laboratory marks 20 years without full-scale nuclear testing The test, code named "Divider," was detonated on Sept. 23, 1992 as the last of an eight-test series called "Julin." September 26, 2012 The "Divider" test rack is hoisted into position for lowering down hole at the Nevada Test Site in September of 1992. Divider was the last full scale underground nuclear test conduced by the United

  17. Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to

  18. Shock initiation and detonation study on high concentration H2O2/H2O solutions using in-situ magnetic gauges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, Stephen A; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B; Gibson, L Lee; Bartram, Brian D; Engelke, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; homogeneous shock initiation behavior has been observed in the experiments where reaction is observed. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these experiments, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot points, times-to-detonation points that indicate low sensitivity (an input of 13.5 GPa produces detonation in 1 {micro}s compared to 9.5 GPa for neat nitromethane), and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions of over 6.6 km/s.

  19. Source terms for plutonium aerosolization from nuclear weapon accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, D.R.

    1995-07-01

    The source term literature was reviewed to estimate aerosolized and respirable release fractions for accidents involving plutonium in high-explosive (HE) detonation and in fuel fires. For HE detonation, all estimates are based on the total amount of Pu. For fuel fires, all estimates are based on the amount of Pu oxidized. I based my estimates for HE detonation primarily upon the results from the Roller Coaster experiment. For hydrocarbon fuel fire oxidation of plutonium, I based lower bound values on laboratory experiments which represent accident scenarios with very little turbulence and updraft of a fire. Expected values for aerosolization were obtained from the Vixen A field tests, which represent a realistic case for modest turbulence and updraft, and for respirable fractions from some laboratory experiments involving large samples of Pu. Upper bound estimates for credible accidents are based on experiments involving combustion of molten plutonium droplets. In May of 1991 the DOE Pilot Safety Study Program established a group of experts to estimate the fractions of plutonium which would be aerosolized and respirable for certain nuclear weapon accident scenarios.

  20. Molecular Theory of Detonation Initiation: Insight from First Principles Modeling of the Decomposition Mechanisms of Organic Nitro Energetic Materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tsyshevsky, Roman; Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija

    2016-02-19

    Our review presents a concept, which assumes that thermal decomposition processes play a major role in defining the sensitivity of organic energetic materials to detonation initiation. As a science and engineering community we are still far away from having a comprehensive molecular detonation initiation theory in a widely agreed upon form. However, recent advances in experimental and theoretical methods allow for a constructive and rigorous approach to design and test the theory or at least some of its fundamental building blocks. In this review, we analyzed a set of select experimental and theoretical articles, which were augmented by our ownmore » first principles modeling and simulations, to reveal new trends in energetic materials and to refine known existing correlations between their structures, properties, and functions. Lastly, our consideration is intentionally limited to the processes of thermally stimulated chemical reactions at the earliest stage of decomposition of molecules and materials containing defects.« less

  1. OVERVIEW OF PRESSURE VESSEL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR INTERNAL DETONATION (BLAST) LOADING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. A. DUFFEY; E. A. RODRIGUEZ

    2001-05-01

    Spherical and cylindrical pressure vessels are often used to completely contain the effects of high explosions. These vessels generally fall into two categories. The first includes vessels designed for multiple use ([1]-[6]). Applications of such multiple-use vessels include testing of explosive components and bomb disposal. Because of the multiple-use requirement, response of the vessel is restricted to the elastic range. The second category consists of vessels designed for one-time use only ([7]-[9]). Vessels in this category are typically used to contain accidental explosions and are designed to efficiently utilize the significant plastic energy absorption capacity of ductile materials. Because these vessels may undergo large permanent plastic deformations, they may not be reusable. Ideally one would design a Containment Vessel according to some National or International Consensus Standard, such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Unfortunately, however, a number of issues preclude direct use of the ASME Code in its present form to the design of Containment Vessels. These issues are described in Section 2, along with a request for guidance from the PVRC as to a suitable path forward for developing appropriate ASME B&PV design guidance for Containment Vessels. Next, a discussion of the nature of impulsive loading as a result of an internal detonation of the high explosive within a Containment Vessel is described in Section 3. Ductile failure criteria utilized for LANL Containment Vessels are described in Section 4. Finally, brittle fracture criteria currently utilized by LANL are presented in Section 5. This memo is concluded with a brief summary of results and an appeal to PVRC to recommend and develop an appropriate path forward (Section 6). This path forward could be of a short-term specialized nature (e.g., Code Case) for specific guidance regarding design of the LANL Containment Vessels; a long-term development of a general design approach

  2. Nuclear Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of...

  3. Method for attenuating seismic shock from detonating explosive in an in situ oil shale retort

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Studebaker, Irving G.; Hefelfinger, Richard

    1980-01-01

    In situ oil shale retorts are formed in formation containing oil shale by excavating at least one void in each retort site. Explosive is placed in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within each retort site adjacent such a void, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. This produces a large explosion which generates seismic shock waves traveling outwardly from the blast site through the underground formation. Sensitive equipment which could be damaged by seismic shock traveling to it straight through unfragmented formation is shielded from such an explosion by placing such equipment in the shadow of a fragmented mass in an in situ retort formed prior to the explosion. The fragmented mass attenuates the velocity and magnitude of seismic shock waves traveling toward such sensitive equipment prior to the shock wave reaching the vicinity of such equipment.

  4. Detonation shock dynamics calibration for pBX 9502 with temperature, density, and material lot variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Larry G; Aslam, Tariq D

    2010-01-01

    We present a methodology for scaling the detonation shock dynamics D{sub n}[{kappa}] calibration function to accommodate variations in the HE starting material. We apply our model to the insensitive TATB-based explosive PBX 9502, for which we have enough front curvature rate stick data to characterize three material attributes: initial temperature T{sub 0}, nominal density {rho}{sub 0}, and manufacturing lot (representing different microstructures). A useful feature of the model is that it returns an absolute estimate for the reaction zone thickness, {delta}. Lacking demonstrated material metrics(s), we express microstructural variation indirectly, in terms of its effect on {delta}. This results in a D{sub n}[{kappa}] function that depends on T{sub 0}, {rho}{sub 0}, and {delta}. After examining the separate effects of each parameter on D{sub n}[{kappa}], we compute an arc geometry as a validation problem. We compare the calculation to a PBX 9502 arc experiment that was pressed from one of the calibrated HE lots. The agreement between the model and experiment is excellent. We compute worst, nominal, and best-performing material parameter combinations to show how much difference accrues throughout the arc.

  5. Prompt laser ignition and transition to detonation in a secondary explosive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setchell, R.E.; Trott, W.M.

    1995-05-01

    A two-stage approach to achieving detonation in a secondary explosive was developed in previous studies in which ignition resulted from low-energy hot wires or from laser diodes. In the current study, this approach was examined in some detail for the case of ignition by a pulsed, solid-state (rod) laser. An initial series of experiments used Nd/glass, Nd/YAG, and Ti/sapphire lasers to investigate the ignition of graphite-doped HMX in highly confined optical fixtures that incorporated a fast piezoelectric pressure transducer. Experimental parameters included the laser power history and the explosive column length. The results of these experiments guided a second series of experiments in which the ignition column explosive was terminated by a thin rupture disc in contact with a transition column of low-density HMX or some other material. The transition column was terminated with a piezoelectric time-of-arrival detector for determining overall function times. Parameters investigated included different laser sources, rupture disc thicknesses, and the transition column explosive characteristics. Overall function times less than 50 microseconds were obtained, and trends established by the various parameter studies indicate that further reductions in function time can be achieved.

  6. Quantification of C?C and C?O Surface Carbons in Detonation Nanodiamond by NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, J -F; Fang, X -W; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2014-05-08

    The ability of solid-state 13C NMR to detect and quantify small amounts of sp2-hybridized carbon on the surface of ?5 nm diameter nanodiamond particles is demonstrated. The C?C carbon fraction is only 1.1 0.4% in pristine purified detonation nanodiamond, while a full single-layer graphitic or bucky diamond shell would contain ca. 25% of all C in a 5 nm diameter particle. Instead of large aromatic patches repeatedly proposed in the recent literature, sp3-hybridized CH and COH carbons cover most of the nanodiamond particle surface, accounting for ?5% each. C?O and COO groups also seen in X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) but not detected in previous NMR studies make up ca. 1.5% of all C. They are removed by heat treatment at 800 C, which increases the aromatic fraction. 13C{1H} NMR demonstrates that the various sp2-hybridized carbons are mostly not protonated, but cross-polarization shows that they are separated from 1H by only a few bond lengths, which proves that they are near the protonated surface. Together, the observed CH, COH, C?O, and C?C groups account for 1214% of all C, which matches the surface fraction expected for bulk-terminated 5 nm diameter diamond particles.

  7. Influence of surface modification adopting thermal treatments on dispersion of detonation nanodiamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Xiangyang . E-mail: xiangyang.xu@sohu.com; Yu Zhiming; Zhu Yongwei; Wang Baichun

    2005-03-15

    In order to improve the dispersion of detonation nanodiamonds (ND) in aqueous and non-aqueous media, a series of thermal treatments have been conducted in air ambient to modify ND surface. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were introduced to observe the primary size of ND. Differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) methodology, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were adopted to analyze the structure, bonds at surfaces of the treated ND. Malvern instrument Zetasizer3000HS was used for measuring the surface electric potential and the size distribution of ND. As thermal treatments can cause graphitization and oxidization of functional groups at the surface, ND treated at high temperature is correspondingly more negatively charged in an aqueous medium, and the increased absolute value of zeta potential ensures the electrostatic stability of ND particles. Specially, after being treated at a temperature more than 850K, ND can be well dispersed in various media.

  8. Type Ia supernovae from merging white dwarfs. II. Post-merger detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raskin, Cody; Kasen, Daniel; Moll, Rainer; Woosley, Stan; Schwab, Josiah

    2014-06-10

    Merging carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs are a promising progenitor system for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), but the underlying physics and timing of the detonation are still debated. If an explosion occurs after the secondary star is fully disrupted, the exploding primary will expand into a dense CO medium that may still have a disk-like structure. This interaction will decelerate and distort the ejecta. Here we carry out multidimensional simulations of 'tamped' SN Ia models, using both particle and grid-based codes to study the merger and explosion dynamics and a radiative transfer code to calculate synthetic spectra and light curves. We find that post-merger explosions exhibit an hourglass-shaped asymmetry, leading to strong variations in the light curves with viewing angle. The two most important factors affecting the outcome are the scale height of the disk, which depends sensitively on the binary mass ratio, and the total {sup 56}Ni yield, which is governed by the central density of the remnant core. The synthetic broadband light curves rise and decline very slowly, and the spectra generally look peculiar, with weak features from intermediate mass elements but relatively strong carbon absorption. We also consider the effects of the viscous evolution of the remnant and show that a longer time delay between merger and explosion probably leads to larger {sup 56}Ni yields and more symmetrical remnants. We discuss the relevance of this class of aspherical 'tamped' SN Ia for explaining the class of 'super-Chandrasekhar' SN Ia.

  9. Prompt laser ignition and transition to detonation in a secondary explosive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setchell, R.E.; Trott, W.M.

    1994-05-01

    A two-stage approach to achieving detonation in a secondary explosive was developed in previous studies in which ignition resulted from low-energy hot wires or from laser diodes. In the current study, this approach was examined in some detail for the case of ignition by a pulsed, solid-state (rod) laser. An initial series of experiments used Nd/glass, ND/YAG, and Ti/sapphire lasers to investigate the ignition of graphite-doped HMX in highly confined optical fixtures that incorporated a fast piezoelectric pressure transducer. Experimental parameters included the laser power history and the explosive column length. The results of these experiments guided a second series of experiments in which the ignition column explosive was terminated by a thin rupture disc in contact with a transition column of low density HMX or some other material. The transition column was terminated with a piezoelectric time-of-arrival detector for determining overall function times. Parameters investigated included different laser sources, rupture disc thicknesses, and the transition column explosive characteristics. Overall function times less than 50 microseconds were obtained, and trends established by the various parameter studies indicate that further reductions in function time can be achieved.

  10. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Nuclear plants and reactors Projections Recurring Uranium All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud Current Issues & Trends See more › U.S. nuclear outages this summer were higher than in summer 2015

  11. Nuclear Forensics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear explosion, is the application of laboratory analysis and interpretation to provide technical conclusions (provenance, design, etc.) about a nuclear device or interdicted nuclear material. Nuclear forensic analysts can build confidence in their conclusions by employing multiple signatures that collectively minimize the

  12. Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The nuclear sites list and map shows how DOE nuclear operations are mostly divided between nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance, research and environmental cleanup. The operations are performed within several different facilities supporting nuclear reactor operations, nuclear research, weapons disassembly, maintenance and testing, hot cell operations, nuclear material storage and processing and waste disposal.

  13. Preserving Nuclear Grade Knowledge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lange, Bob

    2008-02-05

    When people think of the government they think of the President, or Congress, or the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), but there are thousands of people in government-related jobs doing things most don’t really notice everyday. You can find them everywhere, from the space science folks at NASA, to the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) watching out for the bad guys. There are Rangers, and Social Workers, Nurses and Agricultural Managers. They are people working to keep the many facets of the USA rolling. One very diverse bunch is The Department of Energy (DOE) , a group who is expanding the ways we make and save energy to power our cars, homes, and businesses. Tucked away under the DOE is the National Nuclear Security Administration, the NNSA is an agency that maintains the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. It works to reduce global danger from weapons of mass destruction. It provides the U.S. Navy with safe nuclear propulsion, and it responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies in the United States and abroad, and it supports efforts in science and technology*. (* DOE/NNSA/KCP website info)

  14. Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  15. Chemical speciation of U, Fe, and Pu in melt glass from nuclear weapons testing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pacold, J. I.; Lukens, W. W.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.; Knight, K. B.; Eppich, G. R.; Holliday, K. S.

    2016-05-18

    We report that nuclear weapons testing generates large volumes of glassy materials that influence the transport of dispersed actinides in the environment and may carry information on the composition of the detonated device. We determine the oxidation state of U and Fe (which is known to buffer the oxidation state of actinide elements and to affect the redox state of groundwater) in samples of melt glass collected from three U.S. nuclear weapons tests. For selected samples, we also determine the coordination geometry of U and Fe, and we report the oxidation state of Pu from one melt glass sample. Wemore » find significant variations among the melt glass samples and, in particular, find a clear deviation in one sample from the expected buffering effect of Fe(II)/Fe(III) on the oxidation state of uranium. In the first direct measurement of Pu oxidation state in a nuclear test melt glass, we obtain a result consistent with existing literature that proposes Pu is primarily present as Pu(IV) in post-detonation material. In addition, our measurements imply that highly mobile U(VI) may be produced in significant quantities when melt glass is quenched rapidly following a nuclear detonation, though these products may remain immobile in the vitrified matrices. The observed differences in chemical state among the three samples show that redox conditions can vary dramatically across different nuclear test conditions. The local soil composition, associated device materials, and the rate of quenching are all likely to affect the final redox state of the glass. Lastly, the resulting variations in glass chemistry are significant for understanding and interpreting debris chemistry and the later environmental mobility of dispersed material.« less

  16. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Norbo Underground Nuclear Test in U8c, Nevada Nuclear Security Site, and the Impact on Stability of the Ground Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-06-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Norbo underground nuclear test in U8c to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This request is similar to one made for the Salut site in U8c (Pawloski, 2012b). Review of the Norbo site is complicated because the test first exhibited subsurface collapse, which was not unusual, but it then collapsed to the surface over one year later, which was unusual. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Norbo detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeology due to the nuclear detonation. Aviva Sussman from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has also proposed work at this site. Both proposals require physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and focus on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow and deep geophysical surveys.

  17. NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

    2011-04-18

    The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into

  18. nuclear security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Shaping the future of nuclear detection http:nnsa.energy.govblogshaping-future-nuclear-detection

    Learning techniques to combat nuclear trafficking, touring the...

  19. Nuclear Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE)

  20. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. ...

  1. nuclear enterprise

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Outlines Accomplishments in Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors and Managing the Nuclear Enterprise

    The...

  2. Spent Nuclear Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary FAQS Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data ...

  3. Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear science nuclear chemistry Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry Nuclear Physics The 10-MV tandem accelerator at CAMS provides a platform for conducting nuclear physics experiment both for basic science and lab mission-related programs. For example, we performed a new cross section measurement of the astrophysically important reaction 40Ca(a,g)44Ti in which high purity CaO targets were irradiated with helium ions at several different discrete energies. The reaction rate was measured on-line

  4. India and Pakistan`s nuclear arms race: Out of the closet but not in the street

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, D.

    1993-06-01

    CIA Director James Woolsey testified before the Senate on February 24, 1993, {open_quotes}The arms race between India and Pakistan poses perhaps the most probable prospect for future use of weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear weapons.{close_quotes} Currently, both countries are dependent on relatively crude nuclear bombs that do not appear to have been deployed. According to US officials, because of fears of accidental nuclear detonation, both sides would only assemble their nuclear weapons when absolutely necessary. Nevertheless, according to Woolsey, both nations {open_quotes}could, on short notice, assemble nuclear weapons.{close_quotes} Each has combat aircraft that could deliver these bombs in a crisis. India and Pakistan continue to improve their nuclear weapons. Unless their programs are stopped, they might succeed in moving from large, cumbersome bombs to miniaturized, easily armed and fuzed weapons able to be permanently deployed on attack aircraft or ballistic missiles, which are being developed or sought by both countries.

  5. Accident Investigation of the December 11, 2013, Integrated Device Fireset and Detonator Accidental Discharge at the Sandia National Laboratory Site 9920, Albuquerque, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Accident Investigation Board investigated an accident at Sandia National Laboratories, Site 9920 on December 11, 2013. Site 9920 personnel were testing an integrated explosive device, containing a fireset and detonator when the IED unexpectedly went off during handling, causing injury to the firing officer’s left hand.

  6. Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power/Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Tara Camacho-Lopez 2016-06-29T14:02:38+00:00 Contributing to the Next Generation of Nuclear Power Generation Our nuclear energy and fuel cycle technologies supports the safe, secure, reliable, and sustainable use of nuclear power worldwide through strengths in repository science, nonproliferation, safety and security, transportation, modeling, and system demonstrations. Areas of Expertise Defense Waste Management Sandia advises the U.S. Department

  7. Nuclear Energy!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Technical Assistance Nuclear Energy Technical Assistance "The United States will continue to promote the safe and secure use of nuclear power worldwide through a variety of bilateral and multilateral engagements. For example, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission advises international partners on safety and regulatory best practices, and the Department of Energy works with international partners on research and development, nuclear waste and storage, training, regulations,

  8. Propagation or failure of detonation across an air gap in an LX-17 column: continuous time-dependent detonation or shock speed using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hare, D E; Chandler, J B; Compton, S M; Garza, R G; Grimsley, D A; Hernandez, A; Villafana, R J; Wade, J T; Weber, S R; Wong, B M; Souers, P C

    2008-01-16

    The detailed history of the shock/detonation wave propagation after crossing a room-temperature-room-pressure (RTP) air gap between a 25.4 mm diameter LX-17 donor column and a 25.4 mm diameter by 25.4 mm long LX-17 acceptor pellet is investigated for three different gap widths (3.07, 2.08, and 0.00 mm) using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique. The 2.08 mm gap propagated and the 3.07 mm gap failed and this can be seen clearly and unambiguously in the EFO data even though the 25.4 mm-long acceptor pellet would be considered quite short for a determination by more traditional means such as pins.

  9. Effect of composition changes on the structure and properties of W-Cr-Ni-C detonation gun coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stavros, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    Changes in the microstructure and wear behavior of W-Cr-Ni-C coatings as a function of the composition of the starting powder were studied. The experimental powder compositions were chosen so that the results could be analyzed statistically as a mixture problem with the extreme vertices design. All coatings were deposited by identical detonation gun operating conditions. Although the variation of powder chemistry resulted in distinctively different powder morphologies, all coatings were found to be composed of the same 4 (possibly more) complex carbides. The amount and, to some degree, morphology of a particular carbide was found to change with composition. However, neither amount nor morphology could be correlated to microhardness or wear test results. Predictive equations based on powder composition were obtained which fit the wear test results very well.

  10. Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    About Our Programs Nuclear Security Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials ...

  11. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This video tells the story of the Navy`s development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  12. Consequence modeling for nuclear weapons probabilistic cost/benefit analyses of safety retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, T.F.; Peters, L.; Serduke, F.J.D.; Hall, C.; Stephens, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    The consequence models used in former studies of costs and benefits of enhanced safety retrofits are considered for (1) fuel fires; (2) non-nuclear detonations; and, (3) unintended nuclear detonations. Estimates of consequences were made using a representative accident location, i.e., an assumed mixed suburban-rural site. We have explicitly quantified land- use impacts and human-health effects (e.g. , prompt fatalities, prompt injuries, latent cancer fatalities, low- levels of radiation exposure, and clean-up areas). Uncertainty in the wind direction is quantified and used in a Monte Carlo calculation to estimate a range of results for a fuel fire with uncertain respirable amounts of released Pu. We define a nuclear source term and discuss damage levels of concern. Ranges of damages are estimated by quantifying health impacts and property damages. We discuss our dispersal and prompt effects models in some detail. The models used to loft the Pu and fission products and their particle sizes are emphasized.

  13. Microenergetic research involving a coupled experimental and computational approach to evaluate microstructural effects on detonation and combustion at sub-millimeter geometries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogan, John; Palmer, Jeremy Andrew; Brundage, Aaron L.; Long, Gregory T.; Wroblewski, Brian D.; Tappan, Alexander Smith; Renlund, Anita Mariana; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Baer, Melvin R.

    2006-07-01

    A new approach to explosive sample preparation is described in which microelectronics-related processing techniques are utilized. Fused silica and alumina substrates were prepared utilizing laser machining. Films of PETN were deposited into channels within the substrates by physical vapor deposition. Four distinct explosive behaviors were observed with high-speed framing photography by driving the films with a donor explosive. Initiation at hot spots was directly observed, followed by either energy dissipation leading to failure, or growth to a detonation. Unsteady behavior in velocity and structure was observed as reactive waves failed due to decreasing channel width. Mesoscale simulations were performed to assist in experiment development and understanding. We have demonstrated the ability to pattern these films of explosives and preliminary mesoscale simulations of arrays of voids showed effects dependent on void size and that detonation would not develop with voids below a certain size. Future work involves experimentation on deposited films with regular patterned porosity to elucidate mesoscale explosive behavior.

  14. Underground Infrastructure Impacts Due to a Surface Burst Nuclear Device in an Urban Canyon Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bos, Randall J.; Dey, Thomas N.; Runnels, Scott R.

    2012-07-03

    Investigation of the effects of a nuclear device exploded in a urban environment such as the Chicago studied for this particular report have shown the importance on the effects from the urban canyons so typical of today's urban environment as compared to nuclear test event effects observed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Pacific Testing Area on which many of the typical legacy empirical codes are based on. This report first looks at the some of the data from nuclear testing that can give an indication of the damage levels that might be experienced due to a nuclear event. While it is well known that a above ground blast, even a ground burst, very poorly transmits energy into the ground ( < 1%) and the experimental results discussed here are for fully coupled detonations, these results do indicate a useful measure of the damage that might be expected. The second part of the report looks at effects of layering of different materials that typically would make up the near ground below surface environment that a shock would propagate through. As these simulations support and is widely known in the community, the effects of different material compositions in these layers modify the shock behavior and especially modify the energy dispersal and coupling into the basement structures. The third part of the report looks at the modification of the underground shock effects from a surface burst 1 KT device due to the presence of basements under the Chicago buildings. Without direct knowledge of the basement structure, a simulated footprint of a uniform 20m depth was assumed underneath each of the NGI defined buildings in the above ground environment. In the above ground case, the underground basement structures channel the energy along the line of site streets keeping the shock levels from falling off as rapidly as has been observed in unobstructed detonations. These simulations indicate a falloff of factors of 2 per scaled length as compared to 10 for the unobstructed

  15. Comparison of Bacillus atrophaeus spore viability following exposure to detonation of C4 and to deflagration of halogen-containing thermites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tringe, J. W.; Letant, S. E.; Dugan, L. C.; Levie, H. W.; Kuhl, A. L.; Murphy, G. A.; Alves, S. W.; Vandersall, K. S.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-12-17

    We found that energetic materials are being considered for the neutralization of spore-forming bacteria. In this study, the neutralization effects of a monomolecular explosive were compared to the effects of halogen-containing thermites. Bacillus atrophaeus spores were exposed to the post-detonation environment of a 100 g charge of the military explosive C-4 at a range of 50 cm. These tests were performed in the thermodynamically closed environment of a 506-l barometric calorimeter. Associated temperatures were calculated using a thermodynamic model informed by calculations with the Cheetah thermochemicalcode. Temperatures in the range of 2300–2800 K were calculated to persist for nearly themore » full 4 ms pressure observation time. After the detonation event, spores were characterized using optical microscopy and the number of viable spores was assessed. These results showed live spore survival rates in the range of 0.01%–1%. For the thermite tests, a similar, smaller-scale configuration was employed that examined the spore neutralization effects of two thermites: aluminum with iodine pentoxide andaluminum with potassium chlorate. Only the former mixture resulted in spore neutralization. Our results indicate that the detonation environment produced by an explosive with no chemical biocides may provide effective spore neutralization similar to a deflagrating thermite containing iodine.« less

  16. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. Isotopes» A roadmap of matter that will help unlock the secrets of how the universe is put together The DOE Office of Science's Nuclear Physics (NP) program supports the experimental and theoretical research needed to create this roadmap. This quest requires a broad approach to different, but related, scientific

  17. Nuclear Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Nuclear Security Centers of Excellence: Fact Sheet March 23, 2012 "We [the Participating States]... Acknowledge the need for capacity building for nuclear security and cooperation at bilateral, regional and multilateral levels for the promotion of nuclear security culture through technology development, human resource development, education, and training; and stress the importance of optimizing international cooperation and coordination of

  18. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-08-26

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Supersedes DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

  19. NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ROADMAP Table of Contents List of Acronyms ................................................................................................... iii Executive Summary ............................................................................................... v 1. Introduction ...................................................................................................... 1 2. Background

  20. nuclear smuggling

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    13, 2015

    SHANGHAI, CHINA - Today, the Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Defense...

  1. nuclear material

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    width"300" >WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), in partnership with the Defense Threat Reduction...

  2. nuclear weapons

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09, 2015

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and United States Air Force completed eight successful...

  3. nuclear controls

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    which "international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and...

  4. nuclear forensics

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    serves as the premier technical leader in responding to and successfully resolving nuclear and radiological threats worldwide. When the need arises, NNSA is prepared to...

  5. Calculation of laser induced impulse based on the laser supported detonation wave model with dissociation, ionization and radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Li Mousen, Cheng; Xiaokang, Li

    2014-03-15

    In the laser intensity range that the laser supported detonation (LSD) wave can be maintained, dissociation, ionization and radiation take a substantial part of the incidence laser energy. There is little treatment on the phenomenon in the existing models, which brings obvious discrepancies between their predictions and the experiment results. Taking into account the impact of dissociation, ionization and radiation in the conservations of mass, momentum and energy, a modified LSD wave model is developed which fits the experimental data more effectively rather than the existing models. Taking into consideration the pressure decay of the normal and the radial rarefaction, the laser induced impulse that is delivered to the target surface is calculated in the air; and the dependencies of impulse performance on laser intensity, pulse width, ambient pressure and spot size are indicated. The results confirm that the dissociation is the pivotal factor of the appearance of the momentum coupling coefficient extremum. This study focuses on a more thorough understanding of LSD and the interaction between laser and matter.

  6. Nuclear Weapons Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2, 2009 ...

  7. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Myths Topics: Can a Nuclear Reactor Explode Like a Bomb? Will Nuclear Waste Be Around for Millions of Years? Is Nuclear Energy Dangerous? Moderator: Suzy Hobbs ...

  8. Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons off ...

  9. Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear Security in the Middle East Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Nonproliferation, ...

  10. Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear Security in the Middle East Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Nonproliferation, International ...

  11. nuclear | National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request for Proposal Last week the Nuclear Science Week (NSW) National Steering Committee released its impact ...

  12. Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Chernobyl, Ukraine A catastrophic nuclear accident occurs at Chernobyl Reactor 4 in the then Soviet Republic of Ukraine

  13. Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... and monitor nuclear weapons production, proliferation, and nuclear explosions worldwide. ...

  14. Nuclear Forensics: A Capability at Risk (Abbreviated Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Research Council of the National Academies

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear forensics is important to our national security. Actions, including provision of appropriate funding, are needed now to sustain and improve the nation's nuclear forensics capabilities. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), working with cooperating agencies and national laboratories, should plan and implement a sustainable, effective nuclear forensics program. Nuclear forensics is the examination and evaluation of discovered or seized nuclear materials and devices or, in cases of nuclear explosions or radiological dispersals, of detonation signals and post-detonation debris. Nuclear forensic evidence helps law enforcement and intelligence agencies work toward preventing, mitigating, and attributing a nuclear or radiological incident. This report, requested by DHS, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the Department of Defense, makes recommendations on how to sustain and improve U.S. nuclear forensics capabilities. The United States has developed a nuclear forensics capability that has been demonstrated in real-world incidents of interdicted materials and in exercises of actions required after a nuclear detonation. The committee, however, has concerns about the program and finds that without strong leadership, careful planning, and additional funds, these capabilities will decline. Major areas of concern include: Organization. The responsibility for nuclear forensics is shared by several agencies without central authority and with no consensus on strategic requirements to guide the program. This organizational complexity hampers the program and could prove to be a major hindrance operationally. Sustainability. The nation's current nuclear forensics capabilities are available primarily because the system of laboratories, equipment, and personnel upon which they depend was developed and funded by the nuclear weapons program. However, the weapons program's funds are declining. Workforce and Infrastructure. Personnel skilled in nuclear forensics

  15. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Salut Underground Nuclear Test in U20ak, Nevada National Security Site, and the Impact of Stability of the Ground Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-04-25

    At the request of Jerry Sweeney, the LLNL Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Salut underground nuclear test in U20ak to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Review of the Salut site is complicated because the test experienced a subsurface, rather than surface, collapse. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Salut detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeologogy due to the nuclear detonation. Sweeney's proposal requires physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Test Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site), and focuses on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow, and deep geophysical surveys.

  16. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-07

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information. The Manual is Official Use Only, and is not available on the Directives Portal. The point of contact for the Manual is Randall Weidman, NA-121.2, 202-586-4582.) Canceled by DOE O 457.1A

  17. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  18. RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The early days Richards, P. 38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; TECHNETIUM 99; COLLOIDS; MOLYBDENUM...

  19. nuclear navy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:www.nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  20. nuclear navy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  1. Nuclear option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, P.S.

    1983-03-01

    The energy demand complexion of this country is always changing and promises to change in the future. The nuclear industry is responding to changing energy demands through standards writing activities. Since the oil embargo of 1973, there has been a change in the mix of fuels contributing to energy growth in this country; virtually all of the energy growth has come from coal and nuclear power. The predicted expansion of coal use by 1985, over 1977 level, is 37%, while the use of oil is expected to decline by 17%. Use of nuclear power is expected to increase 62% from the 1977 level. The feasibility of using nuclear energy to meet the needs of the USA for electric power is discussed.

  2. Radionuclide Migration at the Rio Blanco Site, A Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clay A. Cooper; Ming Ye; Jenny Chapman; Craig Shirley

    2005-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability gas reservoirs. The third and final project in the program, Project Rio Blanco, was conducted in Rio Blanco County, in northwestern Colorado. In this experiment, three 33-kiloton nuclear explosives were simultaneously detonated in a single emplacement well in the Mesaverde Group and Fort Union Formation, at depths of 1,780, 1,899, and 2,039 m below land surface on May 17, 1973. The objective of this work is to estimate lateral distances that tritium released from the detonations may have traveled in the subsurface and evaluate the possible effect of postulated natural-gas development on radionuclide migration. Other radionuclides were considered in the analysis, but the majority occur in relatively immobile forms (such as nuclear melt glass). Of the radionuclides present in the gas phase, tritium dominates in terms of quantity of radioactivity in the long term and contribution to possible whole body exposure. One simulation is performed for {sup 85}Kr, the second most abundant gaseous radionuclide produced after tritium.

  3. Application of the ORIGEN Fallout Analysis Tool and the DELFIC Fallout Planning Tool to National Technical Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jodoin, Vincent J; Lee, Ronald W; Peplow, Douglas E.; Lefebvre, Jordan P

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide a robust fallout analysis and planning tool for the National Technical Nuclear Forensics interagency ground sample collection team. Their application called for a fast-running, portable mission-planning tool for use in response to emerging improvised nuclear device (IND) post-detonation situations. The project met those goals by research and development of models to predict the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of fallout debris. ORNL has developed new graphical user interfaces for two existing codes, the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code and the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). ORIGEN is a validated, radionuclide production and decay code that has been implemented into the Fallout Analysis Tool to predict the fallout source term nuclide inventory after the detonation of an IND. DELFIC is a validated, physics-based, research reference fallout prediction software package. It has been implemented into the Fallout Planning Tool and is used to predict the fractionated isotope concentrations in fallout, particle sizes, fractionation ratios, dose rate, and integrated dose over the planned collection routes - information vital to ensure quality samples for nuclear forensic analysis while predicting dose to the sample collectors. DELFIC contains a particle activity module, which models the radiochemical fractionation of the elements in a cooling fireball as they condense into and onto particles to predict the fractionated activity size distribution for a given scenario. This provides the most detailed physics-based characterization of the fallout source term phenomenology available in an operational fallout model.

  4. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  5. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  6. MISCELLANEOUS PAPER S71-17 EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE OF EARTH AND...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D A M TO PROJECT RULISON UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATION bv J. E. Ahlberg, J. Fowler, L ... Colorado; Proiect Rulison Underground Nuclear Detonation," published by the Waterways ...

  7. A Review of the Research on Response to Improvised Nuclear Device Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentz, A; Buddemeier, B; Dombroski, M

    2008-07-01

    Following the events of September 11, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. Understanding the state of knowledge, identifying gaps, and making recommendations for how to fill those gaps, this paper will provide a framework under which past findings can be understood and future research can fit. The risk of an improvised nuclear device (IND) detonation may seem unlikely; and while this is hopefully true, due to its destructive capability, IND events must be prepared for. Many people still live under the Cold War mentality that if a city is attacked with a nuclear weapon, there is little chance of survival. This assumption, while perhaps true in the case of multiple, thermonuclear weapons exchanges, does not hold for the current threat. If a single IND were detonated in the United States, there would be many casualties at the point of impact; however, there would also be many survivors and the initial response by two major groups will mean the difference between life and death for many people. These groups are the first responders and the public. Understanding how these two groups prepare, react and interact will improve response to nuclear terrorism. Figure 1 provides a visualization of the response timeline of an IND event. For the purposes of this assessment, it is assumed that to accurately inform the public, three functions need to be fulfilled by

  8. Nuclear Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fossion, Ruben [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-09-10

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  9. Nuclear pursuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This table lists quantities of warheads (in stockpile, peak number per year, total number built, number of known test explosions), weapon development milestones (developers of the atomic bomb and hydrogen bomb, date of first operational ICBM, first nuclear-powered naval SSN in service, first MIRVed missile deployed), and testing milestones (first fission test, type of boosted fission weapon, multistage thermonuclear test, number of months from fission bomb to multistage thermonuclear bomb, etc.), and nuclear infrastructure (assembly plants, plutonium production reactors, uranium enrichment plants, etc.). Countries included in the tally are the United States, Soviet Union, Britain, France, and China.

  10. Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Nuclear Controls Challenge: Detect/deter illicit transfers of nuclear/dual-use materials, technology, and commodities. Solution: Build domestic and international capacity to implement and meet export control obligations. Related Topics international security international security policy NIS nuclear controls safeguards safeguards and security verification Related News Nuclear Verification International Nuclear Safeguards Nonproliferation Policy Nonproliferation and Arms Control NIS

  11. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements, implement regimes to reduce nuclear weapons, and detect and dismantle undeclared nuclear programs. Specific subprogram activities include: Implementing current and developing future

  12. nuclear controls | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    controls Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and

  13. Defense Nuclear Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Nuclear Facility NNSA's safety office accredited and recognized for leadership in safe operation of defense nuclear facilities Part of NNSA's commitment to maintaining the nation's safe, secure, and effective nuclear deterrent are relentlessly high standards for technically capable nuclear enterprise personnel qualifications for all aspects of Defense Nuclear Facility operations. In December 2015, the Department of Energy

  14. Chemical Concentrations in Field Mice from Open-Detonation Firing Sites TA-36 Minie and TA-39 Point 6 at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, Philip R.

    2011-01-01

    Field mice (mostly Peromyscus spp.) were collected at two open-detonation (high explosive) firing sites - Minie at Technical Area (TA) 36 and Point 6 at TA-39 - at Los Alamos National Laboratory in August of 2010 and in February of 2011 for chemical analysis. Samples of whole body field mice from both sites were analyzed for target analyte list elements (mostly metals), dioxin/furans, polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, high explosives, and perchlorate. In addition, uranium isotopes were analyzed in a composite sample collected from TA-36 Minie. In general, all constituents, with the exception of lead at TA-39 Point 6, in whole body field mice samples collected from these two open-detonation firing sites were either not detected or they were detected below regional statistical reference levels (99% confidence level), biota dose screening levels, and/or soil ecological chemical screening levels. The amount of lead in field mice tissue collected from TA-39 Point 6 was higher than regional background, and some lead levels in the soil were higher than the ecological screening level for the field mouse; however, these levels are not expected to affect the viability of the populations over the site as a whole.

  15. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  16. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Impact Topics: Today's & Tomorrow's New Nuclear Energy Construction & the Workforce Outlook Current New Nuclear Energy Construction Projects Small Modular...

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Starr, C.

    1963-01-01

    This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

  18. Cooperative measures to support the Indo-Pak Agreement Reducing Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Sitakanta; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2014-04-01

    In 2012, India and Pakistan reaffirmed the Agreement on Reducing the Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons. Despite a history of mutual animosity and persistent conflict between the two countries, this agreement derives strength from a few successful nuclear confidence building measures that have stood the test of time. It also rests on the hope that the region would be spared a nuclear holocaust from an accidental nuclear weapon detonation that might be misconstrued as a deliberate use of a weapon by the other side. This study brings together two emerging strategic analysts from South Asia to explore measures to support the Agreement and further develop cooperation around this critical issue. This study briefly dwells upon the strategic landscape of nuclear South Asia with the respective nuclear force management structures, doctrines, and postures of India and Pakistan. It outlines the measures in place for the physical protection and safety of nuclear warheads, nuclear materials, and command and control mechanisms in the two countries, and it goes on to identify the prominent, emerging challenges posed by the introduction of new weapon technologies and modernization of the respective strategic forces. This is followed by an analysis of the agreement itself leading up to a proposed framework for cooperative measures that might enhance the spirit and implementation of the agreement.

  19. Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation NNSA Announces Elimination of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Indonesia All of Southeast Asia Now HEU-Free (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Indonesian Nuclear Industry, LLC (PT INUKI), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), and the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) of the... NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence

  20. Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security Council-sponsored policy ...

  1. Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Our Programs Defense Programs Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) mission is to ensure the Nation sustains a safe, secure, and effective ...

  2. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: ...

  3. Nuclear Suppliers Group & Regimes | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency ...

  4. Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ...

  5. Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions PI Name: James Vary PI Email: jvary@iastate.edu Institution: Iowa State University Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 15 ...

  6. Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This includes NNSA's work to advance physical protection standards for nuclear facilities and to strengthen nuclear safeguards, which are criteria for the physical security and the ...

  7. nuclear emergency | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home nuclear emergency nuclear emergency Fukushima: Five Years Later After the March 11, 2011, Japan earthquake, tsunami, and ...

  8. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Radiological Advisory Team (NRAT) provides an emergency response capability for on-scene scientific and technical advice for both domestic and international nuclear or ...

  9. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team NNSA houses the Nuclear Incident Team (NIT), which is responsible for deploying assets at the request of coordinating agencies in response to a nuclear or ...

  10. Nuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) / Transient Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transient Nuclear Fuels Testing - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations ... Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & ...

  11. nuclear science week | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    science week Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request for Proposal Last week the Nuclear Science Week (NSW) National Steering Committee released its impact ...

  12. Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise ... efficient 21stcentury NSE with less environmental impact. ... is referred to as Stockpile Stewardship and Management. ...

  13. Nuclear | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Nuclear power is the use of sustained nuclear fission to generate heat and electricity. Nuclear power plants provide about 6 percent of the world's energy and 13-14 percent of the world's electricity. Featured Moving Forward to Address Nuclear Waste Storage and Disposal Three trucks transport nuclear waste

  14. High-Resolution Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Mach Reflection Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H2O2Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniquesmorein practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.less

  15. High-Resolution Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Mach Reflection Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H 2 –O 2 –Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniquesmore » in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.« less

  16. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  19. Influence of sweeping detonation-wave loading on damage evolution during spallation loading of tantalum in both a planar and curved geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, George Thompson III; Hull, Lawrence Mark; Livescu, Veronica; Faulkner, James; Briggs, Matthew E.; Meyer, Ross Keith; Andrews, Heather Lynn; Hare, Steven John; Jakulewicz, Micah Shawn; Shinas, Michael A.

    2015-03-30

    Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning the shock hardening, damage evolution, and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. However, fewer quantitative studies have been conducted on the effect of direct, in-contact, high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave (unsupported shocks) loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Systematic studies quantifying the effect of sweeping-detonation wave loading are yet sparser. In this study, the damage evolution and spallation response of Ta is shown to be critically dependent on the peak shock stress, the geometry of the sample (flat or curved plate geometry), and the shock obliquity during sweeping-detonation-wave shock loading. Sweepingwave loading in the flat-plate geometry is observed to: a) yield a lower spall strength than previously documented for 1-D supported-shock-wave loading, b) exhibit increased shock hardening as a function of increasing obliquity, and c) lead to an increased incidence of deformation twin formation with increasing shock obliquity. Sweeping-wave loading of a 10 cm radius curved Ta plate is observed to: a) lead to an increase in the shear stress as a function of increasing obliquity, b) display a more developed level of damage evolution, extensive voids and coalescence, and lower spall strength with obliquity in the curved plate than seen in the flat-plate sweeping-detonation wave loading for an equivalent HE loading, and c) no increased propensity for deformation twin formation with increasing obliquity as seen in the flat-plate geometry. The overall observations comparing and contrasting the flat versus curved sweeping-wave spall experiments with 1D loaded spallation behavior suggests a coupled influence of obliquity and geometry on dynamic shock-induced damage evolution and spall strength. Coupled experimental and modeling research

  20. nuclear threat science | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    threat science Counterterrorism Counterterrorism Policy and Cooperation Nuclear Threat Science Office of Nuclear Threat Science The Office of Nuclear Threat Science is responsible for overseeing the Nuclear Counterterrorism Program, an NNSA program that sustains specialized expertise and integrates and executes key activities to advise and enable technical aspects of U.S. Government nuclear counterterrorism and... Office of Counterterrorism Policy and Cooperation The 2011 National Strategy for

  1. nuclear science | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    science Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request for Proposal Last week the Nuclear Science Week (NSW) National Steering Committee released its impact report from the 2015 event, detailing the many ways people were educated about all things nuclear as a result of the event. Nuclear Science Week is an international weeklong celebration to focus interest on... Consortium Led by University of California, Berkeley Awarded $25M NNSA Grant for Nuclear Science and Security

  2. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, G.

    1963-01-01

    This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

  4. Nuclear Data Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Links to Other Useful Sites Online Journals Institutions and Programs Related to Nuclear Physics U.S. Nuclear Data Program: All evaluated nuclear data supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. National Nuclear Data Center: Brookhaven National Laboratory; Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files (ENSDF), Nuclear Science References (NSR) and other databases. Isotopes Project: (E.O.L. Berkeley National Laboratory) Table of Isotopes, Isotope Explorer, XUNDL, Nuclear Data Dissemination Homepage, and

  5. Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements series Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and ...

  6. Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements series Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements series ...

  7. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  9. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  10. TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation Group As a part of the United States Nuclear Data Network and the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators' Network, the Nuclear Data...

  11. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-10

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  12. Office of Nuclear Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes nuclear safety requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of workers and the public from the hazards associated with nuclear operations with all Department operations.

  13. Nuclear Materials Disposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel.  These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for...

  14. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home Nuclear Incident Team Nuclear Incident Team Fukushima: Five Years Later After the March 11, 2011, Japan earthquake, tsunami, ...

  15. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  16. Civilian Nuclear Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Civilian Nuclear Program Civilian Nuclear Program Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Venkateswara Rao Dasari (Rao) (505) 667-5098 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Program is the focal point for

  17. Nuclear Energy Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services » Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC), formerly the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was established on October 1, 1998, to provide independent advice to the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) on complex science and technical issues that arise in the planning, managing, and implementation of DOE's nuclear energy program. NEAC periodically reviews the elements of the NE program and based on these

  18. Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  19. International Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) International Nuclear Security The International Nuclear Security program collaborates with partners world-wide to improve the security of proliferation-sensitive materials, particularly weapons-usable nuclear material in both civilian and non-civilian use in key countries. As part of these efforts, INS works with partner countries to: Upgrade and sustain physical security and material control and accounting systems; Develop national-level nuclear security infrastructure in areas such

  20. Nuclear Materials Information Program | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Information Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

  1. Nuclear & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

  2. Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

    1998-07-01

    Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

  3. Nuclear War Against Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear War Against Cancer 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:March 2016 past issues All Issues submit Nuclear War Against Cancer Los Alamos, in ...

  4. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  5. Advancing Global Nuclear Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today world leaders gathered at The Hague for the Nuclear Security Summit, a meeting to measure progress and take action to secure sensitive nuclear materials.

  6. Nuclear Energy Systems Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management ...

  7. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 RIN 3150-AG41 Advance Notification to Native American Tribes of Transportation of Certain Types of Nuclear Waste AGENCY: ...

  8. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural ...

  9. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Equal ... A. Name and Address of Agency National Nuclear Security Administration Office of ...

  10. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration FY 2013 PER Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC Performance Evaluation Report NNSA Production Office Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex ...

  11. Nuclear Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Materials Science Our multidisciplinary expertise comprises the core actinide materials science and metallurgical capability within the nuclear weapons production and ...

  12. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Equal ... A. Name and Address of Agency National Nuclear Security Administration 1000 Independence ...

  13. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    15 National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2013 PER Babcock & Wilcox Technical ... The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Production Office (NPO) took into ...

  14. Nuclear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    High construction costs for nuclear plants, especially relative to natural-gas-fired plants, make other options for new nuclear capacity uneconomical even in the alternative...

  15. Nuclear Security Summit

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Joint Research Centre and the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration regarding the reduction of excess nuclear material http:...

  16. Sandia Energy Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    afety-expert-elected-to-national-academy-of-engineeringfeed 0 Sandia Teaches Nuclear Safety Course http:energy.sandia.govsandia-teaches-nuclear-safety-course http:...

  17. Nuclear Energy University Programs

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (NSUF) Gateway to Nuclear Research J. Rory Kennedy Director, NSUF Idaho National ... to NSUF (Integration into CINR) * Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database (NEID) * ...

  18. Sandia's Nuclear Weapons Mission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Mission Ensuring that the nation's stockpile is safe, secure and effective, and that it meets military requirements America's Nuclear Weapons Systems Engineering ...

  19. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia's Brayton-Cycle Turbine Boosts Small Nuclear Reactor Efficiency Energy, Energy Efficiency, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy Sandia's Brayton-Cycle Turbine Boosts Small...

  20. Advanced Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & ...

  1. Nuclear Data Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Links to Useful Online Nuclear Physics Journals Important Online Resources Science Direct ... Elsevier Physics Online: Nuclear Physics A, B, Physics Repots, Physics Letters B and more. ...

  2. Nuclear Controls Checklist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Controls Yes No 1) Is your Facility involved in the research on or development, design, manufacture, construction, testing or maintenance of any nuclear explosive ...

  3. Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC), formerly the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was established on October 1, 1998, to provide independent advice to the Office of...

  4. Nuclear Physics: Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns The Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks The Structure of Nuclei Symmetry Tests in Nuclear Physics Meetings ...

  5. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Practice in Nuclear Medicine Radiopharmacy Patient Care Medical Imaging & Computers Moderator: Deborah M. Gibbs, MEd, PET, CNMT Lead Nuclear Medicine PET Facility...

  6. nuclear reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear reactors NNSA Researchers Advance Technology for Remote Reactor Monitoring NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development Program drives the innovation of technical capabilities to detect, identify, and characterize foreign nuclear weapons development activities. To achieve this, NNSA leverages the unique capabilities of the national laboratories

  7. International Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and Member States to implement and meet safeguards obligations. The Office of International Nuclear Safeguards develops and supports the policies, concepts, technologies, expertise, and international safeguards infrastructure necessary to strengthen and sustain the international safeguards system as it evolves to

  8. nuclear enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    enterprise New Report from NNSA Highlights Major Achievements for 2015 Outlines Accomplishments in Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors and Managing the Nuclear Enterprise The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today released "NNSA Achievements: 2015 By the Numbers," a report highlighting major accomplishments and milestones

  9. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  10. State Nuclear Profiles - Energy Information Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary FAQS Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data ...

  11. The Joys of Nuclear Engineering

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2010-01-08

    Nuclear fuels researcher Jon Carmack talks about the satisfactions of a career in nuclear engineering.

  12. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  13. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  14. ORISE: Nurse Triage Lines Support | How ORISE is Making a Difference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nurse triage lines as a promising method for reducing disparities in access to quality health care during an influenza pandemic. Nurse triage lines are used daily in the United...

  15. Advanced nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-14

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  16. 2016 Nuclear Science Week

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Week October 17 - 21, 2016 Nuclear Science Week is a national, broadly observed week-long celebration that focuses on all aspects of nuclear science. Events during this week will provide many learning opportunities about contributions, innovation and careers that can be found by exploring nuclear science. 6-22-16

  17. Advanced nuclear fuel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-15

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  18. Nuclear and Particle Futures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NNSA) Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear weapons are developed, produced, and maintained in the stockpile, and then retired and dismantled. This sequence of events is known as the nuclear weapons life cycle. The Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and in partnership with Department of Defense (DoD) conducts activities in a joint nuclear weapons life cycle process. The major steps, or phases, of the life cycle are described below. Currently,

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Release date: December 7, 2015 Next release date: Late 2018 Spent nuclear fuel data are collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the Department of Energy's Office of Standard Contract Management (Office of the General Counsel) on the Form GC-859, "Nuclear Fuel Data Survey." The data include detailed characteristics of spent nuclear fuel discharged from commercial U.S. nuclear power plants and currently stored at commercial sites in the United

  20. Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) containment and mitigation subtask.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wente, William Baker

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this subtask of the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Design project was to demonstrate mitigation technologies for radiological material dispersal and to assist planners with incorporation of the technologies into a concept of operations. The High Consequence Assessment and Technology department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has studied aqueous foam's ability to mitigate the effects of an explosively disseminated radiological dispersal device (RDD). These benefits include particle capture of respirable radiological particles, attenuation of blast overpressure, and reduction of plume buoyancy. To better convey the aqueous foam attributes, SNL conducted a study using the Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion model, comparing the effects of a mitigated and unmitigated explosive RDD release. Results from this study compared health effects and land contamination between the two scenarios in terms of distances of effect, population exposure, and remediation costs. Incorporating aqueous foam technology, SNL created a conceptual design for a stationary containment area to be located at a facility entrance with equipment that could minimize the effects from the detonation of a vehicle transported RDD. The containment design was evaluated against several criteria, including mitigation ability (both respirable and large fragment particle capture as well as blast overpressure suppression), speed of implementation, cost, simplicity, and required space. A mock-up of the conceptual idea was constructed at SNL's 9920 explosive test site to demonstrate the containment design.

  1. DOE/NV--209-REV15

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... United States Nuclear TestsDetonations Conducted on the Nevada Test Site - By Area . . . ... Index of Nuclear Test Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

  2. Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Summit U.S. and China Continue Cooperative Partnership to Advance Safe, Secure Civil Nuclear Energy for Clean Energy Future DOE/NNSA Hosts 11th U.S.-China Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology Meeting at Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina (Aiken, South Carolina) - On May 10-11, 2016 the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the China... Statement on Signing of the Administrative Arrangement to the Agreement for

  3. defense nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    defense nuclear security NNSA Announces 2014 Security Professional of the Year Awards WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced the recipients of the 2014 Bradley A. Peterson Federal and Contractor Security Professional of the Year Awards. Pamela Valdez from the Los Alamos Field Office will receive the federal award and Randy Fraser from... Michael Lempke receives NNSA's Gold Medal of Excellence DOE Undersecretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA

  4. nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    security U.S. and China Continue Cooperative Partnership to Advance Safe, Secure Civil Nuclear Energy for Clean Energy Future DOE/NNSA Hosts 11th U.S.-China Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology Meeting at Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina (Aiken, South Carolina) - On May 10-11, 2016 the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the China... Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray

  5. nuclear weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    weapons DOE, NNSA leaders open summit on the physical security of nuclear weapons Deputy Secretary of Energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, NNSA Principal Deputy Administrator Madelyn Creedon, and numerous speakers from throughout the Nuclear Security Enterprise spoke at the 2016 Nuclear Weapons Physical Security Collaboration Summit earlier this month at Joint Base Andrews in... Y-12 National Security Complex Completes W69 Dismantlement The man who trains everyone on the bombs Mark Meyer, training

  6. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration ...

  7. nuclear smuggling | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Deputy Administrator Creedon Travels to China In March, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Principal Deputy Administrator Madelyn Creedon traveled to China to ...

  8. Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x2 - triaxiality, and x3 - pairing correlations. Calculations were carried out using nuclear density functional theory. The collective action was minimized using the dynamical...

  9. Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... site link , and the emergence of new proliferation threats from both state and non-state ...

  10. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) National Nuclear Security Administration FY15 Year End Report Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End Report Semi Annual

  11. nuclear material | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Researchers develop a new mathematical tool for analyzing and evaluating nuclear material Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have created a new method for detecting ...

  12. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Minimize Nuclear Waste Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste GNEP will increase the efficiency in the management of used nuclear fuel, also known as spent fuel, and defer the need for additional geologic nuclear waste repositories until the next century. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste (1.2 MB) More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy

  13. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA NuclearRadiological Incident Response December 01, 2008 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has over 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to ...

  14. NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title list of documents made publicly available, January 1-31, 1998 NONE 21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; BIBLIOGRAPHIES; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS;...

  15. NNSA Celebrates National Nuclear Science Week | National Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Celebrates National Nuclear Science Week January 23, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is committed to promoting excellence in nuclear ...

  16. budget | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reflects Commitment to Maintain a Safe, Secure, and Effective Nuclear Deterrent; Prevent, Counter, and Respond to Global Nuclear Dangers; and Effectively Power the Nuclear Navy(...

  17. Nuclear Engineering | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Milestones Publications News Press Releases Features Science Highlights In the ... Divisions Energy Systems Global Security Sciences Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Milestones ...

  18. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thursday, May 26, 2011 Exa-Scale Computational Resources Nuclear Astrophysics Accelerator Physics Cold QCD and Nuclear Forces Hot and Dense QCD Nuclear Structure and Reactions ...

  19. Nuclear Regulatory Commission | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission NNSA Receives Excellence Award for Radiological Security Enhancements in Hawaii HONOLULU - At an official event this week, the City and County of Honolulu presented the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) with the Homeland Security Excellence Award for DOE/NNSA's Office of Radiological Security's (ORS) efforts

  20. nuclear safety | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    safety United States and the Republic of Korea Sign Agreement for Civil Nuclear Cooperation Washington, DC - Today Secretary of Energy Ernest J. Moniz and Korean Foreign Minister Yun signed the successor United States - Republic of Korea Agreement for Civil Nuclear Cooperation, or 123 Agreement, as they are referred to in the United States. The United States and the Republic of Korea (ROK

  1. nuclear technology | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    technology NNSA Updates Export Control Regulation WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) updated the Federal rule (10 CFR Part 810, or Part 810) that regulates the export of unclassified nuclear technology and assistance. The final rule was published in the Federal Register on Feb. 23 and will go into effect on

  2. Naval Nuclear Propulsion | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Naval Nuclear Propulsion Klotz visits Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz, DOE Undersecretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator, visited the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory in West Mifflin, PA on July 2, 2015. Gen. Klotz toured through several test facilities where Bettis personnel reviewed ongoing development efforts to qualify

  3. nuclear testing | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    testing NNSA scientists find more effective ways to detect nuclear explosions near and far NNSA activities are vital to detecting nuclear explosions and helping verify compliance with the testing ban worldwide. Recent developments at NNSA's Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will help NNSA meet this commitment. Using computer-generated models and field experiments, LLNL simulates how

  4. Initial measurements of BN-350 spent fuel in dry storage casks using the dual slab verification detonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santi, Peter Angelo; Browne, Michael C; Freeman, Corey R; Parker, Robert F; Williams, Richard B

    2010-01-01

    The Dual Slab Verification Detector (DSVD) has been developed, built, and characterized by Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as part of the dry storage safeguards system for the spent fuel from the BN-350 fast reactor. The detector consists of two rows of 3He tubes embedded in a slab of polyethylene which has been designed to be placed on the outer surface of the dry storage cask. By performing DSVD measurements at several different locations around the outer surface of the DUC, a signature 'fingerprint' can be established for each DUC based on the neutron flux emanating from inside the dry storage cask. The neutron fingerprint for each individual DUC will be dependent upon the spatial distribution of nuclear material within the cask, thus making it sensitive to the removal of a certain amount of material from the cask. An initial set of DSVD measurements have been performed on the first set of dry storage casks that have been loaded with canisters of spent fuel and moved onto the dry storage pad to both establish an initial fingerprint for these casks as well as to quantify systematic uncertainties associated with these measurements. The results from these measurements will be presented and compared with the expected results that were determined based on MCNPX simulations of the dry storage facility. The ability to safeguard spent nuclear fuel is strongly dependent on the technical capabilities of establishing and maintaining continuity of knowledge (COK) of the spent fuel as it is released from the reactor core and either reprocessed or packaged and stored at a storage facility. While the maintenance of COK is often done using continuous containment and surveillance (C/S) on the spent fuel, it is important that the measurement capabilities exist to re-establish the COK in the event of a significant gap in the continuous CIS by performing measurements that independently confirm the presence and content

  5. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skiba, James M.; Scherer, Carolynn P.

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  6. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  7. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 ... Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Illinois nuclear power ...

  8. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 ... Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) New York nuclear power ...

  9. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 ... Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Maryland nuclear power ...

  10. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 ... Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Michigan nuclear power ...

  11. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  12. Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even ...

  13. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O 452.4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons by LtCol Karl Basham Functional areas: Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Weapons, Security, Safety, Weapon...

  14. The Stimulation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs with Subsurface Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.

    2000-12-08

    Between 1965 and 1979 there were five documented and one or more inferred attempts to stimulate the production from hydrocarbon reservoirs by detonating nuclear devices in reservoir strata. Of the five documented tests, three were carried out by the US in low-permeability, natural-gas bearing, sandstone-shale formations, and two were done in the USSR within oil-bearing carbonates. The objectives of the US stimulation efforts were to increase porosity and permeability in a reservoir around a specific well by creating a chimney of rock rubble with fractures extending beyond it, and to connect superimposed reservoir layers. In the USSR, the intent was to extensively fracture an existing reservoir in the more general vicinity of producing wells, again increasing overall permeability and porosity. In both countries, the ultimate goals were to increase production rates and ultimate recovery from the reservoirs. Subsurface explosive devices ranging from 2.3 to about 100 kilotons were used at depths ranging from 1208 m (3963 ft) to 2568 m (8427 ft). Post-shot problems were encountered, including smaller-than-calculated fracture zones, formation damage, radioactivity of the product, and dilution of the BTU value of tie natural gas with inflammable gases created by the explosion. Reports also suggest that production-enhancement factors from these tests fell short of expectations. Ultimately, the enhanced-production benefits of the tests were insufficient to support continuation of the pro-grams within increasingly adversarial political, economic, and social climates, and attempts to stimulate hydrocarbon reservoirs with nuclear devices have been terminated in both countries.

  15. 3D NUCLEAR SEGMENTAT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003029WKSTN00 Delineation of nuclear structures in 3D multicellular systems https://vision.lbl.gov/Software/3DMorphometry/

  16. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

  17. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Over Five Years Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy, Partnership, Systems Analysis Consortium for Advanced Simulation of...

  18. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting

  19. Nuclear Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Budget | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrade Project Completed Under Budget April 03, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrade Project (NMSSUP) was recently completed approximately $1 million under its original budget of $245 million. NMSSUP upgrades security at Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Technical Area-55, a facility that houses

  20. Nuclear and Radiochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NR Nuclear and Radiochemistry We provide vital radiochemical and radioanalytical capabilities to a wide range of programs. Contact Us Group Leader Felicia Taw Deputy Group Leader Rich Oldenborg Group Office (505) 667-4546 The Nuclear and Radiochemistry (C-NR) Group provides vital radiochemical and radioanalytical capabilities to a wide range of programs. These programs include maintenance and stewardship of the nuclear stockpile, nuclear non-proliferation, environmental management, international

  1. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

  2. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

  3. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Supersedes DOE O 452.2D and DOE M 452.2-1A.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  5. President Obama Hosts Global Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Hosts Global Nuclear Security Summit President Obama Hosts Global Nuclear Security Summit Washington, DC President Obama hosts a Global Nuclear Security Summit to facilitate discussion on the nature of the nuclear threat and develop steps that can be taken together to secure vulnerable materials, combat nuclear smuggling and deter, detect, and disrupt attempts at nuclear terrorism

  6. Ability of the Confined Explosive Component Water Gap Test STANAG 4363 to Assess the Shock Sensitivity of MM-Scale Detonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefrancois, A S; Roeske, F; Benterou, J; Tarver, C M; Lee, R S; Hannah, B

    2006-02-10

    The Explosive Component Water Gap Test (ECWGT) has been validated to assess the shock sensitivity of lead and booster components having a diameter larger than 5 mm. Several countries have investigated by experiments and numerical simulations the effect of confinement on the go/no go threshold for Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) pellets having a height and diameter of 3 mm, confined by a steel annulus of wall thickness 1-3.5 mm. Confinement of the PETN by a steel annulus of the same height of the pellet with 1-mm wall thickness makes the component more sensitive (larger gap). As the wall thickness is increased to 2-mm, the gap increases a lesser amount, but when the wall thickness is increased to 3.5-mm a decrease in sensitivity is observed (smaller gap). This decrease of the water gap has been reproduced experimentally. Recent numerical simulations using Ignition and Growth model [1] for the PETN Pellet have reproduced the experimental results for the steel confinement up to 2 mm thick [2]. The presence of a stronger re-shock following the first input shock from the water and focusing on the axis have been identified in the pellet due to the steel confinement. The double shock configuration is well-known to lead in some cases to shock desensitization. This work presents the numerical simulations using Ignition and Growth model for LX16 (PETN based HE) and LX19 (CL20 based HE) Pellets [3] in order to assess the shock sensitivity of mm-scale detonators. The pellets are 0.6 mm in diameter and 3 mm length with different type of steel confinement 2.2 mm thick and 4.7 mm thick. The influence of an aluminum confinement is calculated for the standard LX 16 pellet 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height. The question of reducing the size of the donor charge is also investigated to small scale the test itself.

  7. Nuclear Material Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Nuclear Material Removal Once weapons-usable nuclear material is no longer required, the Office of Nuclear Material Removal works with global partners and facilities to consolidate, remove and dispose of the excess HEU and plutonium via 1) the U.S.-origin Removal Program that repatriates U.S.-origin HEU and LEU fuel (MTR and TRIGA), 2) the Russian-origin Removal Program that repatriates Russian-origin HEU and separated plutonium, and 3) the Gap Material Program that addresses material

  8. accountability | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    accountability | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  9. transportation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    transportation | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  10. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  11. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, About This Site Budget IG Web Policy...

  12. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) / Radiological Advisory Team NRAT Logo NNSA's Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team (NRAT) provides an emergency response capability for on-scene scientific and technical advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA follow-on assets as needed. The NRAT is composed of scientists and technicians who can provide advice or conduct limited

  13. British nuclear policymaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowie, C.J.; Platt, A.

    1984-01-01

    This study analyzes the domestic political, economic, and bureaucratic factors that affect the nuclear policymaking process in Great Britain. Its major conclusion is that, although there have been changes in that process in recent years (notably the current involvement of a segment of the British public in the debate about the deployment of intermediate-range nuclear forces), future British nuclear policymaking will remain much what it has been in the past. Three ideas are central to understanding British thinking on the subject: (1) Britain's long-standing resolve to have her own national nuclear force is largely traceable to her desire to maintain first-rank standing among the nations of the world in spite of loss of empire. (2) Financial considerations have always been important--so much so that they have usually dominated issues of nuclear policy. (3) The executive branch of government dominates the nuclear policymaking process but does not always present a united front. The United States heavily influences British nuclear policy through having supplied Britain since the late 1950s with nuclear data and components of nuclear weapon systems such as Polaris and Trident. The relationship works both ways since the U.S. depends on Britain as a base for deployment of both conventional and nuclear systems.

  14. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safeguards | Department of Energy Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP will help prevent misuse of civilian nuclear facilities for nonpeaceful purposes by developing enhanced safeguards programs and technologies. International nuclear safeguards are integral to implementing the GNEP vision of a peaceful expansion of nuclear energy and demonstration of more

  15. Nuclear Science References Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.

    2014-06-15

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

  16. Nuclear Energy Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  17. Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Technologies - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  18. Nuclear Workforce Initiative - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety » Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act in 1946, creating the Atomic Energy Commission -- which later became a part of the Department of Energy. Read more about the Department of Energy's role in nuclear security in <a href="/node/1041771/">our interactive timeline.</a> | Energy Department Photo. President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act in 1946, creating the Atomic Energy

  19. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conferences failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  2. Nuclear Physics Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Program HALL A Hall A wide shot of detectors Scientists from across the country and around the world use the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility to ...

  3. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search Nuclear Physics Program Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to ...

  4. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colloquium Experiment Research UserResearcher Information print version Research Highlights Public Interest Nuclear Physics Accelerator Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging ...

  5. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Privacy and Security Notice Skip over navigation Search the JLab Site Nuclear Physics Program Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical ...

  6. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-25

    To prevent unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). Cancels DOE 5635.4 and DOE 5650.3A

  7. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the University of California for violations of nuclear safety rules at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico. The University of California operates LANL for ...

  8. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Administration Savannah River Site 1 NNSA Budget ( Millions) By Program Office FY 2015 Enacted FY 2016 Enacted FY 2017 President Request Delta FY Request Weapon ...

  9. Nuclear Spectra from Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manton, N. S.

    2009-08-26

    The structures of Skyrmions, especially for baryon numbers 4, 8 and 12, are reviewed. The quantized Skyrmion states are compared with nuclear spectra.

  10. defense nuclear security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Defense Nuclear Security http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnuclearsecurity

  11. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  12. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Power Clicks with Geochemistry Energy, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy Computer Power Clicks with Geochemistry Sandia is developing computer models that show how...

  13. Nuclear Energy University Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Awards that are experimental - 30 * Awards in materials and waste - 30 * Awards to Nuclear Engineering Faculty - 18 * Number of universities receiving awards - 26 * Number of...

  14. Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    span>

    WASHINGTON D.C - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) announced today the removal of 36 kilograms...

  15. nuclear threat science

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2011 National Strategy for Counterterrorism states that the danger of nuclear terrorism is the greatest threat to global security, and affirms preventing terrorist...

  16. Nuclear fuel composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feild, Jr., Alexander L.

    1980-02-19

    1. A high temperature graphite-uranium base nuclear fuel composition containing from about 1 to about 5 five weight percent rhenium metal.

  17. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Operator: Dominion Energy Kewaunee Location and Service Territory: The Kewaunee nuclear plant occupies a 900-acre site in Carlton, Wisconsin, about 35 miles southeast of Green Bay. ...

  19. WIPP Nuclear Facilities Transparency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the safety, security, and legitimate management of nuclear materials." Other Links Yucca Mountain Test Data Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center Dimitrovograd Site ...

  20. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    preparedness Read More NSC leader recognized as community role model Read More Apex Gold discussion fosters international cooperation in run-up to 2016 Nuclear Security Summit...

  1. Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... agen- cies, scientific advisory panels, and concerned citizens. * As a ... It also prohibited the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. In 1996, ...

  2. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, Elman E.

    1978-01-01

    A lifting, rotating and sealing apparatus for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor core. This apparatus permits rotation of the plugs to provide under the plug refueling of a nuclear core. It also provides a means by which positive top core holddown can be utilized. Both of these operations are accomplished by means of the apparatus lifting the top core holddown structure off the nuclear core while stationary, and maintaining this structure in its elevated position during plug rotation. During both of these operations, the interface between the rotating member and its supporting member is sealingly maintained.

  3. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  4. Nuclear Physics: Meetings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Topics: Meetings Talks given at the Science & Technology Review 2004 Larry Cardman: Science Overview and the Experimental Program ppt | pdf Tony Thomas: Nuclear Physics ...

  5. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the University of California (UC) have agreed on new management and operations contracts for ...

  6. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office . Environmental Management Operations February 2015 Nevada National Security ...

  7. Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M.J.

    1992-12-31

    An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or {beta} angle of the inner liner.

  8. Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.J.

    1993-10-12

    An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or [beta] angle of the inner liner. 12 figures.

  9. Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or .beta. angle of the inner liner.

  10. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gnome underground nuclear test site, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary site risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gnome site in southeastern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 3.5-kiloton nuclear device in 1961, and a hydrologic tracer test using radionuclides in 1963. The tracer test involved the injection of tritium, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs directly into the Culebra Dolomite, a nine to ten-meter-thick aquifer located approximately 150 in below land surface. The Gnome nuclear test was carried out in the Salado Formation, a thick salt deposit located 200 in below the Culebra. Because salt behaves plastically, the cavity created by the explosion is expected to close, and although there is no evidence that migration has actually occurred, it is assumed that radionuclides from the cavity are released into the overlying Culebra Dolomite during this closure process. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides may be present in concentrations exceeding drinking water regulations outside the drilling exclusion boundary established by DOE. Calculated mean tritium concentrations peak at values exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 20,000 pCi/L at distances of up to almost eight kilometers west of the nuclear test.

  11. verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    verification Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and

  12. Neutron and Nuclear Science News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Recent news and events related to neutron and nuclear science at LANSCE. Neutron and Nuclear Science News Nuclear and Materials Science Research at LANSCE Nuclear science observations and opportunities at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Links Neutron and Nuclear Science News Media Links Profiles Events at LANSCE LAPIS (LANSCE Proposal Intake System

  13. Nuclear Waste Partnership Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements, implement regimes to reduce nuclear weapons, and detect and dismantle undeclared nuclear programs. Specific subprogram activities include: Implementing current and developing future

  14. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies The Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Program will develop crosscutting technologies that ...

  15. Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Washington, DC President Clinton extends the nuclear weapons testing moratorium for at least 15 months

  16. Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Washington, DC President Eisenhower announces a moratorium on nuclear weapons testing to begin on October 31, 1958

  17. Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Waste Policy Act Signed Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed Washington, DC President Reagan signs the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Nation's first comprehensive nuclear waste legislation

  18. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12

    The directive establishes specific nuclear explosive safety (NES) program requirements to implement the DOE NES standards and other NES criteria for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2B. Canceled by DOE O 452.2D.

  19. Office of Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy advances nuclear power as a resource capable of meeting the Nation's energy, environmental, and national security needs by resolving technical, cost, safety, proliferation resistance, and security barriers through research, development, and demonstration as appropriate.

  20. Vented nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Leonard N.; Kaznoff, Alexis I.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

  1. About NNSA | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing; * Preventing the proliferation nuclear weapons and securing dangerous nuclear materials; * Providing the U.S. Navy ...

  2. Civilian Nuclear Programs, SPO-CNP: LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Civilian Nuclear Programs, SPO-CNP Science Program Office Applied Energy Civilian Nuclear Office of Science Civilian Nuclear Programs Home Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs Yucca ...

  3. Engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    reliability and performance of the current and future U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. ... engineering components of both the non-nuclear and nuclear explosive package in nuclear ...

  4. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) December 01, 2008 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has over 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents. NNSA provides technical support to the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, State, and Defense for nuclear terrorism events and domestic nuclear weapon accidents and incidents. The NNSA emergency response assets also provide support to nuclear site and facility accidents and

  5. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) January 01, 2009 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has more than 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents. NNSA provides technical support to the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, State, and Defense for nuclear terrorism events and domestic nuclear weapon accidents and incidents. The NNSA emergency response assets also provide support to nuclear site and facility accidents and

  6. Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security 101 March 23, 2012 The goal of United States Government's nuclear security programs is to prevent the illegal possession, use or transfer of nuclear material, technology and expertise or radioactive material. Successful nuclear security relies on the integration of technology, policy, operational concepts and international collaboration to prevent acts of nuclear terrorism. The Basics of Nuclear Security include: Removing or Eliminating Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and

  7. Office of Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Nuclear Threat Science The Office of Nuclear Threat Science is responsible for overseeing the Nuclear Counterterrorism Program, an NNSA program that sustains specialized expertise and integrates and executes key activities to advise and enable technical aspects of U.S. Government nuclear counterterrorism and counterproliferation missions. Nuclear Counterterrorism The Nuclear Counterterrorism Program operates in partnership with weapons design-, stockpile science-, weapons surety-,

  8. The Office of Nuclear Energy Announces Central Europe Nuclear Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop in Prague | Department of Energy The Office of Nuclear Energy Announces Central Europe Nuclear Safety Workshop in Prague The Office of Nuclear Energy Announces Central Europe Nuclear Safety Workshop in Prague October 3, 2011 - 2:04pm Addthis The Office of Nuclear Energy, in partnership with Czech Republic Ministry of Industry and Trade, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the State Agency for Nuclear Safety of the Czech Republic, and Argonne National Laboratory, is conducting a regional

  9. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  10. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  11. nuclear bombs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    bombs The man who trains everyone on the bombs Mark Meyer, training coordinator and field engineer at Sandia National Laboratories. Over the past five years, Mark Meyer, training coordinator and field engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, has introduced thousands of people across the Department of Energy and Department of Defense nuclear

  12. Preparing for the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    over 10 countries - enough for 16 nuclear bombs. A dozen new countries joining the key international treaties. Over a dozen new nuclear security training and research "centers...

  13. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor core produces heat. Because the fission process also produces...

  14. Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Weapons Testing Resumes Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes Washington, DC The Soviet Union breaks the nuclear test moratorium and the United States resumes testing

  15. Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology United States and China Mark 10th Anniversary of Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology Joint Coordination Meetings CHENGDU, CHINA - On May 6 and ...

  16. National Nuclear Science Week Day 2: NNSA Showcases Nuclear Science...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2: NNSA Showcases Nuclear Science Careers | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  17. NNSA Celebrates National Nuclear Science Week | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Science Week | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

  18. National Nuclear Science Week - Jan. 24-28 | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    - Jan. 24-28 | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  19. JPRS report supplement: Nuclear developments. Iraq -- Nuclear and missile proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-09-14

    This document contains articles from foreign periodicals from throughout the world, translated into English, that concern nuclear developments, specifically nuclear and missile proliferation in Iraq.

  20. Last U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Underground Nuclear Test Conducted | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  1. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W ...

  2. Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE), Cathy Haney (Director, Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards (NRC)), ... (NRC)) Back Row: Tom Hiltz, Office of Nuclear Safety (EHSS DOE), Roy Zimmerman (Deputy ...

  3. Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Arco, ID The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 located at the National Reactor Testing ...

  4. Neutron and Nuclear Science News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Recent news and events related to neutron and nuclear science at LANSCE. Neutron and Nuclear Science News Links Neutron and Nuclear Science News Media Links Profiles Events at LANSCE

  5. hrp | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    hrp Personnel Security Program NNSA is responsible for managing national nuclear security and supports several key program areas including Defense, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, Emergency Operations, Infrastructure and Environment, Nuclear Security, Management and Administration and the Office of the Administrator.

  6. Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lyons, Peter

    2013-05-29

    On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

  7. An Assessment of the Current Day Impact of Various Materials Associated with the U.S. Nuclear Test Program in the Marshall Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Noshkin, V E; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Bogen, K T

    2001-05-01

    Different stable elements, and some natural and man-made radionuclides, were used as tracers or associated in other ways with nuclear devices that were detonated at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls as part of the U.S. nuclear testing program from 1946 through 1958. The question has been raised whether any of these materials dispersed by the explosions could be of sufficient concentration in either the marine environment or on the coral islands to be of a health concern to people living, or planning to live, on the atolls. This report addresses that concern. An inventory of the materials involved during the test period was prepared and provided to us by the Office of Defense Programs (DP) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The materials that the DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) ask to be evaluated are--sulfur, arsenic, yttrium, tantalum, gold, rhodium, indium, tungsten, thallium, thorium-230,232 ({sup 230,232}Th), uranium-233,238 ({sup 233,238}U), polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po), curium-232 ({sup 232}Cu), and americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). The stable elements were used primarily as tracers for determining neutron energy and flux, and for other diagnostic purposes in the larger yield, multistage devices. It is reasonable to assume that these materials would be distributed in a similar manner as the fission products subsequent to detonation. A large inventory of fission product and uranium data was available for assessment. Detailed calculations show only a very small fraction of the fission products produced during the entire test series remain at the test site atolls. Consequently, based on the information provided, we conclude that the concentration of these materials in the atoll environment pose no adverse health effects to humans.

  8. nr | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nr On Womens Equality Day, we celebrate NNSA's talented Women in STEM About Naval Reactors What Is the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program? The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program comprises the military and civilian personnel who design, build, operate, maintain, and manage the nuclear-powered ships and the many facilities that support the U.S. nuclear-powered naval fleet. The Program... Powering the Nuclear Navy Concern for the Environment Protection of People Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants Annual

  9. Nuclear Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Criticality Safety The Nuclear Facility Safety Program establishes and maintains the DOE requirements for nuclear criticality safety. The DOE detailed requirements for criticality ...

  10. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA, through its Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), works closely ...

  11. Newsletters | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the nuclear security enterprise. Online archives are available back to 2003. NNSA publishes a monthly newsletter featuring current events and activities across the nuclear ...

  12. performance | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    performance | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  13. computing | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    computing | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  14. sites | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sites | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  15. airport | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    airport | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  16. Romania | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Romania | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  17. ap | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ap | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

  18. lllnl | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    lllnl | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  19. Links | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Links | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  20. fleet | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    fleet | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...