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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Updated Costs for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This update of 1978 NRC cost estimates--in 1984 dollars--also estimates the costs of several special manpower and licensing options for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. The fully developed methodology offers utilities a sound basis on which to estimate the costs of decommissioning specific plants.

1985-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

2

Yankee Nuclear Power Station - analysis of decommissioning costs  

SciTech Connect

The preparation of decommissioning cost estimates for nuclear power generating stations has received a great deal of interest in the last few years. Owners are required by regulation to ensure that adequate funds are collected for the timely decommissioning of their facilities. The unexpected premature shutdown of several facilities and uncertainties associated with radioactive waste disposal and long-term spent-fuel storage, when viewed in the light of a deregulated electric utility industry, has caused many companies to reevaluate their decommissioning cost estimates. The decommissioning of the Yankee Nuclear Power Station represents the first large-scale project involving the complete decontamination and dismantlement of a commercial light water nuclear power generation facility in the United States. Since this pressurized water reactor operated for 32 yr at a respectable 74% lifetime capacity factor, the actual costs and resources required to decommission the plant, when compared with decommissioning estimates, will yield valuable benchmarking data.

Lessard, L.P. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Decommissioning of Risř's nuclear facilities. Descriptions and cost assessment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear facilities at Risř National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives an assessment of the work to be done and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing for the longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely. Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to be transferred to a Danish repository. ISBN 87-550-2844-6; 87-550-2846-2 (Internet)

Edited Kurt Lauridsen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

Szymczak, W.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Decommissioning Experiences and Lessons Learned: Decommissioning Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1995, the United States (US) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued revised decommissioning regulations that provided a dose-based site release limit and detailed supporting regulatory guidance. This report summarizes the decommissioning cost experiences at US nuclear plants, including information about radwaste volumes and the cost of radwaste disposal based on the current regulatory situation in the US.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

Effect of Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Costs on Plant Life Cycle Decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities implementing Life Cycle Management (LCM) Programs and facing run-relicense-retire decisions need to evaluate the financial cost/benefit of such decisions. Decommissioning costs are one element of these evaluations. This report includes a decommissioning cost estimate for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) that can be used as a reference source by nuclear utilities involved in LCM and license renewal (LR) decisions.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR • the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

Wittenbrock, N. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Comparison of two decommissioning cost estimates developed for the same commercial nuclear reactor power station  

SciTech Connect

This study presents the results of a comparison of a previous decommissioning cost study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and a recent decommissioning cost study of TLG Engineering, Inc., for the same commercial nuclear power reactor station. The purpose of this comparative analysis on the same plant is to determine the reasons why subsequent estimates for similar plants by others were significantly higher in cost and external occupational radiation exposure (ORE) than the PNL study. The primary purpose of the original study by PNL (NUREG/CR-0672) was to provide information on the available technology, the safety considerations, and the probable costs and ORE for the decommissioning of a large boiling water reactor (BWR) power station at the end of its operating life. This information was intended for use as background data and bases in the modification of existing regulations and in the development of new regulations pertaining to decommissioning activities. It was also intended for use by utilities in planning for the decommissioning of their nuclear power stations. The TLG study, initiated in 1987 and completed in 1989, was for the same plant, Washington Public Supply System's Unit 2 (WNP-2), that PNL used as its reference plant in its 1980 decommissioning study. Areas of agreement and disagreement are identified, and reasons for the areas of disagreement are discussed. 31 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Nuclear Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990s several nuclear utilities proceeded with full decommissioning of their nuclear power plants based on perceived economics. This major shift to immediate decommissioning presented a significant challenge to the industry in terms of the development of a decommissioning process and a comprehensive updated regulatory framework. EPRI responded by undertaking the formation of the Decommissioning Support Program. The initial work involved conducting a series of topical workshops directed to specific...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

14

Proposal For Internationally Standardized Cost Item Definitions For The Decommissioning Of Nuclear Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various international decommissioning projects have shown that there are substantial variations in cost estimates for individual installations. Studies to understand the reasons for these differences have been somewhat hampered by the fact that different types of cost estimation methods are used, having different data requirements. Although some uncertainty is inevitable in any costing method, an understanding of the costing methods used in particular projects is useful to avoid key uncertainties. Difficulties of understanding can be encountered and invalid conclusions drawn in making cost comparisons without regard to the context in which the various cost estimates were made. The above-mentioned difficulties are partly due to the lack of a standardized or generally agreed-upon costing method that includes well-structured and defined cost items and an established estimation method. Such a structure and method would be useful not only for project cost comparisons but would also be a t...

Lucien Teunckens Belgoprocess; Kurt Pflugrad; Lucien Teunckens; Candace Chan-sands; Ted Lazo

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act calls for the establishment of a tax-exempt, tax-deductible decommissioning fund by the licensee of any nuclear power generating facility to pay for the...

16

DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decommissioning means permanently removing a nuclear facility from service and reducing radioactive material on the licensed site to levels that would permit termination of the NRC license. On June 27, 1988, the NRC issued general requirements on decommissioning that contained technical and financial criteria and dealt with planning needs, timing, funding mechanisms, and environmental review

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Decommissioning in the mature nuclear power industry  

SciTech Connect

Procedures for decommissioning a nuclear power plant or a spent fuel reprocessing plant are described. (DCC)

Anderson, F.H.; Slansky, C.M.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ris-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear Facilities at Risø National Laboratory Descriptions on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities;Decommissioning of Risø's nuclear facilities. Descriptions and cost assessment. Risø-R-1250(EN) 3 Contents 1

19

Regulatory Process for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC revised decommissioning rule 10 CFR 50.82 in 1996 to make significant changes in the regulatory process for nuclear power plant licensees. This report provides a summary of ongoing federal agency and industry activities. It also describes the regulatory requirements applicable, or no longer applicable, to nuclear power plants at the time of permanent shutdown through the early decommissioning stage. The report describes the major components of a typical decommissioning plan, and provides industry...

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

20

Decommissioning considerations at a time of nuclear renaissance  

SciTech Connect

At a time of renaissance in the nuclear power industry, when it is estimated that anywhere between 60 to 130 new power reactors may be built worldwide over the next 15 years, why should we focus on decommissioning? Yet it is precisely the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account as the industry proceeds with developing final designs for new reactors and the construction on the new build begins. One of the lessons learned from decommissioning of existing reactors has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Even though decommissioning may be sixty years down the road from the time they go on line, eventually all reactors will be decommissioned. It is only prudent that new designs be optimized for eventual decommissioning, along with the other major considerations. The overall objective in this regard is that when the time comes for decommissioning, it can be completed in shorter time frames, with minimum generation of radioactive waste, and with better radiological safety. This will ensure that the tail end costs of the power reactors are manageable and that the public confidence in the nuclear power is sustained through the renaissance and beyond. (author)

Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, 55 E. Monroe St, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Program Change Management During Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear power plant is a complex project, which involves the coordination of several different departments and the management of changing plant conditions, programs, and regulations. As plants meet certain project Milestones, the evolution of such plant programs and regulations can help optimize project execution and cost. This report provides information about these Milestones and the plant departments and programs that change throughout a decommissioning project.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Decommissioning of the Trino Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a referendum in Italy in 1987, the four Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) owned and operated by the state utility ENEL were closed. After closing the NPPs, ENEL selected a ''safestore'' decommissioning strategy; anticipating a safestore period of some 40-50 years. This approach was consistent with the funds collected during plant operation, and was reinforced by the lack of both a waste repository and a set of national free release limits for contaminated materials in Italy. During 1999, twin decisions were made to privatize ENEL and to transform the nuclear division into a separate subsidiary of the ENEL group. This group was renamed Sogin and during the following year, ownership of the company was transferred to the Italian Treasury. On formation, Sogin was asked by the Italian government to review the national decommissioning strategy. The objective of the review was to move from a safestore strategy to a prompt decommissioning strategy, with the target of releasing all of the nuclear sites by 2020. It was recognized that this target was conditional upon the availability of a national LLW repository together with interim stores for both spent fuel and HLW by 2009. The government also agreed that additional costs caused by the acceleration of the decommissioning program would be considered as stranded costs. These costs will be recovered by a levy on the kWh price of electricity, a process established and controlled by the Regulator of the Italian energy sector. Building on the successful collaboration to develop a prompt decommissioning strategy for the Latina Magnox reactor (1), BNFL and Sogin agreed to collaborate on an in depth study for the prompt decommissioning of the Sogin PWR at Trino. BNFL is currently decommissioning six NPPs and is at an advanced stage of planning for two further units, having completed a full and rigorous exercise to develop Baseline Decommissioning Plans (BDP's) for these stations. The BDP exercise utilizes the full range of BNFL decommissioning experience and knowledge to develop a strategy, methodology and cost for the decommissioning of NPPs. Over the past year, a prompt decommissioning strategy for Trino has been developed. The strategy has been based on the principles of minimizing waste products that require long term storage, maximizing 'free release' materials and utilizing existing and regulatory approved technologies.

Brusa, L.; DeSantis, R.; Nurden, P. L.; Walkden, P.; Watson, B.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Services » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in UK and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy More Documents & Publications Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Scanned_Agreement.pdf Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste

24

Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for nuclear waste disposal and decommissioning whilethe cost of decommissioning and nuclear waste disposal on

Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear waste disposal and decommissioning while underminingbetween the cost of decommissioning and nuclear waste

Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Trojan Nuclear Power Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal: Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One goal of the EPRI Decommissioning Technology Program is to capture the growing utility experience in nuclear plant decommissioning activities for the benefit of other utilities facing similar challenges in the future. This report provides historical information on the background, scope, organization, schedule, cost, contracts, and support activities associated with the Trojan Nuclear Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal (RVAIR) Project. Also discussed are problems, successes, and lessons learned...

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

Safety of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full text of publication follows: ensuring safety during all stages of facility life cycle is a widely recognised responsibility of the operators, implemented under the supervision of the regulatory body and other competent authorities. As the majority of the facilities worldwide are still in operation or shutdown, there is no substantial experience in decommissioning and evaluation of safety during decommissioning in majority of Member States. The need for cooperation and exchange of experience and good practices on ensuring and evaluating safety of decommissioning was one of the outcomes of the Berlin conference in 2002. On this basis during the last three years IAEA initiated a number of international projects that can assist countries, in particular small countries with limited resources. The main IAEA international projects addressing safety during decommissioning are: (i) DeSa Project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning; (ii) R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P project on Research Reactors Decommissioning Demonstration Project; and (iii) Project on Evaluation and Decommissioning of Former Facilities that used Radioactive Material in Iraq. This paper focuses on the DeSa Project activities on (i) development of a harmonised methodology for safety assessment for decommissioning; (ii) development of a procedure for review of safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on application of the graded approach to the performance and review of safety assessments; and (iv) application of the methodology and procedure to the selected real facilities with different complexities and hazard potentials (a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory). The paper also outlines the DeSa Project outcomes and planned follow-up activities. It also summarises the main objectives and activities of the Iraq Project and introduces the R{sup 2}D{sup 2} Project, which is a subject of a complementary paper.

Batandjieva, B.; Warnecke, E.; Coates, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Decommissioning Cost Estimating Factors And Earned Value Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats 771 Project progressed from the planning stage of decommissioning a plutonium facility, through the strip-out of highly-contaminated equipment, removal of utilities and structural decontamination, and building demolition. Actual cost data was collected from the strip-out activities and compared to original estimates, allowing the development of cost by equipment groupings and types and over time. Separate data was developed from the project control earned value reporting and compared with the equipment data. The paper discusses the analysis to develop the detailed factors for the different equipment types, and the items that need to be considered during characterization of a similar facility when preparing an estimate. The factors are presented based on direct labor requirements by equipment type. The paper also includes actual support costs, and examples of fixed or one-time start-up costs. The integration of the estimate and the earned value system used for the 771 Project is also discussed. The paper covers the development of the earned value system as well as its application to a facility to be decommissioned and an existing work breakdown structure. Lessons learned are provided, including integration with scheduling and craft supervision, measurement approaches, and verification of scope completion. In summary: The work of decommissioning the Rocky Flats 771 Project process equipment was completed in 2003. Early in the planning process, we had difficulty in identifying credible data and implementing processes for estimating and controlling this work. As the project progressed, we were able to collect actual data on the costs of removing plutonium contaminated equipment from various areas over the life of this work and associate those costs with individual pieces of equipment. We also were able to develop and test out a system for measuring the earned value of a decommissioning project based on an evolving estimate. These were elements that would have been useful to us in our early planning process, and we would expect that they would find application elsewhere as the DOE weapons complex and some commercial nuclear facilities move towards closure. (authors)

Sanford, P.C.; Cimmarron, E. [Englewood, CO, B. Skokan, Office of Project Management Oversight, EM-53, United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990s. Based on current information, the next group of plants whose license will expire will not begin decommissioning for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one plant, the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, in order to capture its experience for future plants.

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

30

Decommissioning Economics and Risk Advisor: An Introduction to DERAD Version 2.0: Volume 1: EPRI's Nuclear Decommissioning Program; Volume 2: Methodology Description; Volume 3: Program Manual; Volume 4: Using DERAD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear plants in the United States is estimated to cost hundreds of millions of dollars per plant. EPRI's Decommissioning Economics and Risk Advisor (DERAD) Version 2.0 is a decision analysis support tool designed to help utilities evaluate the economics and financial risk of decommissioning nuclear power plants. This report provides examples and case studies to support DERAD use.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

31

Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent...

32

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions  

SciTech Connect

The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions  

SciTech Connect

The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Application of Non-Nuclear Robotics to Nuclear Industry Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Segmentation of radioactive components, including reactor cavity internals, has proved to be a challenging job for the nuclear power industry during decommissioning. The innovative use of robotic technology to perform debris cleanup can help utilities maximize worker safety. This report documents a first of its kind robotics experience at Connecticut Yankee.

2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Future AI and Robotics Technology for Nuclear Plants Decommissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robotics Program The Robotics Program within the Nuclear Engineering Division is developing new technologies. Currently, we are exploring opportunities in applications for nuclear reactor operation, maintenance of remote energy installations, decontamination and decommissioning, and minimally invasive surgery

Hu, Huosheng

37

Nuclear reactor decommissioning. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning nuclear power and research reactor decommissioning and decontamination plans, costs, and safety standards. References discuss the design and evaluation of protective confinement, entombment, and dismantling systems. Topics include decommissioning regulations and rules, public and occupational radiation exposure estimates, comparative evaluation, and reactor performance under high neutron flux conditions. Waste packaging and disposal, environmental compliance, and public opinion are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station - Unit 1 Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides detailed information on the successful decommissioning activities of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS 1). The report describes their experiences and lessons learned for managers of US and international plants beginning or currently engaged in decommissioning.

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

39

Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, 625 Indiana Ave., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20004-2901 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Cost Savings through Innovation in Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost effective technologies for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsored large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs) to help bring new technologies into the D&D programs. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) LSDDP generated a list of needs defining specific problems where improved technologies could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. The needs fell into 5 major categories--characterization, dismantlement, safety, material dispositioning, and decontamination. Technologies were carefully selected that provide a large benefit for a small investment. The technologies must provide significant improvements in cost, safety, radiation exposure, waste volume reduction, or schedule savings and widely applicable throughout the DOE complex. The LSDDP project provided training for the new technologies and worked with technology suppliers to resolve any questions that arose. Since 1998, 26 technologies have been demonstrated or deployed through the LSDDP for the D&D program at the INEEL. Of the 26 demonstrated and deployed technologies, 14 were in characterization, 3 were in decontamination, 4 were in dismantlement, 3 were in safety, and 2 were in material dispositioning. To promote the use of these technologies at other sites within the DOE complex, the LSDDP team published fact sheets, videos, technology summary reports, articles in INEEL star newspaper, posters, and maintained an internet home page on the project. As a result, additional deployments have taken place at the Hanford, Mound, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Ashtabula, and West Valley. Eight of the 26 technologies evaluated were developed in foreign countries. The technologies demonstrated have been shown to be faster, less expensive, and/or safer. The technologies evaluated through the LSDDP have provided improvements in the following D&D areas: robotic underwater characterization of fuel storage pools, characterization of scrap metal for recycle, PCB and RCRA metals analysis in soil, water, paint, or sludge, subsurface characterization, personnel safety, waste disposal, scaffolding use, and remote radiation characterization of buildings and soil. It is estimated that the technologies demonstrated and deployed through this program will save more than $50 million dollars over the next 10 years at the INEEL alone. Of the $50 million estimated dollars saved, about 75% of the savings will come from characterization technologies, 11% from technologies associated with material dispositioning, 10% are associated with dismantlement technologies and the balance split between safety and decontamination.

Neal A. Yancey

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Bayesian Analysis for the Site-Specific Dose Modeling in Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Decommissioning is the process of closing down a facility. In nuclear power plant decommissioning, it must be determined that that any remaining radioactivity at a… (more)

Ling, Xianbing

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Decommissioning Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Handbook is a technical guide for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves the removal of the radioactive and, for practical reasons, hazardous materials to enable the facility to be released and not represent a further risk to human health and the environment. This handbook identifies and technologies and techniques that will accomplish these objectives. The emphasis in this handbook is on characterization; waste treatment; decontamination; dismantling, segmenting, demolition; and remote technologies. Other aspects that are discussed in some detail include the regulations governing decommissioning, worker and environmental protection, and packaging and transportation of the waste materials. The handbook describes in general terms the overall decommissioning project, including planning, cost estimating, and operating practices that would ease preparation of the Decommissioning Plan and the decommissioning itself. The reader is referred to other documents for more detailed information. This Decommissioning Handbook has been prepared by Enserch Environmental Corporation for the US Department of Energy and is a complete restructuring of the original handbook developed in 1980 by Nuclear Energy Services. The significant changes between the two documents are the addition of current and the deletion of obsolete technologies and the addition of chapters on project planning and the Decommissioning Plan, regulatory requirements, characterization, remote technology, and packaging and transportation of the waste materials.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

Daly, P.T.; Hlopak, W.J. [Commercial Services Group, EnergySolutions 1009 Commerce Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Standard Guide for Preparing Characterization Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This standard guide applies to developing nuclear facility characterization plans to define the type, magnitude, location, and extent of radiological and chemical contamination within the facility to allow decommissioning planning. This guide amplifies guidance regarding facility characterization indicated in ASTM Standard E 1281 on Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Plans. This guide does not address the methodology necessary to release a facility or site for unconditional use. This guide specifically addresses: 1.1.1 the data quality objective for characterization as an initial step in decommissioning planning. 1.1.2 sampling methods, 1.1.3 the logic involved (statistical design) to ensure adequate characterization for decommissioning purposes; and 1.1.4 essential documentation of the characterization information. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate saf...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cost update technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to update the cost estimates developed in a previous report, NUREG/CR-1757 (Elder 1980) for decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant from the original mid-1981 dollars to values representative of January 1993. The cost updates were performed by using escalation factors derived from cost index trends over the past 11.5 years. Contemporary price quotes wee used for costs that have increased drastically or for which is is difficult to find a cost trend. No changes were made in the decommissioning procedures or cost element requirements assumed in NUREG/CR-1757. This report includes only information that was changed from NUREG/CR-1757. Thus, for those interested in detailed descriptions and associated information for the reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant, a copy of NUREG/CR-1757 will be needed.

Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Decommissioning San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 1 (SONGS-1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear power plant and termination of the plant license requires the removal of highly activated materials from inside the nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Such a task presents a major challenge in terms of technology, project management, and worker exposure. This report documents the approach taken by Southern California Edison (SCE) in their highly successful reactor vessel internals (RVI) segmentation of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 1 (SONGS-1). The report detail...

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

Pending Issues In Decommissioning Of Nuclear Installations In Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While decommissioning technology and infrastructures are reasonably mature in fully developed countries at the beginning of the third millennium, this is not necessarily the case for some developing countries. It is unfortunate that many of these countries have given little or no attention to early planning and creation of infrastructures for the decommissioning of their nuclear installations, which in many cases are candidates for permanent shutdown in the near future. Critical areas include inter alia (1) poor or no allocation of decommissioning funds, (2) uncertain availability of affordable technologies, (3) unclear definition of roles and responsibilities including lack of regulations, (4) inadequate management and organization techniques, (5) perceived low priority and weak political support, and (6) lack of human and technical resources, particularly in the long term. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is a unique forum to identify and address current and prospecti...

Michele Laraia International

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Conceptual Nuclear Decommissioning Knowledge Management System Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taiwan Research Reactor (TRR) was shut down in January 1988, along with the termination of a few nuclear facilities within Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER). In the past few years, INER has continually dismantled its related nuclear facilities. ...

I-Hsin Chou; Chin-Feng Fan; Yen-Chang Tzeng

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Appendices. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Appendices are presented concerning the evaluations of decommissioning financing alternatives; reference site description; reference BWR facility description; radiation dose rate and concrete surface contamination data; radionuclide inventories; public radiation dose models and calculated maximum annual doses; decommissioning methods; generic decommissioning information; immediate dismantlement details; passive safe storage, continuing care, and deferred dismantlement details; entombment details; demolition and site restoration details; cost estimating bases; public radiological safety assessment details; and details of alternate study bases.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Decommissioning handbook  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of information pertinent to the decommissioning of surplus nuclear facilities. This handbook is intended to describe all stages of the decommissioning process including selection of the end product, estimation of the radioactive inventory, estimation of occupational exposures, description of the state-of-the-art in re decontamination, remote csposition of wastes, and estimation of program costs. Presentation of state-of-the-art technology and data related to decommissioning will aid in consistent and efficient program planning and performance. Particular attention is focused on available technology applicable to those decommissioning activities that have not been accomplished before, such as remote segmenting and handling of highly activated 1100 MW(e) light water reactor vessel internals and thick-walled reactor vessels. A summary of available information associated with the planning and estimating of a decommissioning program is also presented. Summarized in particular are the methodologies associated with the calculation and measurement of activated material inventory, distribution, and surface dose level, system contamination inventory and distribution, and work area dose levels. Cost estimating techniques are also presented and the manner in which to account for variations in labor costs as impacting labor-intensive work activities is explained.

Manion, W.J.; LaGuardia, T.S.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Money Related Decommissioning and Funding Decision Making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'Money makes the world go round', as the song says. It definitely influences decommissioning decision-making and financial assurance for future decommissioning. This paper will address two money-related decommissioning topics. The first is the evaluation of whether to continue or to halt decommissioning activities at Fermi 1. The second is maintaining adequacy of financial assurance for future decommissioning of operating plants. Decommissioning costs considerable money and costs are often higher than originally estimated. If costs increase significantly and decommissioning is not well funded, decommissioning activities may be deferred. Several decommissioning projects have been deferred when decision-makers determined future spending is preferable than current spending, or when costs have risen significantly. Decommissioning activity timing is being reevaluated for the Fermi 1 project. Assumptions for waste cost-escalation significantly impact the decision being made this year on the Fermi 1 decommissioning project. They also have a major impact on the estimated costs for decommissioning currently operating plants. Adequately funding full decommissioning during plant operation will ensure that the users who receive the benefit pay the full price of the nuclear-generated electricity. Funding throughout operation also will better ensure that money is available following shutdown to allow decommissioning to be conducted without need for additional funds.

Goodman, Lynne S. [Detroit Edison Company, 6400 N. Dixie Highway, Newport, Michigan 48162 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) for Decommissioning of TAN-607 Hot Shop Area  

SciTech Connect

Test Area North (TAN) -607, the Technical Support Facility, is located at the north end of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is proposing to decommission the northern section of the TAN-607 facility, hereinafter referred to as TAN-607 Hot Shop Area, under a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA). Despite significant efforts by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) to secure new business, no future mission has been identified for the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area. Its disposition has been agreed to by the Idaho State Historical Preservation Office documented in the Memorandum of Agreement signed October 2005 and it is therefore considered a surplus facility. A key element in DOE's strategy for surplus facilities is decommissioning to the maximum extent possible to ensure risk and building footprint reduction and thereby eliminating operations and maintenance cost. In addition, the DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan is ''complete cleanup of the contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and testing sites across the United States. DOE is responsible for the risk reduction and cleanup of the environmental legacy of the Nation's nuclear weapons program, one of the largest, most diverse, and technically complex environmental programs in the world. The Department will successfully achieve this strategic goal by ensuring the safety of the DOE employees and U.S. citizens, acquiring the best resources to complete the complex tasks, and managing projects throughout the United States in the most efficient and effective manner.'' TAN-607 is designated as a historical Signature Property by DOE Headquarters Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and, as such, public participation is required to determine the final disposition of the facility. The decommissioning action will place the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area in a final configuration that will be protective of human health and the environment. Decommissioning the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area is consistent with the joint DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, which establishes the CERCLA NTCRA process as the preferred approach for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities. Under this policy, a NTCRA may be taken when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to human health and/or the environment. When DOE determines that a CERCLA NTCRA is necessary, DOE is authorized to evaluate, select, and implement the removal action that DOE determines is most appropriate to address the potential risk posed by the release or threat of release. This action is taken in accordance with applicable authorities and in conjunction with EPA and the State of Idaho pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. In keeping with the joint policy, this engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was developed in accordance with CERCLA as amended by the ''Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986'' and in accordance with the ''National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan.'' This EE/CA is consistent with the remedial action objectives (RAOs) of the Final Record of Decision, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-10 and supports the overall remediation goals established through the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for Waste Area Group 1. Waste Area Group 1 is located at TAN.

J. P. Floerke

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) for Decommissioning of TAN-607 Hot Shop Area  

SciTech Connect

Test Area North (TAN) -607, the Technical Support Facility, is located at the north end of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is proposing to decommission the northern section of the TAN-607 facility, hereinafter referred to as TAN-607 Hot Shop Area, under a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA). Despite significant efforts by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) to secure new business, no future mission has been identified for the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area. Its disposition has been agreed to by the Idaho State Historical Preservation Office documented in the Memorandum of Agreement signed October 2005 and it is therefore considered a surplus facility. A key element in DOE's strategy for surplus facilities is decommissioning to the maximum extent possible to ensure risk and building footprint reduction and thereby eliminating operations and maintenance cost. In addition, the DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan is ''complete cleanup of the contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and testing sites across the United States. DOE is responsible for the risk reduction and cleanup of the environmental legacy of the Nation's nuclear weapons program, one of the largest, most diverse, and technically complex environmental programs in the world. The Department will successfully achieve this strategic goal by ensuring the safety of the DOE employees and U.S. citizens, acquiring the best resources to complete the complex tasks, and managing projects throughout the United States in the most efficient and effective manner.'' TAN-607 is designated as a historical Signature Property by DOE Headquarters Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and, as such, public participation is required to determine the final disposition of the facility. The decommissioning action will place the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area in a final configuration that will be protective of human health and the environment. Decommissioning the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area is consistent with the joint DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, which establishes the CERCLA NTCRA process as the preferred approach for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities. Under this policy, a NTCRA may be taken when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to human health and/or the environment. When DOE determines that a CERCLA NTCRA is necessary, DOE is authorized to evaluate, select, and implement the removal action that DOE determines is most appropriate to address the potential risk posed by the release or threat of release. This action is taken in accordance with applicable authorities and in conjunction with EPA and the State of Idaho pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. In keeping with the joint policy, this engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was developed in accordance with CERCLA as amended by the ''Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986'' and in accordance with the ''National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan.'' This EE/CA is consistent with the remedial action objectives (RAOs) of the Final Record of Decision, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-10 and supports the overall remediation goals established through the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for Waste Area Group 1. Waste Area Group 1 is located at TAN.

J. P. Floerke

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Report on waste burial charges. Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fourth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991 and 1993, superseding the values given in the May 1993 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1994 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Report on waste burial charges: Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at Low-Level Waste Burial facilities. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fifth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991, 1993, and 1994, superseding the values given in the June 1994 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1995 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

ASTM STANDARD GUIDE FOR EVALUATING DISPOSAL OPTIONS FOR REUSE OF CONCRETE FROM NUCLEAR FACILITY DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

Within the nuclear industry, many contaminated facilities that require decommissioning contain huge volumes of concrete. This concrete is generally disposed of as low-level waste at a high cost. Much of the concrete is lightly contaminated and could be reused as roadbed, fill material, or aggregate for new concrete, thus saving millions of dollars. However, because of the possibility of volumetric contamination and the lack of a method to evaluate the risks and costs of reusing concrete, reuse is rarely considered. To address this problem, Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory teamed to write a ''concrete protocol'' to help evaluate the ramifications of reusing concrete within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document, titled the Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Site (1) is based on ANL-E's previously developed scrap metal recycle protocols; on the 10-step method outlined in DOE's draft handbook, Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material (2); and on DOE Order 4500.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (3). The DOE concrete protocol was the basis for the ASTM Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning, which was written to make the information available to a wider audience outside DOE. The resulting ASTM Standard Guide is a more concise version that can be used by the nuclear industry worldwide to evaluate the risks and costs of reusing concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. The bulk of the ASTM Standard Guide focuses on evaluating the dose and cost for each disposal option. The user calculates these from the detailed formulas and tabulated data provided, then compares the dose and cost for each disposal option to select the best option that meets regulatory requirements. With this information, the reuse of concrete may be possible, thus reducing dose and decontamination and decommissioning costs. This paper outlines ten steps required to release concrete for reuse and discusses the disposal options covered in the ASTM Standard Guide.

Phillips, Ann Marie; Meservey, Richard H.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

59

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Preservation and Implementation of Decommissioning Lessons Learned in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has actively worked to capture and preserve lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. More recently, NRC has involved industry groups, the Organization of Agreement States (OAS), and the Department of Energy (DOE) in the effort to develop approaches to capture, preserve and disseminate decommissioning lessons learned. This paper discusses the accomplishments of the working group, some lessons learned by the NRC in the recent past, and how NRC will incorporate these lessons learned into its regulatory framework. This should help ensure that the design and operation of current and future nuclear facilities will result in less environmental impact and more efficient decommissioning. In summary, the NRC will continue capturing today's experience in decommissioning so that future facilities can take advantage of lessons learned from today's decommissioning projects. NRC, both individually and collectively with industry groups, OAS, and DOE, is aggressively working on the preservation and implementation of decommissioning lessons learned. The joint effort has helped to ensure the lessons from the whole spectrum of decommissioning facilities (i.e., reactor, fuel cycle, and material facilities) are better understood, thus maximizing the amount of knowledge and best practices obtained from decommissioning activities. Anticipated regulatory activities at the NRC will make sure that the knowledge gained from today's decommissioning projects is preserved and implemented to benefit the nuclear facilities that will decommission in the future.

Rodriguez, Rafael L. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA) process as an approach for decommissioning.

A. B. Culp

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

4.1.4 NUCLEAR SUBSTANCE ROOM DECOMMISSIONING FORM The permit holder shall ensure that prior to decommissioning any area, room or enclosure where  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and efficiency of telerobotics in the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Currently, we, LLC Nuclear Engineering Technology Initiatives The Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division carries out · Decontamination & Decommissioning ­ Laser processing technology for decontamination of surfaces · Refractory Alloy

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

63

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O'Leary, E. M.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

66

Report on Waste Burial Charges Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste Burial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, or any of their employees, make any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for any third party’s use or the results of such use, of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed in this report, or represents that its use by such third party would not infringe privately owned rights. The views expressed in this paper are not necessarily those of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1307, Revision 13, is not a substitute for NRC regulations, and compliance is not required. The approaches and/or methods described in this NUREG are provided for information only. Publication of this report does not necessarily A requirement placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is that licensees must annually adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is revised periodically, explains the formula that is acceptable to the NRC for determining the minimum decommissioning fund requirements for nuclear power plants. The sources of information used in the formula are identified, and the values developed for the estimation of radioactive waste burial/disposition costs, by site and by year, are given. Licensees may use the formula, coefficients, and burial/disposition adjustment factors from this report in their cost analyses,

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessment of foreign decommissioning technology with potential application to US decommissioning needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and technically assess foreign decommissioning technology developments that may represent significant improvements over decommissioning technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water reactor (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign decommissioning technologies of potential interest to the US were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of decommissioning literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in decommissioning costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to US needs.

Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.J.; Smith, R.I.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Application of Mobile Agents to Robust Teleoperation of Internet Robots in Nuclear Decommissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to harness nuclear fusion for energy production. The Committee recommends $474,617,000 for fusion energy the Alcator C- Mod facility and provides only enough funding for decommissioning and existing graduate

Hu, Huosheng

70

Nuclear Power Plant Design Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................. 22 5.1.16 Decommissioning: AP600, HTGR, ALWR ............................................................................................................... 35 7.3.4 Decommissioning Cost #12;9 decommissioning. The long delayed nuclear waste disposal facility at Yucca Mountain is becoming

71

Decommissioning Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area. The organizations has been actively performing and supporting others in performing decommissioning of former nuclear sites. Staff members are recognized as subject matter...

72

Characterization and Dose Modeling of Soil, Sediment and Bedrock During Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decommissioning nuclear power plant must confirm that the radionuclides present in the soils, sediments, and bedrock left on site at the time of license termination will meet the appropriate dose limits for site release. This process involves the characterization, dose modeling, and if required, remediation, of these media. At some decommissioning nuclear power plants, the management of contaminated soil, sediments, and bedrocks was a major project that led to generation of remediation projects and rad...

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Comparative Perspective on Reactor Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative perspective on decommissioning, based on facts and figures as well as the national policies, is useful in identifying mutually beneficial 'lessons learned' from various decommissioning programs. In this paper we provide such a perspective on the US and European approaches based on a review of the programmatic experience and the decommissioning projects. The European countries selected for comparison, UK, France, and Germany, have nuclear power programs comparable in size and vintage to the US program but have distinctly different policies at the federal level. The national decommissioning scene has a lot to do with how national nuclear energy policies are shaped. Substantial experience exists in all decommissioning programs and the technology is in a mature state. Substantial cost savings can result from sharing of decommissioning information, technologies and approaches among various programs. However, the Achilles' heel for the decommissioning industry remains the lack of appropriate disposal facilities for the nuclear wastes. (authors)

Devgun, J.S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, 55 E. Monroe Street, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States); Zelmer, R. [Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 1900 City Park Drive, Suite 200, Ottawa, Ontario K1J 1A3 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Concrete Characterization and Dose Modeling During Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990's. The cost effective characterization of contaminated concrete remains a challenge for plants currently undergoing decommissioning. This report provides detailed information on projects involving the characterization, dose modeling, remediation and disposal of contaminated concrete at a number of plants undergoing decommissioning.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Proceedings: EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop at Dounreay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI international workshop on decommissioning and radioactive waste management. EPRI initiated this continuing workshop series to aid utility personnel in assessing the technologies utilized in the decommissioning of nuclear power plants and facilities. The information presented will help individual utilities assess the benefits of the various programs, including their potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

76

Group Differences in Safety Climate Among Workers in the Nuclear Decommissioning and Demolition Industry in the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigated group differences in safety climate among workers in the nuclear decommissioning and demolition (D&D) industry in the United States. The study population… (more)

Findley, Michael Everett

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Comparison of Decommissioning Dose Modeling Codes for Nuclear Power Plant Use: RESRAD and DandD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of power plants are currently in the decommissioning phase. As the plants seek to terminate their operating license, they need to successfully conduct definite dose assessments. To assist these utilities in selecting an analysis code and appropriate input data, EPRI conducted a code comparison. However, this report was done as the industry's input to the NRC on their evolving review and improvement of decommissioning modeling. In early 2000, EPRI will publish a report for the commercial nuclear ...

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

78

Decommissioning of the Nuclear Licensed Facilities at the Fontenay aux Roses CEA Center  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary of the program for the decommissioning of all the CEA's facilities in Fontenay aux Roses. The particularity of this center is that it is located in a built-up area. Taking into account the particularities of the various buildings and the levels of radioactivity in them, it was possible to devise a coherent, optimized program for the CEA-FAR licensed nuclear facility decommissioning operations.

Jeanjacques, Michel; Piketty, Laurence; Mandard, Lionel; Pedron, Guy; Boissonneau, Jean Francois; Fouquereau, Alain; Pichereau, Eric; Lethuaire, Nathalie; Estivie, David; Binet, Cedric; Meden, Igor [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, Direction deleguee des Activites Nucleaires de Saclay, Departement des Reacteurs et des Services Nucleaires, Service d'Assainissement de Fontenay Aux Roses : 18, route du Panorama, BP6, 92265 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Decision to reorganise or reorganising decisions? A First-Hand Account of the Decommissioning of the Phnix Nuclear Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of scheduled nuclear reactor shutdowns. It was also the approach adopted for the study presented here, which in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. ORGANISATIONAL THEORY AND RESEARCH TOOL VALIDATION The study of the Decommissioning of the Phénix Nuclear Power Plant Melchior Pelleterat de Borde, MINES ParisTech, Christophe Martin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

80

WSRC Nuclear Materials Cost Module  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office (GAO) WSRC NM Cost Module Generates WSRC monthly and fiscal year to date Inventory and Manufacturing Statement for government owned accountable nuclear materials....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Criticality safety aspects of decontamination and decommissioning at defense nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

Defense nuclear facilities have operated for forty years with a well-defined mission to produce weapons components for the nation. With the end of the cold war, the facilities` missions have changed to one of decontamination and decommissioning. Off-normal operations and use of new procedures, such as will exist during these activities, have often been among the causal factors in previous criticality accidents at process facilities. This paper explores the similarities in causal factors in previous criticality accidents to the conditions existing in current defense nuclear facilities undergoing the transition to decontamination and decommissioning. Practices to reduce the risk to workers, the public, and the environment are recommended.

Croucher, D.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information are developed for the conceptual decommissioning of commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial grounds. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are used as reference facilities for the study. The two burial grounds are assumed to have the same site capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology. and hydrology of the two sites are chosen to be typical of real western and eastern sites. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed analyses and data needed to support the results given in Volume 1.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Remediation of Embedded Piping: Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization, decontamination, survey, and/or removal of contaminated embedded piping can have a substantial financial impact on decommissioning projects, depending on the project approach. This report presents a discussion of the Trojan Embedded Pipe Remediation Project (EPRP) activities, including categorization and characterization of affected piping, modeling for the proposed contamination acceptance criteria, and evaluations of various decontamination and survey techniques. The report also descr...

2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

84

Decommissioning Pre-Planning Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility experiences in recent years show that significant cost savings will result from advance planning for the eventual closure of nuclear power plants. This report provides a framework for planning ahead for plant decommissioning by drawing upon the experiences of utilities currently involved in decommissioning. It identifies important advance planning decisions, tasks, and contributing disciplines, establishes activity precedence relationships, and defines data requirements. The report also describes...

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This standard guide defines the process for developing a strategy for dispositioning concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. It outlines a 10-step method to evaluate disposal options for radioactively contaminated concrete. One of the steps is to complete a detailed analysis of the cost and dose to nonradiation workers (the public); the methodology and supporting data to perform this analysis are detailed in the appendices. The resulting data can be used to balance dose and cost and select the best disposal option. These data, which establish a technical basis to apply to release the concrete, can be used in several ways: (1) to show that the release meets existing release criteria, (2) to establish a basis to request release of the concrete on a case-by-case basis, (3) to develop a basis for establishing release criteria where none exists. 1.2 This standard guide is based on the “Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Sites,” (1) from ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Determining Background Radiation Levels in Support of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical reference for determining background radiation levels in support of surveys for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. Careful planning and data evaluation are essential for a valid survey. The report discusses important considerations for successful establishment of background levels for soils, surfaces, structures, and groundwater. It also explores alternatives to performing a formal background study.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

87

Proceedings: Decommissioning--License Termination Plans and Final Site Release Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop dealing with the subject of decommissioning license termination and final site release. The workshop was the ninth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. It focused on specific aspects of license termination activities and final site release as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities control decommissioning costs by selecting the best practices and technologies

None

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Proceedings: Decommissioning--License Termination Plans and Final Site Release Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop dealing with the subject of decommissioning license termination and final site release. The workshop was the ninth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. It focused on specific aspects of license termination activities and final site release as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities control decommissioning costs by selecti...

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

89

Decommissioning: License Termination and Final Site Release: Proceedings of EPRI Technical Workshop, October 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop on decommissioning license termination and final site release. The workshop was the eighth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. This workshop focused on specific aspects of license termination and final site release as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities control decommissioning costs by selecting the best practices an...

2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

90

Graphite Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the international participants in the EPRI Decommissioning Technology Program use graphite as a moderator material in their gas cooled reactors. This report reviews the current options for the management and disposal of irradiated nuclear graphite following the decommissioning of these nuclear installations. It also discusses specific issues associated with the disposal of graphite, and outlines innovative options for recycling or reusing products formed from the irradiated material.

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

Decommissioning Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this EPRI Technical Report is to provide a series of pre-planning guidance documents for the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. This guidance is based in part upon Nuclear Decommissioning Plans (NDPs) developed by Commonwealth Edison (now Exelon) following the premature closure of Zion Station in 1998 as well as from other industry references and experience. These NDPs focus on the planning activities over the period from prior to final shutdown through the transition period into de...

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Standard Guide for Environmental Monitoring Plans for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers the development or assessment of environmental monitoring plans for decommissioning nuclear facilities. This guide addresses: (1) development of an environmental baseline prior to commencement of decommissioning activities; (2) determination of release paths from site activities and their associated exposure pathways in the environment; and (3) selection of appropriate sampling locations and media to ensure that all exposure pathways in the environment are monitored appropriately. This guide also addresses the interfaces between the environmental monitoring plan and other planning documents for site decommissioning, such as radiation protection, site characterization, and waste management plans, and federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and guidance. This guide is applicable up to the point of completing D&D activities and the reuse of the facility or area for other purposes.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Decommissioning Low Level Waste Management and Reduction Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear plants undertaking decommissioning projects find that costs of low-level waste (LLW) management are a substantial portion of the total cost. To assist the industry in planning and optimizing their decommissioning radwaste management practices, EPRI developed a guide with more than 75 areas of guidance and an extensive lessons learned section. Using this report will aid utilities in successfully planning, executing, and disposing of low-level wastes during a decommissioning project.

1999-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development of a safety assessment approach for decontamination and decommissioning operations at nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for nearly 1000 nuclear facilities which will eventually be decommissioned. In order to ensure that the health and safety of the workers, other personnel on site and the public in general is maintained during decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations, a methodology specifically for use in evaluating the nuclear safety of the associated activities is being developed within the Department. This methodology represents not so much a departure from that currently fish in the DOE when conducting safety assessments of operations at nuclear facilities but, rather, a formalization of those methods specifically adapted to the D&D activities. As such, it is intended to provide the safety assessment personnel with a framework on which they can base their technical judgement, to assure a consistent approach to safety assessment of D&D operations and to facilitate the systematic collection of data from facilities in the post-operational part of the life cycle.

Worthington, P.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Cowgill, M.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Updates to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Consolidated NMSS Decommissioning Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 2003, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards (NMSS) consolidated and updated the policies and guidance of its decommissioning program in a three-volume NUREG report, NUREG-1757, 'Consolidated NMSS Decommissioning Guidance' [1,2,3]. This NUREG report provides guidance on: planning and implementing license termination under the NRC's License Termination Rule (LTR), in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E; complying with the radiological criteria for license termination; and complying with the requirements for financial assurance and record-keeping for decommissioning and timeliness in decommissioning of materials facilities. The staff plans to periodically update NUREG-1757, so that it reflects current NRC decommissioning policy. In September 2005, the staff issued, for public comment, draft Supplement 1 to NUREG-1757 [4], which contains proposed updates to the three volumes of NUREG-1757. Draft Supplement 1 includes new and revised decommissioning guidance that addresses some of the LTR implementation issues, which were analyzed by the staff in two Commission papers (SECY-03-0069, Results of the LTR Analysis [5]; and SECY-04-0035, Results of the LTR Analysis of the Use of Intentional Mixing of Contaminated Soil [6]). These issues include restricted use and institutional controls, onsite disposal of radioactive materials under 10 CFR 20.2002, selection and justification of exposure scenarios based on reasonably foreseeable future land use (realistic scenarios), intentional mixing of contaminated soil, and removal of material after license termination (a follow-up to the LTR Analysis issue on the relationship between the LTR and the current case-by-case approach for release of solid materials). The staff also developed new and revised guidance on other issues, including the risk-informed graded approach for engineered barriers. This paper is a follow-up to a poster session and paper at Waste Management 2004, which presented the new Consolidated NMSS Decommissioning Guidance in NUREG-1757. This paper discusses the issues addressed in the current update to NRC's decommissioning guidance and explores the relationships between the issues. (authors)

Banovac, K.L.; Johnson, R.L.; Schmidt, D.W. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Capturing Historical Knowledge for Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants: Summary of Historical Site Assessments at Eight Decommis sioning Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes approaches utilized and experience gained in the development of early characterization activities by a number of nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning. In particular, the report provides experience and lessons of performing the Historical Site Assessment, or HSA.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Lessons Learned from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the Safe Termination of Nuclear Activities. Outcomes of the International Conference, 11-15 December 2006, Athens, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full text of publication follows: decommissioning activities are increasing worldwide covering wide range of facilities - from nuclear power plant, through fuel cycle facilities to small laboratories. The importance of these activities is growing with the recognition of the need for ensuring safe termination of practices and reuse of sites for various purposes, including the development of new nuclear facilities. Decommissioning has been undertaken for more than forty years and significant knowledge has been accumulated and lessons have been learned. However the number of countries encountering decommissioning for the first time is increasing with the end of the lifetime of the facilities around the world, in particular in countries with small nuclear programmes (e.g. one research reactor) and limited human and financial resources. In order to facilitate the exchange of lessons learned and good practices between all Member States and to facilitate and improve safety of the planned, ongoing and future decommissioning projects, the IAEA in cooperation with the Nuclear Energy Agency to OECD, European Commission and World Nuclear Association organised the international conference on Lessons Learned from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the Safe Termination of Nuclear Activities, held in Athens, Greece. The conference also highlighted areas where future cooperation at national and international level is required in order to improve decommissioning planning and safety during decommissioning and to facilitate decommissioning by selecting appropriate strategies and technologies for decontamination, dismantling and management of waste. These and other aspects discussed at the conference are presented in this paper, together with the planned IAEA measures for amendment and implementation of the International Action Plan on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and its future programme on decommissioning.

Batandjieva, B.; Laraia, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Use of Probabilistic Methods in Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Dose Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance on the use of probabilistic dose analysis in the demonstration of regulatory compliance for final release of decommissioned nuclear plant sites. It also addresses probabilistic dose analysis and the interpretation of its results in general terms. Finally, the report examines the use of the RESRAD 6.0 as a tool for screening dose analysis and for site-specific probabilistic dose analysis.

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Use of In-Situ Gamma Spectroscopy During Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to leakage and other events that may occur during nuclear power plant operations, soil, concrete and bedrock have the potential to become contaminated, and therefore must be characterized to demonstrate that they meet strict regulatory site release limits. This report provides detailed information on the use of portable gamma spectroscopy systems for the characterization and Final Status Survey of soil, concrete and bedrock contaminated with radionuclides at a number of plants undergoing decommission...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

103

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Clearance Levels For Redundant Material From Decommissioning Of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, a great deal is happening in the regulatory field regarding the release of radiologically contaminated material: . The IAEA is working on the revision of Safety Series 89 (governing the principles of exemption and clearance) and of the TECDOC 855 on clearance levels. . The European Commission Directive on basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation in both nuclear and non-nuclear industries will become effective in May 2000. . The U.S. NRC has issued its draft on clearance of material from nuclear facilities (NUREG 1640), as well as an "issues" paper on the release of solid materials. The U.S. State Department has launched an International Radioactive Source Management Initiative, one of the objectives being to "develop international standards and guidelines and `harmonize' U.S. and IAEA radioactive clearance levels." Of great significance to the implementor of clearance regulations in the nuclear industry is the emergence of the NORM issue durin...

Shankar Menon Program; Shankar Menon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Proceedings: Decommissioning, Decontamination, ALARA, and Worker Safety Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop on decontamination, ALARA, and worker safety was the sixth in a series initiated by EPRI to aid utility personnel in assessing the technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. The workshop focused on specific aspects of decommissioning related to the management of worker radiation exposure and safety. The information presented will help individual utilities assess benefits of programs in these areas for their projects, including their potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

None

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Proceedings: Decommissioning, Decontamination, ALARA, and Worker Safety Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop on decontamination, ALARA, and worker safety was the sixth in a series initiated by EPRI to aid utility personnel in assessing the technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. The workshop focused on specific aspects of decommissioning related to the management of worker radiation exposure and safety. The information presented will help individual utilities assess benefits of programs in these areas for their projects, including their potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 1. A selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography of 633 references represents the first in a series to be produced by the Remedial Actions Program Information Center (RAPIC) containing scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information concerning the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Major chapters selected for this bibliography are Facility Decommissioning, Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup, Contaminated Site Restoration, and Criteria and Standards. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author, corporate affiliation, or title of the document. When the author is not given, the corporate affiliation appears first. If these two levels of authorship are not given, the title of the document is used as the identifying level. Indexes are provided for (1) author(s), (2) keywords, (3) title, (4) technology development, and (5) publication description. An appendix of 123 entries lists recently acquired references relevant to decommissioning of nuclear facilities. These references are also arranged according to one of the four subject categories and followed by author, title, and publication description indexes. The bibliography was compiled from a specialized data base established and maintained by RAPIC to provide information support for the Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program, under the cosponsorship of its three major components: Surplus Facilities Management Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program, and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Actions Program. RAPIC is part of the Ecological Sciences Information Center within the Information Center Complex at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Faust, R.A.; Fore, C.S.; Knox, N.P.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Cost Estimating for Decommissioning of a Plutonium Facility--Lessons Learned From The Rocky Flats Building 771 Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site is implementing an aggressive approach in an attempt to complete Site closure by 2006. The replanning effort to meet this goal required that the life-cycle decommissioning effort for the Site and for the major individual facilities be reexamined in detail. As part of the overall effort, the cost estimate for the Building 771 decommissioning project was revised to incorporate both actual cost data from a recently-completed similar project and detailed planning for all activities. This paper provides a brief overview of the replanning process and the original estimate, and then discusses the modifications to that estimate to reflect new data, methods, and planning rigor. It provides the new work breakdown structure and discusses the reasons for the final arrangement chosen. It follows with the process used to assign scope, cost, and schedule elements within the new structure, and development of the new code of accounts. Finally, it describes the project control methodology used to track the project, and provides lessons learned on cost tracking in the decommissioning environment.

Stevens, J. L.; Titus, R.; Sanford, P. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

SOME RECENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENTS FROM THE UK'S NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY TO ENABLE HAZARD CHARACTERISATION FOR NUCLEAR DECOMMISSIONING APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Under its programme of self investment Internal Research and Development (IR&D), the UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is addressing the requirement for development in technology to enable hazard characterisation for nuclear decommissioning applications. Three such examples are described here: (1) RadBall developed by the NNL (patent pending) is a deployable baseball-sized radiation mapping device which can, from a single location, locate and quantify radiation hazards. RadBall offers a means to collect information regarding the magnitude and distribution of radiation in a given cell, glovebox or room to support the development of a safe, cost effective decontamination strategy. RadBall requires no electrical supplies and is relatively small, making it easy to be deployed and used to map radiation hazards in hard to reach areas. Recent work conducted in partnership with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is presented. (2) HiRAD (patent pending) has been developed by the NNL in partnership with Tracerco Ltd (UK). HiRAD is a real-time, remotely deployed, radiation detection device designed to operate in elevated levels of radiation (i.e. thousands and tens of thousands of Gray) as seen in parts of the nuclear industry. Like the RadBall technology, the HiRAD system does not require any electrical components, the small dimensions and flexibility of the device allow it to be positioned in difficult to access areas (such as pipe work). HiRAD can be deployed as a single detector, a chain, or as an array giving the ability to monitor large process areas. Results during the development and deployment of the technology are presented. (3) Wireless Sensor Network is a NNL supported development project led by the University of Manchester (UK) in partnership with Oxford University (UK). The project is concerned with the development of wireless sensor network technology to enable the underwater deployment and communication of miniaturised probes allowing pond monitoring and mapping. The potential uses, within the nuclear sector alone, are both numerous and significant in terms of the proceeding effort to clean up the UK's nuclear waste legacy.

Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

112

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Nuclear Power Reactor Sites December 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Washington, D.C. Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel The picture on the cover is the Connecticut Yankee Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation site in Haddam, Connecticut, with 43 dry storage NRC-licensed dual-purpose (storage and transport) casks. ii Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The House Appropriations Committee Print that accompanied the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008, requests that the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department):

113

ASSURING THE AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS FOR DECOMMISSIONING NUCLEAR REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This regulatory guide is being issued in draft form to involve the public in the early stages of the development of a regulatory position in this area. It has not received complete staff review or approval and does not represent an official NRC staff position. Public comments are being solicited on this draft guide (including any implementation schedule) and its associated regulatory analysis or value/impact statement. Comments should be accompanied by appropriate supporting data. Written comments may be submitted to the Rules and Directives Branch, Office of Administration, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001. Comments may be submitted electronically or downloaded through the NRC’s interactive web site at through Rulemaking. Copies of comments received may be examined at the NRC Public

Contact B. J. Richter; B. Discussion

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Power Reactor Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past two decades the NRC regulated nuclear industry has encountered and dealt with a diverse range of political, financial and technological challenges while decommissioning its nuclear facilities. During that time, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities has evolved into a mature industry in the United States with a number of large power reactors successfully decommissioned and their NRC licenses terminated. One of the challenges discussed in this report is site release standards, required ...

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an island’s cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography: Volume 8  

SciTech Connect

The 553 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eighth in a series of reports. Foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Management, Technical Measurements Center, and General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations.

Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Update on the Cost of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We update the cost of nuclear power as calculated in the MIT (2003) Future of Nuclear Power study. Our main focus is on the changing cost of construction of new plants. The MIT (2003) study provided useful data on the cost ...

Parsons, John E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Designing decommissioning into new reactor designs  

SciTech Connect

One of the lessons learned from decommissioning of existing reactors has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed some three or four decades ago. Recently, the nuclear power has seen a worldwide resurgence and many new advanced reactor designs are either on the market or nearing design completion. Most of these designs are evolutionary in nature and build on the existing and proven technologies. They also incorporate many improvements and take advantage of the substantial operating experience. Nevertheless, by and large, the main factors driving the design of new reactors are the safety features, safeguards considerations, and the economic factors. With a large decommissioning experience that already exists in the nuclear industry, and with average decommissioning costs at around six hundred million dollars for each reactor in today's dollars, it is necessary that decommissioning factors also be considered as a part of the early design effort. Even though decommissioning may be sixty years down the road from the time they go on line, it is only prudent that new designs be optimized for eventual decommissioning, along with the other major considerations. (authors)

Devgun, J.S.; CHMM, Ph.D. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

A. Petraglia; C. Sabbarese; M. De Cesare; N. De Cesare; F. Quinto; F. Terrasi; A. D'Onofrio; P. Steier; L. K. Fifield; A. M. Esposito

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

123

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

Petraglia, A; De Cesare, M; De Cesare, N; Quinto, F; Terrasi, F; D'Onofrio, A; Steier, P; Fifield, L K; Esposito, A M; 10.1051/radiopro/2012010

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, volume 9  

SciTech Connect

The 604 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the ninth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Subsections for sections 1, 2, 5, and 6 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at (615) 576-0568 or FTS 626-0568.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Michelson, D.C.; Turmer, G.S.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Vol. 18. Part 2. Indexes  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 3638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. This report is the eighteenth in a series of bibliographies prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been included in Part 1 of the report. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D&D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluations; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues. Within the 16 sections, the citations are sorted by geographic location. If a geographic location is not specified, the citations are sorted according to the document title. In Part 2 of the report, indexes are provided for author, author affiliation, selected title phrase, selected title word, publication description, geographic location, and keyword.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography of 657 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fourth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic documents of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been references in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; and (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author, or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. Appendix A lists 264 bibliographic references to literature identified during this reporting period but not abstracted due to time constraints. Title and publication description indexes are given for this appendix. Appendix B defines frequently used acronyms, and Appendix C lists the recipients of this report according to their corporate affiliation.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Faust, R.A.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, volume 9  

SciTech Connect

The 604 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the ninth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Subsections for sections 1, 2, 5, and 6 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at (615) 576-0568 or FTS 626-0568.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Michelson, D.C.; Turmer, G.S.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A review of decommissioning considerations for new reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At a time of 'nuclear renaissance' when the focus is on advanced reactor designs and construction, it is easy to overlook the decommissioning considerations because such a stage in the life of the new reactors will be some sixty years down the road. Yet, one of the lessons learned from major decommissioning projects has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Hence, the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account is right from the design stage with regular updates of the decommissioning strategy and plans throughout the life cycle of the reactor. Designing D and D into the new reactor designs is necessary to ensure that the tail end costs of the nuclear power are manageable. Such considerations during the design stage will facilitate a more cost-effective, safe and timely decommissioning of the facility when a reactor is eventually retired. This paper examines the current regulatory and industry design guidance for the new reactors with respect to the decommissioning issues and provides a review of the design considerations that can help optimize the reactor designs for the eventual decommissioning. (authors)

Devgun, J.S.Ph.D. [Manager Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Going with the flow: Life cycle costing for industrial pumping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time costs of down time, decommissioning, and environmental= environmental costs C d = decommissioning BestPractices

Tutterow, Vestal; Hovstadius, Gunnar; McKane, Aimee

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Decommissioning Yankee Rowe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the process and progress of the decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Plant in Massachusetts. In 32 years Yankee Rowe was a safe, reliable and economical power source for New England. The uncertain near-term availability of disposal facilities for low-level waste, spent fuel, and other high level waste presents special challenges to the decommissioning. The decommissioning plan was submitted to the USNRC in December 1993 with final approval anticipated in 1994. Topics highlighted in this article are the decommissioning plan and the component removal program.

Heider, K.J.; Mellor, R.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decommissioning Authority (NDA) have commissioned the 2007 UK Radioactive Waste Inventory (2007 Inventory) to provide information on the status of radioactive waste at 1 April 2007 and forecasts of future arisings in the UK. Its aim is to provide comprehensive and up-to-date data in an open and transparent manner for those interested in radioactive waste issues. It is part of an ongoing programme of research jointly conducted by Defra and NDA. Waste volumes are given for the UK as a whole, for each type of waste producing activity and for each of the main organisations producing wastes. The report also presents information on the radioactivity and the material content of the wastes. The report includes high, intermediate and low level wastes produced from uranium enrichment, nuclear fuel manufacture, nuclear power production, spent fuel reprocessing, research and development, medical and industrial sources and defence activities. The assumptions used in the forecasts of future waste arisings are presented and discussed. Also the waste quantities in the present Inventory are compared with corresponding information from previous inventories and any differences are explained.

Pöyry Energy Limited Preface

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities: First lessons Learned from UP1, Marcoule, France  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 30, 1997, UP1, Marcoule Fuel reprocessing facility, dissolved its last spent Fuel rod. Final shutdown and stage 1 decommissioning began immediately after, under the supervision of CODEM , a consortium composed of The French Atomic Energy Commission, COGEMA, France fuel Cycle Company and EDF, the French Electricity Utility. The goal of the decommissioning program was to achieve stage 2 decommissioning , as per IAEA standards, within a period of about 15 years. 10 years later, a significant amount of decontamination and decommissioning works has been conducted with success. The contractual structure under which the program was launched has been profoundly modified, and the capacity of The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and AREVA NC to complete full decommissioning programs has been confirmed. In the present document, we propose to examine the main aspects involved in the management of such decommissioning programs, and highlight, with significant examples, the main lessons learnt. In conclusion: As of 2007, UP1 decommissioning program proves to be a success. The choice of early decommissioning, the partnership launched between the French Atomic Energy Commission as owner of the site and decommissioning fund, with AREVA NC as operator and main contractor of the decommissioning works has been a success. The French Atomic Energy commission organized a contractual framework ensuring optimal safety conditions and work completion, while AREVA NC gained a unique experience at balancing the various aspects involved in the conduction of complete decommissioning programs. Although such a framework may not be applicable to all situations and facilities, it provides a positive example of a partnership combining institutional regulations and industrial efficiency.

Chabeuf, Jean-Michel; Boya, Didier [AREVA, AREVA NC Marcoule, 30130 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); CEA, Marcoule, 30130 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Connecticut Yankee Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990's. Based on current information, the next group of plants whose license will expire will not begin decommissioning for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one power reactor - Connecticut Yankee, in order to provide their experience for future plants.

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Decontamination and Decommissioning Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.1.4 NUCLEAR SUBSTANCE ROOM DECOMMISSIONING FORM The permit holder shall ensure that prior to decommissioning any area, room or enclosure where the permitted activity has been conducted: non: ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ #12;Contamination Monitoring Results Provide a floor plan of the lab/area to be decommissioned

Kemner, Ken

135

Nuclear plant cancellations: causes, costs, and consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was commissioned in order to help quantify the effects of nuclear plant cancellations on the Nation's electricity prices. This report presents a historical overview of nuclear plant cancellations through 1982, the costs associated with those cancellations, and the reasons that the projects were terminated. A survey is presented of the precedents for regulatory treatment of the costs, the specific methods of cost recovery that were adopted, and the impacts of these decisions upon ratepayers, utility stockholders, and taxpayers. Finally, the report identifies a series of other nuclear plants that remain at risk of canellation in the future, principally as a result of similar demand, finance, or regulatory problems cited as causes of cancellation in the past. The costs associated with these potential cancellations are estimated, along with their regional distributions, and likely methods of cost recovery are suggested.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Spent Fuel Pool Cooling and Cleanup During Decommissioning: Experience at Trojan Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operation of original in-plant spent fuel pool facilities at shutdown power plants is expensive compared to available alternatives and can interfere with the decommissioning process. This report describes the approach taken in the Trojan Decommissioning Project to establish independent cooling and cleanup services for the fuel pool until the spent fuel is placed in dry storage.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Executive Director for Operations USE OF INSURANCE AS A METHOD TO PROVIDE FINANCIAL ASSURANCE FOR DECOMMISSIONING NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this memorandum is to inform the Commission of the staff’s proposed Standard Review Plan (SRP) criteria for evaluating the insurance method of providing financial assurance for decommissioning nuclear power reactors and provide the status of the staff’s ongoing reviews of two insurance proposals. In a memorandum dated May 20, 2004, from then Executive Director for Operations, Dr. William Travers, the Commission was informed of the staff’s receipt of two first-of-a-kind proposals submitted by Marsh USA (Marsh) and Nuclear Electric Insurance Limited (NEIL) to use insurance to provide financial assurance for decommissioning nuclear power reactors pursuant to 10 CFR 50.75(e)(1)(iii). In that memorandum, the staff stated that it would develop SRP criteria to evaluate the use of insurance, commence reviews of the two proposals, and inform the Commission of its progress by October 2004. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations at 10 CFR 50.75(e) specify that insurance is an acceptable method for a licensee to demonstrate reasonable assurance that sufficient funds will be available for the plant decommissioning process. Specifically, 10 CFR 50.75(e)(1)(iii) requires that certain terms and conditions must be present in the decommissioning insurance policy. These conditions include: automatic renewal, 90-days advance notice by the insurer of intent not to renew the policy, and payment of the full face amount into a trust if the licensee fails to provide an acceptable replacement after receiving notice of the insurer’s intent to cancel the policy. CONTACT: Ronald B. Uleck, NRR/DRIP 301-415-3741 The Commissioners-2-However, 10 CFR 50.75 contains only limited requirements for use of the insurance method. Similarly, existing guidance provided by NUREG-1577, Rev. 1, “Standard Review Plan on

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

GUIDE TO NUCLEAR POWER COST EVALUATION. VOLUME 4. FUEL CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect

Information on fuel cycle cost is presented. Topics covered include: nuclear fuel, fuel management, fuel cost, fissionable material cost, use charge, conversion and fabrication costs, processing cost, and shipping cost. (M.C.G.)

1962-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

The impact of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several utilities have made decisions to decommission nuclear plants. Other utilities are currently investigating the economic and technical feasibility of decommissioning versus continued operations. As a result, assessments are being made to determine the impact of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning. This assessment is being made on a comparison of wet and dry storage (including modifications to current wet storage systems). Not only are the capital and operating costs of the equipment or modifications being evaluated, but staffing levels, interference with other decommissioning activities, and the ability to eventually transfer the fuel to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all factor into the assessments. In the case of the Rancho Seco nuclear generating station, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) developed three objectives related to spent-fuel disposition to support the safe and economical closure of the plant. These objectives are as follows: 1. Minimize occupational and public radiation exposure. 2. Minimize decommissioning costs, including the need to maintain the spent-fuel pool. 3. Prepare the fuel for DOE acceptance. These rather universal goals are being met for Rancho Seco through the use of a canister-based spent-fuel storage and transportation system, the NUHOMS system. This paper discusses the economic and technical impacts of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning, more specifically as it relates to the decommissioning of the Rancho Seco plant.

Bowser, R.C.; Taylor, M. Jr. (Pacific Nuclear, San Jose, CA (United States)); Miller, K.R. (Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Herald, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scientific resources for decommissioning a nuclear facility.t) i Decommissioning Decommissioning of a nuclear facilityDecommissioning Funding: Ethics, Implementa- tion, Uncertainties. Nuclear

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Second EPRI International Decommissioning Workshop at Bristol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an international EPRI workshop on decommissioning and radioactive waste management. The workshop focused on a wide range of decommissioning topics, including general approaches, technical developments, and project experiences. The information presented will assist individual utilities in their decommissioning projects, and has the potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about $440 Million under Cost Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about $440 Million under Cost November 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Crews demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Crews demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown here removed, loaded and ready for transport to the on-site landfill. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown here removed, loaded and ready

143

Innovative implementation of decommissioning activities at Yankee  

SciTech Connect

The decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe reactor is described. Reactor dismantlement, radioactive waste manageemnt, and cost are discussed.

Kadak, A.C.; Maret, G.A.; Mellor, R.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Evaluation of Radionuclides in Concrete Shielding for Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shielding / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Decontamination/Decommissioning

Yen-Fu Chen; Yen-Kung Lin; Rong-Jiun Sheu; Shiang-Huei Jiang

146

Waste Logic(TM): Decommissioning Waste Manager, Version 2.1 and Solid Waste Manager, Version 2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Logic(TM) Decommissioning Waste Manager, Version 2.1: Rising program costs and a more competitive business environment have made solid waste management a major cost concern. Effective management of solid waste can reduce long range operating costs for a large nuclear plant by millions of dollars. To assist waste managers in maximizing potential cost savings, EPRI developed the Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager(TM) computer code. It provides a comprehensive methodology for capturing and quan...

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fort St. Vrain Decommissioning: Public Relations and Human Resources Issues: Personnel Plans and Communications During Decommissioni ng of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details aspects of the personnel plan instrumental in the successful decommissioning of Fort St. Vrain nuclear power plant. It includes discussion of the personnel retention program, actions taken to mitigate harassment and intimidation issues, and the communications plan. The report also discusses some decommissioning pitfalls encountered, signs of trouble brewing, and ways to mitigate personnel problems before they become serious issues. Project managers designed the document to be generic ...

1998-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

148

Decommissioning at AWE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AWE (A) has been at the heart of the UK Nuclear deterrent since it was established in the early 1950's. It is a nuclear licensed site and is governed by the United Kingdoms Nuclear Installation Inspectorate (NII). AWE plc on behalf of the Ministry of Defence (MOD) manages the AWE (A) site and all undertakings including decommissioning. Therefore under NII license condition 35 'Decommissioning', AWE plc is accountable to make and implement adequate arrangements for the decommissioning of any plant or process, which may affect safety. The majority of decommissioning projects currently being undertaken are to do with Hazard category 3, 4 or 5 facilities, systems or plant that have reached the end of their operational span and have undergone Post-Operational Clean-Out (POCO). They were either built for the production of fissile components, for supporting the early reactor fuels programmes or for processing facility waste arisings. They either contain redundant contaminated gloveboxes associated process areas, process plant or systems or a combination of all. In parallel with decommissioning project AWE (A) are undertaking investigation into new technologies to aid decommissioning projects; to remove the operative from hands on operations; to develop and implement modifications to existing process and techniques used. AWE (A) is currently going thorough a sustained phase of upgrading its facilities to enhance its scientific capability, with older facilities, systems and plant being replaced, making decommissioning a growth area. It is therefore important to the company to reduce these hazards progressively and safety over the coming years, making decommissioning an important feature of the overall legacy management aspects of AWE PLC's business. This paper outlines the current undertakings and progress of Nuclear decommissioning on the AWE (A) site. (authors)

Biles, K.; Hedges, M.; Campbell, C

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Decommissioning License Termination Plan Documents and Lessons Learned: Summary of LTPs for Two Reactors and Nuclear Regulatory Comm ission Safety Evaluation Reports for Three Nuclear Power Plant LTPs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report offers those utilities beginning the preparation of License Termination Plans (LTPs) in the near future a comprehensive summary of the approaches currently taken in LTP preparation by major nuclear decommissioning projects. The report details the approach taken in addressing each element of the LTP, and the lessons learned by those utilities currently undergoing the license termination process. This document provides needed guidance for the LTP process, and will greatly benefit utilities cons...

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

150

Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioning Implementation Guide. Decommissioning Benchmarking Study DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine approaches to improve the decommissioning process. The study focused on quantifying productivity of decommissioning physical activities and identifying how productivity is affected by specific working conditions. The decommissioning benchmarking results are the foundation for several distinct products:

152

Regulatory Reform and License Termination Planning in Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) must be safe and cost-effective and consider the needs of a wide range of stakeholders. The creative tension among these objectives has provided opportunities to reform the way these plants are regulated and managed in decommissioning. Enlightened and visionary leaders from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry are seizing these opportunities to create new paradigms for risk-informed regulation; creative stakeholder involvement; and effective, end-state focused, license termination planning.

Michael J. Meisner

2000-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Review of the Costs of Nuclear Power Michael T. Hogue, Research Analyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

long-term option for the future of the College's Reactor. 10. The College runs a small CONSORT nuclear reactor at Silwood Park. Ultimate responsibility for funding its end of life decommissioning currently of the liability, or postponing decommissioning by extending the life of the Reactor. The Paper proposed a method

Provancher, William

154

Substantial Variability Exists in Utilities' Nuclear Decommissioning Funding Adequacy: Baseline Trends (1997-2001); and Scenario and Sensitivity Analyses (Year 2001)  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the trends over 1997-2001 in my baseline simulation analysis of the sufficiency of electric utilities' funds to eventually decommission the nation's nuclear power plants. Further, for 2001, I describe the utilities' funding adequacy results obtained using scenario and sensitivity analyses, respectively. In this paper, I focus more on the wide variability observed in these adequacy measures among utilities than on the results for the ''average'' utility in the nuclear industry. Only individual utilities, not average utilities -- often used by the nuclear industry to represent its funding adequacy -- will decommission their nuclear plants. Industry-wide results tend to mask the varied results for individual utilities. This paper shows that over 1997-2001, the variability of my baseline decommissioning funding adequacy measures (in percentages) for both utility fund balances and current contributions has remained very large, reflected in the sizable ranges and frequency distributions of these percentages. The relevance of this variability for nuclear decommissioning funding adequacy is, of course, focused more on those utilities that show below ideal balances and contribution levels. Looking backward, 42 of 67 utility fund (available) balances, in 2001, were above (and 25 below) their ideal baseline levels; in 1997, 42 of 76 were above (and 34 below) ideal levels. Of these, many utility balances were far above, and many far below, such ideal levels. The problem of certain utilities continuing to show balances much below ideal persists even with increases in the adequacy of ''average'' utility balances.

Williams, D. G.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

Nuclear Systems Technologies - Nuclear Engineering Division ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Departments involved: Research & Test Reactor | Engineering Development and Applications "Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities" training courses Argonne Decommissioning Training...

156

Supercomputer decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercomputer decommissioning Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues submit Roadrunner supercomputer: Rest in...

157

Decommissioning Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioing...

158

Designing Reactors to Facilitate Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Critics of nuclear power often cite issues with tail-end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities as reasons to oppose the building of new reactors. In fact, waste disposal and the decommissioning of large nuclear reactors have proven more challenging than anticipated. In the early days of the nuclear power industry the design and operation of various reactor systems was given a great deal of attention. Little effort, however, was expended on end-of-the-cycle activities, such as decommissioning and disposal of wastes. As early power and test reactors have been decommissioned difficulties with end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities have become evident. Even the small test reactors common at the INEEL were not designed to facilitate their eventual decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement. The results are that decommissioning of these facilities is expensive, time consuming, relatively hazardous, and generates large volumes of waste. This situation clearly supports critics concerns about building a new generation of power reactors.

Richard H. Meservey

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Decommissioning Standard Review Plans and Risk-Informing Decommissioning Regulation: Selected 1999 Industry/NRC Decommissioning Lice nsing Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the technical support EPRI provided the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Decommissioning Working Group in 1999. This volume includes two initiatives that produced four draft Decommissioning Standard Review Plans (DSRPs). It also includes an evaluation entitled Spent Fuel Pool Seismic Failure Frequency in Support of Risk-Informed Decommissioning -- Emergency Planning.

1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Proposals for Nuclear Cooperation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experience in decommissioning its former nuclear-poweredfor decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear vessels.nuclear technology: design, procurement, equipment manufacturing, construction, installation, start up, operation and decommissioning.

Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Choi, Jor-Shan; Fei, Edward

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Author's personal copy Cost analysis of the US spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Types of Nuclear Facilities, from 2001 to 2050 62 Figure 13. Decommissioning Schedule of Power PlantsThe Potential for a Nuclear Renaissance: The Development of Nuclear Power Under Climate Change to the Engineering Systems Division and the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering in Partial Fulfillment

Deinert, Mark

162

Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E.; Banovac, K.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

Leopando, Leonardo [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines); Warnecke, Ernst [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Proceedings: 3rd EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI held its 3rd International Decommissioning Workshop in collaboration with EDF in Lyon, France. This workshop focused on a wide range of decommissioning topics, including general approaches, technical developments and project experiences. The information presented will assist individual utilities in their decommissioning projects with the potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

Rancho Seco--Decommissioning Update  

SciTech Connect

The Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station ceased operation in June of 1989 and entered an extended period of SAFSTOR to allow funds to accumulate for dismantlement. Incremental dismantlement was begun in 1997 of steam systems and based on the successful completion of work, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) board of directors approved full decommissioning in July 1999. A schedule has been developed for completion of decommissioning by 2008, allowing decommissioning funds to accumulate until they are needed. Systems removal began in the Auxiliary Building in October of 1999 and in the Reactor Building in January of 2000. Systems dismantlement continues in the Reactor Building and should be completed by the end of 2003. System removal is near completion in the Auxiliary Building with removal of the final liquid waste tanks in progress. The spent fuel has been moved to dry storage in an onsite ISFSI, with completion on August 21, 2002. The spent fuel racks are currently being removed from the pool, packaged and shipped, and then the pool will be cleaned. Also in the last year the reactor coolant pumps and primary piping were removed and shipped. Characterization and planning work for the reactor vessel and internals is also in progress with various cut-up and/or disposal options being evaluated. In the year ahead the remaining systems in the Reactor Building will be removed, packaged and sent for disposal, including the pressurizer. Work will be started on embedded and underground piping and the large outdoor tanks. Building survey and decontamination will begin. RFP's for removal of the vessel and internals and the steam generators are planned to fix the cost of those components. If the costs are consistent with current estimates the work will go forward. If they are not, hardened SAFSTOR/entombment may be considered.

Newey, J. M.; Ronningen, E. T.; Snyder, M. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

Release of radioisotopes and activated materials from nuclear installations and facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decommissioned. The decommissioning of a 60 Co therapy unit,problems. However, the decommissioning of an acceleratorto be disposed of. The decommissioning of a nuclear power

Manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J.E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Preparing for Decommissioning: The Oyster Creek Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report chronicles the process of preparing GPU Nuclear's Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station for early retirement and decommissioning. The Oyster Creek experience has great relevance to the nuclear industry, as future decommissioning projects will benefit from the comprehensive preplanning work performed there.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

169

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Site decommissioning management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Parametric Study of Front-End Nuclear Fuel Cycle Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides an overview of front-end fuel cost components for nuclear plants, specifically uranium concentrates, uranium conversion services, uranium enrichment services, and nuclear fuel fabrication services. A parametric analysis of light-water reactor (LWR) fuel cycle costs is also included in order to quantify the impacts that result from changes in the cost of one or more front-end components on overall fuel cycle costs.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

173

Related Resources - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

174

Publications: Other Resources - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

175

Publications 2005 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

176

Publications 2003 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

177

Contacts - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

178

Publications 2001 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

179

Publications 2004 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

180

Publications 2009 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

182

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

183

Nuclear Systems Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

184

Publications 2011 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

185

Release of radioisotopes and activated materials from nuclear installations and facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastes coming from the decommissioning of nuclear reactors,use of a nuclear facility The decommissioning, refurbishingdisposed of. The decommissioning of a nuclear power station

Manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J.E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement for Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center A Summary and Guide for Stakeholders DOE/EIS-0226-D (Revised) November 2008 The West Valley Site Availability of the Revised Draft EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center For further information on this Draft EIS, or to request a copy please contact: Cathern Bohan, EIS Document Manager West Valley Demonstration Project U.S. Department of Energy Ashford Office Complex 9030 Route 219 West Valley, NY 14171 Telephone: 716-942-4159 Fax: 716-942-4703 E-mail: catherine.m.bohan@wv.doe.gov Printed with soy ink on recycled paper

187

Final EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the WVDP and Western New York Nuclear Service Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EIS-0226 DOE/EIS-0226 January 2010 Final Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center A Summary and Guide for Stakeholders The West Valley Site Availability of the Final EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center For further information on this Final EIS, or to request a copy of the EIS or references, please contact: Catherine Bohan, EIS Document Manager West Valley Demonstration Project U.S. Department of Energy Ashford Office Complex 9030 Route 219 West Valley, NY 14171 Telephone: 716-942-4159 Fax: 716-942-4703 E-mail: catherine.m.bohan@wv.doe.gov

188

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 18. Part 1B: Citations with abstracts, sections 10 through 16  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 3,638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D and D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized sites Remedial Action Program; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluation; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 18. Part 1A: Citations with abstracts, sections 1 through 9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography contains 3,638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration program; (2) DOE D and D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluation; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

THE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE: PROSPECTS FOR REDUCING ITS COST  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh would make nuclear power competitive with conventional power in lowcost coal areas if capital and operating costs can be brought to within about 10 percent of those of coal-fired plants. Substantial decreases in fuel fabrication cost are anticipated by 1970: other costs in the fuel cycle are expccted to remain about the same as at present. Unit costs and irradiation levels that would be needed to give a fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh are believed to be attainable by 1970. (auth)

Albrecht, W.L.

1959-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Cost Analysis of Inadequate Interoperability in the US Capital ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... inadequate interoperability include manual reentry of ... the costs of the decommissioning phase because ... operate, and decommission capital facilities ...

2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

192

Decommissioning Regulatory Process Interactions in 2000: EPRI Support to NEI for NRC Proposed Decommissioning Rule Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the technical support EPRI provided to the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Decommissioning Working Group in 2000. It includes the material supplied to the NEI for their use in generating comments on behalf of the nuclear energy industry concerning the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) new draft regulations on decommissioning.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

193

Proceedings: Decommissioning - Plant Reconfiguration and Engineering Processes Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Plant Reconfiguration and Engineering Processes Workshop -- the seventh in a series -- will help utility personnel evaluate technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. This workshop focused on specific aspects of plant reconfiguration and engineering processes as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities assess approaches to restructuring of plant engineering processes and reconfiguration management to meet individual decommissioning pro...

2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

194

Decommissioning Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Decommissioning Documents Decommissioning Documents More Documents & Publications CX-002246: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning Handbook CX-003134:...

195

Decommissioning Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Decommissioning Documents Decommissioning Documents More Documents & Publications CX-002246: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning Handbook CX-000018:...

196

Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning: Final Survey for the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final radiological survey for the area where Portland General Electric (PGE) will construct the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at Trojan nuclear power plant. The survey fulfills the requirements for release of this area from Trojan's 10 CFR 50 license before radiation levels increase with spent fuel storage in the ISFSI.

1998-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

197

Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager 2.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Waste Manager, part of EPRI's Waste Logic series of computer programs, analyzes decommissioning waste cost and volume reduction strategies with the intent of quantifying the existing waste management program for any given waste generator.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Decommissioning Technology Experience Reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents four summary reports on field applications and demonstration tests of several nuclear plant deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. Specifically presented are findings from: (1) concrete decontamination technology tests at Rancho Seco; (2) a large bore piping decontamination and characterization demonstration at Big Rock Point; (3) gamma ray imaging for D&D applications; and (4) novel techniques for large tank and vessel removal at Trojan and Rancho Seco.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report  

SciTech Connect

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the {prime}978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A PROPOSED STANDARDISED LIST of ITEMS FOR COSTING PURPOSES in the DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR INSTALLATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report should be viewed as an interim document, to be broadly distributed, discussed and used, and to be finalised, most effectively in a workshop format, after approximately three years. Thereafter, a more definitive and more broadly tested and supported report will be issued. Candace CHAN-SANDS Edward LAZO Kurt PFLUGRAD

Interim Technical Document

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Proceedings: 1998 EPRI/NEI Decommissioning Technology Workshop: Monterey, California, December 7-9, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and NEI provide technical and regulatory support to utilities planning or involved in nuclear plant decommissioning projects. The second joint Decommissioning Technology Workshop provided the opportunity for utility representatives and selected vendors to exchange information related to nuclear plant decommissioning projects. The workshop focused on recent utility decommissioning experience, technological developments and regulatory updates.

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

203

Cost estimate guidelines for advanced nuclear power technologies  

SciTech Connect

To make comparative assessments of competing technologies, consistent ground rules must be applied when developing cost estimates. This document provides a uniform set of assumptions, ground rules, and requirements that can be used in developing cost estimates for advanced nuclear power technologies. 10 refs., 8 figs., 32 tabs.

Delene, J.G.; Hudson, C.R. II.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

International Cooperation on Safety of Nuclear Plants - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

205

Current R&D Activities in Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

206

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 161-180 - Nuclear Data...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

207

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

208

Organization - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

209

Achievements: Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

210

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2  

SciTech Connect

This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately.

Weiss, A. J. [comp.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198  

SciTech Connect

Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

Lowry, N.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

213

2003 NEI/EPRI Decommissioning Forum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NEI/EPRI Decommissioning Forum provides a comprehensive overview of the challenges facing the industry in the completion of the nuclear power plant life cycle. This report presents the proceedings of the NEI/EPRI 2003 Decommissioning Forum, which focused on license termination, material clearance values, funding, and final site release requirements.

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

214

Maine Yankee Decommissioning - Experience Report: Detailed Experiences 1997-2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants began the decommissioning process in the 1990s. Based on current information, it will be several years before the next group of plant licenses expires, and the plants begin decommissioning. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one power reactor, Maine Yankee, in order to document their experience for future plants.

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

215

NEW MATERIALS DEVELOPED TO MEET REGULATORY AND TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED FACILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the 2010 ANS Embedded Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization and Technology, Savannah River National Laboratory's Mike Serrato reported initial information on the newly developed specialty grout materials necessary to satisfy all requirements associated with in-situ decommissioning of P-Reactor and R-Reactor at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Since that report, both projects have been successfully completed and extensive test data on both fresh properties and cured properties has been gathered and analyzed for a total of almost 191,150 m{sup 3} (250,000 yd{sup 3}) of new materials placed. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) special grout mix for filling the P-Reactor vessel (RV) and (2) the new flowable structural fill materials used to fill the below grade portions of the facilities. With a wealth of data now in hand, this paper also captures the test results and reports on the performance of these new materials. Both reactors were constructed and entered service in the early 1950s, producing weapons grade materials for the nation's defense nuclear program. R-Reactor was shut down in 1964 and the P-Reactor in 1991. In-situ decommissioning (ISD) was selected for both facilities and performed as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act actions (an early action for P-Reactor and a removal action for R-Reactor), beginning in October 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy concept for ISD is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally robust facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities), or storing radioactive materials. Funding for accelerated decommissioning was provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Decommissioning of both facilities was completed in September 2011. ISD objectives for these CERCLA actions included: (1) Prevent industrial worker exposure to radioactive or hazardous contamination exceeding Principal Threat Source Material levels; (2) Minimize human and ecological exposure to unacceptable risk associated with radiological and hazardous constituents that are or may be present; (3) Prevent to the extent practicable the migration of radioactive or hazardous contaminants from the closed facility to the groundwater so that concentrations in groundwater do not exceed regulatory standards; (4) Eliminate or control all routes of human exposure to radiological and chemical contamination; and (5) Prevent animal intruder exposure to radioactive and hazardous contamination.

Blankenship, J.; Langton, C.; Musall, J.; Griffin, W.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

216

Student Opportunities in Nuclear Energy R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for decommissioning. · ITER parties met in Barcelona, Feb. 7-11, to complete the technical level negotiations construction, & costs for operation, deactivation, and decommissioning required much interaction with all · Last issue is the complicated matter of P&I and waiver thereto, involving French Nuclear Safety

Kemner, Ken

217

Survey of nuclear power plant construction costs, 1983  

SciTech Connect

This report presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in the construction pipeline, collected on Form EIA-254. The information on US nuclear power plants in the construction pipeline is reported voluntarily each quarter by the electric utilities. This report presents the data collected in the first quarter of 1983 on the 71 nuclear units in the construction pipeline. Historical data on 73 units, totalling 57,287 net megawatts (MWe) of design capacity, in commercial operation as of March 31, 1983, are also given. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership, construction costs, and construction schedule or chronology. Summary statistics are presented on direct component costs and construction leadtimes for a sample of operating units and units in the construction pipeline. The reactor-specific cost data included in Chapter 4 are the estimated final nuclear production plant costs and, for units in the construction pipeline, the disbursed and sunk costs as of March 31, 1983. 7 figures, 5 tables.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Back-end costs of alternative nuclear fuel cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its charter, the Alternate Fuel Cycle Evaluation Program (AFCEP) was directed to evaluate the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle in support of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). The principal conclusion from this study is that the costs for recycling a broad range of reactor fuels will not have a large impact on total fuel cycle costs. For the once-through fuel cycle, the costs of fresh fuel fabrication, irradiated fuel storage, and associated transportation is about 1.2 to 1.3 mills/kWh. For the recycle of uranium and plutonium into thermal reactors, the back-cycle costs (i.e., the costs of irradiated fuel storage, transportation, reprocessing, refabrication, and waste disposal) will be from 3 to 3.5 mills/kWh. The costs for the recycle of uranium and plutonium into fast breeder reactors will be from 4.5 to 5 mills/kWh. Using a radioactive spikant or a denatured /sup 233/U-Th cycle will increase power costs for both recycle cases by about 1 mill/kWh. None of these costs substantially influence the total cost of nuclear power, which is in the range of 4 cents/kWh. The fuel cycle costs used in this study do not include costs incurred prior to fuel fabrication; that is, the cost of the uranium or thorium, the costs for enrichment, or credit for fissile materials in the discharged fuel, which is not recycled with the system.

Rainey, R.H.; Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Unger, W.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Nuclear-fuel-cycle costs. Consolidated Fuel-Reprocessing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel-cycle costs are given for the pressurized-water reactor once-through and fuel-recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast-breeder-reactor system. These calculations show that fuel-cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel-cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder-reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

In-Situ Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination. The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both demolition and complete removal of the structure and its content (including the cost of transport and disposal). In addition, the effective use of ISD reduces human health and safety risks while helping to attain sustainability goals through the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, petroleum consumption and waste generation. Not all contaminated structures can be decommissioned using ISD; canditate sites must meet strict criteria.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Environmental Costs and Benefits Case Study : Nuclear Power Plant : Quantifications and Economic Valuation of Selected Environmental Impacts/Effects. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This case study is an application, to a nuclear power plant, of the methodology for quantifying environmental costs and benefits, contained in the regional energy plan, adopted in April, 1983, by the Northwest Power Planning Council, pursuant to Public Law 96-501.The study is based on plant number 2 of the Washington Public Power Supply System (WNP-2), currently nearing completion on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington State. This report describes and documents efforts to quantify and estimate monetary values for the following seven areas of environmental effects: radiation/health effects, socioeconomic/infrastructure effects, consumptive use of water, psychological/health effects (fear/stress), waste management, nuclear power plant accidents, and decommissioning costs. 103 references.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Office of Power and Resources Management.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nuclear fuel fabrication and refabrication cost estimation methodology  

SciTech Connect

The costs for construction and operation of nuclear fuel fabrication facilities for several reactor types and fuels were estimated, and the unit costs (prices) of the fuels were determined from these estimates. The techniques used in estimating the costs of building and operating these nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are described in this report. Basically, the estimation techniques involve detailed comparisons of alternative and reference fuel fabrication plants. Increases or decreases in requirements for fabricating the alternative fuels are identified and assessed for their impact on the capital and operating costs. The impact on costs due to facility size or capacity was also assessed, and scaling factors for the various captial and operating cost categories are presented. The method and rationale by which these scaling factors were obtained are also discussed. By use of the techniques described herein, consistent cost information for a wide variety of fuel types can be obtained in a relatively short period of time. In this study, estimates for 52 fuel fabrication plants were obtained in approximately two months. These cost estimates were extensively reviewed by experts in the fabrication of the various fuels, and, in the opinion of the reviewers, the estimates were very consistent and sufficiently accurate for use in overall cycle assessments.

Judkins, R.R.; Olsen, A.R.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Nuclear electricity is the least-cost option  

SciTech Connect

The use of integrated resource planning (IRP) as a tool for selecting the means to satisfy the need for new electricity heavily favors those options that are evaluated to have the least cost. The least-cost option these days, generally combined cycle burning natural gas, can generate electricity for between 3.5 to 4.0 {cents}/kW {times} h. The average generating cost of nuclear electricity, by comparison, is {approximately} 7.0 {cents}/kW {times} h, indicative of the economic challenge facing the nuclear industry. The future for the nuclear option may be better, if you believe that natural gas prices will increase. Studies by General Electric (GE) show that if these prices escalate at 3.5% above inflation, as DRI and others forecast, advanced nuclear plants will be in an economic dead heat with coal and combined-cycle/natural-gas plants, the primary baseload options. The use of environmental externalities can also change the evaluation of these competing technology options. When the cost of pollution emissions from fossil plants are factored in, studies show that nuclear electricity generation is the best economic option.

Redding, J.R. [GE, San Jose, CA (United States); Yates, R. [GE, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Proceedings: 4th EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop, Madrid, Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI held its 4th International Decommissioning Workshop in collaboration with ENRESA and Union Fenosa in Madrid, Spain. This workshop focused on a wide range of decommissioning topics, including general approaches, technical developments, and project experiences. The information presented will assist individual utilities in their planning and conduct of decommissioning projects with the potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

225

Worldwide Overview of Lessons Learned from Decommissioning Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an increasing number of radioactive facilities and reactors now reaching the end of their useful life and being taken out of service, there is a growing emphasis worldwide on the safe and efficient decommissioning of such plants. There is a wealth of experience already gained in decommissioning projects for all kinds of nuclear facilities. It is now possible to compare and discuss progress and accomplishments worldwide. In particular, rather than on the factual descriptions of projects, technologies and case histories, it is important to focus on lessons learned: in this way, the return of experience is felt to effectively contribute to progress. Key issues - inevitably based on a subjective ranking - are presented in this paper. Through the exchange of lessons learned, it is possible to achieve full awareness of the need for resources for and constraints of safe and cost-effective decommissioning. What remains now is the identification of specific, remaining issues that may hinder or delay the smooth progress of decommissioning. To this end, lessons learned provide the necessary background information; this paper tries to make extensive use of practical experience gained by the international community.

Laraia, Michele [IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

A NOVEL APPROACH TO SPENT FUEL POOL DECOMMISSIONING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been at the forefront of developing methods to reduce the cost and schedule of deactivating spent fuel pools (SFP). Several pools have been deactivated at the INL using an underwater approach with divers. These projects provided a basis for the INL cooperation with the Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 SFP (Exelon Generation Company) deactivation. It represents the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating process. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and allowing safer, more cost effective deactivation. The INL pioneered underwater coating process was used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by INL and Exelon to decommission SFPs using the underwater coating process. The rationale used to select the underwater coating process and the advantages and disadvantages are described. Special circumstances are also discussed, such as the use of a remotely-operated underwater vehicle to visually and radiologically map the pool areas that were not readily accessible. A larger project, the INTEC-603 SFP in-situ (grouting) deactivation, is reviewed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are discussed and a Lessons Learned evaluation is included.

R. L. Demmer

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FALLS, Idaho - The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) successfully closed out a 796 million nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning project. The work was completed about...

228

NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ``Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.`` The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC`s SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook.

Orlando, D.A.; Hogg, R.C.; Ramsey, K.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Trojan PWR Decommissioning: Large Component Removal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the decommissioning of large commercial nuclear plants in the United States is in its infancy, the technical challenges with associated radioactive waste management are clear. This report describes the removal and disposal of four steam generators and one pressurizer from the Trojan nuclear power plant, the first large PWR to be decommissioned in the United States. The report chronicles the problems, successes, and lessons learned in this project, which was completed on schedule and under budget in...

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

230

Decommissioning Handbook | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Handbook Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and...

231

SDMSM 2.1 - Waste Logic Solid and Decommissioning Multi-Site Manager, Version 2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Logic Solid and Decommissioning Multi-Site Manager (SDMSM) software, Version 2.1, combines several existing Waste Logic programs into a single software package offering comprehensive waste management cost and performance input and analysis for multiple nuclear stations.

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

232

Major Programs - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Program International Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form...

233

Executive Bios: Christopher Grandy - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

234

Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

235

Fuel Cycle Technologies Program - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

236

International Safety Projects - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

237

The Dawn of the Nuclear Age  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

238

Facility Safety Assessment - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

239

Computer Facilities - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

240

Advanced Computation & Visualization - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Facilities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

242

Safety - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

243

Proceedings: EPRI/NEI Decommissioning Workshop: San Antonio, Texas, December 10-12, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and NEI are actively engaged in providing technical support to utilities planning or involved in nuclear plant decommissioning projects. The first joint Nuclear Decommissioning Workshop provided a forum for utility representatives and selected vendors to exchange information related to decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The workshop focused on the utility experience related to major projects currently under way, technology developments and regulatory issues.

1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 61-80 - Nuclear Data Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

245

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 81-100 - Nuclear Data Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

246

FAMS DECOMMISSIONING END-STATE ALTERNATIVE EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Material Management (NMM) completed a comprehensive study at the request of the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) in 2004 (Reference 11.1). The study evaluated the feasibility of removal and/or mitigation of the Pu-238 source term in the F-Area Material Storage (FAMS) facility during on-going material storage operations. The study recommended different options to remove and/or mitigate the Pu-238 source term depending on its location within the facility. During April 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE) sent a letter of direction (LOD) to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) directing WSRC to implement a new program direction that would enable an accelerated shutdown and decommissioning of FAMS (Reference 11.2). Further direction in the LOD stated that effective December 1, 2006 the facility will be transitioned to begin deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. To implement the LOD, Site D&D (SDD) and DOE agreed the planning end-state would be demolition of the FAMS structure to the building slab. SDD developed the D&D strategy, preliminary cost and schedule, and issued the deactivation project plan in December 2005 (Reference 11.3). Due to concerns and questions regarding the FAMS planning end-state and in support of the project's Critical Decision 1, an alternative study was performed to evaluate the various decommissioning end-states and the methods by which those end-states are achieved. This report documents the results of the alternative evaluation which was performed in a structured decision-making process as outlined in the E7 Manual, Procedure 2.15, ''Alternative Studies'' (Reference 11.4).

Grimm, B; Stephen Chostner, S; Brenda Green, B

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

247

Radiochemistry Lab Decommissioning and Dismantlement. AECL, Chalk River Labs, Ontario, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally founded in the mid 1940's to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas under the Canadian Defense Department. In the mid 50's The Canadian government embarked on several research and development programs for the development of the Candu Reactor. AECL was initially built as a temporary site and is now faced with many redundant buildings. Prior to 2004 small amounts of Decommissioning work was in progress. Many reasons for deferring decommissioning activities were used with the predominant ones being: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantlement, 2. Development of a long-term solution for the management of radioactive wastes in Canada, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities shutdown that would require decommissioning funds and the absence of an approved funding strategy. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that is all inclusive of AECL's current and legacy liabilities. Canada does not have a long-term disposal site; therefore waste minimization becomes the driving factor behind decontamination for decommissioning before and during dismantlement. This decommissioning job was a great learning experience for decommissioning and the associated contractors who worked on this project. Throughout the life of the project there was a constant focus on waste minimization. This focus was constantly in conflict with regulatory compliance primarily with respect to fire regulations and protecting the facility along with adjacent facilities during the decommissioning activities. Discrepancies in historical documents forced the project to treat every space as a contaminated space until proven differently. Decommissioning and dismantlement within an operating site adds to the complexity of the tasks especially when it is being conducted in the heart of the plant. This project was very successful with no lost time accidents in over one hundred thousand hours worked, on schedule and under budget despite some significant changes throughout the decommissioning phases. The actual cost to decommission this building will come in under 9 million dollars vs. an estimated 14.5 million dollars. This paper will cover some of the unique aspects of dismantling a radioactive building that has seen pretty much every element of the periodic table pass through it with the client requirement focused on minimization of radioactive waste volumes.

Kenny, Stephen [Acting Director of Waste Management and Decommissioning Operations, AECL, Chalk River Labs, Chalk River, Ont. (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Decommissioning of U.S. uranium production facilities  

SciTech Connect

From 1980 to 1993, the domestic production of uranium declined from almost 44 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to about 3 million pounds. This retrenchment of the U.S. uranium industry resulted in the permanent closing of many uranium-producing facilities. Current low uranium prices, excess world supply, and low expectations for future uranium demand indicate that it is unlikely existing plants will be reopened. Because of this situation, these facilities eventually will have to be decommissioned. The Uranium Mill Tailings and Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) vests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with overall responsibility for establishing environmental standards for decommissioning of uranium production facilities. UMTRCA also gave the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility for licensing and regulating uranium production and related activities, including decommissioning. Because there are many issues associated with decommissioning-environmental, political, and financial-this report will concentrate on the answers to three questions: (1) What is required? (2) How is the process implemented? (3) What are the costs? Regulatory control is exercised principally through the NRC licensing process. Before receiving a license to construct and operate an uranium producing facility, the applicant is required to present a decommissioning plan to the NRC. Once the plan is approved, the licensee must post a surety to guarantee that funds will be available to execute the plan and reclaim the site. This report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) represents the most comprehensive study on this topic by analyzing data on 33 (out of 43) uranium production facilities located in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Decommissioning Plan Review (DPR) Module is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the decommissioning plan prior to approval of the associated CD.

250

A Novel Approach to Spent Fuel Pool Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) (Exelon Generation Co.) was decommissioned using a new underwater coating strategy developed in cooperation with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This was the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating approach. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and in safer, more cost effective deactivation. The process was pioneered at the INL and used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. The INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by the INL and Exelon on the pathway for this activity. The rationale used to select the underwater coating option and the advantages and disadvantages are shown. Special circumstances, such as the use of a remotely operated underwater vehicle to visually and radiologically map the pool areas that were not readily accessible, are discussed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are given and a lessons learned evaluation is included.

R.L. Demmer; J.B. Panozzo; R.J. Christensen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Decommissioning the Dresden Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) (Exelon Generation Co.) was decommissioned using a new underwater coating strategy developed in cooperation with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This was the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating approach. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and in safer, more cost effective deactivation. The process was pioneered at the INL and used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. The INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by the INL and Exelon on the pathway for this activity. The rationale used to select the underwater coating option and the advantages and disadvantages are shown. Special circumstances, such as the use of a remotely operated underwater vehicle to map (visually and radiologically) the pool areas that were not readily accessible, are discussed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are given and a lessons learned evaluation is included. (authors)

Demmer, R.L.; Bargelt, R.J. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-7113 (United States); Panozzo, J.B.; Christensen, R.J. [Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Warrenville, IL 60555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

May. 20, 2003. 01:00 AM Ottawa cool to fusion project cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of doses and and environmental contamination from decommissioning of the nuclear contamination from decommissioning of thecontamination from decommissioning of the nuclear facilities - 6 December 2002 #12;PresentationPresentation · Assessment of activity inventory in the nuclear

253

TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m{sup 3} of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Durbin, M.E. (ed.); Montoya, G.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, draft report for comment. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s WNP-2, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Decommissioning Pre-Planning Manual: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Interim Technical Report provides a framework for pre-planning for the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. It identifies important planning decisions, tasks, and contributing disciplines, establishes activity precedence relationships and defines data requirements. The report identifies actions that utilities can take now to ease the transition to decommissioning status, and will be of value to utilities planning plant closures in the future.

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

257

Shutdown plus 3 - a look at Yankee decommissioning experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In three years, the Yankee Nuclear Power Station has not only made the transition from a facility with a full power operating license to a shut down facility but to a facility with a mature and experienced organization poised to effectively and efficiently decommission the remainder of the plant. Opportunities were acted upon to reduce the cost of running and dismantling a shut-down facility. This paper describes some of those opportunities and Yankee`s future strategy for dismantling in an environment with limited waste disposal availability.

Szymczak, W.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Executive Bios: Dr. Robert N. Hill - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

259

Related Sites, Experimental Resources for Nuclear Data Studies...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

260

Executive Bios: Dr. David C. Wade - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ANS President interviewed at the Argonne Booth during the Nuclear...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

262

Executive Bios: Jerome L. Gaston - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

263

Executive Bios: A. C. (Paul) Raptis - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

264

Executive Bios: Dr. Hussein S. Khalil - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

265

Argonne's role in DOE/NNSA International Nuclear Safeguards and...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

266

Argonne staff members elected to American Nuclear Society governance...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

267

Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

268

Executive Bios: Dr. Temitope Taiwo - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

269

Sloshing response of module-type worm tank - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

270

Executive Bios: Dr. Thomas F. Ewing - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

271

Waste Form Performance Modeling [Nuclear Waste Management using...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

272

Executive Bios: Dr. John G. Stevens - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

273

Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) in the News - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

274

Executive Bios: Dr. Pete Heine - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

275

Executive Bios: Dr. Tanju Sofu - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

276

Risk and Safety Assessments - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

277

Executive Bios: Dr. Ken Natesan - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

278

Unit Process Modeling [Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurg...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

279

DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York Decommissioning Services Contract New York Decommissioning Services Contract DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 William.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The contract is a performance-based, cost-plus-award-fee, completion type contract with cost and schedule incentives. The total contract value is $333.4 million. DOE has selected a phased approach for decommissioning activities at the WVDP. Phase I is the first of a two-phase process for the final decommissioning of the western New York site in accordance with the West

280

DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York Decommissioning Services Contract New York Decommissioning Services Contract DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 William.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The contract is a performance-based, cost-plus-award-fee, completion type contract with cost and schedule incentives. The total contract value is $333.4 million. DOE has selected a phased approach for decommissioning activities at the WVDP. Phase I is the first of a two-phase process for the final decommissioning of the western New York site in accordance with the West

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Optimized Integration of the Decontamination Plan and the Radwaste Management Plan into Decommissioning Plan to the VVR-S Research Reactor from Romania  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the progress of the Decontamination Plan and Radioactive Waste Management Plan which accompanies the Decommissioning Plan for research reactor VVR-S located in Magurele, Ilfov, near Bucharest, Romania. The new variant of the Decommissioning Plan was elaborated taking into account the IAEA recommendation concerning radioactive waste management. A new feasibility study for VVR-S decommissioning was also elaborated. The preferred safe management strategy for radioactive wastes produced by reactor decommissioning is outlined. The strategy must account for reactor decommissioning, as well as rehabilitation of the existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant and the upgrade of the Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at Baita-Bihor. Furthermore, the final rehabilitation of the laboratories and reusing of cleaned reactor building is envisaged. An inventory of each type of radioactive waste is presented. The proposed waste management strategy is selected in accordance with the IAEA assistance. Environmental concerns are a part of the radioactive waste management strategy. In conclusion: The current version 8 of the Draft Decommissioning Plan which include the Integrated concept of Decontamination and Decommissioning and Radwaste Management, reflects the substantial work that has been incorporated by IFIN-HH in collaboration with SITON, which has resulted in substantial improvement in document The decommissioning strategy must take into account costs for VVR-S Reactor decommissioning, as well as costs for much needed refurbishments to the radioactive waste treatment plant and the Baita-Bihor waste disposal repository. Several improvements to the Baita-Bihor repository and IFIN-HH waste treatment facility were proposed. The quantities and composition of the radioactive waste generated by VVR-S Reactor dismantling were again estimated by streams and the best demonstrated practicable processing solution was proposed. The estimated quantities of materials to be managed in the near future raise some issues that need to be solved swiftly, such as treatment of aluminum and lead and graphite management. It is envisaged that these materials to be treated to Subsidiary for Nuclear Research (SCN) Pitesti. (authors)

Barariu, G. [National Authority for Nuclear Activity-Subsidiary of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Projects (Romania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Methodology for estimating reprocessing costs for nuclear fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technological and economic evaluation of reprocessing requirements for alternate fuel cycles requires a common assessment method and a common basis to which various cycles can be related. A methodology is described for the assessment of alternate fuel cycles utilizing a side-by-side comparison of functional flow diagrams of major areas of the reprocessing plant with corresponding diagrams of the well-developed Purex process as installed in the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP). The BNFP treats 1500 metric tons of uranium per year (MTU/yr). Complexity and capacity factors are determined for adjusting the estimated facility and equipment costs of BNFP to determine the corresponding costs for the alternate fuel cycle. Costs of capacities other than the reference 1500 MT of heavy metal per year are estimated by the use of scaling factors. Unit costs of reprocessed fuel are calculated using a discounted cash flow analysis for three economic bases to show the effect of low-risk, typical, and high-risk financing methods.

Carter, W. L.; Rainey, R. H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cutting Australia’s Carbon Abatement Costs with Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Australian Government Treasury modelling of a carbon price shows that Australia must purchase the benefits of overseas abatement efforts if it is to meet its emission reduction target by 2050. That is, foreign abatement will be required to supplement domestic abatement efforts. If more domestic abatement were available, fewer foreign credits would be needed. As an example, the analysis here shows that for the core Treasury policy scenario, Australia could save up to $185 billion net in abatement costs by 2050 if 25 gigawatts of nuclear generation capacity were built instead of building new fossil fuel generators.

Martin Nicholson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Decommissioning Handbook for Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook lays out the steps necessary to fully decommission a coal-fired power plant. The handbook includes ways to handle permitting, environmental cleanup, site dismantlement, and site remediation, and discusses overall decommissioning costs. It is based on three actual case studies of coal plants recently decommissioned: the Arkwright coal-fired plant of Georgia Power, the Watts Bar coal-fired plant of TVA, and the Port Washington coal-fired plant of Wisconsin Electric Power.

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

285

Present Status Of Research Reactor Decommissioning Program In Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, Indonesia has 3 research reactors: MTR-type multipurpose reactor of 30 MW at Serpong site, TRIGA-type research reactor of 1 MW at Bandung site, and small TRIGA - type reactor of 100 kW at Yogyakarta Research Center. The oldest one is the TRIGA reactor at Bandung site, which went critical at 250 kW in 1964, then was operated at maximum of 1000 kW by 1971. The reactor has operated for a total of 35 years. There is no decision for decommissioning this reactor; however, slowly but surely, it will be an object for a near-future decommissioning program. Anticipation of the situation is necessary. For the Indonesian case, early decommissioning strategy for a research reactor and restricted use of the site for another nuclear installation is favorable under high land pricing, availability of radwaste repository, and cost analysis. Graphite from Triga reactor reflector is recommended for direct disposal after conditioning, without volume reduction treatment. Development of human ...

Mulyanto And Gunandjar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options September 19, 2012 Presenter: Dr. Kamiar Jamali, Senior Technical Advisor to the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Safety NA-SH Topics Covered: The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has begun an initiative to develop a methodology to perform cost-benefit analysis for some Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility applications as one potential input into nuclear safety decision-making processes. The scope, approach, precedence, and example of how it might be

287

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Main report, draft report for comment. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Engineering Development & Applications - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies (FCT) Generation IV (Gen IV) Nuclear Energy Program Decontamination and Decommissioning Nuclear Regulatory Research Facilities Environmentally Assisted Cracking...

289

RESPONSE TO NRC REQUEST FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON DECOMMISSIONING FUNDING STATUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is understood that this information is required to be submitted per the regulations referenced in the RAI, and the 2011 Decommissioning Cost Estimate will be modified to include all required information to preclude the need for future RAI's. RAI #1: On March 29, 2011, SMUD provided the following radiological decommissioning costs associated with the license termination for Rancho Seco: The total decommissioning costs are now estimated to be $504.3 million, with an estimated $22.2 million in remaining costs.

Attention John Hickman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

An Integrated Approach To Decommissioning Radwaste Management: The Beginning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the near future, Russia will be forced to start large-scale decommissioning programs embracing nuclear submarines, nuclear power plants, defense and nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) facilities, and numerous research reactors (RR). In this situation any attempt to promote D&D programs has the utmost importance. These obvious considerations stimulated the participation of the St. Petersburg Institute of Technology in the IAEA CRP on Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors with the project entitled "Decontamination and Waste Management in the Course of Research Reactors Decommissioning." The aims of the present study were the following: to estimate waste arising from RR decommissioning; to gather and evaluate information on decontamination and radioactive waste management techniques and materials recycling methods applicable for decommissioning purposes; and to develop a computerized multicriteria decision-making tool for determination of the appropriateness of various techniques ...

Victor Tsvetkov Sergey; Sergey A. Medvedev; Sergey K. Neljubov

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Chapter 20 - Uranium Enrichment Decontamination & Decommissioning Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 CHAPTER 20 URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. To establish policies and procedures for the financial management, accounting, budget preparation, cash management of the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, referred to hereafter as the Fund. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are directly or indirectly involved with the Fund. c. Requirements and Sources of the Fund. (1) The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) requires DOE to establish and administer the Fund. EPACT authorizes that the

292

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09-00269, Rev. 0 09-00269, Rev. 0 KEY WORDS: DOE-HQ In situ Decommissioning Entombment Workshop TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING (ISD) WORKSHOP REPORT Patricia L. Lee, John B. Gladden, G. Timothy Jannik, Christine A. Langton, Michael G. Serrato, SRNL Chuck Urland, Erick Reynolds, PEC June 2009 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Savannah River Site

293

Decontamination and decommissioning experience at Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1  

SciTech Connect

A description is presented of the experience obtained from decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 located at the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, Scottsville, Idaho. Included are the planning, preparation, and operations associated with the removal and processing of radioactively contaminated sodium-potassium eutectic alloy (NaK) and decontamination and decommissioning of the facility. (auth)

Kendall, E.W.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning The design and production of 3-D scale models that replicate the highly contaminated structures within the nuclear facility would provide a significant improvement in visualization of the work space, which would give managers and supervisors a more powerful tool for planning and communicating safety issues and work sequences to personnel executing the physical D&D tasks. 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning More Documents & Publications D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization D&D and Risk Assessment Tools 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D

296

Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine...

297

10 CFR Part 830, Nuclear Safety Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

construction such as environmental restoration activities, decontamination and decommissioning activities, specific nuclear explosives operations, or transition...

298

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - main report. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), which is a boiling water reactor (BWR), located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low- level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center (3/13/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 49 / Thursday, March 13, 2003 / Notices Dated: March 6, 2003. Gerald A. Reynolds, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights. [FR Doc. 03-5999 Filed 3-12-03; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-M DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Intent. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) are announcing their intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and

300

Khalil named co-director of the Center for Advanced Nuclear Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Experimental Resources for Nuclear Data Studies in the U.S. ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

302

Peters and Fanning appear on NBC-5 report on Illinois nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

303

Policy Statement 3, Board Oversight of Department of Energy Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Date: August 19, 1996 Subject Policy Statement on Board oversight of Department of Energy decommissioning activities at defense nuclear facilities. Summary This policy statement describes the decommissioning phase of a DOE defense nuclear facility and identifies the Board's safety oversight responsibilities for decommisioning activities. John T. Conway, Chairman Congress directed the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) to oversee Department of Energy (DOE) practices at defense nuclear facilities that could adversely affect public health and safety during any stage in the life cycle of those facilities, from design, construction, and operation through decommissioning. The Board's objective during decommissioning is identical to its objective during any other phase of a facility's life cycle: to ensure that DOE provides adequate protection of worker and public health and safety at defense nuclear facilities. Congress specifically tasked the Board with reviewing and evaluating:

304

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Comments by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation; Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

305

Optimising waste management performance - The key to successful decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: On the 1. of April 2005 the United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority became responsible for the enormous task of decommissioning the UK's civilian nuclear liabilities. The success of the NDA in delivering its key objectives of safer, cheaper and faster decommissioning depends on a wide range factors. It is self-evident, however, that the development of robust waste management practices by those charged with decommissioning liability will be at the heart of the NDA's business. In addition, the implementation of rigorous waste minimisation techniques throughout decommissioning will deliver tangible environmental benefits as well as better value for money and release funds to accelerate the decommissioning program. There are mixed views as to whether waste minimisation can be achieved during decommissioning. There are those that argue that the radioactive inventory already exists, that the amount of radioactivity cannot be minimised and that the focus of activities should be focused on waste management rather than waste minimisation. Others argue that the management and decommissioning of the UK's civilian nuclear liability will generate significant volumes of additional radioactive waste and it is in this area where the opportunities for waste minimisation can be realised. (author)

Keep, Matthew [Entec UK Limited. 17 Angel Gate. City Road. London EC1V 2SH (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Costs: A 1995 Update, An  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs. EIA published three reports on this subject during the period 1988-1995.

James G. Hewlett

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934

308

EIS-0259 Final Environmental Impact Statement On The Disposal Of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, And Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-. -. 1. PURPOSE AND NEED U.S. Navy nuclear ships are decommissioned and defieled at the end of their usefi Metime, when the cost of continued operation is not justified by their fitary capabfity, or when the ship is no longer needed. The Navy needs to disposition the reactor compartments born defieled and decommissioned ctisers, and OHIO Class and LOS ANGELES Class submarines. The number of reactor compartments under consideration by this Environmental Impact Statement is about 100. These reactor compartments are in addition to the pre-LOS ANGELES Class submarines tieady being disposed of under the Na&s 1984 Find Environmental hpact Statement (USN, 1984a). Newer types of U.S. Navy nuclear-powered stips that are not expected to be decommissioned in the next 20 years (e.g., aircraft carriers, SEAWOLF Class submarines) are not included in this fid Enviromentd Impact Statement.

309

The Financing of Decommissioning - A View on Legal Aspects in the European Union  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the future, an increasing number of nuclear power plants will be definitively closed and undergoing decommissioning. Realising the inseparable connection between the safe performance of decommissioning activities and its financing, the European Union is concerned about the availability of sufficient financial means for carrying out the decommissioning process by the time they are needed. Analysing which measures have been taken by the EU to ensure and harmonise the financing of decommissioning, the author illustrates the draft directives of the European Commission known as the 'nuclear package', which contain rules regarding the funding of decommissioning. In this context, he also descends to the envisaged Commission's analysis about the various concepts established in the Member States with respect to financing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The author comes to the conclusion that the EU has taken first initiatives to promote a transparent and harmonised system of regulations and standards concerning the financing of decommissioning across the Union. (author)

Fillbrandt, M. [Gesellschaft fiir Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Cologne (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Freedom of Information Act - Costs | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

review of documents located for responsiveness; 16% administrative costs; reproduction cost of .05 per page; and the time it took the FOIA Specialist to process the request....

311

An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update  

SciTech Connect

Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic's experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume presents lessons learned during work finished by September 1997. A second volume, to be published in 1998, will complete the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown plants.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: Summary status report: Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 through April 19, 1987. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

Doerge, D. H.; Haffner, D. R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2006  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: NPP Krsko revised decommissioning program, by Vladimir Lokner and Ivica Levanat, APO d.o.o., Croatia, and Nadja Zeleznik and Irena Mele, ARAO, Slovenia; Supporting the renaissance, by Marilyn C. Kray, Exelon Nuclear; Outage world an engineer's delight, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, NP Inc.; Optimizing refueling outages with R and D, by Ross Marcoot, GE Energy; and, A successful project, by Jim Lash, FirstEnergy.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Diagnostic and Advisory Systems - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagnostic and Advisory Systems Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning SystemsProcess...

316

Artificial Intelligence / Expert Systems Expertise - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intelligence Expert Systems Expertise Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning...

317

Process Monitoring & Signal Validation - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Monitoring & Signal Validation Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning Systems...

318

Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect

An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities that are old, poorly maintained, and contain radioactive and hazardous substances, the extent of which may be unknown. In addition, many excess facilities do not have historical facility documents such as operating records, plant and instrumentation diagrams, and incident records. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program, its safety performance, and associated safety and health lessons learned and good practices. Illustrative examples of these lessons learned and good practices are also provided. The primary focus of this report is on the safety and health activities and implications associated with the planning phase of Oak Ridge facility disposition projects. Section 1.0 of this report provides the background and purpose of the report. Section 2.0 presents an overview of the facility disposition activities from which the lessons learned and good practices discussed in Section 3.0 were derived.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project & Identifier Project & Identifier Tech Stage: Deployment In-Situ Decommissioning: SR09171 SRS Area Closure Projects: PBS SR-0040 3-D models of the R reactor building and P reactor vessel were delivered to SRS Area Closure Projects Page 1 of 2 Tech Fact Sheet Savannah River Site South Carolina 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning Challenge Planning for the safe and controlled deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of highly contaminated nuclear facilities requires that engineers and managers fully understand the work space in which personnel and equipment will operate. It also requires that they effectively communicate safety concerns and work sequences to the personnel who will perform the work. This crucial knowledge is conveyed in

320

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Maintaining Quality in a Decommissioning Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decommissioning of AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories is Canada's largest nuclear decommissioning project to date. This research laboratory has operated for forty years since it was set up in 1963 in eastern Manitoba as the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, complete with 60 MW(Th) test reactor, hot cells, particle accelerators, and multiple large-scale research programs. Returning the site to almost complete green state will require several decades of steady work in combination with periods of storage-with-surveillance. In this paper our approach to maintaining quality during the long decommissioning period is explained. In this context, 'quality' includes both regulatory aspects (compliance with required standards) and business aspects (meeting the customers' needs and exceeding their expectations). Both aspects are discussed, including examples and lessons learned. The five years of development and implementation of a quality assurance program for decommissioning the WL site have led to a number of lessons learned. Many of these are also relevant to other decommissioning projects, in Canada and elsewhere: - Early discussions with the regulator can save time and effort later in the process; - An iterative process in developing documentation allows for steady improvements and input throughout the process; - Consistent 2-way communication with staff regarding the benefits of a quality program assists greatly in adoption of the philosophy and procedures; - Top-level management must lead in promoting quality; - Field trials of procedures ('beta testing') ensures they are easy to use as well as useful. Success in decommissioning the Whiteshell Laboratories depends on the successful implementation of a rigorous quality program. This will help to ensure both safety and efficiency of all activities on site, from planning through execution and reporting. The many aspects of maintaining this program will continue to occupy quality practitioners in AECL, reaping steady benefits to AECL and to its customers, the people of Canada.

Attas, Michael [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba, R0E 1L0 (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

COST COMPARISONS OF CAPITOL INVESTMENT IN VARIOUS NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS FOR CENTRAL STATION APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

The capital costs for a number of power reactors are compared after escalation to equivalent construction dates. It is shown that the most important factor affecting nuclear power plant capital costs is the net capacity of the plant. Steam conditions are shown to have a relatively minor effect on capital costs. (auth)

Bender, M.; Stulting, R.D.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program.

Salazar, M.; Elder, J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide provides instruction to the individual charged with the responsibility for developing and implementing the radiation protection program for decommissioning operations. 1.2 This guide provides a basis for the user to develop radiation protection program documentation that will support both the radiological engineering and radiation safety aspects of the decommissioning project. 1.3 This guide presents a description of those elements that should be addressed in a specific radiation protection plan for each decommissioning project. The plan would, in turn, form the basis for development of the implementation procedures that execute the intent of the plan. 1.4 This guide applies to the development of radiation protection programs established to control exposures to radiation and radioactive materials associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The intent of this guide is to supplement existing radiation protection programs as they may pertain to decommissioning workers, members of...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

DECOMMISSIONING OF HOT CELL FACILITIES AT THE BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES  

SciTech Connect

Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL), located in Columbus, Ohio, must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities for nuclear research buildings and grounds at its West Jefferson Facilities by 2006, as mandated by Congress. This effort includes decommissioning several hot cells located in the Hot Cell Laboratory (Building JN-1). JN-1 was originally constructed in 1955, and a hot cell/high bay addition was built in the mid 1970s. For over 30 years, BCL used these hot cell facilities to conduct research for the nuclear power industry and several government agencies, including the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a result of this research, the JN-1 hot cells became highly contaminated with mixed fission and activation products, as well as fuel residues. In 1998, the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) began efforts to decommission JN-1 with the goal of remediating the site to levels of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. This goal requires that each hot cell be decommissioned to a state where it can be safely demolished and transported to an off-site disposal facility. To achieve this, the BCLDP uses a four-step process for decommissioning each hot cell: (1) Source Term Removal; (2) Initial (i.e., remote) Decontamination; (3) Utility Removal; and (4) Final (i.e., manual) Decontamination/Stabilization. To date, this process has been successfully utilized on 13 hot cells within JN-1, with one hot cell remaining to be decommissioned. This paper will provide a case study of the hot cell decommissioning being conducted by the BCLDP. Discussed will be the methods used to achieve the goals of each of the hot cell decommissioning stages and the lessons learned that could be applied at other sites where hot cells need to be decommissioned.

Weaver, Patrick; Henderson, Glenn; Erickson, Peter; Garber, David

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

Replacement energy, capacity, and reliability costs for permanent nuclear reactor shutdowns  

SciTech Connect

Average replacement power costs are estimated for potential permanent shutdowns of nuclear electricity-generating units. Replacement power costs are considered to include replacement energy, capacity, and reliability cost components. These estimates were developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in evaluating regulatory issues that potentially affect changes in serious reactor accident frequencies. Cost estimates were derived from long-term production-cost and capacity expansion simulations of pooled utility-system operations. Factors that affect replacement power cost, such as load growth, replacement sources of generation, and capital costs for replacement capacity, were treated in the analysis. Costs are presented for a representative reactor and for selected subcategories of reactors, based on estimates for 112 individual reactors.

VanKuiken, J.C., Buehring, W.A.; Hamilton, S.; Kavicky, J.A.; Cavallo, J.D.; Veselka, T.D.; Willing, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design (CAD) system and had to be imported into a GIS framework. Since the data is maintained in a different format in CAD, import into GIS involved several spatial processing steps to convert various geometric shapes present in the CAD data to self-closing polygons. The polygons represent facility footprints in plan or map view. Once these were successfully imported and converted, building identifier attributes from the CAD had to be associated with the appropriate polygons in GIS. Attributes are stored as graphical information in a CAD system and are not 'attached' to a building in a relational sense. In GIS, attributes such as building names, building area, hazards, or other descriptive information, must be associated or related to the spatial polygon representing a particular building. This spatial relationship between building polygons and the descriptive attribute information is very similar to relating tables of information in a relational database in which each table record has a unique identifier that can be used to join or relate that table to other tables of information present in the database. The CAD building identifiers were imported into the GIS and several spatial processing steps were used to associate building polygons with the correct identifiers. These spatial steps involved determining the intersection of and nearest identifiers with each building polygon in the GIS. Automating this process in GIS saved a significant amount of time. Once a current and geographically correct representation of the infrastructure data had been created in GIS, field-engineering teams collected information for each facility. This information included the building area, radiological hazards and the associated area, industrial hazards such as asbestos or mercury, structure type (e.g. hardened, industrial, nuclear), annual surveillance and monitoring cost, and other engineering data. The facility engineering data was used in a simple model to determine the rough-order-of-magnitude cost for decontaminating and demolishing each facility. Finally, the engineering and cost d

Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Bldg. 735-A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

STANDARD OPERATING PROTOCOLS FOR DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning projects at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites are conducted under project-specific decision documents, which involve extensive preparation time, public comment periods, and regulatory approvals. Often, the decision documents must be initiated at least one year before commencing the decommissioning project, and they are expensive and time consuming to prepare. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a former nuclear weapons production plant at which hazardous substances and wastes were released or disposed during operations. As a result of the releases, RFETS was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, and is conducting cleanup activities under a federal facilities compliance agreement. Working closely with interested stakeholders and state and federal regulatory agencies, RFETS has developed and implemented an improved process for obtaining the approvals. The key to streamlining the approval process has been the development of sitewide decision documents called Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Standard Operating Protocols or ''RSOPs.'' RSOPs have broad applicability, and could be used instead of project-specific documents. Although no two decommissioning projects are exactly the same and they may vary widely in contamination and other hazards, the basic steps taken for cleanup are usually similar. Because of this, using RSOPs is more efficient than preparing a separate project-specific decision documents for each cleanup action. Over the Rocky Flats cleanup life cycle, using RSOPs has the potential to: (1) Save over 5 million dollars and 6 months on the site closure schedule; (2) Eliminate preparing one hundred and twenty project-specific decision documents; and (3) Eliminate writing seventy-five closure description documents for hazardous waste unit closure and corrective actions.

Foss, D. L.; Stevens, J. L.; Gerdeman, F. W.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

329

Lower power prices and high repair costs drive nuclear retirements ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

However, concerns over the length of the review process and the high costs associated with steam generator repairs led SCE to retire both reactors.

330

Freedom of Information Act - Costs | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

described below. Commercial use requesters: Responsible for all direct costs; i.e. search for responsive documents, review of documents located for responsiveness; 16%...

331

A Characteristics-Based Approach to Radioactive Waste Classification in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a   Geologic   Repository”,   Nuclear  Technology,   154,  in  decommissioned  U.S.  nuclear   facilities,  German  Framework   for   Nuclear   Fuel   Cycle   Concepts,”  

Djokic, Denia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario  

SciTech Connect

In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Downloads - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Team (VAT) Argonne's National Security Information Systems Argonne's Facility Decommissioning Training Course Reactor Safety Experimentation Nuclear Energy Advanced...

334

Parametric Study of Front-End Nuclear Fuel Cycle Costs Using Reprocessed Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates front-end nuclear fuel cycle costs assuming that uranium recovered during the reprocessing of commercial light-water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel is available to be recycled and used in the place of natural uranium. This report explores the relationship between the costs associated with using a natural uranium fuel cycle, in which reprocessed uranium (RepU) is not recycled, with those associated with using RepU.

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

335

Proceedings: 9th EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) held the 9th EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop in collaboration with Enresa on November 2-4, 2010 in Madrid, Spain. A parallel session with EU CARBOWASTE focused on technologies and methodologies for management of graphite wastes. The Workshop featured a visit to the Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant, which is presently undergoing decommissioning. This proceedings document contains the abstracts and presentation slides from the p...

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

336

Proceedings of the 2007 ANS Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization - DD and R 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization (DD and R 2007), 'Capturing Decommissioning Lessons Learned', is sponsored by the ANS Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization; Environmental Sciences; and Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Divisions. This meeting provides a forum for an international exchange of technical knowledge and project management experience gained from the ongoing process of decommissioning nuclear facilities. Of particular note is the number of projects that are approaching completion. This document gathers 113 presentations given at this meeting.

NONE

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

DECOMMISSIONING PLAN AND RADIOLOGICAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cabot Performance Materials (Cabot) holds NRC License SMC-1562, covering storage of radioactive materials at both their Revere and Reading sites in Pennsylvania. Former ore processing at the Revere facility generated waste slag contaminated with uranium and thorium. In 1988, Cabot began onsite decommissioning activities for the Revere facility, including site

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Decommissioning: Reactor Pressure Vessel Internals Segmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear plant covers a wide variety of challenging projects. One of the most challenging areas is the removal and disposal of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and the RPV internals. This report describes commercial reactor pressure vessel segmentation projects that have been completed and discusses several projects that are still in the planning stages. The report also covers lessons learned from each project.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

339

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC) recent experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume supplements Volume 1 by presenting more lessons learned during work finished by September 1998. In 1999, EPRI will publish a final report completing the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shut down plants.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

340

Adaptive nuclear reactor control for integral quadratic cost functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of optimally controlling the power level changes of a nuclear reactor is considered. The model of an existing power plant is used, which is a ninth-order nonlinear system, having time-varying parameters. A closed form solution of the optimal ...

George T. Bereznai; Naresh K. Sinha

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Decommissioning Plan of the Musashi Reactor and Its Progress  

SciTech Connect

The Musashi Reactor is a TRIGA-II, tank-type research reactor, as shown in Table 1. The reactor had been operated at maximum thermal power level of 100 kW since first critical, January 30, 1963. Reactor operation was shut down due to small leakage of water from the reactor tank on December 21,1989. After shutdown, investigation of the causes, making plan of repair and discussions on restart or decommissioning had been done. Finally, decision of decommissioning was made in May, 2003. The initial plan of the decommissioning was submitted to the competent authority in January, 2004. Now, the reactor is under decommissioning. The plan of decommissioning and its progress are described. In conclusion: considering the status of undertaking plan of the waste disposal facility for the low level radioactive waste from research reactors, the phased decommissioning was selected for the Musashi Reactor. First phase of the decommissioning activities including the actions of permanent shutdown and delivering the spent nuclear fuels to US DOE was completed.

Tanzawa, Tomio [Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology, Ozenji 971, Asao-ku, Kawasaki, 215-0013 (Japan)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Study on Cost Allocation in Nuclear Power Coupled with Desalination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As for a single-purpose desalination plant, there is no particular difficulty in computing the unit cost of the water, which is obtained by dividing the annual total costs by the output of fresh water. When it comes to a dual-purpose plant, cost allocation is needed between the two products. No cost allocation is needed in some cases where two alternatives producing the same water and electricity output are to be compared. In these cases, the consideration of the total cost is then sufficient. This study assumes MED (Multi-Effect Distillation) technology is adopted when nuclear power is coupled with desalination. The total production cost of the two commodities in dual-purpose plant can easily be obtained by using costing methods, if the necessary raw data are available. However, it is not easy to calculate a separate cost for each product, because high-pressure steam plant costs cannot be allocated to one or the other without adopting arbitrary methods. Investigation on power credit method is carried out focusing on the cost allocation of combined benefits due to dual production, electricity and water. The illustrative calculation is taken from Preliminary Economic Feasibility Study of Nuclear Desalination in Madura Island, Indonesia. The study is being performed by BATAN (National Nuclear Energy Agency), KAERI (Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute) and under support of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) started in the year 2002 in order to perform a preliminary economic feasibility in providing the Madurese with sufficient power and potable water for the public and to support industrialization and tourism in Madura Region. The SMART reactor coupled with MED is considered to be an option to produce electricity and potable water. This study indicates that the correct recognition of combined benefits attributable to dual production is important in carrying out economics of desalination coupled with nuclear power. (authors)

Lee, ManKi; Kim, SeungSu; Moon, KeeHwan; Lim, ChaeYoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, YuSung, DaeJon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Innovation in Nuclear Technology for the Least Product Price and Cost  

SciTech Connect

In energy markets, costs dominate for all new technology introductions (pressure valves, gas turbines, reactors) both now and far into the future. Technology improves, and costs are reduced as markets are penetrated with the trend following a learning/experience curve (MCE) based on classic economic forces. The curve followed is governed by development costs and market targets, and nuclear systems follow such a curve in order to compete with other technologies and projected future cost for alternate energy initiatives. Funding impacts directly on market penetration and on the ''learning rate.'' The CANDU/AECL development path (experience curve) is a chosen balance between evolution and revolution for a competitive advantage.

Duffey, Romney

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Plan Review Module Decommissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 C OFFICE OF D C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Decomm Rev Critical Decisi CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan missioning view Module ion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) g Plan e plicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Oper ration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

345

U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

Reid, RL

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

Interim Report on Cumulative Risk Assessment for Radiological and Chemical Constituents of Concern at Decommissioning Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning nuclear facilities focus extensive efforts on site characterization to demonstrate regulatory compliance in the termination of site licenses. Many decommissioning sites, while recognizing radiological characterization and assessment needs, lacked experience in chemical risk assessment. This report documents plant approaches for performing cumulative risk assessments of both radiological and non-radiological constituents of concern.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

347

Capabilities listed by Department: Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Bio Research & Test Reactor Advanced Reactor Development Decontamination and Decommissioning Heat Transfer and fluid Mechanics International Nuclear Safety Reactor...

348

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the assay of waste materials generated in the decommissioning of nuclear installations in which one would

349

DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING AT THEEAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGYPAR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING AT THEEAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGYPARK, ER-B-99-01 DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING AT THEEAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGYPARK, ER-B-99-01 The East...

350

Cost probability analysis of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel in the US G.D. Recktenwald, M.R. Deinert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the sustainability of nuclear power while others argue against them on economic, environmental and security groundsCost probability analysis of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel in the US G.D. Recktenwald, M P48 Keywords: Reprocessing Nuclear power Spent fuel The methods by which nuclear power's radioactive

Deinert, Mark

351

Draft principles, policy, and acceptance criteria for decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy contaminated surplus facilities and summary of international decommissioning programs  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning activities enable the DOE to reuse all or part of a facility for future activities and reduce hazards to the general public and any future work force. The DOE Office of Environment, Health and Safety has prepared this document, which consists of decommissioning principles and acceptance criteria, in an attempt to establish a policy that is in agreement with the NRC policy. The purpose of this document is to assist individuals involved with decommissioning activities in determining their specific responsibilities as identified in Draft DOE Order 5820.DDD, ``Decommissioning of US Department of Energy Contaminated Surplus Facilities`` (Appendix A). This document is not intended to provide specific decommissioning methodology. The policies and principles of several international decommissioning programs are also summarized. These programs are from the IAEA, the NRC, and several foreign countries expecting to decommission nuclear facilities. They are included here to demonstrate the different policies that are to be followed throughout the world and to allow the reader to become familiar with the state of the art for environment, safety, and health (ES and H) aspects of nuclear decommissioning.

Singh, B.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[USDOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards, Washington, DC (United States). Systems Analysis and Standards Div.; Gillette, J.; Jackson, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

Camillo A. DiNunzio Framatome ANP DE& S; Dr. Abhinav Gupta Assistant Professor NCSU; Dr. Michael Golay Professor MIT Dr. Vincent Luk Sandia National Laboratories; Rich Turk Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems; Charles Morrow, Sandia National Laboratories; Geum-Taek Jin, Korea Power Engineering Company Inc.

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning A Strategy for Environmental Management Reducing the Footprint of the Cold War For over a decade, the Department of Energy has focused on reducing the footprint of 60 years of nuclear research and weapons testing and production. While these facilities are no longer needed, they exist with varying degrees of radiation contamination from years of operation. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of closing down a nuclear facility and placing it in a state that reduces or eliminates risk to the pub lic and the environment. This generally includes demolition and transport of the debris to a disposal facility. Another alternative is to dispose of the facility in place (i.e., in-situ). The concept of In-Situ Decommis-

354

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Articles and reports in this issue include: D and D technical paper summaries; The role of nuclear power in turbulent times, by Tom Chrisopher, AREVA, NP, Inc.; Enthusiastic about new technologies, by Jack Fuller, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; It's important to be good citizens, by Steve Rus, Black and Veatch Corporation; Creating Jobs in the U.S., by Guy E. Chardon, ALSTOM Power; and, and, An enviroment and a community champion, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovations article is titled Best of the best TIP achievement 2008, by Edward Conaway, STP Nuclear Operating Company.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

YAEC's view of the cause and control of escalating nuclear plant O and M costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides insights on this issue in terms of both the genesis and effective long-term control of O and M costs. Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC's) insights stem not only from an analysis of certain industry data, but also from its unique position within the nuclear industry in terms of its age, plant size, and organization. First, at 30 yr of age, the YAEC plant has endured the full swing of the regulatory/institutional pendulum and the associated impact on O and M costs. Second, with a size of only 185 MW(electric), YAEC's imperative since start-up has been the strict control of O and M costs while still achieving operational excellence. Finally, YAEC is an organization strictly focused on nuclear power operations and has not been distracted by fossil plant operations or other utility requirements like distribution, retail sales, etc., that may have plagued other plant operators.

Haseltine, J.D.; Lessard, L.P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Handbook for quick cost estimates. A method for developing quick approximate estimates of costs for generic actions for nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a supplement to a ''Handbook for Cost Estimating'' (NUREG/CR-3971) and provides specific guidance for developing ''quick'' approximate estimates of the cost of implementing generic regulatory requirements for nuclear power plants. A method is presented for relating the known construction costs for new nuclear power plants (as contained in the Energy Economic Data Base) to the cost of performing similar work, on a back-fit basis, at existing plants. Cost factors are presented to account for variations in such important cost areas as construction labor productivity, engineering and quality assurance, replacement energy, reworking of existing features, and regional variations in the cost of materials and labor. Other cost categories addressed in this handbook include those for changes in plant operating personnel and plant documents, licensee costs, NRC costs, and costs for other government agencies. Data sheets, worksheets, and appropriate cost algorithms are included to guide the user through preparation of rough estimates. A sample estimate is prepared using the method and the estimating tools provided.

Ball, J.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

A Plutonium Finishing Plant Model for the Cercla Removal Action and Decommissioning Construction Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The joint policy between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for decommissioning buildings at DOE facilities documents an agreement between the agencies to perform decommissioning activities including demolition under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The use of removal actions for decommissioning integrates EPA oversight authority, DOE lead agency responsibility, and state authority for decommissioning activities. Once removal actions have been performed under CERCLA, a construction completion report is required to document the completion of the required action. Additionally, a decommissioning report is required under DOE guidance. No direct guidance was found for documenting completion of decommissioning activities and preparing a final report that satisfies the CERCLA requirements and the DOE requirements for decommissioning. Additional guidance was needed for the documentation of construction completion under CERCLA for D and D projects undertaken under the joint policy that addresses the requirements of both agencies. A model for the construction completion report was developed to document construction completion for CERCLA D and D activities performed under the joint EPA/DOE policy at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The model documentation report developed at PFP integrates the DOE requirements for establishing decommissioning end-points, documenting end-point completion and preparing a final decommissioning report with the CERCLA requirements to document completion of the action identified in the Action Memorandum (AM). The model includes the required information on health and safety, data management, cost and schedule and end-points completion. (authors)

Hopkins, A. [Fluor Hanford, Inc, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Progressive Application Decommissioning Models for U.S. Power and Research Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents progressive engineering techniques and experiences in decommissioning projects performed by Bums and Roe Enterprises within the last fifteen years. Specifically, engineering decommissioning technical methods and lessons learned are discussed related to the Trojan Large Component Removal Project, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) Decommissioning Project and the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Decommissioning Project Study. The 25 years since the 1979 TMI accident and the events following 9/11 have driven the nuclear industry away from excessive, closed/elitist conservative methods towards more pragmatic results-oriented and open processes. This includes the essential recognition that codes, standards and regulatory procedures must be efficient, effective and fit for purpose. Financial and open-interactive stakeholder pressures also force adherence to aggressive risk reduction posture in the area of a safety, security and operations. The engineering methods and techniques applied to each project presented unique technical solutions. The decommissioning design for each project had to adopt existing design rules applicable to construction of new nuclear power plants and systems. It was found that the existing ASME, NRC, and DOE codes and regulations for deconstruction were, at best, limited or extremely conservative in their applicability to decommissioning. This paper also suggests some practical modification to design code rules in application for decommissioning and deconstruction. The representative decommissioning projects, Trojan, SONGS and Brookhaven, are discussed separately and the uniqueness of each project, in terms of engineering processes and individual deconstruction steps, is discussed. Trojan Decommissioning. The project included removal of entire NSSS system. The engineering complexity was mainly related to the 1200 MW Reactor. The approach, process of removal, engineering method related to protect the worker against excessive radiation exposure, transportation, and satisfying applicable rules and regulations, were the major problems to overcome. The project's successful completed earned a patent award. SONGS Decommissioning. The reactor's spherical containment and weakened integrity was the scope of this decommissioning effort. The aspects of structure stability and method of deconstruction is the major part of the presentation. The economical process of deconstruction, aspects of structural stability, worker safety, and the protection of the surrounding environment from contamination is highlighted in this section. BGRR Decommissioning Study. BREI was commissioned by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate and analyze the stability, and progressive decommissioning, and removal of BGRR components. This analysis took the form of several detailed decommissioning studies that range from disassembly and removal of the unit's graphite pile to the complete environmental restoration of the reactor site. While most of the facility's decommissioning effort is conventional, the graphite pile and its biological shield present the greatest challenge. The studies develop a unique method of removing high-activity waste trapped in the graphite joints. (authors)

Studnicka, Z.; Lacy, N.H.; Nicholas, R.G.; Campagna, M.; Morgan, R.D. [Bums and Roe Enterprises, Inc., 800 Kinderkamack Road, Oradell, NJ 07649 (United States); Sawruk, W. [ABS Consulting, Inc., 5 Birdsong Court, Shillington, PA 19607 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nuclear power: least cost option for base-load electricity in Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the outstanding operating experience and the low electricity production costs of the existing Finnish nuclear power plants, energy-intensive process industries in particular have a strong belief in nuclear power. There is a potential interest in building more nuclear capacity, the fifth unit, in order to guarantee for Finnish industry the availability of cheap electrical energy in the future. In any case more baseload generation capacity will be needed by 2010 to meet the future growth of electricity consumption in Finland. Nuclear power generation matches excellently with the long-duration load profile of the Finnish power system. The good performance of Finnish nuclear power has yielded benefits also to consumers through its contribution to decreasing the electricity price. Furthermore, the introduction of nuclear power has resulted in a clear drop in the carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation during the 1970s and 1980s, as shown in Figure 1. In 1999 the four Finnish nuclear power units at Loviisa and Olkiluoto generated 22.1 TWh of electricity, roughly equivalent to one third of the total

Risto Tarjanne; Sauli Rissanen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CALL FOR PAPERS Abstract Deadline: January 13, 2012 ANS Embedded Topical on Decommissioning,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Changes the rules for nuclear decommissioning funds that are to be used to clean up closed nuclear plant Subsidies and Incentives for New Nuclear Reactors Research and Development · Generation IV program technologies · Investment in human resources and infrastructure in the nuclear sciences and engineering fields

Kemner, Ken

362

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

363

HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment including the dome was removed, a concrete cover was to be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations.

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

364

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research; the experiences of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) field tests; and the acquired knowledge of industries that have been actively drilling wells for more than 100 years. In addition, the BPM provides an overview of the well-

365

16 years of successful projects in16 years of successful projects in Nuclear Science & TechnologyNuclear Science & Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of operating NPP; · NPP decommissioning and waste treatment; · Novel reactor concepts and Nuclear Fuel Cycle

366

Rocky Flats Closure Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Project has completed the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating environmental media and closing the Rocky Flats Site (Site). The project cost approximately $4.1 B and included the decommissioning of over 700 structures including 5 major plutonium facilities and 5 major uranium facilities, shipping over 14,600 cubic meters of transuranic and 565,000 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste, and remediating a 385-acre industrial area and the surrounding land. Actual costs were collected for a large variety of closure activities. These costs can be correlated with metrics associated with the facilities and environmental media to capture cost factors from the project that could be applicable to a variety of other closure projects both within and outside of the Department of Energy's weapons complex. The paper covers four general topics: the process to correlate the actual costs and metrics, an example of the correlated data for one large sub-project, a discussion of the results, and the additional activities that are planned to correlate and make this data available to the public. The process to collect and arrange the project control data of the Closure Project relied on the actual Closure Project cost information. It was used to correlate these actual costs with the metrics for the physical work, such as building area or waste generated, to support the development of parametric cost factors. The example provides cost factors for the Industrial Sites Project. The discussion addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the data, followed by a section identifying future activities to improve and extend the analyses and integrate it within the Department's Environmental Cost Analysis System. (authors)

Sanford, P.C. [1129 Business Parkway South, Westminister, MD (United States); Skokan, B. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Handbook for cost estimating. A method for developing estimates of costs for generic actions for nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides overall guidance to assist the NRC in preparing the types of cost estimates required by the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines and to assist in the assignment of priorities in resolving generic safety issues. The Handbook presents an overall cost model that allows the cost analyst to develop a chronological series of activities needed to implement a specific regulatory requirement throughout all applicable commercial LWR power plants and to identify the significant cost elements for each activity. References to available cost data are provided along with rules of thumb and cost factors to assist in evaluating each cost element. A suitable code-of-accounts data base is presented to assist in organizing and aggregating costs. Rudimentary cost analysis methods are described to allow the analyst to produce a constant-dollar, lifetime cost for the requirement. A step-by-step example cost estimate is included to demonstrate the overall use of the Handbook.

Ball, J.R.; Cohen, S.; Ziegler, E.Z.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority for exchange of information concerning management of radioactive waste. Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority More Documents & Publications Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority International Agreements Comments

369

HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Underground nuclear energy complexes - technical and economic advantages  

SciTech Connect

Underground nuclear power plant parks have been projected to be economically feasible compared to above ground instalIations. This paper includes a thorough cost analysis of the savings, compared to above ground facilities, resulting from in-place entombment (decommissioning) of facilities at the end of their life. reduced costs of security for the lifetime of the various facilities in the underground park. reduced transportation costs. and reduced costs in the operation of the waste storage complex (also underground). compared to the fair share of the costs of operating a national waste repository.

Myers, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kunze, Jay F [IDAHO STATE UNIV; Giraud, Kellen M [BABECOCK AND WILCOX; Mahar, James M [IDAHO STATE UNIV

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Technical Bases for the Development and Application of Derived Concentration Guidance Levels for Decommissioning and License Termination of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Power plants achieve license termination by meeting regulatory site release criteria. Depending on the country, these criteria may be based on radionuclide concentration or dose. For dose-based criteria, corresponding radionuclide concentration limits, called Derived Concentration Guidance Levels (DCGLs), must also be developed. This report provides information related to site release criteria and the development of DCGLs.BackgroundThe ultimate goal ...

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund  

SciTech Connect

One of the most challenging issues facing the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management is the cleanup of the three gaseous diffusion plants. In October 1992, Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund to accomplish this task. This mission is being undertaken in an environmentally and financially responsible way by: devising cost-effective technical solutions; producing realistic life-cycle cost estimates, based on practical assumptions and thorough analysis; generating coherent long-term plans which are based on risk assessments, land use, and input from stakeholders; and, showing near-term progress in the cleanup of the gaseous diffusion facilities at Oak Ridge.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Decommissioning Project Remnant Considerations  

- P-Reactor 2013 - R-Reactor 2014 - F-Canyon 2015 (pending Global Nuclear Energy Partnership decision by 2011) 5 Project Drivers

374

Power Burst Facility (PBF) Reactor Reactor Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Decommissioning Click here to view Click here to view Reactor Decommissioning Click on an image to enlarge A crane removes the reactor vessel from the Power Burst Facility...

375

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

UNIQUE RADIOANALYTICAL PROTOCOLS FOR CHARACTERIZATION AND VERIFICATION DURING DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to successfully decontaminate, deactivate and decommission surplus Department of Energy (DOE) facilities throughout the Savannah River Site (SRS), a variety of characterizations must be completed to sufficiently identify and quantify potential contaminants of concern. The ultimate goal is to rapidly and efficiently characterize, decontaminate (if necessary), and verify that the remnants meet specified limits established by either an industrial worker model or a groundwater model. To meet this end, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a series of radioanalytical strategies and methodologies which can be used to characterize targeted facilities and prove that decontamination has been sufficient. To our knowledge, this is the first application of this novel methodology within the DOE complex. This methodology has been successfully utilized with nearly 1000 samples from over a dozen facilities. The application of this approach to just a single facility shortened the schedule by 30 days and resulted in non-labor dollar savings of over $60K. Cost savings for a second facility was determined to be $375K. Based on the success of this methodology at SRS, this approach will be valuable to other nuclear facilities in the USA and abroad involved with the decontamination and decommissioning process.

Diprete, C; David Diprete, D; Wooten Simpson, W

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

377

Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the ORNL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program FY 1993--2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration D D program. The purpose and objectivesof this program include: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M) of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities; and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Participating D D contractors are required to prepare formal plans that document the S M programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilities included in the ORNL D D Program.

Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

What To Do With The Material From The Decommissioning Of A Reprocessing Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When decommissioning nuclear installations, large quantities of metal components are produced as well as significant amounts of other radioactive materials, which mostly show low surface contamination. Having been used or having been brought for a while in a controlled area marks them as suspected material. In view of the very high costs for radioactive waste processing and disposal, alternatives have been considered, and much effort has been spent in recycling through decontamination, melting, and unconditional release of metals. In a broader context, recycling of materials can be considered as a first order ecological priority to limit the quantities of radioactive wastes to be disposed of, to reduce the technical and economic problems involved with the management of radioactive wastes, and to make economic use of primary material and conserve natural resources of basic material for future generations. Other evaluations, such as the environmental impact of recycling compared to...

Teunckens Lewandowksi Baumann; L. Teunckens; P. Lew; S. Baumann; D. Millen; R. Walthery

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the primary responsibility for the safe use of nuclear materials. C.3.2 NRC Criteria for Decommissioning, decontamination, decommissioning, and reclamation of uranium or thorium mills and mill tailings. Both regulations, special nuclear, and byproduct materials be managed, processed, and used in a manner that protects public

380

Introduction to Nuclear Engineering Introduction to Nuclear Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CSA Canadian Standards Association D&D Decontamination and Decommissioning DC, dc Association NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration #12;NRTL Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory

Corley, Bill

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Waste minimization value engineering workshop for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Pollution Prevention Program Office sponsored a Value Engineering (VE) Workshop to evaluate recycling options and other pollution prevention and waste minimization (PP/WMin) practices to incorporate into the decommissioning of the Omega West Reactor (OWR) at the laboratory. The VE process is an organized, systematic approach for evaluating a process or design to identify cost saving opportunities, or in this application, waste reduction opportunities. This VE Workshop was a facilitated process that included a team of specialists in the areas of decontamination, decommissioning, PP/WMin, cost estimating, construction, waste management, recycling, Department of Energy representatives, and others. The uniqueness of this VE Workshop was that it used an interdisciplinary approach to focus on PP/WMin practices that could be included in the OWR Decommissioning Project Plans and specifications to provide waste reduction. This report discusses the VE workshop objectives, summarizes the OWR decommissioning project, and describes the VE workshop activities, results, and lessons learned.

Hartnett, S.; Seguin, N. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burns, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West 26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the range of reasonable alternatives to decommission and/or maintain long-term stewardship at WNYNSC. The alternatives analyzed in the EIS include the Sitewide Removal Alternative, the Sitewide Close-In-Place Alternative, the Phased Decisionmaking Alternative (Preferred Alternative), and the No Action Alternative. The analysis and information contained in the EIS are intended to assist DOE and NYSERDA with the consideration of environmental

383

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments. Volume 9. Summary status report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 to May 5, 1985. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

Doerge, D. H.; Miller, R. L.; Scotti, K. S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Disposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2009 ... Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance: Ceramics for .... In-situ Decommissioning of Heavy Water Reactor Disassembly Basin: ...

385

IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING SENSOR NETWORK, MESO-SCALE TEST BED - PHASE 3 FLUID INJECTION TEST SUMMARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

Serrato, M.

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10-01666, Revision 0 10-01666, Revision 0 Key Words: in situ decommissioning sensor remote monitoring end state Retention: Permanent DEVELOPMENT OF A REMOTE MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONED STRUCTURES Panel Report November 2010 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DE-AC09-08SR22470 Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network Page 2 of 34

387

Proceedings: 8th EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Management Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) collaborated with E.On Kernkraft to hold the 8th EPRI International Decommissioning and Radwaste Management Workshop in Hamburg, Germany on October 6-8, 2009. A parallel session with EU CARBOWASTE focused on technologies and methodologies for management of graphite wastes. The Workshop featured a visit to the Stade nuclear power plant, which is presently undergoing decommissioning. This proceedings document contains the abstracts and presentation slides from t...

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

On the road to decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

This article is a review of the planning of the decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe and Trojan reactors, with special note given to the issue of waste disposal. Transportation of the major Yankee Rowe components to the Barnwell site was discussed, and Portland General`s involvement with the Northwest Compact is noted.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

MAUT approach for selecting a proper decommissioning scenario  

SciTech Connect

When dismantling scenarios are selected, not only the quantitatively calculated results but also the qualitatively estimated results should be considered with a logical and systematic process. In this case, the MAUT (Multi-Attribute Utility Theory) is widely used for the quantification of subjective judgments in various fields of a decision making. This study focuses on the introduction and application of the MAUT method for the selection of decommissioning scenarios. To evaluate decommissioning scenarios, nine evaluation attributes are considered. These attributes are: the primary cost, the peripheral cost, the waste treatment cost, the worker's exposure, the worker's safety, the work difficulty, the originality of the dismantling technologies, their contributions to other industries, public relations for, and an understanding of the public. The weighting values of the attributes were determined by using the AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) method and their utility functions are produced from several questionnaires for the decision makers. As an implementation, this method was applied to evaluate two scenarios, the plasma arc cutting scenario and the nibbler cutting scenario for decommissioning the thermal column in KRR- 1 (Korea Research Reactor-1). As a result, this method has many merits even although it is difficult to produce the utility function of each attribute. However, once they are setup it is easy to measure the alternatives' values and it can be applied regardless of the number of alternatives. (authors)

Kim, S.K.; Park, K.W.; Lee, H.S.; Jung, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Materials for the Nuclear Renaissance II - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Nuclear energy does not release carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and ... for used nuclear fuel, and (5) decommissioning, decontamination.

392

Calder Hall Cooling Tower Demolition: Landmark Milestone for Decommissioning at Sellafield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

September 2007 saw a very visible change to the Sellafield site following the culmination of a major decommissioning project; the demolition of the four Calder Hall cooling towers. A key part of the UK's nuclear industrial heritage, Calder Hall, the world's first commercial nuclear power station, was opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in October 1953 and continued to generate electricity until its closure in 2003. Following the decision to decommission the Calder Hall site, explosive demolition was identified as the safest and most cost effective route for the removal of the towers. The technique, involving the placement of explosive in 60% of the circumference of both shell and legs, is a tried and tested method which had already been used successfully in more than 200 cooling towers in the UK in the last 30 years. The location and composition of the four 88 metre high towers also created additional challenges. Situated only 40 metres away from the UK's only nuclear Fuel Handling Plant, as well as other sensitive structures on the Sellafield site, the project had to address the impact of a number of key areas, including dust, ground vibration and air over pressure, to ensure that the demolition could be carried out safely and without significant impact on other operational areas on the site. At the same time, the towers had to be prepared for demolition in a way that minimised the amounts of radioactive or hazardous waste materials arising. This paper follows the four year journey from the initial decision to demolish the towers right through to the demolition itself as well as the clean up of the site post demolition. It will also consider the massive programme of work necessary not only to carry out the physical work safely but also to gain regulatory confidence and stakeholder support to carry out the project successfully. In summary: The demolition of the four Calder Hall cooling towers was a highly visible symbol of the changes that are occurring on the Sellafield site as it moves forward towards a decommissioning future. Although in itself the demolition was both straightforward and standard, the various complexities posed by the towers situation at Sellafield introduced an entirely new element to the project, with a number of complex challenges which had to be overcome or resolved before the demolition could take place. It is a testament to the skill and dedication of the project team and its associated contractors that the project was delivered safely and successfully without a single accident, injury or event throughout the entire four years, and with minimal impact on both site operations and the local community. (authors)

Williamson, E.J. [Nuclear Decommissioning and Major Projects Group, Sellafield Ltd, Seascale, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) As the DOE complex sites prepare for closure, a large number of buildings and facilities must be deactivated and decommissioned. These facilities contain many complex systems (e.g. ventilation), miles of contaminated pipelines, glove boxes, and unique processing equipment that require labor intensive deactivation and decommissioning methods. Although

394

Probabilistic cost-benefit analysis of enhanced safety features for strategic nuclear weapons at a representative location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carried out a demonstration analysis of the value of developing and implementing enhanced safety features for nuclear weapons in the US stockpile. We modified an approach that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed in response to a congressional directive that NRC assess the ``value-impact`` of regulatory actions for commercial nuclear power plants. Because improving weapon safety shares some basic objectives with NRC regulations, i.e., protecting public health and safety from the effects of accidents involving radioactive materials, we believe the NRC approach to be appropriate for evaluating weapons-safety cost-benefit issues. Impact analysis includes not only direct costs associated with retrofitting the weapon system, but also the expected costs (or economic risks) that are avoided by the action, i.e., the benefits.

Stephens, D.R.; Hall, C.H.; Holman, G.S.; Graham, K.F.; Harvey, T.F.; Serduke, F.J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NEW POSITIONS AT THE NEA DRAFT DESCRIPTIONS 1-Nuclear Safety Specialist Grade A3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, operation, uranium mining and milling, and plant decommissioning. 2. The nuclear power lifecycle Engineers.5. Decommissioning The last stage of the nuclear lifecycle involves the decom- missioning and dismantling Japanese nuclear reactors Frontend 17 24.2 Construction 2.8 Operation 3.2 Backend 0.8 Decommissioning 0

Papadopoulos, Evangelos

396

Cost-Sensitive Classification Methods for the Detection of Smuggled Nuclear Material in Cargo Containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classification problems arise in so many different parts of life – from sorting machine parts to diagnosing a disease. Humans make these classifications utilizing vast amounts of data, filtering observations for useful information, and then making a decision based on a subjective level of cost/risk of classifying objects incorrectly. This study investigates the translation of the human decision process into a mathematical problem in the context of a border security problem: How does one find special nuclear material being smuggled inside large cargo crates while balancing the cost of invasively searching suspect containers against the risk of al lowing radioactive material to escape detection? This may be phrased as a classification problem in which one classifies cargo containers into two categories – those containing a smuggled source and those containing only innocuous cargo. This task presents numerous challenges, e.g., the stochastic nature of radiation and the low signal-to-noise ratio caused by background radiation and cargo shielding. In the course of this work, we will break the analysis of this problem into three major sections – the development of an optimal decision rule, the choice of most useful measurements or features, and the sensitivity of developed algorithms to physical variations. This will include an examination of how accounting for the cost/risk of a decision affects the formulation of our classification problem. Ultimately, a support vector machine (SVM) framework with F -score feature selection will be developed to provide nearly optimal classification given a constraint on the reliability of detection provided by our algorithm. In particular, this can decrease the fraction of false positives by an order of magnitude over current methods. The proposed method also takes into account the relationship between measurements, whereas current methods deal with detectors independently of one another.

Webster, Jennifer B

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Decommissioning And Its Financing In Belgium: Better To Prevent Than To Cure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1985 the Belgian legislature has taken measures to guarantee the financing of the ultimate life period of nuclear facilities. An agreement was concluded with the utilities for the settlement of financial provisions for the later decommissioning of all commercial nuclear power plants. In 1991, the preventive measures were extended to all other nuclear facilities in the country, including healing actions for those plants having a lack of financial provisions to carry out the later decommissioning programs, as well as plants for which the operator or owner has failed to satisfy his legal obligation to decommission the plant. In 1997, the legislature extended the precautionary measures to financing for the remediation of all sites within the country containing radioactive substances liable to present risks for the public health or for the environment. The implementation and control of the measures taken since 1991 have been entrusted by laws to ONDRAF/NIRAS. 1.0 THE EVOLUTION...

Marnix Braeckeveldt Roger; Roger Verbeke; Manfred Schrauben; Ingrid Verstraeten

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project: overview and justification  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this booklet is to brief the reader on the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project and to summarize the benefits of funding the project in FY 1984. Background information on the station and the decommissioning project is provided in this section of the booklet; the need for a reactor decommissining demonstration is discussed in the next section; and a summary of how the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) provides the needed demonstration is provided in the final section.

Coffman, F.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

After careful planning and input from regulatory agencies and the community, a decommissioning plan for the HFBR has been finalized. A Feasibility Study was completed and a...

400

Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benchmarking Study Final Report Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reactor Decommissioning Projects | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science &...

402

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2008 and 2007 Financial Statement Audit, OAS-FS-10-05 Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and...

403

Executive Director for Operations PROPOSED RULE ON DECOMMISSIONING TRUST PROVISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To request Commission approval to publish a proposed rule in the Federal Register on decommissioning trust agreement requirements. BACKGROUND: The staff presented a rulemaking plan (SECY-00-0002) to the Commission on December 30, 1999. The plan discussed two actions relating to amending nuclear power reactor decommissioning trust provisions i.e., to amend 10 CFR 50.75 and revise Regulatory Guide 1.159. Subsequently, in a February 9, 2000, staff requirements memorandum (SRM) to the Executive Director for Operations (Attachment 1), the Commission authorized the staff to proceed with the rulemaking plan. Further, the Commission instructed the staff that “any specific trust fund terms and conditions necessary to protect the funds fully should be set out in the rule itself, not in the regulatory guide. Sample language for trust agreements consistent with the terms and conditions within the rule may be provided within the associated regulatory guide.” The attached Federal Register notice (FRN) responds to the SRM. DISCUSSION: Contact:

William D. Travers; Brian Richter

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

NISTIR 7026 Condition Assessment of Concrete Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... An im- portant consideration for decommissioning is that the existing concrete nuclear structure is a primary barrier between its remaining contents ...

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ris-R-1291(EN) Revised Cost Estimate for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-1291(EN) Revised Cost Estimate for the Decommissioning of the Reactor DR 3 Edited by Klaus of the cost estimate for the decommissioning of the research Reactor DR 3 as described in the report Risø Procurement of general equipment and material 17 04 Dismantling activities 18 05 Waste processing and storage

406

EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

53: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell...

407

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning The design and production of 3-D scale models that replicate the highly contaminated...

408

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in...

409

FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield workers to a safe level from the residual radioactivity. Workers then continued preparations for demolishing the structure. Currently, they are isolating utilities, removing asbestos, draining oils, and removing other items not allowed to be disposed in Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The basin's superstructure will be demolished using a heavy industrial excavator equipped with a shear. This portion of the work is expected to be completed in September, with removal of the basin substructure to follow in 2009. D&D of the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream.

GERBER MS

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

For more information, contact Michele Boyd at mboyd@psr.org. Updated July 13, 2009. Existing Subsidies and Incentives for New Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................... 48 Table 5-3 ­ Scheduled nuclear capacity decommissioning prices and load profiles. - Investment in nuclear capacity is very responsive to the severity of CO2........................................................................... 35 4.2 Defining Generators: Investment, Decommission and Performance............................. 40

Laughlin, Robert B.

411

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

412

Fort St. Vrain Decommissioning: Final Site Radiation Survey: Summary Report and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final step in the decommissioning process at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCo) Fort St. Vrain nuclear power plant. The final site radiation survey documents that all nuclear facility surfaces meet the established release limits for unrestricted use. The survey formed the legal basis for the termination of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear license, which occurred in August 1997. The lessons learned in this process will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown p...

1998-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

413

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from...

414

Nuclear Energy RenaissanceNuclear Energy Renaissance National Research Council andNational Research Council and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1. HISTORY 1.1 Decommissioning of the Reactor The Gentilly-I nuclear power plant, located satisfactory for safe operation, and AECL decided to decommission it in 1978. The nuclear fuel was removedSP·215-18 FRP Retrofit of the Ring-Beam of a Nuclear Reactor Containment Structure by M. Demers. A

415

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Cost Comparison Between Once-Through and Plutonium Single-Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the context of long-term waste management and sustainable nuclear fuel supply, there continue to be discussions regarding whether the United States should consider recycling of light-water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for the current fleet of U.S. LWRs. This report presents a parametric study of equilibrium fuel cycle costs for an open fuel cycle without plutonium recycling (once-through) and with plutonium recycling (single-recycling using mixed-oxide, or MOX, fuel), assuming an all-pre...

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

416

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

So how much will it cost to build a nuke?  

SciTech Connect

Trying to get a better understanding of the different estimates of the cost of nuclear power, Prof. Francois Leveque of Mines ParisTech and Marcelo Saguan of Microeconomix examined seven studies published since 2000. They examined levelized cost, which captures the cost of electricity generation from nuclear reactors over the entire life cycle, including initial investment costs, operations and maintenance costs, cost of fuel, cost of capital, and decommissioning. The results, in 2007 euro/MWh, vary from 18 to 80. Making matters worse, more recent studies show an upward trend: the average value for studies published in 2003--05 is about 43 euro/MWh, while those published in 2007--09 average 63 euro2007/MWh. One reason for the different results is different assumptions about the main cost drivers and how they may vary over time. With the advent of third-generation nuclear reactors, numbers in the range of $1,000/kW (approx. 750 euro/kW) were being tossed around, suggesting a $1 billion investment for a 1,000 MW plant. A 2003 MIT study assumed an overnight cost of 1,750 euro/kW, with later studies raising the numbers to 3,000 euro/kW (approx. US$ 4,500). In 2008, Progress Energy Florida put the price tag for 2 new reactors it is planning to build on the Gulf Coast of Florida at $14 billion with another $3 billion for transmission and related expenses. Likewise, Florida Power & Light figures it would cost $20 billion for 2 new reactors at its Turkey Point site in Florida. These higher cost estimates and significant uncertainties about the true costs pose serious challenges to the competitiveness of nuclear power.

NONE

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Abrasive blasting, a technique for the industrial decontamination of metal components and concrete blocks from decommissioning to unconditional release levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When decommissioning nuclear installations, large quantities of metal components are produced as well as significant amounts of other radioactive materials, which mostly show low surface contamination. Having been used or having been brought for a while in a controlled area marks them as 'suspected material'. In view of the very high costs for radioactive waste processing and disposal, alternatives have been considered, and much effort has gone to recycling through decontamination, melting and unconditional release of metals. In a broader context, recycling of materials can considered to be a first order ecological priority in order to limit the quantities of radioactive wastes for final disposal and to reduce the technical and economic problems involved with the management of radioactive wastes. It will help as well to make economic use of primary material and to conserve natural resources of basic material for future generations. In a demonstration programme, Belgoprocess has shown that it is economically interesting to decontaminate metal components to unconditional release levels using dry abrasive blasting techniques, the unit cost for decontamination being only 30 % of the global cost for radioactive waste treatment, conditioning, storage and disposal. As a result, an industrial dry abrasive blasting unit was installed in the Belgoprocess central decontamination infrastructure. At the end of December 2006, more than 1,128 Mg of contaminated metal has been treated as well as 313 Mg of concrete blocks. The paper gives an overview of the experience relating to the decontamination of metal material and concrete blocks at the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Dessel, Belgium as well from the decontamination of concrete containers by abrasive blasting. (authors)

Gills, R.; Lewandowski, P.; Ooms, B.; Reusen, N.; Van Laer, W.; Walthery, R. [Belgoprocess N.V., Gravenstraat 73, 2480 Dessel (Belgium)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Estimating demolition cost of plutonium buildings for dummies  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Rocky Flats Field Office of the US Department of Energy is to decommission the entire plant. In an effort to improve the basis and the accuracy of the future decommissioning cost, Rocky Flats has developed a powerful but easy-to-use tool to determine budget cost estimates to characterize, decontaminate, and demolish all its buildings. The parametric cost-estimating tool is called the Facilities Disposition Cost Model (FDCM).

Tower, S.E.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations  

SciTech Connect

This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Technology issues for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The approach for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has evolved from a conservative plan based on cutting up and burying all of the systems, to one that considers the impact tritium contamination will have on waste disposal, how large size components may be used as their own shipping containers, and even the possibility of recycling the materials of components such as the toroidal field coils and the tokamak structure. In addition, the project is more carefully assessing the requirements for using remotely operated equipment. Finally, valuable cost database is being developed for future use by the fusion community.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Commander, J.C. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Environmental restoration and decontamination & decommissioning safety documentation. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This document presents recommendations of a working group designated by the Environmental Restoration and Remediation (ER) and Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) subcommittees of the Westinghouse M&O (Management and Operation) Nuclear Facility Safety Committee. A commonalty of approach to safety documentation specific to ER and D&D activities was developed and is summarized below. Allowance for interpretative tolerance and documentation flexibility appropriate to the activity, graded for hazard category, duration, and complexity, was a primary consideration in development of this guidance.

Hansen, J.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Frauenholz, L.H. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc. (United States); Kerr, N.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

424

Office of Environmental Management uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund financial statements. September 30, 1994 and 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) transferred the uranium enrichment enterprise to the United States Enrichment Corporation as of July 1, 1993. However, the Act requires the Department of Energy to retain ownership and responsibility for the costs of environmental cleanup resulting from the Government`s operation of the three gaseous diffusion facilities located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio (diffusion facilities). The Act established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) to: Pay for the costs of decontamination and decommissioning at the diffusion facilities; Pay the annual costs for remedial action at the diffusion facilities to the extent that the amount in the Fund is sufficient; and Reimburse uranium/thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government.

Marwick, P.

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund financial statements, September 30, 1995 and 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) requires the Department of Energy to retain ownership and responsibility for the costs of environmental cleanup resulting from the Government`s operation of the three gaseous diffusion facilities located at the K-25 site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. The Act transferred the uranium enrichment enterprise to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as of July 1, 1993, and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) to: Pay for the costs of decontamination and decommissioning at the diffusion facilities; pay the annual costs for remedial action at the diffusion facilities to the extent that the amount in the Fund is sufficient; and reimburse uranium/thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government.

1996-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

426

Technology needs for decommissioning and decontamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the current view of the most important decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) technology needs for the US Department of Energy facilities for which the D & D programs are the responsibility of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The source of information used in this assessment was a survey of the D & D program managers at each facility. A summary of needs presented in earlier surveys of site needs in approximate priority order was supplied to each site as a starting point to stimulate thinking. This document reflects a brief initial assessment of ongoing needs; these needs will change as plans for D & D are finalized, some of the technical problems are solved through successful development programs, and new ideas for D and D technologies appear. Thus, this assessment should be updated and upgraded periodically, perhaps, annually. This assessment differs from others that have been made in that it directly and solely reflects the perceived need for new technology by key personnel in the D & D programs at the various facilities and does not attempt to consider the likelihood that these technologies can be successfully developed. Thus, this list of technology needs also does not consider the cost, time, and effort required to develop the desired technologies. An R & D program must include studies that have a reasonable chance for success as well as those for which there is a high need. Other studies that considered the cost and probability of successful development as well as the need for new technology are documented. However, the need for new technology may be diluted in such studies; this document focuses only on the need for new technology as currently perceived by those actually charged with accomplishing D & D.

Bundy, R.D.; Kennerly, J.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Action Memorandum for General Decommissioning Activities under the Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect

This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative to perform general decommissioning activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). Preparation of this Action Memorandum has been performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the "Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986", and in accordance with the "National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan". An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was prepared and released for public comment and evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of excess buildings and structures whose missions havve been completed.

S. L. Reno

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

428

Monitoring the recovery of decommissioned roads with citizen scientists in the Clearwater National Forest, Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monitoring following road decommissioning . Wildlands CPR,research on road decommissioning, which will in turn allowService. 2003. Road decommissioning monitoring report 2002.

Court, Katherine; Switalski, T. Adam; Broberg, Len; Lloyd, Rebecca

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Wildlife Use of Open and Decommissioned Roads on the Clearwater National Forest, Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effectiveness of road decommissioning (Switalski et al.hunting season. Road decommissioning has been recommended toresulting from road decommissioning has also been predicted

Switalski, T. Adam; Broberg, Len; Holden, Anna

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Road Decommissioning: Minimising the Adverse Ecological Effects of Roads i9n European Agriculture Landscapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

road corridors post-decommissioning, especially those roadsof RRE - that of road decommissioning. To date even thoughFor this reason, road decommissioning can potentially: (1)

Dolan, Lisa; Whelan, Pádraig M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To ensure development of appropriate levels of engineering detail, DOE-EM’s Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) has prepared this guidance for  tailoring a D...

432

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Power Reactors PROTECTION AGAINST SABOTAGE Protection Against Industrial Sabotage I1C-4 Decominarion and Decommissioning

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Two Approaches to Reactor Decommissioning: 10 CFR Part 50 License Termination and License Amendment, Lessons Learned from the Regulatory Perspective  

SciTech Connect

Trojan Nuclear Plant (Trojan) and Maine Yankee Nuclear Plant (Maine Yankee) were the first two power reactors to complete decommissioning under the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) License Termination Rule (LTR), 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. The respective owners' decisions to decommission the sites resulted in different approaches to both the physical aspects of the decommissioning, and the approach for obtaining approval for completing the decommissioning in accordance with regulations. Being in different States, the two single-unit pressurized water reactor sites had different State requirements and levels of public interest that impacted the decommissioning approaches. This resulted in significant differences in decommissioning planning, conduct of decommissioning operations, volumes of low- level radioactive waste disposed, and the final status survey (FSS) program. While both licensees have Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSIs), Trojan obtained a separate license for the ISFSI in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 72 and terminated their 10 CFR Part 50 license. Maine Yankee elected to obtain a general license under 10 CFR Part 50 for the ISFSI and reduce the physical site footprint to the ISFSI through a series of license amendments. While the NRC regulations are flexible and allow different approaches to ISFSI licensing there are separate licensing requirements that must be addressed. In 10 CFR 50.82, the NRC mandates public participation in the decommissioning process. For Maine Yankee, public input resulted in the licensee entering into an agreement with a concerned citizen group and resulted in State legislation that significantly lowered the dose limit below the NRC radiological criteria of 25 mrem (0.25 mSv) per year (yr) in 10 CFR 20.1402 for unrestricted use. The lowering of the radiological criteria resulted in a significant dose modeling effort using site-specific Derived Concentrations Guideline Levels (DCGLs) that were well below the NRC DCGL screening values. This contributed to a longer than anticipated period to obtain NRC approval of the Maine Yankee License Termination Plan (LTP). By employing the lessons learned from its first LTP submittal, which was not accepted by the NRC staff, Trojan was able to obtain approval of its revised LTP promptly. While both licensees provided final status survey reports (FSSRs) for NRC approval, the Trojan approach to decommissioning and data management allowed NRC to efficiently review FSS records and supporting documentation. Therefore, NRC was able to review Trojan's FSSR more efficiently than Maine Yankee's FSSR. This paper describes the regulatory impacts of the two different approaches to the decommissioning, the development of licensee required plans, decommissioning operations and records, the differences in licensing processes, and the lessons learned for improving the processes. (authors)

Watson, B.A.; Buckley, J.T.; Craig, C.M. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards, Decommissioning Directorate (T7E18), Washington, D.C. 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the ORNL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program FY 1993--2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration D&D program. The purpose and objectivesof this program include: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities; and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Participating D&D contractors are required to prepare formal plans that document the S&M programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilities included in the ORNL D&D Program.

Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Joint electric power alternatives study. Appendix G. Joint parallel nuclear alternatives study for Russia. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Joint Parallel Nuclear Alternatives Study for Russia (JPNAS) is a parallel study to the Joint Electric Power Alternatives Study (JEPAS). The JPNAS assessed the costs of enhancing the safety level of Russian nuclear power plants (NPPs), decommissioning of RBMK-1000 and first generation VVER-440 units, completion of NPP construction, NPP repowering into fossil fuel plants, and construction of new generation NPPs. In the framework of the JEPAS, the JPNAS provides data on the nuclear sector which is needed to formulate an integrated resources plan and schedule for investments for the development of Russia`s power sector.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - BOOK ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 22, 2007 ... Topic Title: BOOK: Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXVII ... as papers on waste-, tank- and site-cleanup and decommissioning.

437

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 15, 2007 ... This concise online guide to the nuclear fuel cycle offers a good overview of waste management and decommissioning processes. It is written ...

438

Vibratory Shear Enhanced Process Filtration for Processing Decommissioning Wastes at Rancho Seco  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many non-nuclear industries use a vibratory shear enhanced filtration process (VSEP) to separate solids in liquid streams. Unlike other methods, including the application of a precoat of filter media, the VSEP does not generate any secondary waste, making it seem ideally suited for nuclear power plant radwaste systems. This report presents the results of laboratory and pilot scale in-plant testing of VSEP's ability to successfully process radioactive decommissioning waste. Testing at Rancho Seco showed t...

2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

439

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Cost Comparison Between Once-Through and Fully Closed Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results from a parametric study of equilibrium fuel cycle costs for a closed fuel cycle with multi-recycling of plutonium (Pu) and minor actinides in fast reactors (FRs) compared to an open, once-through fuel cycle using pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The study examines the impact on fuel cycle costs from changes in the unit costs of uranium, advanced plutonium and uranium recovery by extraction (PUREX) reprocessing of discharged fast-reactor mixed-oxide (FR-MOX) fuel, and fabric...

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

440

Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NRC) staff responses to frequently asked questions on the decommissioning process for commercial, nuclear power reactors. The questions were taken from a variety of sources over the past several years, including written inquiries to the NRC and questions asked at public meetings and during informal discussions with the NRC staff. In responding to the questions, the NRC staff attempted to provide the answers in a clear and non-technical form. With the increase in the number of power reactors beginning the decommissioning process and significant changes that occurred in the regulations since 1996, the staff realized that there was a general lack of understanding of the decommissioning process and the risks associated with decommissioning. This document was developed in response to the staff’s concerns. The report contains a definition of decommissioning and a discussion of alternatives. It also provides a focus on decommissioning experiences in the United States and how the NRC regulates the decommissioning process. Questions related to spent fuel, low-level waste, and transportation related to decommissioning are answered. Questions related to license termination, the ultimate disposition of the facility, and finances for completing decommissioning and hazards associated with decommissioning are also addressed. This document also provides responses to questions related to public involvement in decommissioning as well as providing the public with sources for obtaining additional information on decommissioning.

John L Minns; Michael T. Masnik; U. S. Nuclear; Regulatory Commission; Washington D. C. Abstract

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Dalhousie University Nuclear Substance (Class 7) Receiving Refresher Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.fissilematerials.org). In 2006-2007 he was part of a consultant consortium that assessed nuclear decommissioning and waste 2008 main nuclear operators EDF, CEA and AREVA answered a questionnaire on decommissioning and wasteNuclear Power in France Beyond the Myth By Mycle Schneider International Consultant on Energy

Brownstone, Rob

442

NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, engineering, construction. operation, transmission and distribution of nuclear electricity, decommissioning from $O.Ol/kWh ($1982) at l%/yr to $O.O165/kWh in year 50, decommissioning and nuclear waste reserved Copyright 0 1988 Pergamon Journals Ltd THE NET-ENERGY YIELD OF NUCLEAR POWER GENETYNER SR,~ ROBERT

McDonald, Kirk

443