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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of Nonproliferation Research & Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection Develop, Demonstrate, and...

2

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research and Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection NNSA builds the nation's operational sensors that monitor the entire planet from space to...

3

The Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection (NDD) | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Detonation Detection (NDD) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

4

Ground-Based Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Ground-Based Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

5

Radioactive Fallout from Terrorist Nuclear Detonations  

SciTech Connect

Responding correctly during the first hour after a terrorist nuclear detonation is the key to reducing casualties from a low-yield surface burst, and a correct response requires an understanding of the rapidly changing dose rate from fallout. This report provides an empirical formula for dose rate as a function of time and location that can guide the response to an unexpected nuclear detonation. At least one post-detonation radiation measurement is required if the yield and other characteristics of the detonation are unknown.

Marrs, R E

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection (NDD) | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Nuclear Detonations: Develops and builds space sensors for the nation's operational nuclear test treaty monitoring and Integrated Threat WarningAttack Assessment...

7

Reducing the Consequences of a Nuclear Detonation.  

SciTech Connect

The 2002 National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction states that 'the United States must be prepared to respond to the use of WMD against our citizens, our military forces, and those of friends and allies'. Scenario No.1 of the 15 Department of Homeland Security national planning scenarios is an improvised nuclear detonation in the national capitol region. An effective response involves managing large-scale incident response, mass casualty, mass evacuation, and mass decontamination issues. Preparedness planning activities based on this scenario provided difficult challenges in time critical decision making and managing a large number of casualties within the hazard area. Perhaps even more challenging is the need to coordinate a large scale response across multiple jurisdictions and effectively responding with limited infrastructure and resources. Federal response planning continues to make improvements in coordination and recommending protective actions, but much work remains. The most critical life-saving activity depends on actions taken in the first few minutes and hours of an event. The most effective way to reduce the enormous national and international social and economic disruptions from a domestic nuclear explosion is through planning and rapid action, from the individual to the federal response. Anticipating response resources for survivors based on predicted types and distributions of injuries needs to be addressed.

Buddemeier, B R

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

8

Reducing the Consequences of a Nuclear Detonation.  

SciTech Connect

The 2002 National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction states that 'the United States must be prepared to respond to the use of WMD against our citizens, our military forces, and those of friends and allies'. Scenario No.1 of the 15 Department of Homeland Security national planning scenarios is an improvised nuclear detonation in the national capitol region. An effective response involves managing large-scale incident response, mass casualty, mass evacuation, and mass decontamination issues. Preparedness planning activities based on this scenario provided difficult challenges in time critical decision making and managing a large number of casualties within the hazard area. Perhaps even more challenging is the need to coordinate a large scale response across multiple jurisdictions and effectively responding with limited infrastructure and resources. Federal response planning continues to make improvements in coordination and recommending protective actions, but much work remains. The most critical life-saving activity depends on actions taken in the first few minutes and hours of an event. The most effective way to reduce the enormous national and international social and economic disruptions from a domestic nuclear explosion is through planning and rapid action, from the individual to the federal response. Anticipating response resources for survivors based on predicted types and distributions of injuries needs to be addressed.

Buddemeier, B R

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

9

Weapon Detonation Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

10

The Plowshare Program: Peaceful Applications for Nuclear Detonations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Plowshare Program focused on developing the capability to use nuclear detonations for civil works projects and industrial applications. The participants envisioned canals and harbors constructed quickly and cheaply and the augmentation of natural gas, oil, and geothermal power production. The Plowshare Program began in the 1950s and ended in the 1970s. The archaeological effort to relocate and record places associated with this project has identified a unique and varied historical legacy on the landscape in the western United States and discovered that the range and types of projects considered and planned are more diverse than formerly recognized.

C. Beck; S. Edwards; M. King

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Vulnerability Analysis of a Nuclear Power Plant Considering Detonations of Explosive Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vulnerability Analysis of a Nuclear Power Plant Considering Detonations of Explosive Devices Marko threats to a nuclear power plant in the year 1991 and after the 9/11 events in 2001. The methodology which strength and injuries of human beings with nuclear power plant models used in probabilistic safety

Cizelj, Leon

12

Modeling Human Behavior in the Aftermath of a Hypothetical Improvised Nuclear Detonation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Human Behavior in the Aftermath of a Hypothetical Improvised Nuclear Detonation Nidhi, human-initiated crisis in the center of Washington D.C. Prior studies of this scenario have focused on the agent design and multiagent interaction, and present initial results on how rapid restoration

Swarup, Samarth

13

Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a Chicago nuclear detonation scenario.  

SciTech Connect

Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kt detonation in Chicago. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at selected exemplary points. For many Chicago neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a national capital region nuclear detonation scenario.  

SciTech Connect

Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kT detonation in the National Capital Region. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at one exemplary point. For most Washington, DC neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.  

SciTech Connect

The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

CONTAINED NUCLEAR DETONATIONS IN FOUR MEDIA-GEOLOGICAL FACTORS IN CAVITY AND CHIMNEY FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

Underground nuclear tests in tuff, alluvium, rock salt, and granite have yielded data essential to the evaluation of the effects of contained nuclear detonations. The data indicate that for these mediums the cavity radius is predictable within plus or minus 20% without regard to the physical or chemical properties of the rock in the immediate shot environment. Properties of the chimney of broken rock resulting from collapse of the cavity, on the other hand, were found to be related to the physical properties of the rock and to preshot structural weaknesses within the rock. (auth)

Boardman, C.R.; Rabb, D.D.; McArthur, R.D.

1964-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research  

SciTech Connect

While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation.

Bentz, A

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Utilization of the noble gases in studies of underground nuclear detonations  

SciTech Connect

From symposium on noble gases; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA (24 Sep 1973). The Livermore Gas Diagnostics Program employs a number of rare gas isotopes, both stable and radioactive, in its investigations of the phenomenology of underground nuclear detonations. Radioactive gases in a sample are radiochemically purified by elution chromatography, and the separated gases are radioassayed by gamma-ray spectrometry and by internal or thin-window beta proportional counting. Concentrations of the stable gases are determined by mass-spectrometry, following chemical removal of the reactive gases in the sample. The most general application of the noble gases is as device fraction indicators to provide a basis for estimating totals of chimney-gas components. All of the stable rare gases except argon have been used as tracers, as have /sup 127/Xe and /sup 85/Kr. /sup 37/Ar and /sup 85/Kr have proven to be of particular value in the absence of a good tracer material as reference species for studies of chimney-gas chemistry. The rate of mixing of chimney gases and the degree to which the sampled gas truly represents the underground gas mixture can be studied with the aid of the fission- product gases. /sup 222/Ra and He are released to the cavity from the surrounding rock and are therefore useful in studies of the interaction of the detonation with the surrounding medium. (auth)

Smith, C.F.

1973-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

19

BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PRESSURE PHENOMENA OCCURRING INSIDE PROTECTIVE SHELTERS FOLLOWING A NUCLEAR DETONATION  

SciTech Connect

In two series of experiments 277 experimental animals, including 66 dogs, 52 rabbits, 52 guinea pigs, 63 rats, and 44 mice, were exposed under selected conditions in six different general types of instrumented above- and belowground shelters to blast produced by nuclear explosions. The distance of the several structures from Ground Zero ranged from 1050 to 5500 ft. The most severe alterations in the pressure environment occurring inside the structures followed the detonation of a nuclear device with a yield approximately 50% greater than nominal. The highest overpressure to which animals were exposed was 85.8 psi, the rise time of which was 4 msec. The overpressure endured for about 570 msec. Overpressures ranged from this maximum downward in 15 other exposure situations to a minimum of 1.3 psi enduring for nearly 1346 msec but rising to a maximum in about 420 msec. The latter pressure occurred inside a reinforced concrete bathroom shelter, which was the only surviving part of a house otherwise totally destroyed, at 4700 ft where the outside incident pressure was about 5 psi. Following the nuclear explosions, all animals were recovered, examined, sacrificed, and subjected to gross and microscopic pathological study. All lesions were tabulated and described. The results of pressure-time data, documenting the variations on the pressure environment, are presented and analyzed, and an exploratory attempt is made to relate the alterations in the pressure environment to the associated pathology observed. A critical review of selected material from the blast and related literature is presented. All data are discussed, and the several problems related to the design and construction of protective shelters are noted and briefly, but analytically, assessed. The most outstanding contribution of the field experiments and the related study of the literature was the unequivocal demonstration that the provision of adequate protective structures can indeed be an effective means of sharply reducing casualties which would otherwise be associated with the detonation of modern large-scale explosive devices. (auth)

White, C.S.; Chiffelle, T.L.; Richmond, D.R.; Lockyear, W.H.; Bowen, I.G.; Goldizen, V.C.; Merideth, H.W.; Kilgore, D.E.; Longwell, B.B.; Parker, J.T.; Sherping, F.; Cribb, M.E.

1956-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for an urban nuclear detonation scenario.  

SciTech Connect

Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. This study examines shelter-evacuate policies and effectiveness focusing on a 10 kt scenario in Los Angeles. The goal is to provide technical insights that can support development of urban response plans. Results indicate that extended shelter-in-place can offer the most robust protection when high quality shelter exists. Where less effective shelter is available and the fallout radiation intensity level is high, informed evacuation at the appropriate time can substantially reduce the overall dose to personnel. However, uncertainties in the characteristics of the fallout region and in the exit route can make evacuation a risky strategy. Analyses indicate that only a relatively small fraction of the total urban population may experience significant dose reduction benefits from even a well-informed evacuation plan.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ENVIRONMENTAL IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1975 Nonitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT(26-1)-539 for the U . S . ENERGY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION EMSL-LV-5 39-4 May 1976 ENVIRONMENTAL 14ONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December I975 Monitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of

22

Improved estimates of separation distances to prevent unacceptable damage to nuclear power plant structures from hydrogen detonation for gaseous hydrogen storage. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides new estimates of separation distances for nuclear power plant gaseous hydrogen storage facilities. Unacceptable damage to plant structures from hydrogen detonations will be prevented by having hydrogen storage facilities meet separation distance criteria recommended in this report. The revised standoff distances are based on improved calculations on hydrogen gas cloud detonations and structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures. Also, the results presented in this study do not depend upon equivalencing a hydrogen detonation to an equivalent TNT detonation. The static and stagnation pressures, wave velocity, and the shock wave impulse delivered to wall surfaces were computed for several different size hydrogen explosions. Separation distance equations were developed and were used to compute the minimum separation distance for six different wall cases and for seven detonating volumes (from 1.59 to 79.67 lbm of hydrogen). These improved calculation results were compared to previous calculations. The ratio between the separation distance predicted in this report versus that predicted for hydrogen detonation in previous calculations varies from 0 to approximately 4. Thus, the separation distances results from the previous calculations can be either overconservative or unconservative depending upon the set of hydrogen detonation parameters that are used. Consequently, it is concluded that the hydrogen-to-TNT detonation equivalency utilized in previous calculations should no longer be used.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Failure modes of a concrete nuclear-containment building subjected to hydrogen detonation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Calculated response for the Indian Point reactor containment building to static internal pressure and one case of a dynamic pressure representing hydrogen combustion and detonation are presented. Comparison of the potential failure modes is made. 9 figures.

Fugelso, L.E.; Butler, T.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Spent nuclear fuel project detonation phenomena of hydrogen/oxygen in spent fuel containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Movement of Spent N Reactor fuels from the Hanford K Basins near the Columbia River to Dry interim storage facility on the Hanford plateau will require repackaging the fuel in the basins into multi-canister overpacks (MCOs), drying of the fuel, transporting the contained fuel, hot conditioning, and finally interim storage. Each of these functions will be accomplished while the fuel is contained in the MCOs by several mechanisms. The principal source of hydrogenand oxygen within the MCOs is residual water from the vacuum drying and hot conditioning operations. This document assesses the detonation phenomena of hydrogen and oxygen in the spent fuel containers. Several process scenarios have been identified that could generate detonation pressures that exceed the nominal 10 atmosphere design limit ofthe MCOS. Only 42 grams of radiolized water are required to establish this condition.

Cooper, T.D.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

Standard KDF0C4 Fallout Calculations for Buried Nuclear Detonations  

SciTech Connect

The collateral damage caused by fallout from shallow-buried nuclear devices is of considerable interest. In this paper, we present results for ''standard'' calculations using the KDFOC4 fallout computer code. Results are presented for a parametric range of yields from 0.1 kt to 1 Mt in equally-spaced logarithmic increments and for emplacement depths of 5 meters in hard, dry rock and 20 meters in moist soil. We will see that for low yields, this emplacement depth has a marked influence on the shape of the fallout patterns but for the highest yields, the fallout patterns are insensitive to the emplacement medium and depth. We look at two categories of doses: (1) Those for which health effects begin to be serious and range upward to lethal, and (2) Doses that are politically very sensitive but for which any deleterious health effects are difficult to prove.

Serduke, F J D

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

Bidirectional slapper detonator  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure is directed to a bidirectional slapper detonator. One embodiment utilizes a single bridge circuit to detonate a pair of opposing initiating pellets. A line generator embodiment uses a plurality of bridges in electrical series to generate opposing cylindrical wavefronts.

McCormick, Robert N. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Melissa D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives. 3 figs.

Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Kopczewski, M.R.; Schwarz, A.C.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

28

Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives.

Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Kopczewski, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Schwarz, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Detonator-activated ball shutter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

30

Type Ia Supernova: Burning and Detonation in the Distributed Regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple, semi-analytic representation is developed for nuclear burning in Type Ia supernovae in the special case where turbulent eddies completely disrupt the flame. The speed and width of the ``distributed'' flame front are derived. For the conditions considered, the burning front can be considered as a turbulent flame brush composed of corrugated sheets of well-mixed flames. These flames are assumed to have a quasi-steady-state structure similar to the laminar flame structure, but controlled by turbulent diffusion. Detonations cannot appear in the system as long as distributed flames are still quasi-steady-state, but this condition is violated when the distributed flame width becomes comparable to the size of largest turbulent eddies. When this happens, a transition to detonation may occur. For current best estimates of the turbulent energy, the most likely density for the transition to detonation is in the range 0.5 - 1.5 x 10^7 g cm^{-3}.

S. E. Woosley

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

DSD front models : nonideal explosive detonation  

SciTech Connect

The Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) method for propagating detonation in numerical simulation of detonation in high explosive (HE) is based on three elements: (1) a subscale theory of multi-dimensional detonation that treats the evolving detonation as a front with dynamics that depends only on metrics of the front (such as curvature, etc.), (2) high-resolution direct numerical sirnuliltion of detonation serving both to test existing subscale theories and suggest modifications, and (3) physical experiments to characterize multi-dimensional detonation propagation on real explosives and to calibrate the front models for use in engineering simulations. In this paper we describe our work on all three of these elements of the DSD method as it applies to detonation in nonideal explosives.

Bdzil, J. B. (John Bohdan); Short, M. (Mark Short); Aslam, T. D. (Tariq D.); Catanach, R. A. (Richard A.); Hill, L. G. (Larry G.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Conditions For Successful Helium Detonations In Astrophysical Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several models for type Ia-like supernovae events rely on the production of a self-sustained detonation powered by nuclear reactions.In the absence of hydrogen, the fuel that powers these detonations typically consists of either pure helium (He) or a mixture of carbon and oxygen (C/O). Studies that systematically determine the conditions required to initiate detonations in C/O material exist, but until now no analogous investigation of degenerate He matter has been conducted. We perform one-dimensional reactive hydrodynamical simulations at a variety of initial density and temperature combinations and find critical length scales for the initiation of He detonations that range between 1 -- $10^{10}$ cm. These sizes are consistently smaller than the corresponding Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) length scales by a factor of ~100, providing opportunities for thermonuclear explosions in a wider range of low mass white dwarfs (WDs) than previously thought possible. We find that virialized WDs with as little mass as 0.24 $M_\\o...

Holcomb, Cole; De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Roundness of Molded Detonator Heads  

SciTech Connect

The magnitude of the deviations from roundness of molded detonator heads, caused by the geometry of the part and by different materials, was investigated to provide a scientific basis which can be used to predict dimensions and tolerances of size and roundness for new heads. Injection presses were used to mold detonator heads to precision tolerances. Twenty parts were molded under optimum conditions in two different molds using both DAP filled with long glass fibers and DAP filled with asbestos. Each of the parts was analyzed for size and roundness, and the data were analyzed statistically. The results indicate: 1. Geometry is highly significant. 2. Material is highly significant. 3. Geometry and material do not interact. 4. Geometry affects magnitude of deviation from roundness. 5. Geometry affects magnitude of shrinkage.

Wendeln, D. E.; Waldfogle, E. A.

1968-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

Non-detonable explosive simulators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Non-detonable explosive simulators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A summary of hydrogen-air detonation experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dynamic detonation parameters are reviewed for hydrogen-air-diluent detonations and deflagration-to-detonation transitions (DDT). These parameters include the characteristic chemical length scale, such as the detonation cell width, associated with the three-dimensional cellular structure of detonation waves, critical transmission conditions of confined detonations into unconfined environments, critical initiation energy for unconfined detonations, detonability limits, and critical conditions for DDT. The detonation cell width, which depends on hydrogen and diluent concentrations, pressure, and temperature, is an important parameter in the prediction of critical geometry-dependent conditions for the transmission of confined detonations into unconfined environments and the critical energies for the direct initiation of unconfined detonations. Detonability limits depend on both initial and boundary conditions and the limit has been defined as the onset of single head spin. Four flame propagation regimes have been identified and the criterion for DDT in a smooth tube is discussed. 108 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Guirao, C.M.; Knystautas, R.; Lee, J.H.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Useful and Undesirable Chemical Reactions during Detonation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In our work, we consider chemical changes in the sprayed materials induced by reducing or oxidizing species in the detonation products and interactions ...

38

DOE O 452.1D Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. ...

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Study of detonation process: numerical approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is based on non-linear finite element analysis of the effects of the blast wave on structures, caused by the detonation of explosive materials. Dynamic response of a pipeline subjected to the shock wave produced by the detonation of high explosive ... Keywords: blast, coupling, explosive, numerical analysis, pipeline, safety

Jerzy Malachowski

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Shock and Detonation Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WX-9 serves the Laboratory and the Nation by delivering quality technical results, serving customers that include the Nuclear Weapons Program (DOE/NNSA), the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security and other government agencies. The scientific expertise of the group encompasses equations-of-state, shock compression science, phase transformations, detonation physics including explosives initiation, detonation propagation, and reaction rates, spectroscopic methods and velocimetry, and detonation and equation-of-state theory. We are also internationally-recognized in ultra-fast laser shock methods and associated diagnostics, and are active in the area of ultra-sensitive explosives detection. The facility capital enabling the group to fulfill its missions include a number of laser systems, both for laser-driven shocks, and spectroscopic analysis, high pressure gas-driven guns and powder guns for high velocity plate impact experiments, explosively-driven techniques, static high pressure devices including diamond anvil cells and dilatometers coupled with spectroscopic probes, and machine shops and target fabrication facilities.

Robbins, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Detonation Diffraction into a Confined Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detonation diffraction has been, and remains, an active area of research. However, detonation diffraction into a confined volume, and specifically the transformation of a planar detonation into a cylindrical detonation, is an area which has received little attention. Experimental work needs to be conducted on detonation diffraction into a confined volume to better understand how the interaction of the diffracted shock wave with a confining wall impacts the detonation diffraction process. Therefore, a facility was constructed to study this problem, and experiments were conducted to determine under what conditions a planar detonation could be successfully transformed into a cylindrical detonation. Four different fuel-oxidizer mixtures, C?H?+ 2.5 O?, C?H?+ 4 O?, C?H?+ 3 O? and H?+ 0.5 O?, were tested in this study using a combination of pressure transducers and soot foil records as diagnostics. Three different regimes of successful transmission; spontaneous re-ignition, continuous reflected re-initiation, and discontinuous reflected re-initiation, were identified. The detonation cell size and the distance from the tube exit to the confining wall, or gap size, were determined to be the most important parameters in the transmission process and a linear correlation for determining whether or not transmission will be successful for a given set of initial conditions was developed for gap sizes between 10 and 35 mm. For gap sizes smaller than 10 mm or gap size larger than 35 mm the linear correlation does not apply. Finally, the results of this study are compared to results on detonation diffraction into a confined volume available in the literature and explanations for any disagreements are given. This study showed that when compared to transmission of a detonation into an unconfined volume, the transmission of a detonation into a confined volume, for the majority of gap sizes, is possible for a wider range of conditions. However, for extremely small gap sizes, when compared to transmission into an unconfined volume, the range of conditions for which successful transmission is possible into a confined volume is actually narrower.

Polley, Nolan Lee

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Pipeline response to nearby detonations  

SciTech Connect

Texas Gas Transmission Corp. has supplemented the findings of Southwest Research Institute's study of detonation-induced stresses on pipelines by applying SwRI's equations to actual field problems. Texas Gas used the blasting-stress equations to fix the minimum allowable stand-off distance and maximum particle velocities for strip-mining operations planned along a transmission line right-of-way. The ultimate goal was to ensure that the combined stresses of blasting and operating pressures would not exceed 72% of the pipe's specified minimum yield strength. These stress calculations enabled Texas Gas to maintain normal operating conditions throughout the time that overburden blasting was taking place 100-500 ft from the line.

Bart, G.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Detonability of H/sub 2/-air-diluent mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Heated Detonation Tube (HDT). Detonation cell width and velocity results are presented for H/sub 2/-air mixtures, undiluted and diluted with CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O for a range of H/sub 2/ concentration, initial temperature and pressure. The results show that the addition of either CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O significantly increases the detonation cell width and hence reduces the detonability of the mixture. The results also show that the detonation cell width is reduced (detonability is increased) for increased initial temperature and/or pressure.

Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Berman, M.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

MC3196 Detonator Shipping Package Hazard Classification Assessment  

SciTech Connect

An investigation was made to determine whether the MC3196 detonator should be assigned a DOT hazard classification of Detonating Fuze, Class C Explosives per 49 CFR 173.113. This study covers the Propagation Test and the External Heat Test as approved by DOE Albuquerque Operations Office. Test data led to the recommeded hazard classification of detonating fuze, Class C explosives.

Jones; Robert B.

1979-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

LATERALLY PROPAGATING DETONATIONS IN THIN HELIUM LAYERS ON ACCRETING WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical work has shown that intermediate mass (0.01 M{sub Sun} < M{sub He} < 0.1 M{sub Sun }) helium shells will unstably ignite on the accreting white dwarf (WD) in an AM CVn binary. For more massive (M > 0.8 M{sub Sun }) WDs, these helium shells can be dense enough (>5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} g cm{sup -3}) that the convectively burning region runs away on a timescale comparable to the sound travel time across the shell, raising the possibility for an explosive outcome rather than an Eddington limited helium novae. The nature of the explosion (i.e., deflagration or detonation) remains ambiguous, is certainly density dependent, and likely breaks spherical symmetry. In the case of detonation, this causes a laterally propagating front whose properties in these geometrically thin and low-density shells we begin to study here. Our calculations show that the radial expansion time of <0.1 s leads to incomplete helium burning, in agreement with recent work by Sim and collaborators, but that the nuclear energy released is still adequate to realize a self-sustaining laterally propagating detonation. These detonations are slower than the Chapman-Jouguet speed of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm s{sup -1}, but still fast enough at 0.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm s{sup -1} to go around the star prior to the transit through the star of the inwardly propagating weak shock. Our simulations resolve the subsonic region behind the reaction front in the detonation wave. The two-dimensional nucleosynthesis is shown to be consistent with a truncated one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering calculation at the slower detonation speed. The ashes from the lateral detonation are typically He rich, and consist of predominantly {sup 44}Ti, {sup 48}Cr, along with a small amount of {sup 52}Fe, with very little {sup 56}Ni and with significant {sup 40}Ca in carbon-enriched layers. If this helium detonation results in a Type Ia supernova, its spectral signatures would appear for the first few days after explosion.

Townsley, Dean M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States); Moore, Kevin; Bildsten, Lars, E-mail: Dean.M.Townsley@ua.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Detonation of hydrogen-air mixtures. [PWR; BWR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The detonation of a hydrogen-air cloud subsequent to an accidental release of hydrogen into ambient surroundings cannot be totally ruled out in view of the relative sensitivity of the hydrogen-air system. The present paper investigates the key parameters involved in hydrogen-air detonations and attempts to establish quantitative correlations between those that have important practical implications. Thus, for example, the characteristic length scale lambda describing the cellular structure of a detonation front is measured for a broad range of hydrogen-air mixtures and is quantitatively correlated with the key dynamic detonation properties such as detonability, transmission and initiation.

Lee, J.H.S.; Knystautas, R.; Benedick, W.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Detonation propagation in a high loss configuration  

SciTech Connect

This work presents an experimental study of detonation wave propagation in tubes with inner diameters (ID) comparable to the mixture cell size. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in two test section tubes with inner diameters of 1.27 mm and 6.35 mm. For both test sections, the initial pressure of stoichiometric mixtures was varied to determine the effect on detonation propagation. For the 6.35 mm tube, the equivalence ratio {phi} (where the mixture was {phi} C{sub 3}H{sub 8} + 50{sub 2}) was also varied. Detonations were found to propagate in mixtures with cell sizes as large as five times the diameter of the tube. However, under these conditions, significant losses were observed, resulting in wave propagation velocities as slow as 40% of the CJ velocity U{sub CJ}. A review of relevant literature is presented, followed by experimental details and data. Observed velocity deficits are predicted using models that account for boundary layer growth inside detonation waves.

Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shepherd, Joseph E [CALTECH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hydrogen detonation and detonation transition data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The BNL High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is an experimental research tool capable of investigating the effects of initial thermodynamic state on the high-speed combustion characteristic of reactive gas mixtures. The overall experimental program has been designed to provide data to help characterize the influence of elevated gas-mixture temperature (and pressure) on the inherent sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation, on the potential for flames accelerating in these mixtures to transition into detonations, on the effects of gas venting on the flame-accelerating process, on the phenomena of initiation of detonations in these mixtures by jets of hot reactant product,s and on the capability of detonations within a confined space to transmit into another, larger confined space. This paper presents results obtained from the completion of two of the overall test series that was designed to characterize high-speed combustion phenomena in initially high-temperature gas mixtures. These two test series are the intrinsic detonability test series and the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) test series. A brief description of the facility is provided below.

Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology; Tagawa, H. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Malliakos, A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Studies of fast reactions in detonations  

SciTech Connect

The time-dependent behavior of the flow in reaction zones of the detonating homogeneous explosives nitromethane, liquid TNT, and ideal gases has been investigated using one- and two-dimensional Lagrangian and Eulerian numerical hydrodynamics with Arrhenius chemical reaction. A general model for bulk decomposition of heterogeneous explosives, called Forest Fire, has been developed, which gives the rate of explosive decomposition as a function of local pressure. The model permits description of the process of heterogeneous explosive initiation, propagation, and failure.

Mader, C.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

THE DETONATION MECHANISM OF THE PULSATIONALLY ASSISTED GRAVITATIONALLY CONFINED DETONATION MODEL OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the detonation mechanism composing the 'pulsationally assisted' gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and {sup 56}Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the 'classical' GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, C.; Weide, K.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q. [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Fisher, R. T. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA 02740 (United States); Townsley, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Meakin, C. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Reid, L. B. [NTEC Environmental Technology, Subiaco WA 6008 (Australia)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Detonation Gun Sprayed Ni-20Cr ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Detonation Gun Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on a Boiler Steel at 900°C. Author(s), Gagandeep Kaushal, Harpreet ...

53

Early Science High Speed Combustion and Detonation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science High Speed Combustion and Detonation Project (HSCD) Alexei Khokhlov, University of Chicago Joanna Austin, University of Illinois Andrew Knisely, University of Illinois...

54

Safety and performance enhancement circuit for primary explosive detonators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety and performance enhancement arrangement for primary explosive detonators. This arrangement involves a circuit containing an energy storage capacitor and preset self-trigger to protect the primary explosive detonator from electrostatic discharge (ESD). The circuit does not discharge into the detonator until a sufficient level of charge is acquired on the capacitor. The circuit parameters are designed so that normal ESD environments cannot charge the protection circuit to a level to achieve discharge. When functioned, the performance of the detonator is also improved because of the close coupling of the stored energy.

Davis, Ronald W. (Tracy, CA)

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

55

Evaluation of the effects of detonation in a spherical bomb. [PWR; BWR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of the time-dependent pressure forces and impulse loadings on the walls of the hemispherical dome of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel arising from a centrally ignited hydrogen-oxygen detonation. Investigated in this context are the effects of richness of the detonable gas mixture as well as those due to the inclusion of water vapor. In the analysis the gas mixture was treated as a perfect gas, and the partial differential equations governing the gasdynamic flow were integrated using the CLOUD CODE - a finite-difference technique set in Lagrangian coordinates and incorporating the smoothing action of artificial viscosity. The most interesting results pertain to the ringing of pressure pulses at the walls. Their frequency is quite uniform, and their pressure peaks, at levels significantly higher than that of combustion at constant volume, decay at a negligible rate.

Kurylo, J.; Oppenheim, A.K.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

SNFP detonation phenomena of hydrogen/oxygen in spent fuel containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Movement of spent nuclear fuels from the Hanford K Basins near the Columbia River to dry interim storage facility on the Hanford plateau will require repackaging the fuel in the basin into multi-canister overpacks (MCOs), drying of the fuel, transporting the contained fuel, hot conditioning, and finally interim storage. Each of these functions will be accomplished while the fuel is contained in the MCOs. Hydrogen and oxygen can be generated within the MCOs by several mechanisms. The principal source of hydrogen and oxygen within the MCOs is residual water from the vacuum drying and hot conditioning operations. This document assesses the detonation phenomena of hydrogen and oxygen in the spent fuel containers. Several process scenarios have been identified that could generate detonation pressures that exceed the nominal 10 atmosphere design limit of the MCOs. Only 42 grams of radiolized water are required to establish this condition.

Cooper, T.D.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Computation of a diverging Comp-B detonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expansion which occurs in diverging detonations weakens the wave and yields pressures and densities below those occurring in planar geometry. We study the problem of a spherically expanding detonation of Comp-B. The effect of varying the order of reaction as well as the rate law parameters (using an Arrhenius burn model) is studied. 14 refs., 3 figs.

Bukiet, B.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Adaptive high-resolution simulation of realistic gaseous detonation waves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The numerical approximation of detonation waves in gaseous combustible mixtures is extremely demanding since a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. A dynamically adaptive high-resolution finite volume method is described that has enabled accurately resolved computational investigations of the transient behavior of regularly oscillating detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in realistic two-dimensional geometry.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Detonation wave velocity and curvature of brass encased PBXN-111  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detonation velocities and wave front curvatures were measured for PBXN-111 charges encased in 5 mm thick brass tubes. In all the experiments (charge diameters from 19 to 47 mm) the brass case affected the detonation properties of PBXN-111. Steady detonation waves propagated in brass encased charges with diameters as small as 19 mm, which is about half of the unconfined failure diameter. The radii of curvature of the detonation waves at the center of the wave fronts ranged from 52 to 141 mm for charge diameters of 25 to 47 mm. The angles between the detonation wave fronts and the brass/charge interfaces were between 72 and 74 degrees. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Forbes, J.W.; Lemar, E.R. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division, Silver Spring, Maryland 20903-5640 (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Flame Evolution During Type Ia Supernovae and the Deflagration Phase in the Gravitationally Confined Detonation Scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an improved method for tracking the nuclear flame during the deflagration phase of a Type Ia supernova, and apply it to study the variation in outcomes expected from the gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) paradigm. A simplified 3-stage burning model and a non-static ash state are integrated with an artificially thickened advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) flame front in order to provide an accurate but highly efficient representation of the energy release and electron capture in and after the unresolvable flame. We demonstrate that both our ADR and energy release methods do not generate significant acoustic noise, as has been a problem with previous ADR-based schemes. We proceed to model aspects of the deflagration, particularly the role of buoyancy of the hot ash, and find that our methods are reasonably well-behaved with respect to numerical resolution. We show that if a detonation occurs in material swept up by the material ejected by the first rising bubble but gravitationally confined to the white dwarf (WD) surface (the GCD paradigm), the density structure of the WD at detonation is systematically correlated with the distance of the deflagration ignition point from the center of the star. Coupled to a suitably stochastic ignition process, this correlation may provide a plausible explanation for the variety of nickel masses seen in Type Ia Supernovae.

D. M. Townsley; A. C. Calder; S. M. Asida; I. R. Seitenzahl; F. Peng; N. Vladimirova; D. Q. Lamb; J. W. Truran

2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Blasting detonators incorporating semiconductor bridge technology  

SciTech Connect

The enormity of the coal mine and extraction industries in Russia and the obvious need in both Russia and the US for cost savings and enhanced safety in those industries suggests that joint studies and research would be of mutual benefit. The author suggests that mine sites and well platforms in Russia offer an excellent opportunity for the testing of Sandia`s precise time-delay semiconductor bridge detonators, with the potential for commercialization of the detonators for Russian and other world markets by both US and Russian companies. Sandia`s semiconductor bridge is generating interest among the blasting, mining and perforation industries. The semiconductor bridge is approximately 100 microns long, 380 microns wide and 2 microns thick. The input energy required for semiconductor bridge ignition is one-tenth the energy required for conventional bridgewire devices. Because semiconductor bridge processing is compatible with other microcircuit processing, timing and logic circuits can be incorporated onto the chip with the bridge. These circuits can provide for the precise timing demanded for cast effecting blasting. Indeed tests by Martin Marietta and computer studies by Sandia have shown that such precise timing provides for more uniform rock fragmentation, less fly rock, reduce4d ground shock, fewer ground contaminants and less dust. Cost studies have revealed that the use of precisely timed semiconductor bridges can provide a savings of $200,000 per site per year. In addition to Russia`s vast mineral resources, the Russian Mining Institute outside Moscow has had significant programs in rock fragmentation for many years. He anticipated that collaborative studies by the Institute and Sandia`s modellers would be a valuable resource for field studies.

Bickes, R.W. Jr.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Lattice Boltzmann model for combustion and detonation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a lattice Boltzmann model for combustion and detonation. In this model the fluid behavior is described by a finite-difference lattice Boltzmann model by Gan et al. [Physica A, 2008, 387: 1721]. The chemical reaction is described by the Lee-Tarver model [Phys. Fluids, 1980, 23: 2362]. The reaction heat is naturally coupled with the flow behavior. Due to the separation of time scales in the chemical and thermodynamic processes, a key technique for a successful simulation is to use the operator-splitting scheme. The new model is verified and validated by well-known benchmark tests. As a specific application of the new model, we studied the simple steady detonation phenomenon. To show the merit of LB model over the traditional ones, we focus on the reaction zone to study the non-equilibrium effects. It is interesting to find that, at the von Neumann peak, the system is nearly in its thermodynamic equilibrium. At the two sides of the von Neumann peak, the system deviates from its equilibrium in opposite directions. In the front of von Neumann peak, due to the strong compression from the reaction product behind the von Neumann peak, the system experiences a sudden deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium. Behind the von Neumann peak, the release of chemical energy results in thermal expansion of the matter within the reaction zone, which drives the system to deviate the thermodynamic equilibrium in the opposite direction. From the deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium, defined in this paper, one can understand more on the macroscopic effects of the system due to the deviation from its thermodynamic equilibrium.

Bo Yan; Aiguo Xu; Guangcai Zhang; Yangjun Ying; Hua Li

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

63

High-Speed Combustion and Detonation (HSCD) | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a hydrogen-oxygen mixture in a square channel, performed within the high-speed combustion and detonation project (HSCD). Pseudo-schlieren image of a temperature field....

64

Detonation cell widths in hydrogen-air-diluent mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper I report on the influence of steam and carbon dioxide on the detonability of hydrogen-air mixtures. Data were obtained on the detonation cell width in a heated detonation tube that is 0.43 m in diameter and 13.1 m long. The detonation cell widths were correlated using a characteristic length calculated from a chemical kinetic model. The addition of either diluent to a hydrogen-air mixture increased the cell width for all equivalence ratios. For equal diluent concentrations, however, carbon dioxide not only yielded larger increases in the cell width than steam, but its efficacy relative to steam was predicted to increase with increasing concentration. The range of detonable hydrogen concentrations in a hydrogen-air mixture initially at 1 atm pressure was found to be between 11.6 percent and 74.9 percent for mixtures at 20{degree}C and 9.4 percent and 76.9 percent for mixtures at 100{degree}C. The detonation limit was between 38.8 percent and 40.5 percent steam for a stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixture initially at 100{degree}C and 1 atm. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Stamps, D.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

Reaugh, J E

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

66

HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation  

SciTech Connect

HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

Reaugh, J E

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

67

January 3, 2007 National Nuclear Security AdministrationNational Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

January 3, 2007 National Nuclear Security AdministrationNational Nuclear Security Administration & Objectives Reduce the threat to national security posed by nuclear weapons proliferation/detonation or the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials through the development of new and novel technology. Mission

Learned, John

68

Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto.

Boberg, Ralph E. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Weingart, Richard C. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ideal detonation characteristics of biogas-hydrogen and -hydrogen peroxide mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports the ideal detonation characteristics of various mixtures of biogas-hydrogen and biogas-hydrogen peroxide with air. The results obtained by the chemical equilibrium calculations reveal the fundamental improvement of the biogas detonation ... Keywords: bio-energy, biogas detonation, biogas utilization, equilibrium thermochemistry, hydrogen, hydrogen peroxide

Khalid M. Saqr; Hassan I. Kassem; Mohsin M. Sies; Mazlan A. Wahid

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Flame acceleration and transition to detonation in channels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results are reported for combustion of pre-mixed H/sub 2/-air mixtures in a 136 m/sup 3/ channel and a 1:12.6 linear scale model. Test variables include H/sub 2/-air equivalence ratio, obstacles and degree of transverse venting. The results show that flame acceleration is increased by sensitive mixtures, presence of obstacles, large scales, and insufficient venting. The results also support the hypothesis that deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) can occur if the ratio of detonation cell width to channel width is less than a critical value, provided that the flame speed prior to transition has approached the isobaric sound speed.

Sherman, M.P.; Tieszen, S.R.; Benedick, W.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Using an electronic detonator system and expanded blast patterns to prevent sympathetic detonation at Powder River Basin coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a systematic approach to prevent cast blast holes from detonating sympathetically through the use of the electronic initiation and expanded blast patterns. In-situ measurements were recorded from pressure probes, velocity of detonation probes and near field accelerometers, along with digital images generated from a high speed CCD camera. Large diameter angled drill holes were also checked for any measurable amount of deviation by a cable type borehole measurement tool. The field measurements provided the scientific evidence, statistical data, and documentation necessary to develop a sound method or a 'road map' that would minimize and in some situations prevent the occurrence of blast hole sympathetic detonation. 2 refs., 3 figs.

Yang, R.; Fleetwood, K.; Haid, J. [Orica USA Inc., Watkins, CO (United States). Advanced Mining Solutions

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Station blackout at nuclear power plants: Radiological implications for nuclear war  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work on station blackout is reviewed its radiological implications for a nuclear war scenario is explored. The major conclusion is that the effects of radiation from many nuclear weapon detonations in a nuclear war would swamp those from possible reactor accidents that result from station blackout.

Shapiro, C.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

In-Situ Continuous Detonation Velocity Measurements Using Fiber-optic Bragg Grating Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation and detonation research requires continuous measurement of low order detonation velocities as the detonation runs up to full order detonation for a given density and initiation pressure pulse. A novel detector of detonation velocity is presented using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber with an integral chirped fiber Bragg grating as an intrinsic sensor. This fiber is embedded in the explosive under study and interrogated during detonation as the fiber Bragg grating scatters light back along the fiber to a photodiode, producing a return signal dependant on the convolution integral of the grating reflection bandpass, the ASE intensity profile and the photodetector response curve. Detonation velocity is measured as the decrease in reflected light exiting the fiber as the grating is consumed when the detonation reaction zone proceeds along the fiber sensor axis. This small fiber probe causes minimal perturbation to the detonation wave and can measure detonation velocities along path lengths tens of millimeters long. Experimental details of the associated equipment and preliminary data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within nitromethane and PBX-9502 are presented.

Benterou, J; Udd, E; Wilkins, P; Roeske, F; Roos, E; Jackson, D

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

74

The history of nuclear weapon safety devices  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the history of safety devices used in nuclear weapons from the early days of separables to the latest advancements in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Although the paper focuses on devices, the principles of Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety implementation will also be presented.

Plummer, D.W.; Greenwood, W.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Simulations of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Reactive Gases |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image Weak ignition behind a reflected Mach=1.5 shock in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture at 0.1 atm initial pressure. Picture shows a numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image of the onset of a detonation in a turbulent boundary layer. Alexei Khokhlov, University of Chicago; Charles Bacon, Argonne National Laboratory, Joanna Austin, Andrew Knisely, University of Illinois at Urbanna-Champaign Simulations of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Reactive Gases PI Name: Alexei Khokhlov PI Email: ajk@oddjob.uchicago.edu Institution: The University of Chicago Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 130 Million Year: 2013 Research Domain: Chemistry Hydrogen is an abundant, environmentally friendly fuel with the potential

76

Engineering models of deflagration-to-detonation transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past two years, Los Alamos has supported research into the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in damaged energetic materials as part of the explosives safety program. This program supported both a theory/modeling group and an experimentation group. The goal of the theory/modeling group was to examine the various modeling structures (one-phase models, two-phase models, etc.) and select from these a structure suitable to model accidental initiation of detonation in damaged explosives. The experimental data on low-velocity piston supported DDT in granular explosive was to serve as a test bed to help in the selection process. Three theoretical models have been examined in the course of this study: (1) the Baer-Nunziato (BN) model, (2) the Stewart-Prasad-Asay (SPA) model and (3) the Bdzil-Kapila-Stewart model. Here we describe these models, discuss their properties, and compare their features.

Bdzil, J.B.; Son, S.F.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

THE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF PULSED DETONATION ENGINE GROUND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/4 in.) i.d., to two 25 mm (1 in.) i.d. setups, to a 101 mm (4 in.) i.d. dual-stage PDE setup with a pre valves were tested at up to 30 Hz on a 25 mm i.d. PDE. The dual-stage PDE was run at both 1 Hz and 10 Hz ................................................................................................................47 2.5 Detonation Nomenclature

Texas at Arlington, University of

78

Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simulator is disclosed which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Initial hydrogen detonation data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Brookhaven National Laboratory High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is described and data from initial hydrogen detonation experiments are presented. Initial phase of the inherent detonability experimental program is described. Test gases thus far tested are hydrogen-air mixtures at one atmosphere initial pressure and temperatures 300K-650K. Detonation pressure, wave speed, and detonation cell size were measured. Data were consistent with earlier SSDA (small-scale development apparatus) test results. HTCF results confirm the conclusion from the SSDA program that the gas temperature decreases the cell size and, therefore, increases the sensitivity of mixtures to detonation. Data from the larger HTCF test vessel, however, also demonstrates that the effect of increased scale is to extend the range of detonable mixtures to lower concentration.

Ginsberg, T.; Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Chemical processing in geothermal nuclear chimney  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A closed rubble filled nuclear chimney is provided in a subterranean geothermal formation by detonation of a nuclear explosive device therein, with reagent input and product output conduits connecting the chimney cavity with appropriate surface facilities. Such facilities will usually comprise reagent preparation, product recovery and recycle facilities. Proccsses are then conducted in the nuclear chimney which processes are facilitated by temperature, pressure, catalytic and other conditions existent or which are otherwise provided in the nuclear chimney. (auth)

Krikorian, O.H.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Letter Report: Scoping Analysis of Gas Phase Transport from the Rulison Underground Nuclear Test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This letter report documents the results of a computer model to quantify the travel time of tritium (radioactive hydrogen) from an underground nuclear detonation in 1969 toward a proposed producing gas well located 1,500 feet (457 meters) away.

Clay Cooper

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

United States Nuclear Tests, July 1945 through September 1992, December 2000  

SciTech Connect

This document list chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Revision 15, dated December 2000.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Hydrogen loaded metal for bridge-foils for enhanced electric gun/slapper detonator operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a more efficient electric gun or slapper detonator ich provides a higher velocity flyer by using a bridge foil made of a hydrogen loaded metal.

Osher, John E. (Alamo, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Material properties effects on the detonation spreading and propagation of diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent dynamic testing of Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) has focused on understanding the material properties affecting the detonation propagation, spreading, behavior and symmetry. Small scale gap testing and wedge testing focus on the sensitivity to shock with the gap test including the effects of particle size and density. Floret testing investigates the detonation spreading as it is affected by particle size, density, and binder content. The polyrho testing illustrates the effects of density and binder content on the detonation velocity. Finally the detonation spreading effect can be most dramatically seen in the Mushroom and Onionskin tests where the variations due to density gradients, pressing methods and geometry can be seen on the wave breakout behavior.

Francois, Elizabeth Green [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kennedy, James E [HERE LLC

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Detonation Spraying of TiO2-Ag: Controlling the Phase Composition ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Detonation Spraying of TiO2-Ag: Controlling the Phase Composition and Microstructure ... Using Ice to Make Nature Inspired Hybrid Materials.

87

Experimental study on transmission of an overdriven detonation wave from propane/oxygen to propane/air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sets of experiments were performed to achieve a strong overdriven state in a weaker mixture by propagating an overdriven detonation wave via a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) process. First, preliminary experiments with a propane/oxygen mixture were used to evaluate the attenuation of the overdriven detonation wave in the DDT process. Next, experiments were performed wherein a propane/oxygen mixture was separated from a propane/air mixture by a thin diaphragm to observe the transmission of an overdriven detonation wave. Based on the characteristic relations, a simple wave intersection model was used to calculate the state of the transmitted detonation wave. The results showed that a rarefaction effect must be included to ensure that there is no overestimate of the post-transmission wave properties when the incident detonation wave is overdriven. The strength of the incident overdriven detonation wave plays an important role in the wave transmission process. The experimental results showed that a transmitted overdriven detonation wave occurs instantaneously with a strong incident overdriven detonation wave. The near-CJ state of the incident wave leads to a transmitted shock wave, and then the transition to the overdriven detonation wave occurs downstream. The attenuation process for the overdriven detonation wave decaying to a near-CJ state occurs in all tests. After the attenuation process, an unstable detonation wave was observed in most tests. This may be attributed to the increase in the cell width in the attenuation process that exceeds the detonability cell width limit. (author)

Li, J.; Lai, W.H. [National Cheng Kung University, Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Tainan (China); Chung, K. [National Cheng Kung University, Aerospace Science and Technology Research Center, Tainan (China); Lu, F.K. [University of Texas at Arlington, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Aerodynamics Research Center, TX 76019 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF DETONATION IN A SPHERICAL BOMB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilcox Company. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, Unitedthe hemispherical dome of a nuclear reactor pressure vesselPower Plants. Reactor Safety Study, United States Nuclear

Kurylo, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Method and system for making integrated solid-state fire-sets and detonators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A slapper detonator comprises a solid-state high-voltage capacitor, a low-jitter dielectric breakdown switch and trigger circuitry, a detonator transmission line, an exploding foil bridge, and a flier material. All these components are fabricated in a single solid-state device using thin film deposition techniques.

O' Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA); Druce, Robert L. (Union City, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube P. Ravindran applications, primarily in propulsion.1 Detonations use a reacting flow mechanism wherein a strong shock wave of intense chemical re- actions. The leading shock causes a compression of the combustible mixture, which

Texas at Arlington, University of

91

Detonation cell size measurements in H/sub 2/-air-H/sub 2/O mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conclusions of this study are: (1) For H/sub 2/-air mixtures at 20/sup 0/C and a total pressure of 101 kPa, detonations have been achieved between 13.5% and 70% H/sub 2/ mole fraction. This compositional range is wider than the detonability limits previously reported for smaller tubes. (2) The addition of CO/sub 2/ to H/sub 2/-air mixtures greatly reduces the detonability of the mixture. (3) For a given initial temperature, air density and equivalence ratio, the addition of steam to a H/sub 2/-Air mixture greatly decreases the detonability of the mixture. (4) At 100/sup 0/C and an air density of 41.6 moles/m/sup 3/, detonation of H/sub 2/-air mixtures with up to 30% steam have been recorded. (5) For H/sub 2/-air mixtures, the detonability increases with increasing initial temperature at constant density. Consequently, the diluent effect of the addition of steam to a fixed volume of an H/sub 2/-air mixture in reducing detonability is partially offset if there is a concomitant temperature increase. (6) At 100/sup 0/C and an air density of 41.6 moles/m/sup 3/, a 13.0% H/sub 2/-air mixture has been detonated. 18 refs., 7 figs.

Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.; Shepherd, J.E.; Knystautas, R.; Lee, J.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nation’s verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

Klingensmith, A. L.

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999.

Trowbridge, L.D.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable is disclosed. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive. 11 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Detonating Failed Deflagration Model of Thermonuclear Supernovae I. Explosion Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detonating failed deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae. In this model, the thermonuclear explosion of a massive white dwarf follows an off-center deflagration. We conduct a survey of asymmetric ignition configurations initiated at various distances from the stellar center. In all cases studied, we find that only a small amount of stellar fuel is consumed during deflagration phase, no explosion is obtained, and the released energy is mostly wasted on expanding the progenitor. Products of the failed deflagration quickly reach the stellar surface, polluting and strongly disturbing it. These disturbances eventually evolve into small and isolated shock-dominated regions which are rich in fuel. We consider these regions as seeds capable of forming self-sustained detonations that, ultimately, result in the thermonuclear supernova explosion. Preliminary nucleosynthesis results indicate the model supernova ejecta are typically composed of about 0.1-0.25 Msun of silicon group elements, 0.9-1.2 Msun of iron group elements, and are essentially carbon-free. The ejecta have a composite morphology, are chemically stratified, and display a modest amount of intrinsic asymmetry. The innermost layers are slightly egg-shaped with the axis ratio ~1.2-1.3 and dominated by the products of silicon burning. This central region is surrounded by a shell of silicon-group elements. The outermost layers of ejecta are highly inhomogeneous and contain products of incomplete oxygen burning with only small admixture of unburned stellar material. The explosion energies are ~1.3-1.5 10^51 erg.

Tomasz Plewa

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

98

First-Principles Simulations of High-Speed Combustion and Detonation |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Picture shows a numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image of the onset of a detonation in a turbulent boundary layer. Picture shows a numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image of the onset of a detonation in a turbulent boundary layer. Weak ignition behind a reflected Mach=1.5 shock in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture at 0.1 atm initial pressure. Picture shows a numerically generated pseudo-schlieren image of the onset of a detonation in a turbulent boundary layer. Alexei Khokhlov, University of Chicago, Charles Bacon, Argonne National Laboratory, Joanna Austin and Andrew Knisely, University of Illinois at Urbanna-Champaign. First-Principles Simulations of High-Speed Combustion and Detonation PI Name: Alexei Khokhlov PI Email: ajk@oddjob.uchicago.edu Institution: University of Chicago Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2014

99

Hydrogen loaded metal for bridge-foils for enhanced electric gun/slapper detonator operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a more efficient electric gun or slapper detonator which provides a higher velocity flyer by using a bridge foil made of a hydrogen loaded metal. 8 figs.

Osher, J.E.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

100

Instrumentation techniques for monitoring shock and detonation waves  

SciTech Connect

CORRTEX (Continuous Reflectometry for Radius Versus Time Experiments), SLIFER (Shorted Location Indication by Frequency of Electrical Resonance), and pin probes were used to monitor several conditions of blasting such as the detonation velocity of the explosive, the functioning of the stemming column confining the explosive, and rock mass motion. CORRTEX is a passive device that employs time-domain reflectometry to interrogate the two-way transit time of a coaxial cable. SLIFER is an active device that monitors the changing frequency resulting from a change in length of a coaxial cable forming an element of an oscillator circuit. Pin probes in this application consist of RG-174 coaxial cables, each with an open circuit, placed at several known locations within the material. Each cable is connected to a pulse-forming network and a voltage source. When the cables are shorted by the advancing wave, time-distance data are produced from which a velocity can be computed. This paper describes each technique, installation of the gauge, examples of the signals, and interpretation of the records. 11 refs., 11 figs.

Dick, R.D.; Parrish, R.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) Calibration for LX-17  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this report is to summarize the results of a Detonation shock dynamics (DSD) calibration for the explosive LX-17. Considering that LX-17 is very similar to PBX 9502 (LX-17 is 92.5% TATB with 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder, while PBX 9502 is 95% TATB with 5% Kel-F 800 binder), we proceed with the analysis assuming many of the DSD constants are the same. We only change the parameters D{sub CJ}, B and {bar C}{sub 6} ({bar C}{sub 6} controls the how D{sub CJ} changes with pressing density). The parameters D{sub CJ} and {bar C}{sub 6} were given by Josh Coe and Sam Shaw's EOS. So, only B was optimized in fitting all the calibration data. This report first discusses some general DSD background, followed by a presentation of the available dataset to perform the calibration, and finally gives the results of the calibration and draws some conclusions. A DSD calibration of LX-17 has been conducted using the existing diameter effect data and shock shape records. The new DSD fit is based off the current PBX 9502 calibration and takes into account the effect of pressing density. Utilizing the PBX 9502 calibration, the effects of initial temperature can also be taken into account.

Aslam, Tariq D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

104

White House honors Sandia nurse for helping women veterans, children |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White House honors Sandia nurse for helping women veterans, children | White House honors Sandia nurse for helping women veterans, children | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > White House honors Sandia nurse for helping ... White House honors Sandia nurse for helping women veterans, children Posted By Office of Public Affairs

105

NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN TWO-DIMENSIONAL DELAYED DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS  

SciTech Connect

For the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), different scenarios have been suggested. In these, the propagation of the burning front through the exploding white dwarf (WD) star proceeds in different modes, and consequently imprints of the explosion model on the nucleosynthetic yields can be expected. The nucleosynthetic characteristics of various explosion mechanisms are explored based on three two-dimensional explosion simulations representing extreme cases: a pure turbulent deflagration, a delayed detonation following an approximately spherical ignition of the initial deflagration, and a delayed detonation arising from a highly asymmetric deflagration ignition. Apart from this initial condition, the deflagration stage is treated in a parameter-free approach. The detonation is initiated when the turbulent burning enters the distributed burning regime. This occurs at densities around 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}-relatively low as compared to existing nucleosynthesis studies for one-dimensional spherically symmetric models. The burning in these multidimensional models is different from that in one-dimensional simulations as the detonation wave propagates both into unburned material in the high-density region near the center of a WD and into the low-density region near the surface. Thus, the resulting yield is a mixture of different explosive burning products, from carbon-burning products at low densities to complete silicon-burning products at the highest densities, as well as electron-capture products synthesized at the deflagration stage. Detailed calculations of the nucleosynthesis in all three models are presented. In contrast to the deflagration model, the delayed detonations produce a characteristic layered structure and the yields largely satisfy constraints from Galactic chemical evolution. In the asymmetric delayed detonation model, the region filled with electron capture species (e.g., {sup 58}Ni, {sup 54}Fe) is within a shell, showing a large off-set, above the bulk of {sup 56}Ni distribution, while species produced by the detonation are distributed more spherically.

Maeda, K. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Roepke, F.K.; Fink, M.; Hillebrandt, W.; Travaglio, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, 85741 Garching (Germany); Thielemann, F.-K., E-mail: keiichi.maeda@ipmu.j [Department Physik, Universitaet Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Flame-driven deflagration-to-detonation transitions in Type Ia supernovae?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although delayed detonation models of thermonuclear explosions of white dwarfs seem promising for reproducing Type Ia supernovae, the transition of the flame propagation mode from subsonic deflagration to supersonic detonation remains hypothetical. A potential instant for this transition to occur is the onset of the distributed burning regime, i.e. the moment when turbulence first affects the internal flame structure. Some studies of the burning microphysics indicate that a deflagration-to-detonation transition may be possible here, provided the turbulent intensities are strong enough. Consequently, the magnitude of turbulent velocity fluctuations generated by the deflagration flame is analyzed at the onset of the distributed burning regime in several three-dimensional simulations of deflagrations in thermonuclear supernovae. It is shown that the corresponding probability density functions fall off towards high turbulent velocity fluctuations much more slowly than a Gaussian distribution. Thus, values claimed to be necessary for triggering a detonation are likely to be found in sufficiently large patches of the flame. Although the microphysical evolution of the burning is not followed and a successful deflagration-to-detonation transition cannot be guaranteed from simulations presented here, the results still indicate that such events may be possible in Type Ia supernova explosions.

F. K. Roepke

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

107

Transient characteristics of C3H8/O2turbulent mixing in a hypersonic pulse detonation engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of a time-dependent three-dimensional numerical simulation of the turbulent mixing characteristics in the mixing chamber of a hypersonic pulse detonation engine (PDE). Fuel (C3H8) was injected through one supersonic injector, while ... Keywords: high altitude aircrafts, hypersonic propulsion, ionospheric flight, pulse detonation engine, supersonic jet, turbulent mixing

Khalid M. Saqr; Ahmed Faiz; Hassan Kassem; Mohsin Sies; Mazlan A. Wahid

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

High-Speed Combustion and Detonation Project Scaling Up for Mira | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Speed Combustion and Detonation Project Scaling Up for Mira High-Speed Combustion and Detonation Project Scaling Up for Mira March 26, 2013 Printer-friendly version Researchers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) are simulating the high-speed combustion and detonation of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures to enable safer and more widespread use of hydrogen as an alternative fuel. This is one of 16 projects in the ALCF's Early Science Program (ESP), which is aimed at preparing key scientific applications for the architecture and scale of Mira, Argonne's new 10-petaflop IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer. Using pre-production time on Mira for real scientific problems, these projects vet the system and gather knowledge that will help future projects take full advantage of Mira's vastly increased power and capabilities when it goes into production later this year.

109

Surface chemical reaction of laser ablated aluminum sample for detonation initiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the evolution of metal plasma generated by high laser irradiances and its effect on the surrounding air by using shadowgraph images after laser pulse termination; hence the formation of laser supported detonation and combustion processes has been investigated. The essence of the paper is in observing initiation of chemical reaction between ablated aluminum plasma and oxygen from air by inducing high power laser pulse (>1000 mJ/pulse) and conduct a quantitative comparison of chemically reactive laser initiated waves with the classical detonation of exploding aluminum (dust) cloud in air. Findings in this work may lead to a new method of initiating detonation from metal sample in its bulk form without the need of mixing nano-particles with oxygen for initiation.

Kim, Chang-hwan; Yoh, Jack J. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanakro, Kwanakgu, Seoul, Korea 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Detonation cell size measurements and predictions in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at elevated temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present research reports on the effect of initial mixture temperature on the experimentally measured detonation cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Experimental and theoretical research related to combustion phenomena in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures has been ongoing for many years. However, detonation cell size data currently exists or hydrogen-air-steam mixtures up to a temperature of only 400K. Sever accident scenarios have been identified for light water reactors (LWRs) where hydrogen-air mixture temperatures in excess of 400K could be generated within containment. The experiments in this report focus on extending the cell size data base for initial mixture temperatures in excess of 400K. The experiments were carried out in a 10-cm inner-diameter, 6.1-m long heated detonation tube with a maximum operating temperature of 700K and spatial temperature uniformity of {plus_minus}14K. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air initial gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K--650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside-diameter test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent by hydrogen at 300K down to about 9 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

LA-UR-11-05233 Page 1 Session 3: High Explosive Topics Modeling of Detonation Propagation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

233 233 Page 1 Session 3: High Explosive Topics Modeling of Detonation Propagation Tariq D. Aslam Los Alamos National Laboratory Summary A simple methodology for propagation of detonation waves, Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD), is presented. Theory, experiments and computational issues regarding DSD will be addressed. Introduction Detonation Shock Dynamics is based on a weak curvature, quasi-steady analysis of the compressible reactive Euler equations. See [1] for a recent review of the field. The key result from DSD is that to a first order approximation, a detonation wave will propagate normal to itself at a velocity related to its local curvature. This is expressed as a D n -k relation. This D n -k relation is an intrinsic propagation rule (i.e., all

112

Flashing Dark Matter-- Gamma-Ray Bursts from Relativistic Detonations of Electro-Dilaton Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We speculate that the universe is filled with stars composed of electromagnetic and dilaton fields which are the sources of the powerful gamma-ray bursts impinging upon us from all directions of the universe. We calculate soliton-like solutions of these fields and show that their energy can be converted into a relativistic plasma in an explosive way. As in classical detonation theory the conversion proceeds by a relativistic self-similar solution for a spherical detonation wave which extracts the energy from the scalar field via a plasma in the wave front.

V. Folomeev; V. Gurovich; H. Kleinert; H. -J. Schmidt

2002-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Application of Pulsed Detonation Engine for Electric Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiencies and specific impulses. Therefore, PDEs have simpler geometries and less moving parts than regular produced electric power at 27 W and the compressor pumped air at a rate of 0.055 kg/s. The exhaust to increase the static pressure and temperature of the fluid before heat addition, in a PDE, a detonation wave

Texas at Arlington, University of

114

A virtual test facility for simulating detonation-induced fracture of thin flexible shells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fluid-structure interaction simulation of detonation- and shock-wave-loaded fracturing thin-walled structures requires numerical methods that can cope with large deformations as well as topology changes. We present a robust level-set-based approach ...

Ralf Deiterding; Fehmi Cirak; Sean P. Mauch; Daniel I. Meiron

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

An efficient numerical method for the onset of blast waves generated by spherical detonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blast wave, generated by a high detonating spherical charge, is modeled using the Euler equations. The problem is split into two parts. The first part makes use of the isotropy to solve the problem in spherical radial coordinate. Overpressure distribution ... Keywords: Cartesian methods, blast wave, remapping techniques

Adel M. Benselama; Mame J. P. William-Louis; François Monnoyer

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame S. E structure which, de- pending on density, may involve separate regions of carbon, oxygen and silicon burning, all propagating in a self-similar, subsonic front. The separation between these three burning regions

117

The influence of initial temperature on flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of initial mixture temperature on deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) has been investigated experimentally. The experiments were carried out in a 27-cm-inner diameter, 21.3-meter-long heated detonation tube, which was equipped with periodic orifice plates to promote flame acceleration. Hydrogen-air-steam mixtures were tested at a range of temperatures up to 650K and at an initial pressure of 0.1 MPa. In most cases, the limiting hydrogen mole fraction which resulted in transition to detonation corresponded to the mixture whose detonation cell size, {lambda}, was approximately equal to the inner diameter of the orifice plate, d (e.g., d/{lambda}{approximately}1). The only exception was in dry hydrogen-air mixtures at 650K where the DDT limit was observed to be 11 percent hydrogen, corresponding to a value of d/{lambda} equal to 5.5. For a 10.5 percent hydrogen mixture at 650K, the flame accelerated to a maximum velocity of about 120 m/s and then decelerated to below 2 m/s. This observation indicates that the d/{lambda} = 1 DDT limit criterion provides a necessary condition but not a sufficient one for the onset of DDT in obstacle-laden ducts. In this particular case, the mixture initial condition (i.e., temperature) resulted in the inability of the mixture to sustain flame acceleration to the point where DDT could occur. It was also observed that the distance required for the flame to accelerate to the onset of detonation was a function of both the hydrogen mole fraction and the mixture initial temperature. For example, decreasing the hydrogen mole fraction or increasing the initial mixture temperature resulted in longer transition distances.

Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Modeling unit cell interactions for the microstructure of a heterogeneous explosive: detonation diffraction past an inert sphere  

SciTech Connect

We describe an approach being used to model multi-phase blast explosive, that is mostly condensed explosive by volume with inert embedded particles. The asymptotic theory of detonation shock dynamics is used to describe the detonation shock propagation in the explosive. The shock motion rule in the explosive requires that the shock move at a normal speed that depends on the shock curvature. The angle that the shock makes with the particle boundary is also prescribed. We describe theory that can be used to predict the behavior of a collection of such detonation shock/particle interactions in the larger aggregate. A typical unit cell problem of a detonation shock diffraction over a sphere is analyzed by analytical and numerical means and the properties of an ensemble of such unit cell problems is discussed with implications for the macroscopic limiting behavior of the heterogeneous explosive.

Bdzil, John B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stewart, Donald S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Walter, John W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aida, Toru [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A study of detonation timing and fragmentation using 3-D finite element techniques and a damage constitutive model  

SciTech Connect

The transient dynamics finite element computer program, PRONTO-3D, has been used in conjunction with a damage constitutive model to study the influence of detonation timing on rock fragmentation during blasting. The primary motivation of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of precise detonators in improving fragmentation. PRONTO-3D simulations show that a delay time of 0.0 sec between adjacent blastholes results in significantly more fragmentation than a 0.5 ms delay.

Preece, D.S.; Thorne, B.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

From detonation to diapers: Los Alamos computer codes at core of advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From detonation to diapers From detonation to diapers Los Alamos computer codes at core of advanced manufacturing tools The computer codes used for predictive fluid modeling are part of the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics Library. July 27, 2011 This simulation of a droplet of liquid falling into a pool of liquid was modeled using Los Alamos National Laboratory's Computational Fluid Dynamics Library This simulation of a droplet of liquid falling into a pool of liquid was modeled using Los Alamos National Laboratory's Computational Fluid Dynamics Library (CFDLib), which was also used by Procter and Gamble to simulate a manufacturing process. The computer code is now available to help American industries become more competitive. Contact James Rickman Communicatons Office (505) 665-9203

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121

Indexes of the proceedings for the nine symposia (international) on detonation, 1951--89  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Proceedings of the nine Detonation Symposia have become the major archival source of information of international research in explosive phenomenology, theory, experimental techniques, numerical modeling, and high-rate reaction chemistry. In many cases, they contain the original reference or the only reference to major progress in the field. For some papers, the information is more complete than the complementary article appearing in a formal journal, yet for others, authors elected to publish only an abstract in the Proceedings. For the large majority of papers, the Symposia Proceedings provide the only published reference to a body of work. This report indexes the nine existing Proceedings of the Detonation Symposia by paper titles, topic phrases, authors, and first appearance of acronyms and code names.

Crane, S.L.; Deal, W.E.; Ramsay, J.B.; Roach, A.M.; Takala, B.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Indexes of the proceedings for the nine symposia (international) on detonation, 1951--89  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Proceedings of the nine Detonation Symposia have become the major archival source of information of international research in explosive phenomenology, theory, experimental techniques, numerical modeling, and high-rate reaction chemistry. In many cases, they contain the original reference or the only reference to major progress in the field. For some papers, the information is more complete than the complementary article appearing in a formal journal, yet for others, authors elected to publish only an abstract in the Proceedings. For the large majority of papers, the Symposia Proceedings provide the only published reference to a body of work. This report indexes the nine existing Proceedings of the Detonation Symposia by paper titles, topic phrases, authors, and first appearance of acronyms and code names.

Crane, S.L.; Deal, W.E.; Ramsay, J.B.; Roach, A.M.; Takala, B.E.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Modeling and analysis of hydrogen detonation events in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor containment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes salient aspects of the modeling, analyses, and evaluations for hydrogen detonation in selected regions of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) containment during hypothetical severe accident conditions. Shock wave generation and transport modeling and analyses were conducted for two stratified configurations in the dome region of the high bay. Principal tools utilized for these purposes were the CTH and CET89 computer codes. Dynamic pressure loading functions were generated for key locations and used for evaluating structural response behavior for which a finite-element model was developed using the ANSYS code. For the range of conditions analyzed in the two critical dome regions, it was revealed that the ANS containment would be able to withstand detonation loads without failure.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Kim, S.H.; Valenti, S.N.; Simpson, D.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sawruk, W. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

JCZS: An Intermolecular Potential Database for Performing Accurate Detonation and Expansion Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exponential-13,6 (EXP-13,6) potential pammeters for 750 gases composed of 48 elements were determined and assembled in a database, referred to as the JCZS database, for use with the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler equation of state (JCZ3-EOS)~l) The EXP- 13,6 force constants were obtained by using literature values of Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential functions, by using corresponding states (CS) theory, by matching pure liquid shock Hugoniot data, and by using molecular volume to determine the approach radii with the well depth estimated from high-pressure isen- tropes. The JCZS database was used to accurately predict detonation velocity, pressure, and temperature for 50 dif- 3 Accurate predictions were also ferent explosives with initial densities ranging from 0.25 glcm3 to 1.97 g/cm . obtained for pure liquid shock Hugoniots, static properties of nitrogen, and gas detonations at high initial pressures.

Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; McGee, B.C.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

Indexes of the Proceedings for the Ten International Symposia on Detonation 1951-93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Proceedings of the ten Detonation Symposia have become the major archival source of information of international research in explosive phenomenology, theory, experimental techniques, numerical modeling, and high-rate reaction chemistry. In many cases, they contain the original reference or the only reference to major progress in the field. For some papers, the information is more complete than the complementary article appearing in a formal journal; yet for others, authors elected to publish only an abstract in the Proceedings. For the large majority of papers, the Symposia Proceedings provide the only published reference to a body of work. This report indexes the ten existing Proceedings of the Detonation Symposia by paper titles, topic phrases, authors, and first appearance of acronyms and code names.

Deal, William E.; Ramsay, John B.; Roach, Alita M.; Takala, Bruce E.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Detonation product equation-of-state directly from the cylinder test  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-analytic method is presented for obtaining the detonation-product expansion isentrope directly from cylinder test data. The idea actually dates to G.I. Taylor`s invention of the cylinder test--though he did not implement it for lack of data--but has received little attention since. The method uses the fact that the pressure may be determined from the measured wall trajectory, whereupon the associated specific volume follows from the equations of continuity and momentum. Using the HMX-based explosive PBX9501 as an example, the method makes a good prediction of the detonation pressure and the basic form of {gamma}, the isentropic exponent. However, the model isentrope is slightly low in the mid-range, perhaps because the standard cylinder test is not optimal for this analysis. A better-suited design is proposed, and a simple ad-hoc correction is offered that reconciles the standard test.

Hill, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Application of Statistical Quality Control Techniques to Detonator Fabrication: Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study was performed on the use of process control techniques which might reduce the need for a duplicate inspection by production inspection and quality control inspection. Two active detonator fabrication programs were selected for the study. Inspection areas accounting for the greatest percentage of total inspection costs were selected by applying "Pareto's Principle of Maldistribution." Data from these areas were then gathered and analyzed by a process capabiltiy study.

Jones, J. Frank

1971-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nitrate analysis of snow and ice core samples collected in the vicinity of a waste detonation event, McMurdo Station, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 30, 1991, a small quantity of hazardous materials was detonated at a site near McMurdo Station, Antarctica. The materials involved in the detonation represented highly reactive or explosive wastes that could not be transported safely for disposal in the United States. Detonation was therefore considered the safest and most effective means for disposing these hazardous materials. One concern regarding the detonation of these substances was that the process could generate or distribute measurable quantities of contaminants to the area surrounding the detonation site. Nitrate was selected as a tracer to document the distribution of contaminants from the detonation. Snow and ice cores were collected about 4 months after the event. These cores were analyzed for nitrate concentrations in May 1993, and a map was generated to show the extent of nitrate contamination. This report describes the collection of these samples and summarizes the analytical results.

White, G.J.; Lugar, R.M.; Crockett, A.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Detonability of DMSO/LX-10-1 and DMSO/PBX-9404 solutions  

SciTech Connect

Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been involved in weapons disassembly since its involvement in weapons design, the Lab was recently requested by the Department of Energy to extend its responsibility for LLNL-designed weapons to include dismantlement of some systems in the cold war arsenal. Dissolution of LX-10-1 and PBX-9404 explosive from two artillery fired atomic projectiles (AFAPs) can be accomplished using dimethyl sulfoxide. The composition of LX-10-1 and PBX-9404 are given. The authors have evaluated the detonability of solutions of these two plastic bonded explosives in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) under shock and thermal scenarios based on the UN ``Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods - Tests and Criteria`` (ST/SG/AC.10/11) and US Army Technical Bulletin 700-2. Prior to the relatively large scale shock and thermal sensitivity testing, small scale safety tests and thermochemical code calculations were used as a preliminary estimate of the detonability and hazards associated with up to 33% of these explosives in DMSO. Thermochemical calculations, small scale safety testing, and gap testing all indicate that these solutions are not detonable. They are currently in the process of evaluating these solutions using the small scale cookoff bomb (SCB) test.

Helm, F.; Hoffman, D.M.

1994-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hydrodynamic Modeling of Air Blast Propagation from the Humble Redwood Chemical High Explosive Detonations Using GEODYN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic models were developed using GEODYN to simulate the propagation of air blasts resulting from a series of high explosive detonations conducted at Kirtland Air Force Base in August and September of 2007. Dubbed Humble Redwood I (HR-1), these near-surface chemical high explosive detonations consisted of seven shots of varying height or depth of burst. Each shot was simulated numerically using GEODYN. An adaptive mesh refinement scheme based on air pressure gradients was employed such that the mesh refinement tracked the advancing shock front where sharp discontinuities existed in the state variables, but allowed the mesh to sufficiently relax behind the shock front for runtime efficiency. Comparisons of overpressure, sound speed, and positive phase impulse from the GEODYN simulations were made to the recorded data taken from each HR-1 shot. Where the detonations occurred above ground or were shallowly buried (no deeper than 1 m), the GEODYN model was able to simulate the sound speeds, peak overpressures, and positive phase impulses to within approximately 1%, 23%, and 6%, respectively, of the actual recorded data, supporting the use of numerical simulation of the air blast as a forensic tool in determining the yield of an otherwise unknown explosion.

Chipman, V D

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

131

Method for effecting directional nuclear fracturing  

SciTech Connect

A method for localizing and directing energy from an underground nuclear explosion includes the steps of providing an acoustical blocking zone on at least one side of the contemplated explosion situs to limit transmission of elastic waves to the earth on the opposite sides of the acoustical blocking zone, then detonating the nuclear explosive at the situs. The acoustical blocking zone is a zone of material which is at variance in its acoustical characteristics with respect to the adjacent earth in which it is located. (5 claims)

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1972-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

132

The effect of initial temperature on flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition phenomenon  

SciTech Connect

The High-Temperature Combustion Facility at BNL was used to conduct deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) experiments. Periodic orifice plates were installed inside the entire length of the detonation tube in order to promote flame acceleration. The orifice plates are 27.3-cm-outer diameter, which is equivalent to the inner diameter of the tube, and 20.6-cm-inner diameter. The detonation tube length is 21.3-meters long, and the spacing of the orifice plates is one tube diameter. A standard automobile diesel engine glow plug was used to ignite the test mixture at one end of the tube. Hydrogen-air-steam mixtures were tested at a range of temperatures up to 650K and at an initial pressure of 0.1 MPa. In most cases, the limiting hydrogen mole fraction which resulted in DDT corresponded to the mixture whose detonation cell size, {lambda}, was equal to the inner diameter of the orifice plate, d (e.g., d/{lambda}=1). The only exception was in the dry hydrogen-air mixtures at 650K where the DDT limit was observed to be 11 percent hydrogen, corresponding to a value of d/{lambda} equal to 5.5. For a 10.5 percent hydrogen mixture at 650K, the flame accelerated to a maximum velocity of about 120 mIs and then decelerated to below 2 mIs. By maintaining the first 6.1 meters of the vessel at the ignition end at 400K, and the rest of the vessel at 650K, the DDT limit was reduced to 9.5 percent hydrogen (d/{lambda}=4.2). This observation indicates that the d/{lambda}=1 DDT limit criteria provides a necessary condition but not a sufficient one for the onset of DDT in obstacle laden ducts. In this particular case, the mixture initial condition (i.e., temperature) resulted in the inability of the mixture to sustain flame acceleration to the point where DDT could occur. It was also observed that the distance required for the flame to accelerate to the point of detonation initiation, referred to as the run-up distance, was found to be a function of both the hydrogen mole fraction and the mixture initial temperature. Decreasing the hydrogen mole fraction or increasing the initial mixture temperature resulted in longer run-up distances. The density ratio across the flame and the speed of sound in the unburned mixture were found to be two parameters which influence the run-up distance.

Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Tagawa, H. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Malliakos, A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

HELIUM SHELL DETONATIONS ON LOW-MASS WHITE DWARFS AS A POSSIBLE EXPLANATION FOR SN 2005E  

SciTech Connect

Recently, several Type Ib supernovae (SNe; with the prototypical SN 2005E) have been shown to have atypical properties. These SNe are faint (absolute peak magnitude of {approx} - 15) and fast SNe that show unique composition. They are inferred to have low ejecta mass (a few tenths of a solar mass) and to be highly enriched in calcium, but poor in silicon elements and nickel. These SNe were therefore suggested to belong to a new class of calcium-rich faint SNe explosions. Their properties were proposed to be the result of helium detonations that may occur on helium accreting white dwarfs. In this paper, we theoretically study the scenario of helium detonations and focus on the results of detonations in accreted helium layers on low-mass carbon-oxygen (CO) cores. We present new results from one-dimensional simulations of such explosions, including their light curves and spectra. We find that when the density of the helium layer is low enough the helium detonation produces large amounts of intermediate elements, such as calcium and titanium, together with a large amount of unburnt helium. Alternatively, enough carbon enrichment of the accreted helium as a result of convective undershoot at the early stages of the runaway can avoid the production of iron group elements as the alpha particles are consumed avoiding iron production. Our results suggest that the properties of calcium-rich faint SNe could indeed be consistent with the helium-detonation scenario on small CO cores. Above a certain density (larger CO cores) the detonation leaves mainly {sup 56}Ni and unburnt helium, and the predicted spectrum will unlikely fit the unique features of this class of SNe. Finally, none of our studied models reproduces the bright, fast-evolving light curves of another type of peculiar SNe suggested to originate in helium detonations (SNe 1885A, 1939B, and 2002bj).

Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli; Glasner, Ami [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Sauer, Daniel [Stockholm University, Department for Astronomy, AlbaNova University Center, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Perets, Hagai [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mazzali, Paolo [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Truran, James W. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gal-Yam, Avishay [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nightingale College of Nursing Scorebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Limited performance projections are reported, including ... needs, meet state demand for nurses ... air conditioning (HVAC) and energy, clinical supplies ...

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Chemical stability of salt cake in the presence of organic materials. [Detonation hazard  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-level waste stored as salt cake is principally NaNO/sub 3/. Some organic material is known to have been added to the waste tanks. It has been suggested that some of this organic material may have become nitrated and transformed to a detonable state. Arguments are presented to discount the presence of nitrated organics in the waste tanks. Nitrated organics generated accidentally usually explode at the time of formation. Detonation tests show that salt cake and ''worst-case'' organic mixtures are not detonable. Organic mixtures with salt cake are compared with black powder, a related exothermic reactant. Black-powder mixtures of widely varying composition can and do burn explosively; ignition temperatures are 300-450/sup 0/C. However, black-powder-type mixes cannot be ignited by radiation and are shock-insensitive. Temperatures generated by radionuclide decay in the salt are below 175/sup 0/C and would be incapable of igniting any of these mixtures. The expected effect of radiation on organics in the waste tanks is a slow dehydrogenation and depolymerization along with a slight increase in sensitivity to oxidation. The greatest explosion hazard, if any exists, is a hydrogen--oxygen explosion from water radiolysis, but the hydrogen must first be generated and then trapped so that the concentration of hydrogen can rise above 4 vol percent. This is impossible in salt cake. Final confirmation of the safety against organic-related explosive reactions in the salt cake will be based upon analytical determinations of organic concentrations. 12 tables, 5 fig. (DLC)

Beitel, G.A.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced plasticity, phase transformations, and detonation  

SciTech Connect

Modern computers enable routine multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations of shock propagation in solids using realistic interatomic potentials, and offer a direct insight into the atomistic processes underlying plasticity, phase transformations, and the detonation of energetic materials. Past, present, and prospects for future simulations will be discussed in the context of prototypical systems for each of these three classes of problems. Initial samples ranging from perfect single crystals, to those with specific isolated defects, to full-fledged polycrystalline materials will be considered.

Germann, T. C. (Timothy C.)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL small-scale development apparatus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is a 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperatures between 300K and 650K at a fixed initial pressure of 0.1 MPa. Hydrogen-air mixtures with hydrogen composition from 9 to 60 percent by volume and steam fractions up to 35 percent by volume were studied for stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K-650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside diameter SSDA test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent hydrogen at 300K down to between 9 and 10 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsburg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sato, K.; Kinoshita, M. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Sources of History of Nursing in Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sources of Nursing History in Korea, 1886-1911. Commissionedthe nursing profession in Korea. Regarding the publicationearly modern and colonial Korea, and stimulate the in-depth

UCLA Center for the Study of Women

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The use of post detonation analysis of stable isotope ratios to determine the type and production process of the explosive involved  

SciTech Connect

The detonation of a series of explosives was performed in a controlled manner to collect the resulting, solid residue or {open_quotes}soot.{close_quotes} This residue was examined to determine the ratios of the stable carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopes. The goal of the experiment was to determine if these ratios could be used to indicate, from the post detonation residues, the type and origin of the detonated explosive. The ratios of the stated stable isotopes in the undetonated explosive were also determined. Despite some reservations in the quality of the data resulting from contamination by nonexplosive components, certain trends can be discerned. (1) Carbon isotopes allow aromatic explosives to be distinguished from nonaromatic explosives. This trend seems to carry through the detonation so that the distinction might be made after the fact. (2) The amination process for TATB can be detected through the hydrogen and, to some extent, the nitrogen isotope ratios. Unfortunately, the data are not sufficiently good to determine if this differential carries through the detonation. (3) The relative magnitude and sign of the nitrogen isotope ratio seems to carry through the detonation: some exchange with atmospheric nitrogen is probable. Even though this set of experiments must also be viewed as preliminary, there is a definite indication that certain qualitative characteristics of explosives can be detected after the detonation. This {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} could have application to both intelligence and counter terrorism.

McGuire, R.R.; Velsko, C.A.; Lee, C.G.; Raber, E.

1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

140

High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL Small-Scale Development Apparatus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger-scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is a lo-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperatures between 300K and 650K at a fixed pressure of 0.1 MPa. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K to 650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments. Experiments were conducted to measure the rate of hydrogen oxidation in the absence of ignition sources at temperatures of 500K and 650K, for hydrogen-air mixtures of 15 percent and 50 percent, and for a mixture of equimolar hydrogen-air and 30 percent steam at 650K. The rate of hydrogen oxidation was found to be significant at 650K. Reduction of hydrogen concentration by chemical reaction from 50 to 44 percent hydrogen, and from 15 to 11 percent hydrogen, were observed on a time frame of minutes.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Sato, K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Method of detonating explosives for fragmenting oil shale formation toward a vertical free face  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of a method for explosively expanding oil shale formation toward a limited void volume provided by a void excavated in a retort site in formation containing oil shale, wherein said void has at least one vertical free face, the improvement comprising the steps of: placing explosive in a roiw of blasting holes in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within the retort site adjacent such a vertical free face, said blasting holes being mutually spaced apart along the length of the void; and detonating explosive in the blasting holes in a single round in a time delay sequence progressing along the length of the row of blasting holes for explosivelyexpanding formation in said remaining portion of unfragmented formation toward such vertical free face for forming at least a portion of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort.

Hutchins, N.; Ridley, R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Oblique shock wave calculations for detonation waves in brass confined and bare PBXN-111 cylindrical charges  

SciTech Connect

Shock polar theory is used to calculate the angles detonation fronts make with the cylinder wall for brass cased and bare PBXN-111 cylinders. Two extrapolated unreacted PBXN-111 Hugoniot curves are used to calculate these angles. Measured and calculated angles for bare PBXN-111 cylinders are in good agreement for one of the unreacted PBXN-111 Hugoniots. Except for the 100 mm diameter charge, the differences between calculated and measured angles for brass cased charges are beyond experimental error. Limited data suggests that the wave front curvature exhibits a large change right at the brass wall and the resolution in the experiments may not be fine enough to show it clearly. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Lemar, E.R. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Maryland 20640 (United States); Forbes, J.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Cowperthwaite, M. [Enig Associates, Inc., Silver Spring, Maryland 20904 (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by appropriate responses by local responders and the general population within the hazard zones, regional planning is essential to success. The remainder of this Executive Summary provides summary guidance for response planning in three areas: (1) Public Protection Strategy details the importance of early, adequate shelter followed by informed evacuation. (2) Responder Priorities identify how to protect response personnel, perform regional situational assessment, and support public safety. (3) Key Planning Considerations refute common myths and provide important information on planning how to respond in the aftermath of nuclear terrorism.

Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

Measurement of critical energy for direct initiation of spherical detonations in stoichiometric high-pressure H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} mixtures  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the critical energy for direct initiation of spherical detonations in stoichiometric high-pressure hydrogen-oxygen mixtures are measured and investigated to look at the effect of explosion limits on the detonation sensitivity. Results up to an initial pressure of 20 atm are obtained. Experiments are carried out in a spherical bomb and direct initiation is achieved via spark ignition from a high-voltage capacitor discharge. A detailed description of different methods to obtain a good estimate of the correct amount of energy deposited into the mixture used to initiate the detonation, including the calorimeter method and current method, is provided. It is demonstrated that at elevated initial pressure, the second explosion limit effect plays a significant role leading to slow-branching reactions and the detonation sensitivity of hydrogen mixtures is comparable to other common hydrocarbon mixtures at such condition. (author)

Kamenskihs, Vsevolods; Lee, John H.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ng, Hoi Dick [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Shock initiation and detonation study on high concentration H2O2/H2O solutions using in-situ magnetic gauges  

SciTech Connect

Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; homogeneous shock initiation behavior has been observed in the experiments where reaction is observed. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these experiments, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot points, times-to-detonation points that indicate low sensitivity (an input of 13.5 GPa produces detonation in 1 {micro}s compared to 9.5 GPa for neat nitromethane), and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions of over 6.6 km/s.

Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Parallel Adaptive Simulation of Weak and Strong Transverse-Wave Structures in H2-O2 Detonations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two- and three-dimensional simulation results are presented that investigate at great detail the temporal evolution of Mach reflection sub-structure patterns intrinsic to gaseous detonation waves. High local resolution is achieved by utilizing a distributed memory parallel shock-capturing finite volume code that employs block-structured dynamic mesh adaptation. The computational approach, the implemented parallelization strategy, and the software design are discussed.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

DEFLAGRATION-TO-DETONATION TRANSITION IN LX-04 AS A FUNCTION OF LOADING DENSITY, TEMPERATURE, AND CONFINEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in LX-04 (85/15 HMX/Viton) is being evaluated as a function of loading density, temperature, and confinement. In the high confinement arrangement, a matrix of tests will be performed with the LX-04 loaded at {approx}50, 70, 90, and {approx}99 %TMD; and temperatures of ambient, 160 C, and 190 C, at each loading density. A more limited set of tests at medium confinement will be conducted. As expected, LX-04 does not undergo DDT at near TMD loadings in both medium and high confinement, although the later still results in significant fragmentation. In high confinement at pour density (50.3 %TMD), LX-04 does not transit to detonation at 160 C, but does at ambient and 190 C with the shortest run distance to detonation (l) at ambient temperature. With a 70% TMD loading at ambient temperature, l was even less. The limited ambient temperature measurements for l in high confinement are similar to previous data for 91/9 HMX/wax, which has nearly the same %volume of HMX as LX-04.

Sandusky, H W; Granholm, R H; Bohl, D G; Hare, D E; Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to tritium migration.

C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Method of detonating explosives for fragmenting oil shale formation toward a vertical free face  

SciTech Connect

An oil shale formation is explosively expanded toward a limited void volume for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation. A void in the form of a narrow vertical slot is excavated within a retort site, leaving at least one portion of unfragmented formation within the retort site adjacent a vertical free face of the slot. Explosive is placed in a row of vertical blasting holes in the remaining portion of unfragmented formation adjacent the vertical free face. The blasting holes are mutually spaced apart along the length of the slot, and the row of blasting holes extends parallel to the vertical free face. Explosive in the blasting holes is detonated in a time delay sequence starting near one end of the slot and progressing along the length of the slot for explosively expanding the formation in the vertical free face. A fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale is formed in an in situ oil shale retort. 34 claims.

Hutchins, N.M.; Ridley, R.D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Estimating the exposure to first receivers from a contaminated victim of a radiological dispersal device detonation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The threat of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) detonation arouses the concern of contaminated victims of all ages. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose to a uniformly contaminated five-year old male. It also explores the exposure rates surrounding the victim to be used by first receivers to estimate their exposure from the victim. The victim was modeled as an anthropomorphic phantom using the BodyBuilder program. A thin layer of source material was added to the surface of the phantom’s skin to simulate whole-body contamination. The computer code MCNP5 was used to tally the doses to the individual organs of the phantom and create a mesh to generate contour exposure rate lines. Using an activity of 37 GBq m-2, the five-year-old victim received an effective dose 158.23 mSv in one hour. Contour lines were produced that showed the exposure rates around the victims ranging from 0.5 to 10 R/h. The contour exposure-rate contour lines were also generated after the removal of contaminated clothing. Removing the victim’s clothing reduced the exposure rates by eighty percent.

Phillips, Holly Anne

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Detonation shock dynamics calibration for pBX 9502 with temperature, density, and material lot variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a methodology for scaling the detonation shock dynamics D{sub n}[{kappa}] calibration function to accommodate variations in the HE starting material. We apply our model to the insensitive TATB-based explosive PBX 9502, for which we have enough front curvature rate stick data to characterize three material attributes: initial temperature T{sub 0}, nominal density {rho}{sub 0}, and manufacturing lot (representing different microstructures). A useful feature of the model is that it returns an absolute estimate for the reaction zone thickness, {delta}. Lacking demonstrated material metrics(s), we express microstructural variation indirectly, in terms of its effect on {delta}. This results in a D{sub n}[{kappa}] function that depends on T{sub 0}, {rho}{sub 0}, and {delta}. After examining the separate effects of each parameter on D{sub n}[{kappa}], we compute an arc geometry as a validation problem. We compare the calculation to a PBX 9502 arc experiment that was pressed from one of the calibrated HE lots. The agreement between the model and experiment is excellent. We compute worst, nominal, and best-performing material parameter combinations to show how much difference accrues throughout the arc.

Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aslam, Tariq D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method for attenuating seismic shock from detonating explosive in an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In situ oil shale retorts are formed in formation containing oil shale by excavating at least one void in each retort site. Explosive is placed in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within each retort site adjacent such a void, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. This produces a large explosion which generates seismic shock waves traveling outwardly from the blast site through the underground formation. Sensitive equipment which could be damaged by seismic shock traveling to it straight through unfragmented formation is shielded from such an explosion by placing such equipment in the shadow of a fragmented mass in an in situ retort formed prior to the explosion. The fragmented mass attenuates the velocity and magnitude of seismic shock waves traveling toward such sensitive equipment prior to the shock wave reaching the vicinity of such equipment.

Studebaker, Irving G. (Grand Junction, CO); Hefelfinger, Richard (Grand Junction, CO)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Non-molecular Phases of H2O and HF Under Detonation-like Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energetic materials are known to produce simple molecular species, such as HF and H{sub 2}O, during detonation. The behavior of such species under conditions of simultaneous high pressure and temperature are unknown. The predicted high pressure superionic phases of water and HF are investigated via ab initio molecular dynamics. We study water at densities of 2.0-3.0 g/cc (34 -115 GPa) along the 2000 K isotherm. We find that extremely rapid (superionic) diffusion of protons occurs in a fluid phase at pressures between 34 and 58 GPa. A transition to a stable body-centered cubic (bcc) O lattice with superionic proton conductivity is observed between 70 and 75 GPa. We find that all molecular species at pressures greater than 75 GPa are too short lived to be classified as bound states. Up to 95 GPa, we find a solid superionic phase characterized by covalent O-H bonding. Above 95 GPa, a transient network phase is found characterized by symmetric O-OH hydrogen bonding with nearly 50% covalent character. Ab initio molecular dynamics H simulations of HF were conducted at densities of 1.8-4.0 g/cc along the 900 K isotherm. According to our simulations, a unique form of (symmetric) hydrogen bonding could play a significant role in superionic conduction. Our work shows that the Chapman-Jouget and Zeldovich-von Neumann Doring (ZND) states of some energetic materials are close to the molecular to non-molecular transition.

Fried, L E; Goldman, N; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

FLAMES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA: DEFLAGRATION-DETONATION TRANSITION IN THE OXYGEN-BURNING FLAME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flame in a Type Ia supernova is a conglomerate structure that, depending on density, may involve separate regions of carbon, oxygen, and silicon burning, all propagating in a self-similar, subsonic front. The separation between these three burning regions increases as the density declines until eventually, below about 2 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, only carbon burning remains active, the other two burning phases having 'frozen out' on stellar scales. Between 2 and 3 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, however, there remains an energetic oxygen-burning region that trails the carbon burning by an amount that is sensitive to the turbulence intensity. As the carbon flame makes a transition to the distributed regime (Karlovitz number {approx}> 10), the characteristic separation between the carbon- and oxygen-burning regions increases dramatically, from a fraction of a meter to many kilometers. The oxygen-rich mixture between the two flames is created at a nearly constant temperature, and turbulence helps to maintain islands of well-mixed isothermal fuel as the temperature increases. The delayed burning of these regions can be supersonic and could initiate a detonation.

Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kerstein, A. R. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Aspden, A. J., E-mail: woosley@ucolick.org, E-mail: arkerst@sandia.gov, E-mail: ajaspden@lbl.gov [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

FAILED-DETONATION SUPERNOVAE: SUBLUMINOUS LOW-VELOCITY Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR KICKED REMNANT WHITE DWARFS WITH IRON-RICH CORES  

SciTech Connect

Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) originate from the thermonuclear explosions of carbon-oxygen (C-O) white dwarfs (WDs). The single-degenerate scenario is a well-explored model of SNe Ia where unstable thermonuclear burning initiates in an accreting, Chandrasekhar-mass WD and forms an advancing flame. By several proposed physical processes, the rising, burning material triggers a detonation, which subsequently consumes and unbinds the WD. However, if a detonation is not triggered and the deflagration is too weak to unbind the star, a completely different scenario unfolds. We explore the failure of the gravitationally confined detonation mechanism of SNe Ia, and demonstrate through two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations the properties of failed-detonation SNe. We show that failed-detonation SNe expel a few 0.1 M{sub Sun} of burned and partially burned material and that a fraction of the material falls back onto the WD, polluting the remnant WD with intermediate-mass and iron-group elements that likely segregate to the core forming a WD whose core is iron rich. The remaining material is asymmetrically ejected at velocities comparable to the escape velocity from the WD, and in response, the WD is kicked to velocities of a few hundred km s{sup -1}. These kicks may unbind the binary and eject a runaway/hypervelocity WD. Although the energy and ejected mass of the failed-detonation SN are a fraction of typical thermonuclear SNe, they are likely to appear as subluminous low-velocity SNe Ia. Such failed detonations might therefore explain or are related to the observed branch of peculiar SNe Ia, such as the family of low-velocity subluminous SNe (SN 2002cx/SN 2008ha-like SNe).

Jordan, George C. IV; Van Rossum, Daniel R. [Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Perets, Hagai B. [Physics Department, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Fisher, Robert T. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA 02740 (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Fingerprint of element found by LANL/Japanese team. May 29, 2012 How would the detonation of a nuclear energy source afffect an incoming asteroid? Georgios Koutroulakis and H. Yasuoka in the condensed-matter NMR lab at Los Alamos National Laboratory after having observed the magnetic resonance signal of Pu 239 for the first time. Get Expertise Scientist Eric Bauer Condensed Matter & Magnet Science Email Professor Hiroshi Yasuoka Japan Atomic Energy Agency "This discovery of the plutonium 239 magnetic resonance promises to revolutionize our understanding of plutonium solid state physics, chemistry, biology and materials science."

157

Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manhattan Project » Signature Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion The world's first nuclear explosion occurred on July 16, 1945, when a plutonium implosion device was tested at a site located 210 miles south of Los Alamos on the barren plains of the Alamogordo Bombing Range, known as the Jornada del Muerto. Inspired by the poetry of John Donne, J. Robert Oppenheimer code-named the test Trinity. Hoisted atop a 150-foot tower, the plutonium device, or Gadget, detonated at precisely 5:30 a.m. over the New Mexico desert, releasing 18.6 kilotons of power, instantly vaporizing the tower and turning the surrounding asphalt and sand into green glass.

158

Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed

Hideo Harada

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

An experimental study of deflagration to detonation transition supported by dust layers  

SciTech Connect

The roles which dust layers play in severe dust explosions were investigated in a 70-m-long and 30-cm-diameter horizontal Flame Acceleration Tube (FAT) with one end closed and the other end open to the atmosphere. A variety of dusts such as corn dust, cornstarch, Mira Gel starch, wheat dust, and wood flour were layered on the bottom half of the FAT. Flame and detonation propagation parameters were closely monitored at different locations along the FAT. The study demonstrated that the moisture content of the dust, the exposed area of the dust layers to the convective flow, and the physical characteristics of the dust are the factors that most determine the severity of layered dust explosions, indicating that prelayered dust combustion is dominated by the dust/air mixing process. While the dust explosion rate constant K{sub st} can be used to characterize dust explosibility in predispersed dust in constant volume enclosures, it does not appear to characterize the behavior of layered dust explosions. Qualitative measurements of the variation of dust concentration during a layered dust explosion were obtained. The measurements indicated that the dust concentration at the time of flame arrival is highly nonuniform. The maximum pressure rise (P{sub max} {minus} P{sub 0}) within the FAT during a layered dust explosion was found to vary linearly with the flame velocity V{sub f} when V{sub f} is subsonic. As V{sub f} reaches supersonic values the maximum pressure increase was found to vary with the V{sub f}{sup 2}, the square of the flame velocity. This result was found to be independent of dust type and concentration.

Li, Y.C.; Kauffman, C.W.; Sichel, M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ignition of a deuterium micro-detonation with a gigavolt super marx generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Centurion-Halite experiment demonstrated the feasibility of igniting a deuterium-tritium micro-explosion with an energy of not more than a few megajoule, and the Mike test, the feasibility of a pure deuterium explosion with an energy of more than 10^6 megajoule. In both cases the ignition energy was supplied by a fission bomb explosive. While an energy of a few megajoule, to be released in the time required of less than 10^-9 sec, can be supplied by lasers and intense particle beams, this is not enough to ignite a pure deuterium explosion. Because the deuterium-tritium reaction depends on the availability of lithium, the non-fusion ignition of a pure deuterium fusion reaction would be highly desirable. It is shown that this goal can conceivably be reached with a "Super Marx Generator", where a large number of "ordinary" Marx generators charge (magnetically insulated) fast high voltage capacitors of a second stage Marx generator, called a "Super Marx Generator", ultimately reaching gigavolt potentials with an energy output of 100 megajoule. An intense 10^7 Ampere-GeV proton beam drawn from a "Super Marx Generator" can ignite a deuterium thermonuclear detonation wave in a compressed deuterium cylinder, where the strong magnetic field of the proton beam entraps the charged fusion reaction products inside the cylinder. In solving the stand-off problem, the stiffness of a GeV proton beam permits to place the deuterium target at a comparatively large distance from the wall of a cavity confining the deuterium micro-explosion.

Friedwardt Winterberg

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

On the existence of multiphase thermal detonations W.W. Yuen, T.G. Theofanous*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(than tin) nuclear reactor fuel, as illustrated in Fig. 5. It is important to note that in this case of explosive melt-water inter- actions. Advances in Heat Transfer: Heat Transfer in Nuclear Reactor Safety 29 state theory in terms of fully dynamic propagations computed numerically. A sample of the physical

Yuen, Walter W.

162

Late Wash/Nitric Acid flowsheet hydrogen generation bases for simulation of a deflagration/detonation in the DWPF CPC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen generation data obtained from IDMS runs PX4 and PX5 will be used to determine a bases for a deflagration/detonation simulation in the DWPF CPC. This simulation is necessary due to the new chemistry associated with the Late Wash/ Nitric Acid flowsheet and process modifications associated with the presence of H{sub 2} in the offgas. The simulation will be performed by Professor Van Brunt from the University of South Carolina. The scenario which leads up to the deflagration/detonation simulation will be chosen such that the following conditions apply. The SRAT is filled to its maximum operating level with 9,600 gal of sludge, which corresponds to the minimum vapor space above the sludge. The SRAT is at the boiling point, producing H{sub 2} at a very low rate (about 10 % of the peak) and 15 scfm of air inleakage is entering the SRAT. Then, the H{sub 2} generation rate will be allowed to increase exponentially (catalyst activation) until it readies the peak H{sub 2} generation rate of the IDMS run, after which the H{sub 2} generation rate will be allowed to decay exponentially (catalyst deactivation) until the total amount of H2 produced is between 85 and 100% of that produced during the IDMS run.

Ritter, J.A.

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

164

Nuclear power and nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

Vaughen, V.C.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Norbo Underground Nuclear Test in U8c, Nevada Nuclear Security Site, and the Impact on Stability of the Ground Surface  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Norbo underground nuclear test in U8c to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This request is similar to one made for the Salut site in U8c (Pawloski, 2012b). Review of the Norbo site is complicated because the test first exhibited subsurface collapse, which was not unusual, but it then collapsed to the surface over one year later, which was unusual. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Norbo detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeology due to the nuclear detonation. Aviva Sussman from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has also proposed work at this site. Both proposals require physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and focus on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow and deep geophysical surveys.

Pawloski, G A

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

166

Wireless sensor network system for supporting nursing context-awareness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a wireless sensor network system for supporting context-awareness of nursing activities in hospitals. Our system is aimed at automated recording of nursing work, providing context-aware services to nurses and visualising analytical results ...

Futoshi Naya; Ren Ohmura; Masakazu Miyamae; Haruo Noma; Kiyoshi Kogure; Michita Imai

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Preserving Nuclear Grade Knowledge  

SciTech Connect

When people think of the government they think of the President, or Congress, or the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), but there are thousands of people in government-related jobs doing things most don’t really notice everyday. You can find them everywhere, from the space science folks at NASA, to the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) watching out for the bad guys. There are Rangers, and Social Workers, Nurses and Agricultural Managers. They are people working to keep the many facets of the USA rolling. One very diverse bunch is The Department of Energy (DOE) , a group who is expanding the ways we make and save energy to power our cars, homes, and businesses. Tucked away under the DOE is the National Nuclear Security Administration, the NNSA is an agency that maintains the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. It works to reduce global danger from weapons of mass destruction. It provides the U.S. Navy with safe nuclear propulsion, and it responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies in the United States and abroad, and it supports efforts in science and technology*. (* DOE/NNSA/KCP website info)

Lange, Bob

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

Countering the Nuclear Terrorist Threat  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear/radioactive threat to homeland security posed by terrorists can be broken into four categories. Of highest concern is the use of an improvised nuclear device (IND). An IND, as its name implies, is a nuclear explosive device. It produces nuclear yield, and this nuclear yield has catastrophic effects. An IND is the ultimate terrorist weapon, and terrorist groups are actively attempting to acquire nuclear weapons. Detonation of an IND could dwarf the devastation of the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center. Dealing with the aftermath of an IND would be horrific. Rescue efforts and cleanup would be hazardous and difficult. Workers would have to wear full protection suits and self-contained breathing apparatus. Because of the residual radioactivity, in certain locations they could only work short times before acquiring their ''lifetime'' dose. As with the Chernobyl event, some rescue workers might well expose themselves to lethal doses of radiation, adding to the casualty toll. Enormous volumes of contaminated debris would have to be removed and disposed. If a terrorist group decides not to pursue an actual nuclear device, it might well turn to Radiological Dispersal Devices (RDDs) or ''dirty bombs'' as they are often called. RDDs spread radioactivity but they do not generate nuclear yield. The fabrication of an RDD requires radioactive material and a dispersal mechanism. Radioactive materials are used all over the world for medical, industrial, and research applications. Standards for safe handling and accountability of radioactive material vary around the world. Stories in the press suggest inadequate controls on radiological materials in parts of the world. The effects of an RDD vary widely, and are measured in terms of contamination area, health effects to the exposed population, and economic consequences. Even a negligible, but measurable, exposure would exploit the general public's fear of things radioactive and would have significant psychological consequences. The greatest impact of a small release would probably be economic, associated with cleanup and restoration of the contaminated area. Another category of threat is the attack on a facility, either a power reactor or sabotage of a large radiation source. In general these facilities are hard targets (structurally), and damage and contamination are localized. The final category of threat is the use of radioactive materials to deliver a radiation dose to individuals. This type of attack is again localized and does not readily fall into the category of a weapon of mass destruction.

Vantine, H C

2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

169

NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into action. Much work needs to be accomplished to enhance nuclear preparedness and to substantially bolster and clarify the capacity to deploy competent resources. Until detailed plans are scripted, and personnel and other resources are postured, and exercised, IND specific planning remains an urgent need requiring attention and action. Although strategic guidance, policies, concepts of operations, roles, responsibilities, and plans governing the response and consequence management for the IND scenario exist, an ongoing integration challenge prevails regarding how best to get capable and competent surge capacity personnel (disaster reservists) and other resources engaged and readied in an up-front manner with pre-scripted assignments to augment the magnitude of anticipated demands of expertise. With the above in mind, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) puts science to work to create and deploy practical, high-value, cost-effective nuclear solutions. As the Department of Energy's (DOE) applied research and development laboratory, SRNL supports Savannah River Site (SRS) operations, DOE, national initiatives, and other federal agencies, across the country and around the world. SRNL's parent at SRS also employs more than 8,000 personnel. The team is a great asset that seeks to continue their service in the interest of national security and stands ready to accomplish new missions. Overall, an integral part of the vision for SRNL's National and Homeland Security Directorate is the establishment of a National Security Center at SRNL, and development of state of the science capabilities (technologies and trained technical personnel) for responding to emergency events on local, regional, or national scales. This entails leveraging and posturing the skills, knowledge and experience base of SRS personnel to deliver an integrated capability to support local, state, and federal authorities through the development of pre-scripted requests for assistance, agreements, and plans. It also includes developing plans, training, exercises, recruitment strategies, and processes to e

Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Related Resources - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

171

Publications: Other Resources - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

172

Publications 2005 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

173

Publications 2003 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

174

Contacts - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

175

Publications 2001 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

176

Publications 2004 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

177

Publications 2009 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

178

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

179

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

180

Nuclear Systems Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Publications 2011 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

182

Daily Scheduling of Nurses in Operating Suites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This, in turn, leads to reduced patient safety and substandard treatment ... to improve the nurse scheduling process (Ernst et al., 2004). Recent surveys include ...

183

Propagation or failure of detonation across an air gap in an LX-17 column: continuous time-dependent detonation or shock speed using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique  

SciTech Connect

The detailed history of the shock/detonation wave propagation after crossing a room-temperature-room-pressure (RTP) air gap between a 25.4 mm diameter LX-17 donor column and a 25.4 mm diameter by 25.4 mm long LX-17 acceptor pellet is investigated for three different gap widths (3.07, 2.08, and 0.00 mm) using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique. The 2.08 mm gap propagated and the 3.07 mm gap failed and this can be seen clearly and unambiguously in the EFO data even though the 25.4 mm-long acceptor pellet would be considered quite short for a determination by more traditional means such as pins.

Hare, D E; Chandler, J B; Compton, S M; Garza, R G; Grimsley, D A; Hernandez, A; Villafana, R J; Wade, J T; Weber, S R; Wong, B M; Souers, P C

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Research utilisation in nursing practice : Barriers and facilitators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research utilisation in nursing practice - barriers and facilitators To improve and develop nursing practice it is important that research findings are utilised by the… (more)

Nilsson Kajermo, Kerstin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Slag characterization and removal using pulse detonation for coal gasification. Quarterly research report, October--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Experiments will mainly focus on breaking the bonds within the slag itself using detonation wave. For the experiments, initial suggestion was to build up slag deposit around a representative tube by placing it inside the convection pass of an actual boiler at the Northern States Power Company. But it was later concluded that once the tube is cooled to room condition, the thermal stress will greatly reduce the bonding between the heat transfer surface and the slag. It was concluded that the slag will be attached to the tube using high density epoxy resin. High density epoxy will be used so that they do not diffuse into the slag and strengthen the bonding within the slag. Suggestions on candidate epoxy are provided by MTI lab. MTI also provided PVAMU with different kinds of slags for testing. The deposits for characterization were from a subbituminous coal fired utility boiler.

Huque, Z.; Zhou, J.; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.

1995-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Iterated local search in nurse rostering problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents how to solve a nurse rostering problem over the real datasets of Centre hospitalier régional de Trois-Rivières hospital in Canada. Due to the complexity of this problem with plenty of hard constraints, we propose an ... Keywords: greedy, iterated local search, nurse rostering, tabu search

Sen Ngoc Vu, Minh H. Nhat Nguyen, Le Minh Duc, Chantal Baril, Viviane Gascon, Tien Ba Dinh

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nuclear Reactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used to measure the properties of nuclei. Reactions that exchange energy or nucleons can be used to measure the energies of...

189

Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear Safety information site that provides assistance and resources to field elements in implementation of requirements and resolving nuclear safety, facility safety, and quality assurance issues.

190

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... response of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory, and ...

191

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

School of Nursing A Resource Guide for Faculty and Staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Contents 2012-2013 Page i CONTENTS SECTION 1: OHSU SCHOOL OF NURSING · School of Nursing Overview-Year, Tenure-Track, Tenured #12;School of Nursing Handbook ­ Contents 2012-2013 Page ii o Affiliate and Joint ............................................................ 44 #12;School of Nursing Handbook ­ Contents 2012-2013 Page iii SECTION 7: ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

Chapman, Michael S.

193

Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research...

194

Detonation cell size measurements in high-temperature hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at the BNL high-temperature combustion facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was designed and constructed with the objective of studying detonation phenomena in mixtures of hydrogen-air-steam at initially high temperatures. The central element of the HTCF is a 27-cm inner-diameter, 21.3-m long cylindrical test vessel capable of being heating to 700K {+-} 14K. A unique feature of the HTCF is the {open_quotes}diaphragmless{close_quotes} acetylene-oxygen gas driver which is used to initiate the detonation in the test gas. Cell size measurements have shown that for any hydrogen-air-steam mixture, increasing the initial mixture temperature, in the range of 300K to 650K, while maintaining the initial pressure of 0.1 MPa, decreases the cell size and thus makes the mixture more detonable. The effect of steam dilution on cell size was tested in stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric (e.g., equivalence ratio of 0.5) hydrogen-air mixtures. Increasing the steam dilution in hydrogen-air mixtures at 0.1 MPa initial pressure increases the cell size, irrespective of initial temperature. It is also observed that the desensitizing effect of steam diminished with increased initial temperature. A 1-dimensional, steady-state Zel`dovich, von Neumann, Doring (ZND) model, with full chemical kinetics, has been used to predict cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at different initial conditions. Qualitatively the model predicts the overall trends observed in the measured cell size versus mixture composition and initial temperature and pressure. It was found that the proportionality constant used to predict detonation cell size from the calculated ZND model reaction zone varies between 10 and 100 depending on the mixture composition and initial temperature. 32 refs., 35 figs.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.L. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. ... see all Nuclear Analytical Chemistry news ... ...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

Future of Nuclear Data for Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear astrophysics is an exciting growth area in nuclear science. Because of the enormous nuclear data needs of this field

Michael S. Smith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

198

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

199

Neutrino Counter Nuclear Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiations produced by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation at the Z0 pole can be used to heat up the primary stage of a thermonuclear warhead and can in principle detonate the device remotely. Neutrino-antineutrino annihilation can also be used as a tactical assault weapon to target hideouts that are unreachable by conventional means.

Alfred Tang

2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

200

Dehydration of the Elderly in Nursing Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

51. 6. Gasper, PM. Water intake of nursing home residents. Jrequires 2,500 mL/day water intake from foods and fluids (determining adequate water intake: 100 mL/kg for the first

Garcia, Marcela Esperanza

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Underground Infrastructure Impacts Due to a Surface Burst Nuclear Device in an Urban Canyon Environment  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of the effects of a nuclear device exploded in a urban environment such as the Chicago studied for this particular report have shown the importance on the effects from the urban canyons so typical of today's urban environment as compared to nuclear test event effects observed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Pacific Testing Area on which many of the typical legacy empirical codes are based on. This report first looks at the some of the data from nuclear testing that can give an indication of the damage levels that might be experienced due to a nuclear event. While it is well known that a above ground blast, even a ground burst, very poorly transmits energy into the ground ( < 1%) and the experimental results discussed here are for fully coupled detonations, these results do indicate a useful measure of the damage that might be expected. The second part of the report looks at effects of layering of different materials that typically would make up the near ground below surface environment that a shock would propagate through. As these simulations support and is widely known in the community, the effects of different material compositions in these layers modify the shock behavior and especially modify the energy dispersal and coupling into the basement structures. The third part of the report looks at the modification of the underground shock effects from a surface burst 1 KT device due to the presence of basements under the Chicago buildings. Without direct knowledge of the basement structure, a simulated footprint of a uniform 20m depth was assumed underneath each of the NGI defined buildings in the above ground environment. In the above ground case, the underground basement structures channel the energy along the line of site streets keeping the shock levels from falling off as rapidly as has been observed in unobstructed detonations. These simulations indicate a falloff of factors of 2 per scaled length as compared to 10 for the unobstructed case. Again, as in the above ground case, the basements create significant shielding causing the shock profile to become more square and reducing the potential for damage diagonal to the line of sight streets. The results for a 1KT device is that the heavily damaged zone (complete destruction) will extend out to 50m from the detonation ({approx}100m for 10KT). The heavily to moderately damaged zone will extend out to 100m ({approx}200m for 10KT). Since the destruction will depend on geometric angle from the detonation and also the variability of response for various critical infrastructure, for planning purposes the area out to 100m from the detonation should be assumed to be non-operational. Specifically for subway tunnels, while not operational, they could be human passable for human egress in the moderately damaged area. The results of the simulations presented in this report indicate only the general underground infrastructure impact. Simulations done with the actual basement geometry would be an important improvement. Equally as important or even more so, knowing the actual underground material configurations and material composition would be critical information to refine the calculations. Coupling of the shock data into structural codes would help inform the emergency planning and first response communities on the impact to underground structures and the state of buildings after the detonation.

Bos, Randall J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dey, Thomas N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Runnels, Scott R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

203

Nuclear forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

Bing, G.F.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTINUING TRAINING SELF- CONTINUING TRAINING SELF- STUDY PROGRAM DOE O 452.1D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM DOE O 452.2D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY DOE O 452.1D and DOE O 452.2D Familiar Level June 2011 1 DOE O 452.1D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM DOE O 452.2D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the objectives of implementing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) O 452.1D? 2. Define the following terms as they apply to this Order: Abnormal environment High explosive detonation 3. What are the objectives of implementing DOE O 452.2D? 4. What are the general requirements of DOE O 452.2D?

206

Nuclear Deterrence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Charlie McMillan, Director: "For the last 70 years there has not been a world war, and I have to think that our strong deterrent has something to do with that fact." Mission nuclear weapons Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:06 Director McMillan on nuclear deterrence While the role and prominence of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy

207

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Salut Underground Nuclear Test in U20ak, Nevada National Security Site, and the Impact of Stability of the Ground Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of Jerry Sweeney, the LLNL Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Salut underground nuclear test in U20ak to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Review of the Salut site is complicated because the test experienced a subsurface, rather than surface, collapse. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Salut detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeologogy due to the nuclear detonation. Sweeney's proposal requires physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Test Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site), and focuses on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow, and deep geophysical surveys.

Pawloski, G A

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

208

White House honors Sandia nurse for helping women veterans, children...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > White House honors Sandia nurse for helping ... White House honors Sandia nurse for helping women...

209

Nursing Simulation: A Review of the Past 40 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation, in its many forms, has been a part of nursing education and practice for many years. The use of games, computer-assisted instruction, standardized patients, virtual reality, and low-fidelity to high-fidelity mannequins have appeared in the ... Keywords: anatomical models, computer-assisted instruction, health care education, high-fidelity patient simulation, low-fidelity patient simulation, nursing education, nursing practice, nursing research, objective structured clinical experience, partial task trainers, standardized patients, virtual reality

Wendy M. Nehring; Felissa R. Lashley

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Use of Lasers to Study the Impact of Fractionation and Condensation on the Toxicity of Nuclear Weapon Fallout  

SciTech Connect

An experimental concept has been developed to collect data to aid in the refinement of simulation programs designed to predict the fallout effects arising from surface and shallowly buried nuclear weapon detonations. These experiments, called the Condensation Debris Experiments (CDE), are intended to study the condensation/fractionation of material that is liberated following an initial deposition of laser energy onto a small, characterized target. The CDE effort also encompasses target development and material studies as well as supporting computational efforts studying radiation hydrodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and relevant neutron activation processes (not discussed here).

Vidnovic III, T; Bradley, K S; Debonnel, C S; Dipeso, G; Fournier, K; Karpenko, V P; Tobin, M

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL NURSES' HEALTH STUDY Please reply to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL NURSES' HEALTH STUDY Please reply to: Channing Laboratory 181 Longwood just a moment to complete this short form! #12;HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL NURSES' HEALTH STUDY #12;BEFORE NURSES' HEALTH STUDY - HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL 1. 3. 4. What is your date of birth? Have your menstrual

Church, George M.

212

Nuclear Energy  

Nuclear Energy Environmental Mgmt. Study Objectives: Respond to the pressing need to refine existing corrosion models: Predict performance in wide range of environments

213

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

214

Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I review progress that has been made in nuclear astrophysics over the past few years and summarize some of the questions that remain. Topics selected include solar neutrinos

W. C. Haxton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 17. Purchases of enrichment services by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type in delivery year, 2012

216

Nuclear Weapons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear science that has had a significant global influence. Following the observation of fission products of uranium by Hahn and Strassmann in 1938, a uranium fission weapon...

217

NUCLEAR ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

could improve the economic and safety performance of these advanced reactors. Nuclear power can reduce GHG emissions from electricity production and possibly in co-generation...

218

Radionuclide Migration at the Rio Blanco Site, A Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability gas reservoirs. The third and final project in the program, Project Rio Blanco, was conducted in Rio Blanco County, in northwestern Colorado. In this experiment, three 33-kiloton nuclear explosives were simultaneously detonated in a single emplacement well in the Mesaverde Group and Fort Union Formation, at depths of 1,780, 1,899, and 2,039 m below land surface on May 17, 1973. The objective of this work is to estimate lateral distances that tritium released from the detonations may have traveled in the subsurface and evaluate the possible effect of postulated natural-gas development on radionuclide migration. Other radionuclides were considered in the analysis, but the majority occur in relatively immobile forms (such as nuclear melt glass). Of the radionuclides present in the gas phase, tritium dominates in terms of quantity of radioactivity in the long term and contribution to possible whole body exposure. One simulation is performed for {sup 85}Kr, the second most abundant gaseous radionuclide produced after tritium.

Clay A. Cooper; Ming Ye; Jenny Chapman; Craig Shirley

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Application of the ORIGEN Fallout Analysis Tool and the DELFIC Fallout Planning Tool to National Technical Nuclear Forensics  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to provide a robust fallout analysis and planning tool for the National Technical Nuclear Forensics interagency ground sample collection team. Their application called for a fast-running, portable mission-planning tool for use in response to emerging improvised nuclear device (IND) post-detonation situations. The project met those goals by research and development of models to predict the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of fallout debris. ORNL has developed new graphical user interfaces for two existing codes, the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code and the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). ORIGEN is a validated, radionuclide production and decay code that has been implemented into the Fallout Analysis Tool to predict the fallout source term nuclide inventory after the detonation of an IND. DELFIC is a validated, physics-based, research reference fallout prediction software package. It has been implemented into the Fallout Planning Tool and is used to predict the fractionated isotope concentrations in fallout, particle sizes, fractionation ratios, dose rate, and integrated dose over the planned collection routes - information vital to ensure quality samples for nuclear forensic analysis while predicting dose to the sample collectors. DELFIC contains a particle activity module, which models the radiochemical fractionation of the elements in a cooling fireball as they condense into and onto particles to predict the fractionated activity size distribution for a given scenario. This provides the most detailed physics-based characterization of the fallout source term phenomenology available in an operational fallout model.

Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Lefebvre, Jordan P [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A Mobile Nursing Information System Based on Human-Computer Interaction Design for Improving Quality of Nursing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conventional Nursing Information System (NIS), which supports the role of nurse in some areas, is typically deployed as an immobile system. However, the traditional information system can't response to patients' conditions in real-time, causing delays ... Keywords: Human-computer interaction, Nursing information system, Personal digital assistant, Small-screen interface design

Kuo-Wei Su; Cheng-Li Liu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forces and Nuclear Systems Forces and Nuclear Systems Our goal is to achieve a description of nuclear systems ranging in size from the deuteron to nuclear matter and neutron stars using a single parameterization of the nuclear forces. Our work includes both the construction of two- and three-nucleon potentials and the development of many-body techniques for computing nuclear properties with these interactions. Detailed quantitative, computationally intense studies are essential parts of this work. In the last decade we have constructed several realistic two- and three-nucleon potential models. The NN potential, Argonne v18, has a dominant charge-independent piece plus additional charge-dependent and charge-symmetry-breaking terms, including a complete electromagnetic interaction. It fits 4301 pp and np elastic scattering data with a chi**2

222

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue...

223

Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

role in developing science and technology for nuclear power programs, nuclear propulsion, nuclear medicine, and the nation's nuclear weapon program among others. Many...

224

Nuclear hadrodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of hadron dynamics in the nucleus is illustrated to show the importance of nuclear medium effects in hadron interactions. The low lying hadron spectrum is considered to provide the natural collective variable for nuclear systems. Recent studies of nucleon?nucleon and delta?nucleon interactions are reviewed

D. F. Geesaman

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

Stocker, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials...

227

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management &...

228

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are of interest for nuclear security applications. Theof interest to nuclear security. To either make theseother targets of nuclear security interest, such kilogram-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diablo Canyon 2 nuclear reactors. Data were taken fromCapacity Operation of nuclear reactors for power generationby the operation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, ap-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System...

231

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

232

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transmission say for Nuclear Fuel Assemblies 4.1Facilities Spent nuclear fuel is another example wherein intact spent nuclear fuel would be a technological

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nuclear Halos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that extreme nuclear halos are caused only by pairs of s?wave neutrons (or single s?wave neutrons) and that such states occur much more frequently in the periodic table than previously believed. Besides lingering long near zero neutron separation energy such extreme halos have very remarkable properties: they can contribute significantly to the nuclear density at more than twice the normal nuclear radius and their spreading width can be very narrow. The properties of these states are primarily determined by the “thickness” of the nuclear surface in the mean?free nuclear potential and thus their importance increases greatly as we approach the neutron drip line. We discuss what such extreme halos are

Erich Vogt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier than iron, and neutron stars. Big-bang nucleosynthesis is concerned with the formation of elements with A nuclear physics inputs required are few-nucleon reaction cross sections. The nucleosynthesis of heavier elements involves a variety of proton-, alpha-, neutron-, and photon-induced reactions, coupled with radioactive decay. The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities has opened an important new avenue for studying these processes, as many involve radioactive species. Nuclear physics also plays an important role in neutron stars: both the nuclear equation of state and cooling processes involving neutrino emission play a very important role. Recent developments and also the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be highlighted.

Carl R. Brune

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Review of the Research on Response to Improvised Nuclear Device Events  

SciTech Connect

Following the events of September 11, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. Understanding the state of knowledge, identifying gaps, and making recommendations for how to fill those gaps, this paper will provide a framework under which past findings can be understood and future research can fit. The risk of an improvised nuclear device (IND) detonation may seem unlikely; and while this is hopefully true, due to its destructive capability, IND events must be prepared for. Many people still live under the Cold War mentality that if a city is attacked with a nuclear weapon, there is little chance of survival. This assumption, while perhaps true in the case of multiple, thermonuclear weapons exchanges, does not hold for the current threat. If a single IND were detonated in the United States, there would be many casualties at the point of impact; however, there would also be many survivors and the initial response by two major groups will mean the difference between life and death for many people. These groups are the first responders and the public. Understanding how these two groups prepare, react and interact will improve response to nuclear terrorism. Figure 1 provides a visualization of the response timeline of an IND event. For the purposes of this assessment, it is assumed that to accurately inform the public, three functions need to be fulfilled by response personnel, namely planning, developing situational awareness, and developing a public message. Planning varies widely from city to city, and to date no comprehensive study has been completed to assess how individual cities are progressing with preparation plans. Developing situational awareness about an IND detonation has been well researched over the years, yet it is far from fully understood. While messaging is an integral component to response, it is one that suffers from a dearth of knowledge. The public will have a certain level of education and preparation. After the detonation the public will respond naturally and upon receiving the responders message will react to the message and may modify their behavior accordingly. Reviewing the nodes under both headings, responders and public will help better prepare the country to meet the challenges of an IND attack.

Bentz, A; Buddemeier, B; Dombroski, M

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

(Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

Haxton, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

238

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

239

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

240

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

242

Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

243

Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

244

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

245

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

246

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. ... A 600 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Analytical Data Compilation Reference Materials. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Nuclear Chirality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear chirality is a novel manifestation of spontaneous symmetry breaking resulting from an orthogonal coupling of angular momentum vectors in triaxial nuclei. Three perpendicular angular momenta can form two systems of opposite handedness; the time reversal operator

Krzysztof Starosta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the Thermal Stability of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Nuclear Waste Applications by K. Hildal, J.H. Perepezko, and L. Kaufman, $10.00 ($10.00), $25.00.

250

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 21. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2008-2012

251

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

Atkins-Duffin, C E

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

International Cooperation on Safety of Nuclear Plants - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

253

Current R&D Activities in Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

254

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 161-180 - Nuclear Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

255

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

256

Detonating an insensitive explosive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making 3-amino-5-nitro-1,2,4-triazole using ammonium 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole and hydrazine hydrate as starting materials and a method for providing energy derived from 3-amino-5-nitro-1,2,4-triazole.

Lee, Kien-yin (Los Alamos, NM); Storm, Carlyle B. (Santa Fe, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism Home > Our Mission > Countering Nuclear Terrorism Countering Nuclear Terrorism NNSA provides expertise, practical tools, and technically informed policy

258

Model-Based Calculations of the Probability of a Country's Nuclear Proliferation Decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first nuclear weapon was detonated in August 1945 over Japan to end World War II. During the past six decades, the majority of the world's countries have abstained from acquiring nuclear weapons. However, a number of countries have explored the nuclear weapons option, 23 in all. Among them, 14 countries have dropped their interest in nuclear weapons after initiating some efforts. And nine of them today possess nuclear weapons. These countries include the five nuclear weapons states - U.S., Russia, U.K., France, and China - and the four non- NPT member states - Israel, India, Pakistan, and North Korea. Many of these countries initially used civilian nuclear power technology development as a basis or cover for their military program. Recent proliferation incidents in Iraq, Iran, and North Korea brought the world together to pay much attention to nuclear nonproliferation. With the expected surge in the use of nuclear energy for power generation by developing countries, the world's nuclear nonproliferation regime needs to be better prepared for potential future challenges. For the world's nuclear nonproliferation regime to effectively cope with any future proliferation attempts, early detection of potentially proliferation-related activities is highly desirable. Early detection allows the international community to respond and take necessary actions - ideally using political and diplomatic influences without resorting to harsh measures such as sanctions or military actions. In this regard, a capability to quantitatively predict the chance of a country's nuclear proliferation intent or activities is of significant interest. There have been various efforts in the research community to understand the determinants of nuclear proliferation and develop quantitative tools to predict nuclear proliferation events. These efforts have shown that information about the political issues surrounding a country's security along with economic development data can be useful to explain the occurrences of proliferation decisions. However, predicting major historical proliferation events using model-based predictions has been unreliable. Nuclear proliferation decisions by a country is affected by three main factors: (1) technology; (2) finance; and (3) political motivation [1]. Technological capability is important as nuclear weapons development needs special materials, detonation mechanism, delivery capability, and the supporting human resources and knowledge base. Financial capability is likewise important as the development of the technological capabilities requires a serious financial commitment. It would be difficult for any state with a gross national product (GNP) significantly less than that of about $100 billion to devote enough annual governmental funding to a nuclear weapon program to actually achieve positive results within a reasonable time frame (i.e., 10 years). At the same time, nuclear proliferation is not a matter determined by a mastery of technical details or overcoming financial constraints. Technology or finance is a necessary condition but not a sufficient condition for nuclear proliferation. At the most fundamental level, the proliferation decision by a state is controlled by its political motivation. To effectively address the issue of predicting proliferation events, all three of the factors must be included in the model. To the knowledge of the authors, none of the exiting models considered the 'technology' variable as part of the modeling. This paper presents an attempt to develop a methodology for statistical modeling and predicting a country's nuclear proliferation decisions. The approach is based on the combined use of data on a country's nuclear technical capability profiles economic development status, security environment factors and internal political and cultural factors. All of the information utilized in the study was from open source literature. (authors)

Li, Jun; Yim, Man-Sung; McNelis, David N. [Department of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

DAMAGE TO COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS EXPOSED TO NUCLEAR EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

One equipment control building designed to be blast resistant and two each of three standardized types of metal warehouse or utility buildings were exposed to the effects of a nuclear device detonation. One of the utility buildings was frameless, with deeply corrugated wall and roof sections; a second was very largely frameless, utilizing interlocking channel sections; and in the third the aluininum-panel wall and roof covering was supported by girts and purlins, which in turn were supported by steel frames. Because of atmospheric conditions at the time of an earlier detonation in the test series, one of each of the three types of utility buildings was exposed to approximately 0.7 psi overpressure before the planned test. In the planned test one of each of the three types was exposed to approximately 3.0 psi overpressure and one to 1.3 psi, with the intention of bracketing their overpressure survival range and obtaining data for possible economic redesign for improved blast resistance. The equipment control building utilized continuous-welded steel frames and reinforced-gypsum curtain-wall construction. The control building was exposed to approximately 4.1 psi, in the anticipated fringe zone of major structural damage, to determine its protective capabilities. The blast-resistant equipment control building was nat structurally damaged by the blast, thus exceeding the expectations of the design. Each of the three utility buildings received severe damage at the near range, one being completely destroyed, whereas at the far range the damage in every case was repairable. The test results are discussed, and recommendations for improved designs are made. Damage records during the unexpected test and at the far range in the planned test are correlated by means of dynamic analyses with pressuretime data and studies of structural resintance. Pressure-time information is appended. (auth)

Johnston, B.G.

1956-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Organization - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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261

Achievements: Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

262

Automating the Coupling of ORIGEN with GADRAS via the Fallout Analysis Tool for National Technical Nuclear Forensics  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear forensic teams will be deployed to collect and evaluate fallout samples on the ground in the scenario of a low-yield nuclear detonation in a heavily populated area. Quick non-destructive methods of predicting the quality of the sample before it is analyzed in detail are essential for efficient post-event collections. In this work, the process of exporting Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) results into Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) has been automated within the Fallout Analysis Tool. This coupling allows for the simulation of detector responses to fallout samples with varying degrees of fractionation. The degree to which the samples are fractionated depends on the location of the samples in the fallout field. In the following study, this phenomenon is examined, as its understanding is important to the investigation of debris distribution. The simulated detector spectra from GADRAS can be used to compare peak ratios of volatile-refractory isotope pairs in order to determine the degree of fractionation. Simulated fractionated fallout samples from DELFIC for a 10 kt, pure 235U fission surface burst were modeled for distances ranging to 256 km out from ground zero, and for times up to 1 week from detonation. The fractionation ratios, also known as r values, from isotope concentrations, photon lines and peak areas of four volatile-refractory pairs were calculated and compared. Fractionation prediction via the peak areas method was evaluated for each pair by comparing the results with the simulated radionuclide inventory.

Monterial, Mateusz [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL; Lefebvre, Jordan P [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Hooper, David A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nuclear scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

Friar, J.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world of the twenty first century is an energy consuming society. Due to increasing population and living standards, each year the world requires more energy and new efficient systems for delivering it. Furthermore, the new systems must be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. The goal of the book is to show the current state-of-the-art in the covered technical areas as well as to demonstrate how general engineering principles and methods can be applied to nuclear power systems.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Nuclear Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear reactions generate energy in nuclear reactors, in stars, and are responsible for the existence of all elements heavier than hydrogen in the universe. Nuclear reactions denote reactions between nuclei, and between nuclei and other fundamental particles, such as electrons and photons. A short description of the conservation laws and the definition of basic physical quantities is presented, followed by a more detailed account of specific cases: (a) formation and decay of compound nuclei; (b)direct reactions; (c) photon and electron scattering; (d) heavy ion collisions; (e) formation of a quark-gluon plasma; (f) thermonuclear reactions; (g) and reactions with radioactive beams. Whenever necessary, basic equations are introduced to help understand general properties of these reactions. Published in Wiley Encyclopedia of Physics, ISBN-13: 978-3-527-40691-3 - Wiley-VCH, Berlin, 2009.

C. A. Bertulani

2009-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

OLDER HOME HEALTH REGISTERED NURSES: WORK PERCEPTIONS AND SATISFACTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is a current and growing nursing shortage in the United States, at the same time that more aging baby boomers require health services. This… (more)

Rossman, Therese L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Predictors of Nursing Home Placement for Home Care Consumers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of nursing home placement for individuals receiving home care services through a locally funded levy program.… (more)

Nelson, Ian M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nuclear Models  

SciTech Connect

The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

Fossion, Ruben [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Collaborating Organizations - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborating Organizations Collaborating Organizations Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program Collaborating Organizations Bookmark and Share National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network, coordinated by IAEA, Vienna, Austria Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Group, Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. Nuclear Spectroscopy Group, Department of Nuclear Physics,

271

Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Program Data Program Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program We contribute to the development of comprehensive nuclear reactions and nuclear structure databases, including nuclear data measurement, analysis, modeling and evaluation methodologies, that are implemented in basic science research and advanced nuclear technologies. Bookmark and Share Recent Events Nuclear Structure 2012 Conference Argonne National Laboratory hosted the

272

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program...

273

National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Nuclear Data Center and Nuclear Energy Pavel Oblozinsky National Nuclear Data Center;National Nuclear Data Center Probably the oldest active organization at BNL History · Founded in 1952 as Sigma Center, neutron cross sections · Changed to National Nuclear Data Center in 1977 · 40 staff

274

Midwest Nuclear Compact (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Midwest Nuclear Compact establishes a Midwest Nuclear Board to cooperatively evaluate and make recommendations regarding the development of nuclear technology, distribute information about...

275

Nuclear Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

276

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space...

277

Brookhaven Nuclear Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Nuclear Physics Historically, nuclear physicists have studied the structure, characteristics, and behavior of the atomic nucleus and the nature of the nuclear force....

278

NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

Randrup, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Energy Sources Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has...

280

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nuclear explosions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the physics of a nuclear bomb explosion and its effects on human beings is presented at the level of a sophomore general physics course without calculus. It is designed to supplement a standard text for such a course and problems are included.

A. A. Broyles

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nuclear ferromagnetism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of producing ordered states of nuclear spins by DNP followed by ADRF was first demonstrated in 1969. The spins of 19F in a crystal of CaF2 were cooled below one microdegree (with the applied field along the [100] axis) and their antiferromagnetic ordering was exhibited through the characteristic behaviour of their transverse and (later) longitudinal susceptibilities.

A. Abragam

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described that includes spaced vertical fuel elements centrally disposed in a pressure vessel, a mass of graphite particles in the pressure vessel, means for fluidizing the graphite particles, and coolant tubes in the pressure vessel laterally spaced from the fuel elements. (AEC)

Post, R.G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

Starr, C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nuclear Terrorism.  

SciTech Connect

As pointed out by several speakers, the level of violence and destruction in terrorist attacks has increased significantly during the past decade. Fortunately, few have involved weapons of mass destruction, and none have achieved mass casualties. The Aum Shinrikyo release of lethal nerve agent, sarin, in the Tokyo subway on March 20, 1995 clearly broke new ground by crossing the threshold in attempting mass casualties with chemical weapons. However, of all weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons still represent the most frightening threat to humankind. Nuclear weapons possess an enormous destructive force. The immediacy and scale of destruction are unmatched. In addition to destruction, terrorism also aims to create fear among the public and governments. Here also, nuclear weapons are unmatched. The public's fear of nuclear weapons or, for that matter, of all radioactivity is intense. To some extent, this fear arises from a sense of unlimited vulnerability. That is, radioactivity is seen as unbounded in three dimensions - distance, it is viewed as having unlimited reach; quantity, it is viewed as having deadly consequences in the smallest doses (the public is often told - incorrectly, of course - that one atom of plutonium will kill); and time, if it does not kill you immediately, then it will cause cancer decades hence.

Hecker, Siegfried S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

encompasses Sandia's work in Nonproliferation R&D, the US Nuclear Detonation Detection System (USNDS

287

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculation...

Ejiri, H; Boswell, M; Young, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculations for them.

H. Ejiri; A. I. Titov; M. Boswell; A. Young

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Forensics Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security

290

Why Nuclear Energy?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear Why nuclear energy? energy? Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the world world' 's energy needs s...

291

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

292

The State of the Art of Nurse Rostering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nurse rostering is a complex scheduling problem that affects hospital personnel on a daily basis all over the world. The need for quality software solutions is acute for a number of reasons. In particular, it is very important to efficiently utilise ... Keywords: hospital personnel scheduling, nurse rostering

Edmund K. Burke; Patrick De Causmaecker; Greet Vanden Berghe; Hendrik Van Landeghem

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

ANS Nuclear Historic Landmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NCNR declared a Nuclear Historic Landmark by the American Nuclear Society. The NIST Center for Neutron Research ...

294

WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. Wilets, "Theories of Nuclear Fission", Clarendon Press,of the nuclear force, result in lower calculated fission

Myers, W.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

296

Nuclear Analytical Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Analytical Methods. Research activities in the Nuclear Analytical Methods Group are focused on the science that ...

297

How ORISE is Making a Difference: Nurse Triage Lines Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nurse Triage Lines Support Nurse Triage Lines Support ORISE contributes to CDC Public Health Policy Competition win The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Influenza Coordination Unit (ICU) recently won the 2012 Annual Public Health Policy Competition for a proposal to explore the use of nurse triage lines during an influenza pandemic. As a key partner, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provided critical coordination, research, development of educational materials, and consultation to support the project, which has been underway since September 2011. The CDC ICU hosted the Nurse Triage Line Stakeholders Meeting in March of 2012. The project is exploring the use of nurse triage lines as a promising method for reducing disparities in access to quality health care during an

298

Nuclear rockets  

SciTech Connect

A systems analysis is made of a class of nuclear-propelled rockets in combination with chemical boosters. Various missions are considered including the delivery of 5000-lb payload 5500 nautical miles, the placement of a satellite in an orbit about the earth and the delivery of a payload to escape velocity. The reactors considered are of the heterogeneous type utilizing graphite fuel elements in a matrix of Be or hydrogenous moderator. Liquid hydrogen and ammonia are considered as propellants. Graphical results are presented which show the characteristics and performance of the nuclear rockets as the design parameters are varied. It should be emphasized that this report is not in any sense intended as a handbook of rocket parameters; it is intended only as a guide for determining areas of interest.

York, H.F.; Biehl, A.T.

1955-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

299

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

300

DAMAGE TO CONVENTIONAL AND SPECIAL TYPES OF RESIDENCES EXPOSED TO NUCLEAR EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

Ten residential structures of wood, brick, lightweight reinforced concrete block, and lightweight precast concrete slabs were exposed in pairs to the effects of a nuclear device of approximately 30 kt yield, detonated atop a 500-ft tower. The houses represented various structural types, and two houses of each type were tested. One house was located at an anticipated overpressure at which collapse or major damage might be expected and the other was located at an anticipated overpressure at which damage without collapse might be expected. The one-story reinforced lightweight concrete block house and the one-story precast lightweight concrete house suffered only minor structural damage. Photographs are included of the houses both before and after damage. Motion pictures were made during the event and were analyzed for information on thermal and blast effects. Recommendations are included for strengthening the structures within the limits of practical economy and so providing increased protection to dwelling structures. (C.H.)

Randall, P.A.

1961-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

302

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

303

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

304

Nuclear Systems Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Criticality Safety Irradiation Experiment Development and Execution Robotics & Remote Systems Engineering and Applications Thermal & Hydraulic Experiments & Analysis Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Nuclear Systems Technology SHARE Nuclear Systems Technology Nuclear Systems Technology Image 2 ORNL has had historic involvement in a broad set of nuclear research areas: irradiated materials and isotopes R&D, fission and fusion reactors development, neutron scattering, fuel enrichment, used fuel recycling and disposal, etc. The skills and knowledge required to succeed in these research areas often cultivated core areas of expertise in which ORNL is

305

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

306

Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gasbuggy underground nuclear test site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gasbuggy site in northwestern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 29-kiloton nuclear device in 1967. The test took place in the Lewis Shale, approximately 182 m below the Ojo Alamo Sandstone, which is the aquifer closest to the detonation horizon. The conservative assumption was made that tritium was injected from the blast-created cavity into the Ojo Alamo Sandstone by the force of the explosion, via fractures created by the shot. Model results suggest that if radionuclides produced by the shot entered the Ojo Alamo, they are most likely contained within the area currently administered by DOE. The transport calculations are most sensitive to changes in the mean groundwater velocity, followed by the variance in hydraulic conductivity, the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity, the transverse hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient, and uncertainty in the source size. This modeling was performed to investigate how the uncertainty in various physical parameters affects calculations of radionuclide transport at the Gasbuggy site, and to serve as a starting point for discussion regarding further investigation at the site; it was not intended to be a definitive simulation of migration pathways or radionuclide concentration values.

Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Andricevic, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

Young, G.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nuclear Photonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With new gamma-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest with 10^13 g/s and a bandwidth of Delta E_g/E_g ~10^-3, a new era of g-beams with energies Duke Univ., USA) with 10^8 g/s and Delta E_g/E_g~0.03. Even a seeded quantum FEL for g-beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused g-beams. We describe a new experiment at the g-beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for g-beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for g-beams are being developed. Thus we have to optimize the system of the g-beam facility, the g-beam optics and g-detectors. We can trade g-intensity for band width, going down to Delta E_g/E_g ~ 10^-6 and address individual nuclear levels. 'Nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with g-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, g-beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to micron resolution using Nucl. Reson. Fluorescence for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

D. Habs; M. M. Guenther; M. Jentschel; P. G. Thirolf

2012-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

309

GTRI: Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

310

Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste GNEP will increase the efficiency in the...

312

National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety Study Program, IG-0581 National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety Study Program, IG-0581 To...

313

Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes September 01, 1961 Washington, DC Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes The Soviet Union breaks the nuclear test...

314

Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed January 07, 1983 Washington, DC Nuclear Waste Policy Act Signed President Reagan signs the Nuclear Waste...

315

WEB RESOURCE: Nuclear Materials and Nuclear Fuel/Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ...

316

Regulation of nuclear envelope breakdown by the nuclear pore complex;.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In higher eukaryotes, each time a cell divides dramatic changes occur at the nuclear periphery. The nuclear envelope, nuclear pore complexes, and nuclear lamina must… (more)

Prunuske, Amy Jeanette

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Enterprise Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Nuclear Security Enterprise Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) mission is to ensure the Nation sustains a safe, secure, and effective nuclear deterrent through the

318

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Presented to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Crystal City, Virginia John Gutteridge Director, University Programs Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology September 30 - October 1, 2002 Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Gutteridge/Sep-Oct_02 INIE-NERAC.ppt (2) INIE The Stimuli .... INIE The Stimuli .... 6 Declining number of operating university research/training reactors 6 Dwindling student population in nuclear engineering 6 Closing or loss of identity of university nuclear engineering programs 6 Looming shortage of nuclear engineering graduates 6 Threat of additional reactor closures -- Cornell, Michigan, MIT

319

Reconversion of nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

Kapitza, Sergei P

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Capabilities - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis System Process Monitoring,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

National Nuclear Data Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Radiation Dose Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data File Experimental nuclear reaction data Sigma Retrieval & Plotting Nuclear structure & decay Data Nuclear Science References Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File NNDC databases Ground and isomeric states properties Nuclear structure & decay data journal Nuclear reaction model code Tools and Publications US Nuclear Data Program Cross Section Evaluation Working Group Nuclear data networks Basic properties of atomic nuclei Parameters & thermal values Basic properties of atomic nuclei Internal Radiation Dose Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data File Experimental nuclear reaction data Sigma Retrieval & Plotting Nuclear structure & decay Data Nuclear Science References Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File NNDC databases Ground and isomeric states properties Nuclear structure & decay data journal Nuclear reaction model code Tools and Publications US Nuclear Data Program Cross Section Evaluation Working Group Nuclear data networks Basic properties of atomic nuclei Parameters & thermal values Basic properties of atomic nuclei Homepage BNL Home Site Index - Go USDNP and CSEWG November 18-22! USNDP CSEWG Agenda Thanks for attending! EXFOR 20,000 Milestone EXFOR Milestone 20,000 experimental works are now in the EXFOR database!

322

Nuclear Data | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data SHARE Nuclear Data Nuclear Data ORNL is a recognized, international leader in nuclear data research and development (R&D) to support nuclear applications analyses. For more...

323

Nuclear Power and the Environment  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This Nuclear Issue Paper discusses Nuclear Plant Wastes, Interactions of Fossil Fuel and Nuclear Power Waste Decisions, and the Environmental Position of Nuclear Power.

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Homecare risk management: nursing issues related to technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional risk management may not address the needs of technology being introduced into homecare situations for nurses. We propose to augment traditional risk management with insights from Prevention through Design and The 8 Rights giving a more technology ...

Juliana J. Brixey, James P. Turley

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hillbrook Nursing Home Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Clancy, Montana Coordinates 46.4652096°, -111.9863826° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

327

NUCLEAR DEFORMATION ENERGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.R. Nix, Theory of Nuclear Fission and Superheavy Nuclei,energy maps relevant for nuclear fission and nucleus-nucleusin connection with nuclear fission. The need for a better

Blocki, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

d UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R. B.IS UNLfflfTEO LBL-11089 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE by R.B.and E. Browne June 1980 Nuclear Science Division University

Firestone, R.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics ofPhysics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics ofPhysics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of

Myers, W.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete Events in Medium-Energy Nuclear Collisions" C-Y.+ corrections. (A) The nuclear potential-energy problem isquantum dynamics in high-energy nuclear collisions. We have

Myers, W.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS: THEORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions", Preprint LBL-Pion Interferometry of Nuclear Collisions. 18.1 M.Gyulassy,was supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

Gyulassy, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Asians Resist Nuclear Threat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midway carries soma 100 nuclear weapons and the missiles onthe removal of U. S. nuclear weapons from Asia. It is ti-aeof U. S. tactical nuclear weapons This set the figure for

Schirmer, Daniel Boone

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Predicting injury among nursing personnel using personal risk factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis was to develop a means of predicting future injury among nursing personnel working in a hospital system. Nursing has one of the highest incidence rates of musculoskeletal injuries among U.S. occupations. Endemic to the job are tasks such as rolling, sitting, standing, and transferring large, and often times, uncooperative patients. These tasks often place large biomechanical stresses on the musculoskeletal system and, in some cases, contribute to or cause a musculoskeletal injury. Given the current nursing shortage, it is imperative to keep nurses injury-free and productive so they can provide patient care services. Even though a large number of nursing personnel are injured every year and most are exposed to these high levels of biomechanical stress, the majority of nurses are injury-free. The question then arises "Why do some nurses have injuries while others do not?" The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether individual attributes in a population of nurses were associated with risk of future injury. The subject population was comprised of 140 nursing personnel at a local hospital system hired between April 1995 and February 1999. Data on individual attributes, such as patient demographics, previous injuries, posture, joint range of motion, flexibility, and muscular strength, was ascertained during a post-offer screening on these personnel. Twenty six (19%) nurses experienced an injury associated with the axial skeleton. Chi square test for homogeneity for the categorical predictor variables, and the Student's T-test for continuous predictor variables were used to determine if any individual attributes were associated with future injuries. None of the variables were associated with a risk of future axial skeletal injury. Practical application of these results for St. Joseph Regional Health Center, and possibly other acute care facilities, directs us to stop costly pre-employment/post-offer testing for the purpose of identifying injury prone nurse applicants. Secondly, it allows the focus of limited resources to be on making the job safer through administrative and engineering controls.

Gjolberg, Ivar Henry

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security Nuclear Security The Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) is responsible for the development and implementation of security programs for NNSA. In this capacity, DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for

335

Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

101 | National Nuclear Security Administration 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Nuclear Security 101 Fact Sheet Nuclear Security 101 Mar 23, 2012 The goal of United States Government's nuclear security programs is to prevent the illegal possession, use or transfer of nuclear material,

336

Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security Nuclear Security The Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) is responsible for the development and implementation of security programs for NNSA. In this capacity, DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for

337

Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

101 | National Nuclear Security Administration 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Nuclear Security 101 Fact Sheet Nuclear Security 101 Mar 23, 2012 The goal of United States Government's nuclear security programs is to prevent the illegal possession, use or transfer of nuclear material,

338

Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

value of 92.16 MeV and the point rms radius is 2.35 fm vs 2.33 from experiment. Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions PI Name: James Vary PI Email: jvary@iastate.edu...

339

Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the ab initio no-core full configuration approach," Phys. Rev. C 86, 034325 (2012) Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions PI Name: James Vary PI Email: jvary@iastate.edu...

340

Nuclear power and nuclear-weapons proliferation  

SciTech Connect

The danger that fissile isotopes may be diverted from nuclear power production to the construction of nuclear weapons would be aggravated by a switch to the plutonium breeder: but future uranium supplies are uncertain.

Moniz, E.J.; Neff, T.L.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

1950-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nuclear Systems Technologies - Nuclear Engineering Division ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Departments involved: Research & Test Reactor | Engineering Development and Applications "Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities" training courses Argonne Decommissioning Training...

344

Publications 2000 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Publications 2011 Publications 2010 Publications 2009...

345

Nuclear Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

346

AN ADMINISTRATIVE CHALLENGE: NUCLEAR MEDICINE  

SciTech Connect

The development of nuclear medicine facilities in hospitals in the United States is discussed, particularly in relation to the problems presented to hospital administration for understanding, organizing, and planning such facilities. The increase in the number of hospital radioisotope departments from 1952 to 1958 was 300%, a growth unparalleled by any other major hospital service. Today, 20%, of the hospitals in the U. S. maintain radioisotope departments. Reasons for the relative lag among smaller hospitals are discussed. Responsibilities of administrations, in seeing that A.E.C. licensing requirements for the use of radioisotopes in general hospitals are maintained, are outlined. Organization of a hospital isotopes committee and appointment of a safety officer is commented on. After an outline of the various radioisotope techniques most useful to the general hospital, the cost of the necessary equipment and other laboratory facilities is estimated. Other problems discussed in relation to responsibilities of hospital administrators include laundry decontamination, shielding, training of nursing personnel, information programs for personnel, legalities arising over radiation exposure claims, and the corresponding need for the keeping of records, autopsies, insurance, waste disposal, public fears and misconceptions, sanitation, and film badge monitoring. (H.H.D.)

Hellman, J.S.

1961-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

theory describing the structure of the nuclear surface region, so that one may take two flat nuclear surfaces and calculate their interaction energy

Randrup, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Sustainable Nuclear Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Enabling a Sustainable Nuclear Energy Future Since its inception, Argonne R&D has supported U.S. Department of Energy nuclear programs and initiatives, including today's...

349

6 Nuclear Fuel Designs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Message from the Director Message from the Director 2 Nuclear Power & Researrh Reactors 3 Discovery of Promethium 4 Nuclear Isotopes 4 Nuclear Medicine 5 Nuclear Fuel Processes & Software 6 Nuclear Fuel Designs 6 Nuclear Safety 7 Nuclear Desalination 7 Nuclear Nonproliferation 8 Neutron Scattering 9 Semiconductors & Superconductors 10 lon-Implanted Joints 10 Environmental Impact Analyses 11 Environmental Quality 12 Space Exploration 12 Graphite & Carbon Products 13 Advanced Materials: Alloys 14 Advanced Materials: Ceramics 15 Biological Systems 16 Biological Systems 17 Computational Biology 18 Biomedical Technologies 19 Intelligent Machines 20 Health Physics & Radiation Dosimetry 21 Radiation Shielding 21 Information Centers 22 Energy Efficiency: Cooling & Heating

350

Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate Nuclear and Particle Physics (NPP) at BNL comprises the Collider-Accelerator Department (including the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory,...

351

Nuclear Sites Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactor operations, nuclear research, weapons disassembly, maintenance and testing, hot cell operations, nuclear material storage and processing and waste disposal. Each...

352

Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management's Yucca Mountain Project and the Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) programs. Efforts...

353

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and development to 'boots-on-the-ground' implementation. This work ranges from uranium fuel cycle research to detection technologies and nuclear forensics. The nuclear...

354

Nuclear Safety Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program Search Approved Standards Recently Approved RevCom...

355

Nuclear Fuels - Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012... for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Nuclear Fuels - Modeling .... Using density functional theory (DFT), we have predicted that ...

356

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration, USof Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the National Nuclear Security Administration, US Departmentof Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Initial measurements of BN-350 spent fuel in dry storage casks using the dual slab verification detonator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dual Slab Verification Detector (DSVD) has been developed, built, and characterized by Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as part of the dry storage safeguards system for the spent fuel from the BN-350 fast reactor. The detector consists of two rows of 3He tubes embedded in a slab of polyethylene which has been designed to be placed on the outer surface of the dry storage cask. By performing DSVD measurements at several different locations around the outer surface of the DUC, a signature 'fingerprint' can be established for each DUC based on the neutron flux emanating from inside the dry storage cask. The neutron fingerprint for each individual DUC will be dependent upon the spatial distribution of nuclear material within the cask, thus making it sensitive to the removal of a certain amount of material from the cask. An initial set of DSVD measurements have been performed on the first set of dry storage casks that have been loaded with canisters of spent fuel and moved onto the dry storage pad to both establish an initial fingerprint for these casks as well as to quantify systematic uncertainties associated with these measurements. The results from these measurements will be presented and compared with the expected results that were determined based on MCNPX simulations of the dry storage facility. The ability to safeguard spent nuclear fuel is strongly dependent on the technical capabilities of establishing and maintaining continuity of knowledge (COK) of the spent fuel as it is released from the reactor core and either reprocessed or packaged and stored at a storage facility. While the maintenance of COK is often done using continuous containment and surveillance (C/S) on the spent fuel, it is important that the measurement capabilities exist to re-establish the COK in the event of a significant gap in the continuous CIS by performing measurements that independently confirm the presence and content of Plutonium (Pu) in the spent fuel. The types of non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements that can be performed on the spent fuel are strongly dependent on the type of spent fuel that is being safeguarded as well as the location in which the spent fuel is being stored. The BN-350 Spent Fuel Disposition Project was initiated to improve the safeguards and security of the spent nuclear fuel from the BN-350 fast-breeder reactor and was developed cooperatively to meet the requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as well as the terms of the 1993 CTR and MPC&A Implementing Agreements. The unique characteristics of fuel from the BN-350 fast-breeder reactor have allowed for the development of an integrated safeguards measurement program to inventory, monitor, and if necessary, re-verify Pu content of the spent fuel throughout the lifetime of the project. This approach includes the development of a safeguards measurement program to establish and maintain the COK on the spent fuel during the repackaging and eventual relocation of the spent-fuel assemblies to a long-term storage site. As part of the safeguards measurement program, the Pu content of every spent-fuel assembly from the BN-350 reactor was directly measured and characterized while the spent-fuel assemblies were being stored in the spent-fuel pond at the BN-350 facility using the Spent Fuel Coincidence Counter (SFCC). Upon completion of the initial inventory of the Pu content of the individual spent-fuel assemblies, the assemblies were repackaged into welded steel canisters that were filled with inert argon gas and held either four or six individual spent-fuel assemblies depending on the type of assembly that was being packaged. This repackaging of the spent-fuel assemblies was performed in order to improve the stability of the spent-fuel assemblies for long-term storage and increase the proliferation resistance of the spent fuel. To maintain the capability of verifying the presence of the spent-fuel assemblies inside the welded steel canisters, measurements were performed on the canis

Santi, Peter Angelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Browne, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Robert F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Richard B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Office of Nuclear Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home » Directives » Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules » Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program » Search » Approved Standards » Recently Approved » RevCom for TSP » Monthly Status Reports » Archive » Feedback DOE Nuclear Safety Research & Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design (HS-31) Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design - About Us » Nuclear Policy Technical Positions/Interpretations » Risk Assessment Working Group » Criticality Safety » DOE O 420.1C Facility Safety » Beyond Design Basis Events Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs (HS-32) Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs - About Us

360

Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) containment and mitigation subtask.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this subtask of the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Design project was to demonstrate mitigation technologies for radiological material dispersal and to assist planners with incorporation of the technologies into a concept of operations. The High Consequence Assessment and Technology department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has studied aqueous foam's ability to mitigate the effects of an explosively disseminated radiological dispersal device (RDD). These benefits include particle capture of respirable radiological particles, attenuation of blast overpressure, and reduction of plume buoyancy. To better convey the aqueous foam attributes, SNL conducted a study using the Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion model, comparing the effects of a mitigated and unmitigated explosive RDD release. Results from this study compared health effects and land contamination between the two scenarios in terms of distances of effect, population exposure, and remediation costs. Incorporating aqueous foam technology, SNL created a conceptual design for a stationary containment area to be located at a facility entrance with equipment that could minimize the effects from the detonation of a vehicle transported RDD. The containment design was evaluated against several criteria, including mitigation ability (both respirable and large fragment particle capture as well as blast overpressure suppression), speed of implementation, cost, simplicity, and required space. A mock-up of the conceptual idea was constructed at SNL's 9920 explosive test site to demonstrate the containment design.

Wente, William Baker

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Advancing Methods for Determining the Source of HEU Used in Terrorist Nuclear Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An algorithm was developed that uses measured isotopic ratios from fission product residue following the detonation of a high-enriched uranium nuclear weapon to compute the original attributes of the material used in the device. The specific attributes assessed are the uranium isotopics (considering 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U) and the enrichment process used to create the material (e.g., gaseous diffusion, gas centrifuge, etc.). Using the original attributes of the weapon significantly increases the probability of identifying the perpetrator of the attack. In this study, research was conducted to perform sensitivity analysis of the calculated values, analyze alternate enrichment methods, determine the source (uranium mine) from which the feed material was taken and assess potential “spoofing” techniques. The purpose of this research was to verify that the analytical method developed would remain valid for a multitude of variations that could be used to disguise the origin of the nuclear material in the device. It is envisioned that this methodology could serve as a preprocessing step to a more computationally intensive and more accurate system in the event of a nuclear terrorist attack.

LaFleur, Adrienne; Charlton, William

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

362

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA); Rowan, William J. (Monroeville, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Focus Article Nuclear winter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Article Nuclear winter Alan Robock Nuclear winter is the term for a theory describing the climatic effects of nuclear war. Smoke from the fires started by nuclear weapons, especially the black, sooty smoke from cities and industrial facilities, would be heated by the Sun, lofted into the upper

Robock, Alan

364

Nuclear Security & Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department is working to enhance nuclear security through defense, nonproliferation, and environmental efforts.

365

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate SE- 10658 Stockholm, Sweden. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 131 AUG. 2000 239 by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, contract 14.5-980942-98242. REFERENCES 1. A. M. WEINBERG and H. C

Pázsit, Imre

366

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use patient and learn the importance of physical and pharmacologic stress in nuclear cardiology 3. Interpret

Ford, James

367

Availability and Nuclear Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Availability and Nuclear Properties The first six transplutonium metals, americium (Am), curium (Cm), berkelium

368

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP will help prevent misuse of civilian nuclear facilities for nonpeaceful purposes by developing enhanced safeguards programs and technologies. International nuclear safeguards are integral to implementing the GNEP vision of a peaceful expansion of nuclear energy and demonstration of more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle technologies. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale

369

Nuclear Deployment Scorecards | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiatives Nuclear Reactor Technologies Nuclear Deployment Scorecards Nuclear Deployment Scorecards January 1, 2014 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 The...

370

Major Programs - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Program International Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form...

371

Executive Bios: Christopher Grandy - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

372

Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

373

Fuel Cycle Technologies Program - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

374

International Safety Projects - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

375

The Dawn of the Nuclear Age  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

376

Facility Safety Assessment - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

377

Computer Facilities - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

378

Advanced Computation & Visualization - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

379

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Facilities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

380

Safety - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear Power ... Nuclear Power Background, Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle ...

382

Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Enabling Technologies Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies Fuel Cycle Technologies International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation Nuclear...

383

Operation Redwing-Project 6. 4. Airborne antennas and phototubes for determination of nuclear-weapon yield. Report for May-July 1956  

SciTech Connect

Airborne equipment was designed for determining the location and yield of a nuclear detonation. This equipment determines yield from a measurement of the interval between the time of the burst and the time of the second peak in the thermal-radiation intensity curve. Flush-mounted ferrite-core magnetic loop antennas for use in detecting the electromagnetic signal and thus fixing the time of the burst, performed successfully during Operation Redwing. Two kinds of photocubes for detecting the second thermal peak were tested and were found about equally satisfactory. The method selected for yield determination gave results accurate + or - 16% for five shots. Detailed study of the data showed that the electromagnetic signal, consisting of a direct pulse followed by a series of ionosphere-reflected sky waves, could be used in many waves to give information concerning the detonation and the ionsphere. From the time intervals between the ground wave and sky waves, it was foun possible to compute both the distance between and receiver and the height of the reflecting ionosphere layer.

Waters, A.J.; Clapp, R.E.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to intensive site security efforts, NNSA is also working to build international standards and criteria for nuclear and radiological security. This includes NNSA's work to...

385

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criticality Safety Nuclear Criticality Safety Overview Experience Analysis Tools Current NCS Activities Current R&D Activities DOE Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG) Other...

386

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

387

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

388

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

389

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

390

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA...

391

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nature of the nuclear recipient’s security environment. ThisKeywords: Nuclear weapons proliferation; security; securitynature of the nuclear recipient’s security environment. This

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Dynamics of nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limited expression of nuclear pore membrane glycoprotein 210suggests cell-type specific nuclear pores in metazoans. Expand Dultz, E. (2008). Nuclear pore complex assembly through

Anderson, Daniel J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. The nuclear fuel cycle: A challenge forhave mastered parts of the nuclear fuel cycle, but have notprovision of fuel-cycle services, in which nuclear capable

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

395

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nuclear proliferation: a quantitative test. Journal ofINTERNATIONAL NUCLEAR ASSISTANCE DATA To test this strategictheory of nuclear proliferation faces a difficult test in

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Nuclear Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Science Accelerator Science Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Home » Science at NERSC » Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of matter. This includes discovering the origins of nuclei and identifying the forces that transform matter. Specific topics include: Nuclear astrophysics and the synthesis of nuclei in stars and elsewhere in the cosmos; Nuclear forces and quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field

397

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clear; second, nuclear power plants are stated terroristinvesting in new nuclear power plants because they do notas things stand, new nuclear power plants will not be cost

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

nuclear energy legislation on track  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

07/8 - NUCLEAR ENERGY LEGISLATION ON TRACK ... the safety and economic viability of nuclear power, the management of nuclear waste, the advancement ...

400

Reactor Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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401

NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1975  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gove and A. H. Wapstra, Nuclear Data Tables 11, 127 (1972).P. Jackson, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Report (1975)national Conference on Nuclear Structure and Spec­ troscopy,

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radioactive spent nuclear fuel is stored at commercialmost polluting part of the nuclear fuel cycle. It would notthe reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel will face technical,

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America's nuclear agenda, which affirms the central importance of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty." - President Obama on the Nuclear Posture Review, April 6, 2010 "The...

404

Peace, Stability, and Nuclear Weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in South Asia, Pakistan’s nuclear military capability, alongof the nuclear club: India, Pakistan, and North Korea. Ifand then India became nuclear powers, and Pakistan naturally

Waltz, Kenneth N.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or {beta} angle of the inner liner.

Murphy, M.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [June 28, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partial contents include: Nuclear Power; Qinshan Plant; Nuclear Weapons; Nuclear Power Plants; Nuclear Waste; Nuclear Policy; Decontamination Devices; and Environmental Protection.

NONE

1989-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

Nuclear Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 15, 2002 April 15, 2002 NERAC Spring 2002 Meeting Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Magwood/April15_02 NERAC.ppt (2) 2002 Will Be A Transition Year 2002 Will Be A Transition Year 6 Nuclear Power 2010 6 Major Program Developments 6 FY 2003 Budget Request Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Magwood/April15_02 NERAC.ppt (3) Nuclear Power 2010 Nuclear Power 2010 Nuclear Power 2010 is a new R&D initiative announced by Secretary Abraham on February 14, 2002. This initiative is designed to clear the way for the construction of new nuclear power plants by 2010. Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Magwood/April15_02 NERAC.ppt (4) Can We Build New U.S. Reactors By 2010? Yes! Can We Build New U.S. Reactors By 2010? Yes! Can Be Deployed by 2010

408

Guidebook to nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen.

Nero, A.V. Jr.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Semipalatinsk Nuclear Tests - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3.1 Tower used for measurements of nuclear weapon effects near ground zero. 3.1 A Brief ... atomic bomb. This output is 6% of all the nuclear explosions in.

410

Nuclear Imaging instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Imaging instrumentation Advances in gamma-ray detection and imaging have increased the pace of discovery in a broad cross-section of the sciences ranging from nuclear...

411

Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Nuclear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2014. Symposium, Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Nuclear. Sponsorship. Organizer(s) ...

412

NIST Nuclear Physics Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Physics Data. Radionuclide Half-Life Measurements Made at NIST; Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions. ... Physical Reference Data. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

Idaho Site Nuclear Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Nuclear Facilities Idaho Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Idaho Closure Project (ICP) This page was last updated on May 16...

414

WIPP Nuclear Facilities Transparency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transparency Technologies Other Transparency Activities Sandia National Laboratories Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) in conjunction with WIPP is providing this Nuclear...

415

The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coupled and complex systems like nuclear weapons arsenals.The complex technology required to build nuclear weapons is

Kroenig, Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Institute of Nuclear Material Management, Tucson, AZ,Assay, Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 51st Annual

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

NNSA: Working To Prevent Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

418

Office of Nuclear Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

419

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

420

Nuclear Safeguards and Security | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nuclear Shadowing and Diffraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relation between diffraction in lepton-proton collisions and shadowing of nuclear structure functions which arises from Gribov inelastic shadowing, is described. A model realizing such relation, which produces a parameter-free description of experimental data on nuclear structure functions at small $x$, is presented. The application to the description of multiplicities in nuclear collisions is discussed and related to other approaches.

J. L. Albacete; N. Armesto; A. Capella; A. B. Kaidalov; C. A. Salgado

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant, this measurement is car a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

423

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed reactivity effects--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring- hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

424

Nuclear Physics with trapped  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Physics with trapped atoms and ions #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian Outline · Scope and applications of nuclear physics precision frontier compliments LHC properties and aquifers in the Sahara #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian What is Nuclear Physics? · Began with the study

Boas, Harold P.

425

NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Contaminant Boundary at the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) have reached agreement on a corrective action strategy applicable to address the extent and potential impact of radionuclide contamination of groundwater at underground nuclear test locations. This strategy is described in detail in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 2000). As part of the corrective action strategy, the nuclear detonations that occurred underground were identified as geographically distinct corrective action units (CAUs). The strategic objective for each CAU is to estimate over a 1,000-yr time period, with uncertainty quantified, the three-dimensional extent of groundwater contamination that would be considered unsafe for domestic and municipal use. Two types of boundaries (contaminant and compliance) are discussed in the FFACO that will map the three-dimensional extent of radionuclide contamination. The contaminant boundary will identify the region wi th 95 percent certainty that contaminants do not exist above a threshold value. It will be prepared by the DOE and presented to NDEP. The compliance boundary will be produced as a result of negotiation between the DOE and NDEP, and can be coincident with, or differ from, the contaminant boundary. Two different thresholds are considered for the contaminant boundary. One is based on the enforceable National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for radionuclides, which were developed as a requirement of the Safe Drinking Water Act. The other is a risk-based threshold considering applicable lifetime excess cancer-risk-based criteria The contaminant boundary for the Faultless underground nuclear test at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is calculated using a newly developed groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model that incorporates aspects of both the original three-dimensional model (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and the two-dimensional model developed for the Faultless data decision analysis (DDA) (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). This new model includes the uncertainty in the three-dimensional spatial distribution of lithology and hydraulic conductivity from the 1999 model as well as the uncertainty in the other flow and transport parameters from the 2000 DDA model. Additionally, the new model focuses on a much smaller region than was included in the earlier models, that is, the subsurface within the UC-1 land withdrawal area where the 1999 model predicted radionuclide transport will occur over the next 1,000 years. The purpose of this unclassified document is to present the modifications to the CNTA groundwater flow and transport model, to present the methodology used to calculate contaminant boundaries, and to present the Safe Drinking Water Act and risk-derived contaminant boundaries for the Faultless underground nuclear test CAU.

Greg Pohll; Karl Pohlmann; Jeff Daniels; Ahmed Hassan; Jenny Chapman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Rulison Underground Nuclear Test Site, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Rulison site in west-central Colorado was the location of an underground detonation of a 40-kiloton nuclear device in 1969. The test took place 2,568 m below ground surface in the Mesaverde Formation. Though located below the regional water table, none of the bedrock formations at the site yielded water during hydraulic tests, indicating extremely low permeability conditions. The scenario evaluated was the migration of radionuclides from the blast-created cavity through the Mesaverde Formation. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides from the test are contained entirely within the area currently administered by DOE. The transport calculations are most sensitive to changes in the mean groundwater velocity and the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity, with transport of strontium and cesium also sensitive to the sorption coefficient.

Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Andricevic, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

FOIA | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

429

NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE, IG-0556 NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE, IG-0556 The Department of Energy (Department),...

430

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear...

431

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of...

432

Pollux | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollux | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

433

Testimonials | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testimonials | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

434

Training | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

435

Engineering Development & Applications - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies (FCT) Generation IV (Gen IV) Nuclear Energy Program Decontamination and Decommissioning Nuclear Regulatory Research Facilities Environmentally Assisted Cracking...

436

Counterterrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

437

Vocabulary | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

438

Pantex | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

439

Awards | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

440

Policy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Supercomputers | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

442

Engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

443

Contacts | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

444

Accomplishments | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

445

Preparedness | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

446

Public | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

447

Recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

448

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

449

Overview | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

450

Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

451

Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

452

Conferences | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

453

Planning | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

454

Compensation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

455

Convert | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

456

Protect | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

457

Leave | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

458

International | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

459

Remove | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

460

Interdiction | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Features | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

462

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BRANCH SCHOOL OF NURSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the fundamental principles of pharmacology and pathophysiology for nursing practice. Learning objectives://www.utmb.edu/enrollmentservices/about/catalogs.html), and SON Student Handbook, (http://www.son.utmb.edu/studentaffairs/handbooks/), taken together guide. Student Handbook: Each student is responsible for knowing and adhering to the University of Texas Medical

Wood, James B.

463

A 0-1 goal programming model for nurse scheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a computerized nurse-scheduling model is developed. The model is approached through a 0-1 linear goal program. It is adapted to Riyadh Al-Kharj hospital Program (in Saudi Arabia) to improve the current manual-made schedules. The developed ...

M. N. Azaiez; S. S. Al Sharif

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting DOE Directives & Manuals DOE Standards Central Technical Authorities (CTA) Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) Line Management SSO/ FAC Reps 48 CFR 970 48 CFR 952 Federal Acquisition Regulations External Oversight *Defense Nuclear Facility

465

Nuclear spirals in galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent high-resolution observations indicate that nuclear spirals are often present in the innermost few hundred parsecs of disc galaxies. My models show that nuclear spirals form naturally as a gas response to non-axisymmetry in the gravitational potential. Some nuclear spirals take the form of spiral shocks, resulting in streaming motions in the gas, and in inflow comparable to the accretion rates needed to power local Active Galactic Nuclei. Recently streaming motions of amplitude expected from the models have been observed in nuclear spirals, confirming the role of nuclear spirals in feeding of the central massive black holes.

Witold Maciejewski

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

466

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 61-80 - Nuclear Data Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

467

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 81-100 - Nuclear Data Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

468

Commercial nuclear power 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

469

Nuclear | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Nuclear Nuclear Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Nuclear power is the use of sustained nuclear fission to generate heat and electricity. Nuclear power plants provide about 6 percent of the world's energy and 13-14 percent of the world's electricity. Featured Five Years of Building the Next Generation of Reactors Simulated three-dimensional fission power distribution of a single 17x17 rod PWR fuel assembly. | Photo courtesy of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). A two-year update on the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors and the progress being made in overcoming barriers to national

470

Sensing remote nuclear spins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensing single nuclear spins is a central challenge in magnetic resonance based imaging techniques. Although different methods and especially diamond defect based sensing and imaging techniques in principle have shown sufficient sensitivity, signals from single nuclear spins are usually too weak to be distinguished from background noise. Here, we present the detection and identification of remote single C-13 nuclear spins embedded in nuclear spin baths surrounding a single electron spins of a nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond. With dynamical decoupling control of the centre electron spin, the weak magnetic field ~10 nT from a single nuclear spin located ~3 nm from the centre with hyperfine coupling as weak as ~500 Hz is amplified and detected. The quantum nature of the coupling is confirmed and precise position and the vector components of the nuclear field are determined. Given the distance over which nuclear magnetic fields can be detected the technique marks a firm step towards imaging, detecting and cont...

Zhao, Nan; Schmid, Berhard; Isoya, Junichi; Markham, Mathew; Twitchen, Daniel; Jelezko, Fedor; Liu, Ren-Bao; Fedder, Helmut; Wrachtrup, Jörg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Office of Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nuclear Threat Science Home > About Us > Our Programs > Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation > Office of Nuclear Threat Science Office of Nuclear Threat Science

472

Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

473

Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

474

Nuclear & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

475

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

476

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines the measurement of nuclear resonance fluorescence gamma-rays as a technique to non-destructively determine isotopic compositions of target materials that are of interest… (more)

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Publications 1998 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data for Explosive Hydrogen Burning on A 30-50 Nuclei Nuclei in the Cosmos V, Volos, Greece, 6-11 July (1998) Summary 1998 Publications totalJournal Phys. Rev. C 1 Nuclear Sci....

478

Nuclear power and nuclear-weapons proliferation  

SciTech Connect

Concern over the risk of nuclear proliferation has led to extensive reexamination of the technical, economic, and political assumptions underlying both national and international nuclear policies. An attempt is made in the present article to clarify the basic technical and political issues. The connections between various fuel cycles and their possible proliferation risks are discussed. As the resolution of the existing differing views on proliferation risks will be largely a political process, solutions to the problem are not proposed. (JSR)

Moniz, E.J.; Neff, T.L.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION DEPARTMENT NUCLEAR SAFETY GUIDE  

SciTech Connect

The limitations and operating techniques which were in effect at ANPD for the prevention of criticality accidents are summarized. The standards followed by the atomic industry were followed; however, the safe mass of U/sup 235/ moderated with beryllium oxide and hydrogeneous materials was based upon criticality experiments conducted at ANPD. Although the guide was primarily for the use of the ANPD nuclear safety control organization, it may also be of assistance to designers and operating management in maintaining nuclear safety. (auth)

Pryor, W.A.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gnome underground nuclear test site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary site risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gnome site in southeastern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 3.5-kiloton nuclear device in 1961, and a hydrologic tracer test using radionuclides in 1963. The tracer test involved the injection of tritium, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs directly into the Culebra Dolomite, a nine to ten-meter-thick aquifer located approximately 150 in below land surface. The Gnome nuclear test was carried out in the Salado Formation, a thick salt deposit located 200 in below the Culebra. Because salt behaves plastically, the cavity created by the explosion is expected to close, and although there is no evidence that migration has actually occurred, it is assumed that radionuclides from the cavity are released into the overlying Culebra Dolomite during this closure process. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides may be present in concentrations exceeding drinking water regulations outside the drilling exclusion boundary established by DOE. Calculated mean tritium concentrations peak at values exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 20,000 pCi/L at distances of up to almost eight kilometers west of the nuclear test.

Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear detonation nurse" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Outreach Educational Outreach Publications and Reports News and Awards Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science Nuclear Science | Nuclear Science SHARE In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies and systems to improve human health; explore safer, more environmentally friendly power; and better understand the structure of matter. Thanks to its nuclear heritage, ORNL is a world leader in the production of isotopes for medical purposes and research. The lab's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) together provide the western world's sole supply of californium-252, an isotope instrumental in a wide variety of uses including cancer therapy,

482

nuclear | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nuclear nuclear Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world nuclear energy. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Source Earth Policy Institute Date Released January 12th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EU nuclear nuclear electricity world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Summary nuclear energy consumption data (xls, 68.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment "Reuse of our data is permitted. We merely ask that wherever it is listed, it be appropriately cited" Rate this dataset

483

Nuclear Science References Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr and the International Atomic Energy Agency http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr.

B. Pritychenko; E. B?ták; B. Singh; J. Totans

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

484

The Office of Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The Office of Nuclear Verification Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security > The Office of Nuclear Verification The Office of Nuclear Verification

485

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing August 22, 1958 Washington, DC Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing

486

National Nuclear Security Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Ofice of Secure Transportation mKlK= Box RQMM= ^luquerqueI= kj= UTNUR= ;JAN 03 213 MEMORANDUM FOR GREGORY eK= WOODS GENERAL COUNSEL DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FROM: SUBJECT: JEFFREY P. HARREL ASSIST ANT DEPU FOR SECURE 2013 ANNUAL PLANNING SUMMARY In response to your memorandum of December TI= 2012, the following information is provided for the National Nuclear Security Administration Ofice of Secure

487

Nuclear Fabrication Consortium  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

Levesque, Stephen

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

488

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

489

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

The Exposure Rate Conversion Factor for Nuclear Fallout  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fallout is comprised of approximately 2000 radionuclides. About 1000 of these radionuclides are either primary fission products or activated fission products that are created during the burn process. The exposure rate one meter above the surface produced by this complex mixture of radionuclides varies rapidly with time since many of the radionuclides are short-lived and decay numerous times before reaching a stable isotope. As a result, the mixture of radionuclides changes rapidly with time. Using a new code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the mixture of radionuclides at any given point in time can be calculated. The code also calculates the exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for all 3864 individual isotopes contained in its database based on the total gamma energy released per decay. Based on the combination of isotope mixture and individual ECFs, the time-dependent variation of the composite exposure rate conversion factor for nuclear fallout can be easily calculated. As example of this new capability, a simple test case corresponding to a 10 kt, uranium-plutonium fuel has been calculated. The results for the time-dependent, composite ECF for this test case are shown in Figure 1. For comparison, we also calculated the composite exposure rate conversion factor using the conversion factors found in Federal Guidance Report No.12 (FGR-12) published by ORNL, which contains the conversion factors for approximately 1000 isotopes. As can be noted from Figure 1, the two functions agree reasonably well at times greater than about 30 minutes. However, they do not agree at early times since FGR-12 does not include all of the short-lived isotopes that are produced in nuclear fallout. It should also be noted that the composite ECF at one hour is 19.7 R/hr per Ci/m{sup 2}. This corresponds to 3148 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile, which agrees reasonably well with the value of 3000 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile as quoted by Glasstone. We have also tabulated the top 50 contributors to the exposure rate at various points in time following a detonation. These major contributors are given in Table 1.

Spriggs, G D

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

491

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 21, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 244)] December 21, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 244)] [Proposed Rules] [Page 71331-71333] From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr21de99-21] ======================================================================= ----------------------------------------------------------------------- NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 RIN 3150-AG41 Advance Notification to Native American Tribes of Transportation of Certain Types of Nuclear Waste AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering an amendment to its regulations that would require NRC licensees to notify

492

Enabling the Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance ... Glass Development for the Combined Cs + LN + TM Fission Products from the Advanced Fuel ...

493

CMCs for Nuclear Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are considered to improve the performance and safety of nuclear fusion and fission reactors. Silicon carbide-reinforced ...

494

LANL | Physics | Nuclear Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of quantum chromodynamics Quantum chromodynamics is the theory that the strong nuclear force holds together the atomic nucleus. We lead experiments at the Relativistic...

495

Nuclear Energy Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Synchrotron Radiation in Solving Scientific Challenges in Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems 27 to 28 January 2010 at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source Scope Third-generation...

496

Nuclear criticality safety guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.] [eds.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

provides a new user interface to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) to easily identify, organize, and analyze nuclear safety-related events reported into...

498

Nuclear Physics from QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective field theories provide a bridge between QCD and nuclear physics. I discuss light nuclei from this perspective, emphasizing the role of fine-tuning.

U. van Kolck

2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

499

Nuclear reactor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lifting, rotating and sealing apparatus for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor core. This apparatus permits rotation of the plugs to provide under the plug refueling of a nuclear core. It also provides a means by which positive top core holddown can be utilized. Both of these operations are accomplished by means of the apparatus lifting the top core holddown structure off the nuclear core while stationary, and maintaining this structure in its elevated position during plug rotation. During both of these operations, the interface between the rotating member and its supporting member is sealingly maintained.

Wade, Elman E. (Ruffs Dale, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

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