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1

Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Development of a Preliminary Decommissioning Plan Following the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations - 13361  

SciTech Connect

The International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations, published by OECD/NEA, IAEA and EC is intended to provide a uniform list of cost items for decommissioning projects and provides a standard format that permits international cost estimates to be compared. Candesco and DECOM have used the ISDC format along with two costing codes, OMEGA and ISDCEX, developed from the ISDC by DECOM, in three projects: the development of a preliminary decommissioning plan for a multi-unit CANDU nuclear power station, updating the preliminary decommissioning cost estimates for a prototype CANDU nuclear power station and benchmarking the cost estimates for CANDU against the cost estimates for other reactor types. It was found that the ISDC format provides a well defined and transparent basis for decommissioning planning and cost estimating that assists in identifying gaps and weaknesses and facilitates the benchmarking against international experience. The use of the ISDC can also help build stakeholder confidence in the reliability of the plans and estimates and the adequacy of decommissioning funding. (authors)

Moshonas Cole, Katherine; Dinner, Julia; Grey, Mike [Candesco - A Division of Kinectrics Inc, 26 Wellington E 3rd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5E 1S2 (Canada)] [Candesco - A Division of Kinectrics Inc, 26 Wellington E 3rd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5E 1S2 (Canada); Daniska, Vladimir [DECOM a.s., Sibirska 1, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)] [DECOM a.s., Sibirska 1, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

SciTech Connect

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR • the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

Wittenbrock, N. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act calls for the establishment of a tax-exempt, tax-deductible decommissioning fund by the licensee of any nuclear power generating facility to pay for the...

8

Ris-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear Facilities at Risø National Laboratory Descriptions on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities;Decommissioning of Risø's nuclear facilities. Descriptions and cost assessment. Risø-R-1250(EN) 3 Contents 1

9

Decommissioning of the Iraq former nuclear complex  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A number of sites in Iraq have some degree of radiological contamination and require decommissioning and remediation in order to ensure radiological safety. Many of these sites in Iraq are located at the nuclear research centre at Al Tuwaitha. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors has approved a project to assist the Government of Iraq in the evaluation and decommissioning of former facilities that used radioactive materials. The project is divided into three phases: Phase 1: collect and analyze all available data and conduct training of the Iraqi staff, Phase 2: develop a decommissioning and remediation plan, and Phase 3: implement field activities relating to decommissioning, remediation and site selection suitable for final disposal of waste. Four working groups have been established to complete the Phase 1 work and significant progress has been made in drafting a new nuclear law which will provide the legal basis for the licensing of the decommissioning of the former nuclear complex. Work is also underway to collect and analysis existing date, to prioritize future activities and to develop a waste management strategy. This will be a long-term and costly project. (authors)

Abbas, Mohammed [Ministry of Science and Technology (Iraq); Helou, Tuama; Ahmead, Bushra [Ministry of Environment (Iraq); Al-Atia, Mousa; Al-Mubarak, Mowaffak [Iraqi Radiation Sources Regulatory Authority (Iraq); Danneels, Jeffrey; Cochran, John; Sorenson, Ken [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Coates, Roger [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100 - 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies of conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference boiling water reactor (BWR) described in the earlier study; and defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in three areas concerning decommissioning of the reference BWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Concepts and Approaches for Excess Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning End State - 13367  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently has numerous radiologically contaminated excess nuclear facilities waiting decommissioning throughout the Complex. The traditional decommissioning end state is complete removal. This commonly involves demolishing the facility, often segregating various components and building materials and disposing of the highly contaminated, massive structures containing tons of highly contaminated equipment and piping in a (controlled and approved) landfill, at times hundreds of miles from the facility location. Traditional demolition is costly, and results in significant risks to workers, as well as risks and costs associated with transporting the materials to a disposal site. In situ decommissioning (ISD or entombment) is a viable alternative to demolition, offering comparable and potentially more protective protection of human health and the environment, but at a significantly reduced cost and worker risk. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has completed the initial ISD deployment for radiologically contaminated facilities. Two reactor (P and R Reactors) facilities were decommissioned in 2011 using the ISD approach through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SRS ISD approach resolved programmatic, regulatory and technical/engineering issues associated with avoiding the potential hazards and cost associated with generating and disposing of an estimated 124,300 metric tons (153,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated debris per reactor. The DOE Environmental Management Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering, through the Savannah River National Laboratory, is currently investigating potential monitoring techniques and strategies to assess ISD effectiveness. As part of SRS's strategic planning, the site is seeking to leverage in situ decommissioning concepts, approaches and facilities to conduct research, design end states, and assist in regulatory interactions in broad national and international government and private industry decommissioning applications. SRS offers critical services based upon the SRS experience in decommissioning and reactor entombment technology (e.g., grout formulations for varying conditions, structural and material sciences). The SRS ISD approach follows a systems engineering framework to achieve a regulatory acceptable end state based on established protocols, attains the final end state with minimal long stewardship requirements, protects industrial workers, and protects groundwater and the environment. The ISD systems engineering framework addresses key areas of the remedial process planning, technology development and deployment, and assessment to attain the ultimate goal of natural resource stewardship and protecting the public. The development and deployment of the SRS ISD approach has established a path for ISD of other large nuclear facilities in the United States and around the globe as an acceptable remedial alternative for decommissioning nuclear facilities. (authors)

Serrato, Michael G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Musall, John C.; Bergren, Christopher L. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Services » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in UK and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy More Documents & Publications Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Scanned_Agreement.pdf Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste

14

Safety of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Full text of publication follows: ensuring safety during all stages of facility life cycle is a widely recognised responsibility of the operators, implemented under the supervision of the regulatory body and other competent authorities. As the majority of the facilities worldwide are still in operation or shutdown, there is no substantial experience in decommissioning and evaluation of safety during decommissioning in majority of Member States. The need for cooperation and exchange of experience and good practices on ensuring and evaluating safety of decommissioning was one of the outcomes of the Berlin conference in 2002. On this basis during the last three years IAEA initiated a number of international projects that can assist countries, in particular small countries with limited resources. The main IAEA international projects addressing safety during decommissioning are: (i) DeSa Project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning; (ii) R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P project on Research Reactors Decommissioning Demonstration Project; and (iii) Project on Evaluation and Decommissioning of Former Facilities that used Radioactive Material in Iraq. This paper focuses on the DeSa Project activities on (i) development of a harmonised methodology for safety assessment for decommissioning; (ii) development of a procedure for review of safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on application of the graded approach to the performance and review of safety assessments; and (iv) application of the methodology and procedure to the selected real facilities with different complexities and hazard potentials (a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory). The paper also outlines the DeSa Project outcomes and planned follow-up activities. It also summarises the main objectives and activities of the Iraq Project and introduces the R{sup 2}D{sup 2} Project, which is a subject of a complementary paper.

Batandjieva, B.; Warnecke, E.; Coates, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

A critical review of nuclear power plant decommissioning planning studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the past decade there have been at least ten major efforts to perform comprehensive, analytical studies of the complex issues associated with decommissioning civilian nuclear power plants. These planning efforts are reviewed, using the standard framework of technology assessment. In particular, each study is analysed to determine the degree to which formal methods of decision analysis have been employed to evaluate options and make recommendations and the degree to which formal methods of consensus have been employed to engage citizen involvement and promote public acceptance. Not unexpectedly, we find that the greatest strides in decommissioning analyses have been made in forecasting the economic costs of decommissioning to licensees. Comparatively few improvements have been made in the processes used to compare the impacts of alternative technologies more broadly, or to address the legitimate concerns of interested parties more widely.

W.Timothy Lough; K.Preston White Jr.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Decommissioning Cost Estimating Factors And Earned Value Integration  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats 771 Project progressed from the planning stage of decommissioning a plutonium facility, through the strip-out of highly-contaminated equipment, removal of utilities and structural decontamination, and building demolition. Actual cost data was collected from the strip-out activities and compared to original estimates, allowing the development of cost by equipment groupings and types and over time. Separate data was developed from the project control earned value reporting and compared with the equipment data. The paper discusses the analysis to develop the detailed factors for the different equipment types, and the items that need to be considered during characterization of a similar facility when preparing an estimate. The factors are presented based on direct labor requirements by equipment type. The paper also includes actual support costs, and examples of fixed or one-time start-up costs. The integration of the estimate and the earned value system used for the 771 Project is also discussed. The paper covers the development of the earned value system as well as its application to a facility to be decommissioned and an existing work breakdown structure. Lessons learned are provided, including integration with scheduling and craft supervision, measurement approaches, and verification of scope completion. In summary: The work of decommissioning the Rocky Flats 771 Project process equipment was completed in 2003. Early in the planning process, we had difficulty in identifying credible data and implementing processes for estimating and controlling this work. As the project progressed, we were able to collect actual data on the costs of removing plutonium contaminated equipment from various areas over the life of this work and associate those costs with individual pieces of equipment. We also were able to develop and test out a system for measuring the earned value of a decommissioning project based on an evolving estimate. These were elements that would have been useful to us in our early planning process, and we would expect that they would find application elsewhere as the DOE weapons complex and some commercial nuclear facilities move towards closure. (authors)

Sanford, P.C.; Cimmarron, E. [Englewood, CO, B. Skokan, Office of Project Management Oversight, EM-53, United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Estimating boiling water reactor decommissioning costs. A user`s manual for the BWR Cost Estimating Computer Program (CECP) software: Draft report for comment  

SciTech Connect

With the issuance of the Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), nuclear power plant licensees are required to submit to the U.S. Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. This user`s manual and the accompanying Cost Estimating Computer Program (CECP) software provide a cost-calculating methodology to the NRC staff that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals. The CECP, designed to be used on a personal computer, provides estimates for the cost of decommissioning BWR power stations to the point of license termination. Such cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial costs; and manpower costs. In addition to costs, the CECP also calculates burial volumes, person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning.

Bierschbach, M.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Impact of Lack of Consistent Free Release Standards on Decommissioning Projects and Costs  

SciTech Connect

While the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has had specific and dose-based standards for the release of liquids and gases for a long time, there are no regulatory mechanisms in place for the release of solid bulk materials from a nuclear power plant. Even though free releases of small quantities of solid materials continue under existing guidelines from the operating plants, the regulatory void creates major difficulties for the bulk materials that result from the decommissioning of a nuclear site. Decommissioning of a commercial nuclear power plant generates large quantities of solid bulk materials such as concrete, metal, and demolition debris. Disposition of such materials has a large impact on the overall decommissioning cost. Yet, there are no clear and cost-effective alternatives for the disposal of these materials from a regulatory perspective. This paper discusses the methodologies for clearance of solid materials1, their applicability to the disposition of bulk materials, and the impact of lack of consistent free release standards on the decommissioning projects and costs.

Devgun, J. S.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

19

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Waste Management Strategy for Dismantling Waste to Reduce Costs for Power Plant Decommissioning - 13543  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants generates large volumes of radioactive or potentially radioactive waste. The proper management of the dismantling waste plays an important role for the time needed for the dismantling phase and thus is critical to the decommissioning cost. An efficient and thorough process for inventorying, characterization and categorization of the waste provides a sound basis for the planning process. As part of comprehensive decommissioning studies for Nordic NPPs, Westinghouse has developed the decommissioning inventories that have been used for estimations of the duration of specific work packages and the corresponding costs. As part of creating the design basis for a national repository for decommissioning waste, the total production of different categories of waste packages has also been predicted. Studsvik has developed a risk based concept for categorization and handling of the generated waste using six different categories with a span from extremely small risk for radiological contamination to high level waste. The two companies have recently joined their skills in the area of decommissioning on selected market in a consortium named 'ndcon' to further strengthen the proposed process. Depending on the risk for radiological contamination or the radiological properties and other properties of importance for waste management, treatment routes are proposed with well-defined and proven methods for on-site or off-site treatment, activity determination and conditioning. The system is based on a graded approach philosophy aiming for high confidence and sustainability, aiming for re-use and recycling where found applicable. The objective is to establish a process where all dismantled material has a pre-determined treatment route. These routes should through measurements, categorization, treatment, conditioning, intermediate storage and final disposal be designed to provide a steady, un-disturbed flow of material to avoid interruptions. Bottle-necks in the process causes increased space requirements and will have negative impact on the project schedule, which increases not only the cost but also the dose exposure to personnel. For these reasons it is critical to create a process that transfers material into conditioned waste ready for disposal as quickly as possible. To a certain extent the decommissioning program should be led by the waste management process. With the objective to reduce time for handling of dismantled material at site and to efficiently and environmental-friendly use waste management methods (clearance for re-use followed by clearance for recycling), the costs for the plant decommissioning could be reduced as well as time needed for performing the decommissioning project. Also, risks for delays would be reduced with a well-defined handling scheme which limits surprises. Delays are a major cost driver for decommissioning projects. (authors)

Larsson, Arne; Lidar, Per [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)] [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden); Bergh, Niklas; Hedin, Gunnar [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 2, SE-721 63, Vaesteraas (Sweden)] [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 2, SE-721 63, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Comparative Evaluation of Cutting Methods of Activated Concrete from Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning - 13548  

SciTech Connect

The amount of radioactive wastes from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant varies greatly depending on factors such as type and size of the plant, operation history, decommissioning options, and waste treatment and volume reduction methods. There are many methods to decrease the amount of decommissioning radioactive wastes including minimization of waste generation, waste reclassification through decontamination and cutting methods to remove the contaminated areas. According to OECD/NEA, it is known that the radioactive waste treatment and disposal cost accounts for about 40 percentage of the total decommissioning cost. In Korea, it is needed to reduce amount of decommissioning radioactive waste due to high disposal cost, about $7,000 (as of 2010) per a 200 liter drum for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). In this paper, cutting methods to minimize the radioactive waste of activated concrete were investigated and associated decommissioning cost impact was assessed. The cutting methods considered are cylindrical and volume reductive cuttings. The study showed that the volume reductive cutting is more cost-effective than the cylindrical cutting. Therefore, the volume reductive cutting method can be effectively applied to the activated bio-shield concrete. (authors)

Kim, HakSoo; Chung, SungHwan; Maeng, SungJun [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)] [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cost Savings through Innovation in Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Dismantlement  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost effective technologies for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsored large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs) to help bring new technologies into the D&D programs. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) LSDDP generated a list of needs defining specific problems where improved technologies could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. The needs fell into 5 major categories--characterization, dismantlement, safety, material dispositioning, and decontamination. Technologies were carefully selected that provide a large benefit for a small investment. The technologies must provide significant improvements in cost, safety, radiation exposure, waste volume reduction, or schedule savings and widely applicable throughout the DOE complex. The LSDDP project provided training for the new technologies and worked with technology suppliers to resolve any questions that arose. Since 1998, 26 technologies have been demonstrated or deployed through the LSDDP for the D&D program at the INEEL. Of the 26 demonstrated and deployed technologies, 14 were in characterization, 3 were in decontamination, 4 were in dismantlement, 3 were in safety, and 2 were in material dispositioning. To promote the use of these technologies at other sites within the DOE complex, the LSDDP team published fact sheets, videos, technology summary reports, articles in INEEL star newspaper, posters, and maintained an internet home page on the project. As a result, additional deployments have taken place at the Hanford, Mound, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Ashtabula, and West Valley. Eight of the 26 technologies evaluated were developed in foreign countries. The technologies demonstrated have been shown to be faster, less expensive, and/or safer. The technologies evaluated through the LSDDP have provided improvements in the following D&D areas: robotic underwater characterization of fuel storage pools, characterization of scrap metal for recycle, PCB and RCRA metals analysis in soil, water, paint, or sludge, subsurface characterization, personnel safety, waste disposal, scaffolding use, and remote radiation characterization of buildings and soil. It is estimated that the technologies demonstrated and deployed through this program will save more than $50 million dollars over the next 10 years at the INEEL alone. Of the $50 million estimated dollars saved, about 75% of the savings will come from characterization technologies, 11% from technologies associated with material dispositioning, 10% are associated with dismantlement technologies and the balance split between safety and decontamination.

Neal A. Yancey

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

Daly, P.T.; Hlopak, W.J. [Commercial Services Group, EnergySolutions 1009 Commerce Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

An evaluation of the dismantling technologies for decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper is to suggest an evaluation method on the dismantling technologies for decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The parameters of evaluation are performance impacts, site-specific impacts, safety impacts, and cost impacts. The evaluation model was provided and applied for dismantling of a steam generator.

KwanSeong Jeong; ByungSeon Choi; Jeikwon Moon; Dongjun Hyun; JongHwan Lee; IkJune Kim; GeunHo Kim; JaeSeok Seo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Radiological planning and implementation for nuclear-facility decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The need and scope of radiological planning required to support nuclear facility decommissioning are issues addressed in this paper. The role of radiation protection engineering and monitoring professionals during project implementation and closeout is also addressed. Most of the discussion focuses on worker protection considerations; however, project support, environmental protection and site release certification considerations are also covered. One objective is to identify radiological safety issues that must be addressed. The importance of the issues will vary depending on the type of facility being decommissioned; however, by giving appropriate attention to these issues difficult decommissioning projects can be accomplished in a safer manner with workers and the public receiving minimal radiation exposures.

Valentine, A.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in UK and US Department of Energy

27

Cost update technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to update the cost estimates developed in a previous report, NUREG/CR-1757 (Elder 1980) for decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant from the original mid-1981 dollars to values representative of January 1993. The cost updates were performed by using escalation factors derived from cost index trends over the past 11.5 years. Contemporary price quotes wee used for costs that have increased drastically or for which is is difficult to find a cost trend. No changes were made in the decommissioning procedures or cost element requirements assumed in NUREG/CR-1757. This report includes only information that was changed from NUREG/CR-1757. Thus, for those interested in detailed descriptions and associated information for the reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant, a copy of NUREG/CR-1757 will be needed.

Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Engineering and planning for decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

With the publication of NUREG-0586, ''Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities'' in January, 1981 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has put the industry on notice that the termination of operating licenses and the final disposal of physical facilities will require the early consideration of several options and approaches and the preparation of comprehensive engineering and planning documents for the selected option at the end of useful life. This paper opens with a discussion of the options available and the principal aspects of decommissioning. The major emphasis of the composition is the nature of documents, the general approach to be followed, and special considerations to be taken into account when performing the detailed engineering and planning for decommissioning, as the end of life approaches and actual physical disposal is imminent. The author's main point of reference is on-going work by Burns and Roe, with Nuclear Energy Services, under contract to the Department of Energy's Richland Office, to perform the engineering and planning for the decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Pennsylvania.

Gans, G.M. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Decommissioning handbook  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of information pertinent to the decommissioning of surplus nuclear facilities. This handbook is intended to describe all stages of the decommissioning process including selection of the end product, estimation of the radioactive inventory, estimation of occupational exposures, description of the state-of-the-art in re decontamination, remote csposition of wastes, and estimation of program costs. Presentation of state-of-the-art technology and data related to decommissioning will aid in consistent and efficient program planning and performance. Particular attention is focused on available technology applicable to those decommissioning activities that have not been accomplished before, such as remote segmenting and handling of highly activated 1100 MW(e) light water reactor vessel internals and thick-walled reactor vessels. A summary of available information associated with the planning and estimating of a decommissioning program is also presented. Summarized in particular are the methodologies associated with the calculation and measurement of activated material inventory, distribution, and surface dose level, system contamination inventory and distribution, and work area dose levels. Cost estimating techniques are also presented and the manner in which to account for variations in labor costs as impacting labor-intensive work activities is explained.

Manion, W.J.; LaGuardia, T.S.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

An analysis of decommissioning costs for the AFRRI TRIGA reactor facility  

SciTech Connect

A decommissioning cost analysis for the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility was made. AFRRI is not at this time suggesting that the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility be decommissioned. This report was prepared to be in compliance with paragraph 50.33 of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations which requires the assurance of availability of future decommissioning funding. The planned method of decommissioning is the immediate decontamination of the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor site to allow for restoration of the site to full public access - this is called DECON. The cost of DECON for the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility in 1990 dollars is estimated to be $3,200,000. The anticipated ancillary costs of facility site demobilization and spent fuel shipment is an additional $600,000. Thus the total cost of terminating reactor operations at AFRRI will be about $3,800,000. The primary basis for this cost estimate is a study of the decommissioning costs of a similar reactor facility that was performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as provided in USNRC publication NUREG/CR-1756. The data in this study were adapted to reflect the decommissioning requirements of the AFRRI TRIGA. (author)

Forsbacka, Matt [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A New Life Adaptive Reuse and Redevelopment of Decommissioned Commercial Nuclear Power Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??My study analyzed the challenges and opportunities faced in the historic preservation and adaptive reuse of decommissioned commercial nuclear power plants. While operating, these plants… (more)

Farrow, Elizabeth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority for exchange of information concerning management of radioactive waste.

34

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Schafer, J.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. (Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Schafer, J.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Report on waste burial charges. Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fourth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991 and 1993, superseding the values given in the May 1993 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1994 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Report on waste burial charges: Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at Low-Level Waste Burial facilities. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fifth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991, 1993, and 1994, superseding the values given in the June 1994 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1995 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA) process as an approach for decommissioning.

A. B. Culp

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O'Leary, E. M.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Expectations on Documented Safety Analysis for Deactivated Inactive Nuclear Facilities in a State of Long Term Surveillance & Maintenance or Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

DOE promulgated 10 CFR 830 ''Nuclear Safety Management'' on October 10, 2000. Section 204 of the Rule requires that contractors at DOE hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities develop a ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (DSA) that summarizes the work to be performed, the associated hazards, and hazard controls necessary to protect workers, the public, and the environment. Table 2 of Appendix A to the rule has been provided to ensure that DSAs are prepared in accordance with one of the available predetermined ''safe harbor'' approaches. The table presents various acceptable safe harbor DSAs for different nuclear facility operations ranging from nuclear reactors to decommissioning activities. The safe harbor permitted for decommissioning of a nuclear facility encompasses methods described in DOE-STD-1 120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Facility Disposition Activities,'' and provisions in 29 CFR 1910.120 or 29 CFR 1926.65 (HAZWOPER). Additionally, an evaluation of public safety impacts and development of necessary controls is required when the facility being decommissioned contains radiological inventory or contamination exceeding the Rule's definition for low-level residual fixed radioactivity. This document discusses a cost-effective DSA approach that is based on the concepts of DOE-STD-I 120 and meets the 10 CFR 830 safe harbor requirements for both transition surveillance and maintenance as well as decommissioning. This DSA approach provides continuity for inactive Hanford nuclear facilities that will eventually transition into decommissioning. It also uses a graded approach that meets the expectations of DOE-STD-3011 and addresses HAZWOPER requirements to provide a sound basis for worker protection, particularly where intrusive work is being conducted.

JACKSON, M.W.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major interviews, articles and reports in this issue include: Increasing momentum, by Gary Taylor, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; An acceptable investment, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, Inc.; Fuel recycling for the U.S. and abroad, by Philippe Knoche, Areva, France; We're bullish on nuclear power, by Dan R. Keuter, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; Ten key actions for decommissioning, by Lawrence E. Boing, Argonne National Laboratory; Safe, efficient and cost-effective decommissioning, by Dr. Claudio Pescatore and Torsten Eng, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), France; and, Plant profile: SONGS decommissioning.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes  

SciTech Connect

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland for exchange of information concerning management of...

45

Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the Department of Energy of the United States and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and northern Ireland for exchange of...

46

Criticality safety aspects of decontamination and decommissioning at defense nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

Defense nuclear facilities have operated for forty years with a well-defined mission to produce weapons components for the nation. With the end of the cold war, the facilities` missions have changed to one of decontamination and decommissioning. Off-normal operations and use of new procedures, such as will exist during these activities, have often been among the causal factors in previous criticality accidents at process facilities. This paper explores the similarities in causal factors in previous criticality accidents to the conditions existing in current defense nuclear facilities undergoing the transition to decontamination and decommissioning. Practices to reduce the risk to workers, the public, and the environment are recommended.

Croucher, D.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216  

SciTech Connect

Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is responsible for decommissioning activities. The IDD and the RWTMD work together on decommissioning projects. The IDD has developed plans and has completed decommissioning of the GeoPilot Facility in Baghdad and the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) in Al-Tuwaitha. Given this experience, the IDD has initiated work on more dangerous facilities. Plans are being developed to characterize, decontaminate and decommission the Tamuz II Research Reactor. The Tammuz Reactor was destroyed by an Israeli air-strike in 1981 and the Tammuz II Reactor was destroyed during the First Gulf War in 1991. In addition to being responsible for managing the decommissioning wastes, the RWTMD is responsible for more than 950 disused sealed radioactive sources, contaminated debris from the first Gulf War and (approximately 900 tons) of naturally-occurring radioactive materials wastes from oil production in Iraq. The RWTMD has trained staff, rehabilitated the Building 39 Radioactive Waste Storage building, rehabilitated portions of the French-built Radioactive Waste Treatment Station, organized and secured thousands of drums of radioactive waste organized and secured the stores of disused sealed radioactive sources. Currently, the IDD and the RWTMD are finalizing plans for the decommissioning of the Tammuz II Research Reactor. (authors)

Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq)] [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

DECOMMISSIONING OF THE NUCLEAR FACILITIES OF VKTA AT THE ROSSENDORF RESEARCH SITE  

SciTech Connect

VKTA decommissioned the old nuclear facilities of former GDR's (German Democratic Republic) Central Institute of Nuclear Research which was closed end of 1991. VKTA is responsible for fissile material and waste management, environmental and radiation protection and runs an accredited laboratory for environmental and radionuclide analytics. The Rossendorf research site is located east of the city of Dresden. The period from 1982 to about 1997 was mainly characterized by obtaining the necessary licenses for decommissioning and developing a new infrastructure (i.e. waste treatment facility, interim storages for fissile material and waste, clearance monitoring facility). The decommissioning work has been in progress since that time. The decommissioning projects are concentrated on three complexes: (1) the reactors and a fuel development and testing facility, (2) the radioisotope production facilities, and (3) the former liquid and solid waste storage facilities. The status of decommissioning progress and treatment of the residues will be demonstrated. Finally an outlook will be given on the future tasks of VKTA based on the ''Conception VKTA 2000 plus'', which was confirmed by the Saxonian government last year.

U. Helwig, W. Boessert

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Standard Guide for Environmental Monitoring Plans for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers the development or assessment of environmental monitoring plans for decommissioning nuclear facilities. This guide addresses: (1) development of an environmental baseline prior to commencement of decommissioning activities; (2) determination of release paths from site activities and their associated exposure pathways in the environment; and (3) selection of appropriate sampling locations and media to ensure that all exposure pathways in the environment are monitored appropriately. This guide also addresses the interfaces between the environmental monitoring plan and other planning documents for site decommissioning, such as radiation protection, site characterization, and waste management plans, and federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and guidance. This guide is applicable up to the point of completing D&D activities and the reuse of the facility or area for other purposes.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

cost savings | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cost savings | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing...

52

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

55

Decision to reorganise or reorganising decisions? A First-Hand Account of the Decommissioning of the Phnix Nuclear Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Decommissioning of the Phénix Nuclear Power Plant Melchior Pelleterat de Borde, MINES ParisTech, Christophe Martin looks at the effect of ongoing organisational changes taking place in a nuclear power plant being campaigns, the Phénix nuclear power plant was taken out of service at the end of 2009. The plant has two

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

56

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12  

SciTech Connect

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

Sullivan T.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

59

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Screening evaluation of radionuclide groundwater concentrations for the end state basement fill model Zion Nuclear Power Station decommissioning project  

SciTech Connect

ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled with clean material. The final selection of fill material has not been made.

Sullivan T.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cost Estimating for Decommissioning of a Plutonium Facility--Lessons Learned From The Rocky Flats Building 771 Project  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Site is implementing an aggressive approach in an attempt to complete Site closure by 2006. The replanning effort to meet this goal required that the life-cycle decommissioning effort for the Site and for the major individual facilities be reexamined in detail. As part of the overall effort, the cost estimate for the Building 771 decommissioning project was revised to incorporate both actual cost data from a recently-completed similar project and detailed planning for all activities. This paper provides a brief overview of the replanning process and the original estimate, and then discusses the modifications to that estimate to reflect new data, methods, and planning rigor. It provides the new work breakdown structure and discusses the reasons for the final arrangement chosen. It follows with the process used to assign scope, cost, and schedule elements within the new structure, and development of the new code of accounts. Finally, it describes the project control methodology used to track the project, and provides lessons learned on cost tracking in the decommissioning environment.

Stevens, J. L.; Titus, R.; Sanford, P. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

62

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Nuclear Power Reactor Sites December 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Washington, D.C. Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel The picture on the cover is the Connecticut Yankee Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation site in Haddam, Connecticut, with 43 dry storage NRC-licensed dual-purpose (storage and transport) casks. ii Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The House Appropriations Committee Print that accompanied the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008, requests that the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department):

63

Systematic Approach for Decommissioning Planning and Estimating  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear facility decommissioning, satisfactorily completed at the lowest cost, relies on a systematic approach to the planning, estimating, and documenting the work. High quality information is needed to properly perform the planning and estimating. A systematic approach to collecting and maintaining the needed information is recommended using a knowledgebase system for information management. A systematic approach is also recommended to develop the decommissioning plan, cost estimate and schedule. A probabilistic project cost and schedule risk analysis is included as part of the planning process. The entire effort is performed by a experienced team of decommissioning planners, cost estimators, schedulers, and facility knowledgeable owner representatives. The plant data, work plans, cost and schedule are entered into a knowledgebase. This systematic approach has been used successfully for decommissioning planning and cost estimating for a commercial nuclear power plant. Elements of this approach have been used for numerous cost estimates and estimate reviews. The plan and estimate in the knowledgebase should be a living document, updated periodically, to support decommissioning fund provisioning, with the plan ready for use when the need arises.

Dam, A. S.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nuclear processing - a simple cost equation or a complex problem?  

SciTech Connect

BNFL has extensive experience of nuclear processing plant from concept through to decommissioning, at all stages of the fuel cycle. Nexia Solutions (formerly BNFL's R and D Division) has always supported BNFL in development of concept plant, including the development of costed plant designs for the purpose of economic evaluation and technology selection. Having undertaken such studies over a number of years, this has enabled Nexia Solutions to develop a portfolio of costed plant designs for a broad range of nuclear processes, throughputs and technologies. This work has led to an extensive understanding of the relationship of the cost of nuclear processing plant, and how this can be impacted by scale of process, and the selection of design philosophy. The relationship has been seen to be non linear and so simplistic equations do not apply, the relationship is complex due to the variety of contributory factors. This is particularly evident when considering the scale of a process, for example how step changes in design occurs with increasing scale, how the applicability of technology options can vary with scale etc... This paper will explore the contributory factor of scale to nuclear processing plant costs. (authors)

Banfield, Z.; Banford, A.W.; Hanson, B.C.; Scully, P.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd: Hinton House, Risley, Warrington, Cheshire, WA3 6AS (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground Environmental Surveillance Programs  

SciTech Connect

This Addendum supplements, and to some extent replaces, the preliminary description of environmental radiological surveillance programs for low-level waste burial grounds (LLWBG) used in the parent document, 11 Technology, Safety and Costs of DecolliTlissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground, 11 NUREG/ CR-0570. The Addendum provides additional detail and rationale for the environmental radiological surveillance programs for the two referenced sites and inventories described in NUREG/CR-0570. The rationale and performance criteria herein are expected to be useful in providing guidance for determining the acceptability of environmental surveillance programs for other inventories and other LLWBG sites. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are reference facilities considered in this Addendum, and as described in the parent document (NUREG/CR-0570). The two sites are assumed to have the same capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology, and hydrology of the two reference sites are typical of existing western and eastern sites, altnough a single population distribution was chosen for both. Each reference burial ground occupies about 70 hectares and includes 180 trenches filled with a total of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} of radioactive waste. In acldition, there are 10 slit trenches containing about 1.5 x 10{sup 3} m{sup 3} of high beta-gamma activity waste. In this Addendum environmental surveillance programs are described for the several periods in the life of a LLWBG: preoperational (prior to nuclear waste receipt); operational (including interim trench closures); post-operational (after all nuclear waste is received), for both short-term {up to three years) and long-term (up to 100 years) storage and custodial care; and decommissioning (only for the special case of waste removal). The specific environmental monitoring requirements for final site characterization and certification surveys are beyond the scope of this Addendum. Data collection associated with site reconnaissance and preselection is not specifically addressed, but it is recognized that such data may be useful in designing the preoperational program. Predisposal control measures, quality assurance, and record-keeping (other than inventory records) associated with waste disposal operations are also not addressed. The primary intent of routine environmental surveillance at a LLWBG is to help ensure that site activities do not cause significant transport of radioactivity from the site, resulting in an unacceptable health hazard to people. Preoperational environmental surveillance serves to determine for later comparison the background radioactivity levels, either naturally occurring or the result of man's activities (e.g. world-wide fallout or an adjacent nuclear facility), in and around the proposed burial ground site. The operational environmental surveillance program is used to estimate radiological conditions, both onsite and offsite as a possible result of burial ground activities, including trench closure(s). These data help to determine LLWBG compliance with regulatory requirements. During the post-operational period environmental surveillance should normally be an extension of the program carried out during operations, with appropriate deletions (or modifications) to account for the differences between operational and post-operational activities at the site. During the long-term storage and custodial care period, environmental surveillance serves to verify the radionuclide confinement capability of the burial ground and to identify problem situations requiring remedial action. For waste removal (exhumation), the environmental surveillance program is again modified to account for the greatly increased potential for direct radiation and contamination spread. At the time of decommissioning, "environmental surveillance" takes on a new meaning, from that of an ongoing prog

Denham, D. H.; Eddy, P. A.; Hawley, K. A.; Jaquish, R. E.; Corley, J. P.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an island’s cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Joint US/Russian study on the development of a decommissioning strategy plan for RBMK-1000 unit No. 1 at the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this joint U.S./Russian study was to develop a safe, technically feasible, economically acceptable strategy for decommissioning Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) Unit No. 1 as a representative first-generation RBMK-1000 reactor. The ultimate goal in developing the decommissioning strategy was to select the most suitable decommissioning alternative and end state, taking into account the socioeconomic conditions, the regulatory environment, and decommissioning experience in Russia. This study was performed by a group of Russian and American experts led by Kurchatov Institute for the Russian efforts and by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. efforts and for the overall project.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A review of decommissioning considerations for new reactors  

SciTech Connect

At a time of 'nuclear renaissance' when the focus is on advanced reactor designs and construction, it is easy to overlook the decommissioning considerations because such a stage in the life of the new reactors will be some sixty years down the road. Yet, one of the lessons learned from major decommissioning projects has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Hence, the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account is right from the design stage with regular updates of the decommissioning strategy and plans throughout the life cycle of the reactor. Designing D and D into the new reactor designs is necessary to ensure that the tail end costs of the nuclear power are manageable. Such considerations during the design stage will facilitate a more cost-effective, safe and timely decommissioning of the facility when a reactor is eventually retired. This paper examines the current regulatory and industry design guidance for the new reactors with respect to the decommissioning issues and provides a review of the design considerations that can help optimize the reactor designs for the eventual decommissioning. (authors)

Devgun, J.S.Ph.D. [Manager Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

A. Petraglia; C. Sabbarese; M. De Cesare; N. De Cesare; F. Quinto; F. Terrasi; A. D'Onofrio; P. Steier; L. K. Fifield; A. M. Esposito

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

Petraglia, A; De Cesare, M; De Cesare, N; Quinto, F; Terrasi, F; D'Onofrio, A; Steier, P; Fifield, L K; Esposito, A M; 10.1051/radiopro/2012010

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cost Savings of Nuclear Power with Total Fuel Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

The cost of fast reactor (FR) generated electricity with pyro-processing is estimated in this article. It compares favorably with other forms of energy and is shown to be less than that produced by light water reactors (LWR's). FR's use all the energy in natural uranium whereas LWR's utilize only 0.7% of it. Because of high radioactivity, pyro-processing is not open to weapon material diversion. This technology is ready now. Nuclear power has the same advantage as coal power in that it is not dependent upon a scarce foreign fuel and has the significant additional advantage of not contributing to global warming or air pollution. A jump start on new nuclear plants could rapidly allow electric furnaces to replace home heating oil furnaces and utilize high capacity batteries for hybrid automobiles: both would reduce US reliance on oil. If these were fast reactors fueled by reprocessed fuel, the spent fuel storage problem could also be solved. Costs are derived from assumptions on the LWR's and FR's five cost components: 1) Capital costs: LWR plants cost $106/MWe. FR's cost 25% more. Forty year amortization is used. 2) The annual O and M costs for both plants are 9% of the Capital Costs. 3) LWR fuel costs about 0.0035 $/kWh. Producing FR fuel from spent fuel by pyro-processing must be done in highly shielded hot cells which is costly. However, the five foot thick concrete walls have the advantage of prohibiting diversion. LWR spent fuel must be used as feedstock for the FR initial core load and first two reloads so this FR fuel costs more than LWR fuel. FR fuel costs much less for subsequent core reloads (< LWR fuel) if all spent fuel feedstock is from the fast reactor (i.e., Breeding Ratio =1). 4) Yucca Mountain storage of unprocessed LWR spent fuel is estimated as $360,000/MTHM. But this fuel can be processed to remove TRU for use as fast reactor fuel. The remaining fission products repository costs are only one fifth that of the original fuel. Storage of short half life fission products alone requires less storage time and long term integrity than LWR spent fuel (300 years storage versus 100,000 years.) 5) LWR decommissioning costs are estimated to be $0.3 x 10{sup 6}/MWe. The annual cost for a 40 year licensed plant would be 2.5 % of this or less if interest is taken into account. All plants will eventually have to replace those components which become radiation damaged. FR's should be designed to replace parts rather than decommission. The LWR costs are estimated to be 2.65 cents/kWh. FR costs are 2.99 cents/kWh for the first 7.5 years and 2.39 cents/kWh for the next 32.5 years. The average cost over forty years is 2.50 cents/kWh which is less than the LWR costs. These power costs are similar to coal power, are lower than gas, oil, and much lower than renewable power.(authors)

Solbrig, Charles W.; Benedict, Robert W. [Fuel Cycle Programs Division, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about $440 Million under Cost Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about $440 Million under Cost November 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Crews demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Crews demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown here removed, loaded and ready for transport to the on-site landfill. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown here removed, loaded and ready

76

Human Costs of Nuclear Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...final storage elsewhere. The sole reprocessing plant for fuel rods from operating nuclear power plants is located in West Valley, New York. Although the radionuclide mix-ture released from this facility differs considerably from that of a power...

L. A. Sagan

1972-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

77

Decommissioning at AWE  

SciTech Connect

AWE (A) has been at the heart of the UK Nuclear deterrent since it was established in the early 1950's. It is a nuclear licensed site and is governed by the United Kingdoms Nuclear Installation Inspectorate (NII). AWE plc on behalf of the Ministry of Defence (MOD) manages the AWE (A) site and all undertakings including decommissioning. Therefore under NII license condition 35 'Decommissioning', AWE plc is accountable to make and implement adequate arrangements for the decommissioning of any plant or process, which may affect safety. The majority of decommissioning projects currently being undertaken are to do with Hazard category 3, 4 or 5 facilities, systems or plant that have reached the end of their operational span and have undergone Post-Operational Clean-Out (POCO). They were either built for the production of fissile components, for supporting the early reactor fuels programmes or for processing facility waste arisings. They either contain redundant contaminated gloveboxes associated process areas, process plant or systems or a combination of all. In parallel with decommissioning project AWE (A) are undertaking investigation into new technologies to aid decommissioning projects; to remove the operative from hands on operations; to develop and implement modifications to existing process and techniques used. AWE (A) is currently going thorough a sustained phase of upgrading its facilities to enhance its scientific capability, with older facilities, systems and plant being replaced, making decommissioning a growth area. It is therefore important to the company to reduce these hazards progressively and safety over the coming years, making decommissioning an important feature of the overall legacy management aspects of AWE PLC's business. This paper outlines the current undertakings and progress of Nuclear decommissioning on the AWE (A) site. (authors)

Biles, K.; Hedges, M.; Campbell, C

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Novel Problems Associated with Accounting and Control of Nuclear Material from Decontamination and Decommissioning and in Waste  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The reduction in nuclear arms and the production facilities that supported the weapons programs have produced some unique problems for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A). Many of these problems are not limited to the weapons complex, but have the potential to appear in many legacy facilities as they undergo dismantlement and disposal. Closing facilities find that what was previously defined as product has become a waste stream bringing regulatory, human, and technological conflict. The sometimes unique compositions of these materials produce both storage and measurement problems. The nuclear material accounting and control programs have had to become very adaptive and preemptive to ensure control and protection is maintained. This paper examines some of the challenges to Safeguards generated by deinventory, decontamination decommissioning, dismantlement, demolition, and waste site remediation from predictable sources and some from unpredictable sources. 1.0 Introduction The United States is eliminating many facilities that support the nuclear weapons program. With the changing political conditions around the world and changes in military capabilities, the decreased emphasis on nuclear weapons has eliminated the need for many of the aging facilities. Additionally, the recovery of plutonium from dismantled weapons and reuse of components has eliminated the need to produce more plutonium for the near future. Because the nuclear weapons program and commercial applications generally do not mix in the United States, the facilities in the DOE complex that no longer have a weapon mission are being deinventoried, decontaminated, decommissioned, and dismantled/demolished. The materials from these activities are then disposed of in various ways but usually in select waste burial sites. Additionally, the waste in many historical burial sites associated with the weapons complex are being recovered, repackaged if necessary, and disposed of in either geological sites or low-level waste sites. The type of waste from the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities varies from uncontaminated construction materials to nuclear weapon components. This variety of forms, types, and composition of nuclear material presents many challenges to MC&A. It requires the creative application of regulations, but current regulations are adequate to ensure the security and control of the nuclear material. This paper examines some of the approaches used to meet regulatory requirements and problems that occurred during D&D. Experiences are drawn for the Hanford site and elsewhere in the DOE complex.

Schlegel, Steven C.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioning Implementation Guide. Decommissioning Benchmarking Study DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine approaches to improve the decommissioning process. The study focused on quantifying productivity of decommissioning physical activities and identifying how productivity is affected by specific working conditions. The decommissioning benchmarking results are the foundation for several distinct products:

80

Decommissioning Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Documents Decommissioning Documents More Documents & Publications Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report Decommissioning Handbook dgappendices.pdf...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Decommissioning Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioing...

82

Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E.; Banovac, K.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

83

Progress in Decommissioning the Humboldt Bay Power Plant - 13604  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) Company Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear facility has now, after more than three decades of SAFSTOR and initial decommissioning work, transitioned to full-scale decommissioning. Decommissioning activities to date have been well orchestrated and executed in spite of an extremely small work site with space constricted even more by other concurrent on-site major construction projects including the demolition of four fossil units, construction of a new generating station and 60 KV switchyard upgrade. Full-scale decommissioning activities - now transitioning from Plant Systems Removal (PG and E self-perform) to Civil Works Projects (contractor performed) - are proceeding in a safe, timely, and cost effective manner. As a result of the successful decommissioning work to date (approximately fifty percent completed) and the intense planning and preparations for the remaining work, there is a high level of confidence for completion of all HBPP Unit 3 decommissions activities in 2018. Strategic planning and preparations to transition into full-scale decommissioning was carried out in 2008 by a small, highly focused project team. This planning was conducted concurrent with other critical planning requirements such as the loading of spent nuclear fuel into dry storage at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) finishing December 2008. Over the past four years, 2009 through 2012, the majority of decommissioning work has been installation of site infrastructure and removal of systems and components, known as the Plant System Removal Phase, where work scope was dynamic with significant uncertainty, and it was self-performed by PG and E. As HBPP Decommissioning transitions from the Plant System Removal Phase to the Civil Works Projects Phase, where work scope is well defined, a contracting plan similar to that used for Fossil Decommissioning will be implemented. Award of five major work scopes in various stages of development are planned as they include: Turbine Building Demolition, Nuclear Facilities Demolition and Excavation, Intake and Discharge Canal Remediation, Office Facility Demobilization, and Final Site Restoration. Benefits realized by transitioning to the Civil Works Projects Phase with predominant firm fixed-price/fixed unit price contracting include single civil works contractor who can coordinate concrete shaving, liner removal, structural removal, and other demolition activities; streamline financial control; reduce PG and E overhead staffing; and provide a specialized Bidder Team with experience from other similar projects. (authors)

Rod, Kerry [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States)] [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States); Shelanskey, Steven K. [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States)] [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States); Kristofzski, John [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)] [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation Estimating the costs of nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on this topic is fairly confusing. Some present electricity production using nuclear power as an affordable of costs and draw a distinction between a private cost and a social cost. The private cost is what evaluating the costs it is impossible to establish the cost price, required to compare electricity production

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

85

DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING PLANNING AND ANALYSIS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dispositioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dispositioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities.

Bollinger, J; William Austin, W; Larry Koffman, L

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

86

Rancho Seco--Decommissioning Update  

SciTech Connect

The Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station ceased operation in June of 1989 and entered an extended period of SAFSTOR to allow funds to accumulate for dismantlement. Incremental dismantlement was begun in 1997 of steam systems and based on the successful completion of work, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) board of directors approved full decommissioning in July 1999. A schedule has been developed for completion of decommissioning by 2008, allowing decommissioning funds to accumulate until they are needed. Systems removal began in the Auxiliary Building in October of 1999 and in the Reactor Building in January of 2000. Systems dismantlement continues in the Reactor Building and should be completed by the end of 2003. System removal is near completion in the Auxiliary Building with removal of the final liquid waste tanks in progress. The spent fuel has been moved to dry storage in an onsite ISFSI, with completion on August 21, 2002. The spent fuel racks are currently being removed from the pool, packaged and shipped, and then the pool will be cleaned. Also in the last year the reactor coolant pumps and primary piping were removed and shipped. Characterization and planning work for the reactor vessel and internals is also in progress with various cut-up and/or disposal options being evaluated. In the year ahead the remaining systems in the Reactor Building will be removed, packaged and sent for disposal, including the pressurizer. Work will be started on embedded and underground piping and the large outdoor tanks. Building survey and decontamination will begin. RFP's for removal of the vessel and internals and the steam generators are planned to fix the cost of those components. If the costs are consistent with current estimates the work will go forward. If they are not, hardened SAFSTOR/entombment may be considered.

Newey, J. M.; Ronningen, E. T.; Snyder, M. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

87

Site decommissioning management plan  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

STATUS OF THE NRC'S DECOMMISSIONING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program. It discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors, complex decommissioning sites, and sites listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper provides the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including a Standard Review Plan for evaluating plans and information submitted by licensees to support the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the D and D Screen software for determining the potential doses from residual radioactivity. Finally, it discusses the status of the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L. W.; Buckley, J.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

89

Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement for Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center A Summary and Guide for Stakeholders DOE/EIS-0226-D (Revised) November 2008 The West Valley Site Availability of the Revised Draft EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center For further information on this Draft EIS, or to request a copy please contact: Cathern Bohan, EIS Document Manager West Valley Demonstration Project U.S. Department of Energy Ashford Office Complex 9030 Route 219 West Valley, NY 14171 Telephone: 716-942-4159 Fax: 716-942-4703 E-mail: catherine.m.bohan@wv.doe.gov Printed with soy ink on recycled paper

90

Final EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the WVDP and Western New York Nuclear Service Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EIS-0226 DOE/EIS-0226 January 2010 Final Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center A Summary and Guide for Stakeholders The West Valley Site Availability of the Final EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center For further information on this Final EIS, or to request a copy of the EIS or references, please contact: Catherine Bohan, EIS Document Manager West Valley Demonstration Project U.S. Department of Energy Ashford Office Complex 9030 Route 219 West Valley, NY 14171 Telephone: 716-942-4159 Fax: 716-942-4703 E-mail: catherine.m.bohan@wv.doe.gov

91

Decontamination and Decommissioning activities photobriefing book FY 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is dedicated to the safe and cost effective D{ampersand}D of surplus nuclear facilities. There is currently a backlog of more than 7,000 contaminated US Department of Energy facilities nationwide. Added to this are 110 licensed commercial nuclear power reactors operated by utilities learning to cope with deregulation and an aging infrastructure that supports the commercial nuclear power industry, as well as medical and other uses of radioactive materials. With this volume it becomes easy to understand the importance of addressing the unique issues and objectives associated with the D{ampersand}D of surplus nuclear facilities. This photobriefing book summarizes the decontamination and decommissioning projects and activities either completed or continuing at the ANL-E site during the year.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal for Electricity, under the Mexican scenario. Javier C. Palacios, Gustavo Alonso, Ramn Ramrez, Armando Gmez, Javier Ortiz, Luis C....

93

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

94

Issues of Policy Integration in Solving the Problems of Nuclear Submarines Decommissioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power in ships is a field of human activity that is linked with various kinds of hazards with nonzero probability. In order to define possible priorities and our place in the entire problem of disposal...

V. G. Iljin; V. A. Melnikov…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; and (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. These four phases of work were conducted in accordance with applicable regulations for D and D of research facilities and applicable regulations for packaging, transportation, and burial and storage of radioactive materials. The final result is that the Advanced Fuel Laboratories now meet requirements of ANSI 13.12 and can be released for unrestricted use. The four principal documents utilized in the D and D of the Cheswick Site were: (1) Plan for Fully Decontaminating and Decommissioning, Revision 3; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontaminating and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pa.; (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontaminating and Decommissioning Activities; and (4) Health Physics, Fire Control, and Site Emergency Manual. These documents are provided as Attachments 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Adams, G.A.; Bowen, W.C.; Cromer, P.M.; Cwynar, J.C.; Jacoby, W.R.; Woodsum, H.G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Decommissioning of Large Components as an Example of Steam Generator from PWR Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the procedure for the qualification of large components (Steam Generators) as an IP-2 package, the ship transport abroad to Sweden and the external treatment of this components to disburden the Nuclear Power Plant from this task, to assure an accelerated the deconstruction phase and to minimize the amount of waste. In conclusion: The transport of large components to an external treatment facility is linked with many advantages for a Nuclear Power Plant: - Disburden of the Nuclear Power Plant from the treatment of such components, - no timely influence on the deconstruction phase of the power reactor and therewith an accelerated deconstruction phase and - minimization of the waste to be returned and therewith less demand of required waste storage capacity. (authors)

Beverungen, M. [GNS Gesellschaft fur Nuklear-Service mbH, Hollestrabe 7A (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Shielding requirements for the transport of nuclear warhead components under decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The requirements to carry out accurate shielding calculations involved with the safe off-site transportation of packages containing nuclear warhead components, special assemblies and radioactive materials are discussed. The need for (a) detailed information on the geometry and material composition of the packaging and radioactive load, (b) accurate representation of the differential energy spectra (dN/dE) for the neutron and gamma spectra emitted by the radioactive materials enclosed in the packaging, (c) well-tested neutron and photon cross section libraries, (d) and accurate three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport codes are illustrated. A brief discussion of the need for reliable dose measurements is presented.

Hansen, L.F.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 3}H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 123}I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 137}Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 241}Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a facility, DECON requires that contaminated components either be: (1) decontaminated to restricted or unrestricted release levels or (2) packaged and shipped to an authorized disposal site. This study considers unrestricted release only. The new decommissioning criteria of July 1997 are too recent for this study to include a cost analysis of the restricted release option, which is now allowed under these new criteria. The costs of decommissioning facility components are generally estimated to be in the range of $140 to $27,000, depending on the type of component, the type and amount of radioactive contamination, the remediation options chosen, and the quantity of radioactive waste generated from decommissioning operations. Estimated costs for decommissioning the example laboratories range from $130,000 to $205,000, assuming aggressive low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction. If only minimal LLW volume reduction is employed, decommissioning costs range from $150,000 to $270,000 for these laboratories. On the basis of estimated decommissioning costs for facility components, the costs of decommissioning typical non-fuel-cycle laboratory facilities are estimated to range from about $25,000 for the decommissioning of a small room containing one or two fume hoods to more than $1 million for the decommissioning of an industrial plant containing several laboratories in which radiochemicals and sealed radioactive sources are prepared. For the reference sites of this study, the basic decommissioning alternatives are: (1) site stabilization followed by long-term care and (2) removal of the waste or contaminated soil to an authorized disposal site. Cost estimates made for decommissioning three reference sites range from about $130,000 for the removal of a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank to more than $23 million for the removal of a tailings pile that contains radioactive residue from ore-processing operations in which tin slag is processed for the recovery of rare metals. Total occupational radiation doses generally range from 0.00007 person-rem to 13 person-rem for

MC Bierschbach; DR Haffner; KJ Schneider; SM Short

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2  

SciTech Connect

This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately.

Weiss, A. J. [comp.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198  

SciTech Connect

Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

Lowry, N.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

In-Situ Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination. The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both demolition and complete removal of the structure and its content (including the cost of transport and disposal). In addition, the effective use of ISD reduces human health and safety risks while helping to attain sustainability goals through the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, petroleum consumption and waste generation. Not all contaminated structures can be decommissioned using ISD; canditate sites must meet strict criteria.

102

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

SciTech Connect

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Decommissioning of Nuclear Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

All wastes from dismantling or operations will be sent ... proceed according to the chosen strategy shipping the waste to a long-term centralized storage center, if available, or may be...

Maurizio Cumo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ``Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.`` The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC`s SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook.

Orlando, D.A.; Hogg, R.C.; Ramsey, K.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Radiochemistry Lab Decommissioning and Dismantlement. AECL, Chalk River Labs, Ontario, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally founded in the mid 1940's to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas under the Canadian Defense Department. In the mid 50's The Canadian government embarked on several research and development programs for the development of the Candu Reactor. AECL was initially built as a temporary site and is now faced with many redundant buildings. Prior to 2004 small amounts of Decommissioning work was in progress. Many reasons for deferring decommissioning activities were used with the predominant ones being: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantlement, 2. Development of a long-term solution for the management of radioactive wastes in Canada, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities shutdown that would require decommissioning funds and the absence of an approved funding strategy. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that is all inclusive of AECL's current and legacy liabilities. Canada does not have a long-term disposal site; therefore waste minimization becomes the driving factor behind decontamination for decommissioning before and during dismantlement. This decommissioning job was a great learning experience for decommissioning and the associated contractors who worked on this project. Throughout the life of the project there was a constant focus on waste minimization. This focus was constantly in conflict with regulatory compliance primarily with respect to fire regulations and protecting the facility along with adjacent facilities during the decommissioning activities. Discrepancies in historical documents forced the project to treat every space as a contaminated space until proven differently. Decommissioning and dismantlement within an operating site adds to the complexity of the tasks especially when it is being conducted in the heart of the plant. This project was very successful with no lost time accidents in over one hundred thousand hours worked, on schedule and under budget despite some significant changes throughout the decommissioning phases. The actual cost to decommission this building will come in under 9 million dollars vs. an estimated 14.5 million dollars. This paper will cover some of the unique aspects of dismantling a radioactive building that has seen pretty much every element of the periodic table pass through it with the client requirement focused on minimization of radioactive waste volumes.

Kenny, Stephen [Acting Director of Waste Management and Decommissioning Operations, AECL, Chalk River Labs, Chalk River, Ont. (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Decommissioning Plan Review (DPR) Module is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the decommissioning plan prior to approval of the associated CD.

108

DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York Decommissioning Services Contract New York Decommissioning Services Contract DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 William.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The contract is a performance-based, cost-plus-award-fee, completion type contract with cost and schedule incentives. The total contract value is $333.4 million. DOE has selected a phased approach for decommissioning activities at the WVDP. Phase I is the first of a two-phase process for the final decommissioning of the western New York site in accordance with the West

109

DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York Decommissioning Services Contract New York Decommissioning Services Contract DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 William.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The contract is a performance-based, cost-plus-award-fee, completion type contract with cost and schedule incentives. The total contract value is $333.4 million. DOE has selected a phased approach for decommissioning activities at the WVDP. Phase I is the first of a two-phase process for the final decommissioning of the western New York site in accordance with the West

110

RESULTS OF IONSIV® IE-95 STUDIES FOR THE REMOVAL OF RADIOACTIVE CESIUM FROM K-EAST BASIN SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL POOL DURING DECOMMISSIONING ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect

This report delineates the results obtained from laboratory testing of IONISIV{reg_sign} IE-95 to determine the efficacy of the zeolite for the removal of radioactive cesium from the KE Basin water prior to transport to the Effluent Treatment Facility, as described in RPP-PLAN-36158, IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-95 Studies for the removal of Radioactive Cesium from KE Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Pool during Decommissioning Activities. The spent nuclear fuel was removed from KE Basin and the remaining sludge was layered with a grout mixture consisting of 26% Lehigh Type I/II portland cement and 74% Boral Mohave type F fly ash with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.43. The first grout pour was added to the basin floor to a depth of approximately 14 in. covering an area of 12,000 square feet. A grout layer was also added to the sludge containers located in the attached Weasel and Technical View pits.

DUNCAN JB; BURKE SP

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

112

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Main report, draft report for comment. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning the organization of the decommissioning project; decommissioning operations concept; safety and environmental assessment; information and guidance for the DOC; work breakdown structure; decommissioning operation schedule; decommissiong operations estimate; and training requirements.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Chapter 20 - Uranium Enrichment Decontamination & Decommissioning Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 CHAPTER 20 URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. To establish policies and procedures for the financial management, accounting, budget preparation, cash management of the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, referred to hereafter as the Fund. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are directly or indirectly involved with the Fund. c. Requirements and Sources of the Fund. (1) The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) requires DOE to establish and administer the Fund. EPACT authorizes that the

115

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09-00269, Rev. 0 09-00269, Rev. 0 KEY WORDS: DOE-HQ In situ Decommissioning Entombment Workshop TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING (ISD) WORKSHOP REPORT Patricia L. Lee, John B. Gladden, G. Timothy Jannik, Christine A. Langton, Michael G. Serrato, SRNL Chuck Urland, Erick Reynolds, PEC June 2009 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Savannah River Site

116

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning The design and production of 3-D scale models that replicate the highly contaminated structures within the nuclear facility would provide a significant improvement in visualization of the work space, which would give managers and supervisors a more powerful tool for planning and communicating safety issues and work sequences to personnel executing the physical D&D tasks. 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning More Documents & Publications D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization D&D and Risk Assessment Tools 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D

117

Blue Ribbon Commission, Yucca Mountain Closure, Court Actions - Future of Decommissioned Reactors, Operating Reactors and Nuclear Power - 13249  

SciTech Connect

Issues related to back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle continue to be difficult for the commercial nuclear power industry and for the decision makers at the national and international level. In the US, the 1982 NWPA required DOE to develop geological repositories for SNF and HLW but in spite of extensive site characterization efforts and over ten billion dollars spent, a repository opening is nowhere in sight. There has been constant litigation against the DOE by the nuclear utilities for breach of the 'standard contract' they signed with the DOE under the NWPA. The SNF inventory continues to rise both in the US and globally and the nuclear industry has turned to dry storage facilities at reactor locations. In US, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future issued its report in January 2012 and among other items, it recommends a new, consent-based approach to siting of facilities, prompt efforts to develop one or more geologic disposal facilities, and prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. In addition, the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi accident had a severe impact on the future growth of nuclear power. The nuclear industry is focusing on mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events and in the US, the industry is in the process of implementing the recommendations from NRC's Near Term Task Force. (authors)

Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC1, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC1, Chicago, IL (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Suggestion of typical phases of in-vessel fuel-debris by thermodynamic calculation for decommissioning technology of Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station  

SciTech Connect

For the decommissioning of the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), the characterization of fuel-debris in cores of Units 1-3 is necessary. In this study, typical phases of the in-vessel fuel-debris were estimated using a thermodynamic equilibrium (TDE) calculation. The FactSage program and NUCLEA database were applied to estimate the phase equilibria of debris. It was confirmed that the TDE calculation using the database can reproduce the phase separation behavior of debris observed in the Three Mile Island accident. In the TDE calculation of 1F, the oxygen potential [G(O{sub 2})] was assumed to be a variable. At low G(O{sub 2}) where metallic zirconium remains, (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2} were found as oxides, and oxygen-dispersed Zr, Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U), and Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2} were found as metals. With an increase in zirconium oxidation, the mass of those metals, especially Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2}, decreased, but the other phases of metals hardly changed qualitatively. Consequently, (U,Zr)O{sub 2} is suggested as a typical phase of oxide, and Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U) is suggested as that of metal. However, a more detailed estimation is necessary to consider the distribution of Fe in the reactor pressure vessel through core-melt progression. (authors)

Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Yano, Kimihiko; Kaji, Naoya; Washiya, Tadahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Kondo, Yoshikazu; Noguchi, Yoshikazu [PESCO Co.Ltd. (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine...

120

A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options September 19, 2012 Presenter: Dr. Kamiar Jamali, Senior Technical Advisor to the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Safety NA-SH Topics Covered: The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has begun an initiative to develop a methodology to perform cost-benefit analysis for some Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility applications as one potential input into nuclear safety decision-making processes. The scope, approach, precedence, and example of how it might be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center (3/13/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 49 / Thursday, March 13, 2003 / Notices Dated: March 6, 2003. Gerald A. Reynolds, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights. [FR Doc. 03-5999 Filed 3-12-03; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-M DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Intent. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) are announcing their intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and

122

Policy Statement 3, Board Oversight of Department of Energy Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Date: August 19, 1996 Subject Policy Statement on Board oversight of Department of Energy decommissioning activities at defense nuclear facilities. Summary This policy statement describes the decommissioning phase of a DOE defense nuclear facility and identifies the Board's safety oversight responsibilities for decommisioning activities. John T. Conway, Chairman Congress directed the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) to oversee Department of Energy (DOE) practices at defense nuclear facilities that could adversely affect public health and safety during any stage in the life cycle of those facilities, from design, construction, and operation through decommissioning. The Board's objective during decommissioning is identical to its objective during any other phase of a facility's life cycle: to ensure that DOE provides adequate protection of worker and public health and safety at defense nuclear facilities. Congress specifically tasked the Board with reviewing and evaluating:

123

EIS-0259 Final Environmental Impact Statement On The Disposal Of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, And Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-. -. 1. PURPOSE AND NEED U.S. Navy nuclear ships are decommissioned and defieled at the end of their usefi Metime, when the cost of continued operation is not justified by their fitary capabfity, or when the ship is no longer needed. The Navy needs to disposition the reactor compartments born defieled and decommissioned ctisers, and OHIO Class and LOS ANGELES Class submarines. The number of reactor compartments under consideration by this Environmental Impact Statement is about 100. These reactor compartments are in addition to the pre-LOS ANGELES Class submarines tieady being disposed of under the Na&s 1984 Find Environmental hpact Statement (USN, 1984a). Newer types of U.S. Navy nuclear-powered stips that are not expected to be decommissioned in the next 20 years (e.g., aircraft carriers, SEAWOLF Class submarines) are not included in this fid Enviromentd Impact Statement.

124

Shippingport Station decommissioning project decommission plan  

SciTech Connect

This volume consists of the following appendices: long-lead-time activities, technical baseline, assessment of one-price removal of reactor vessel and internals by barge, final environmental impact statement (this forms the bulk of this volume), and record of the decision to decommission Shippingport. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Testing and Performance Validation of a Sensitive Gamma Ray Camera Designed for Radiation Detection and Decommissioning Measurements in Nuclear Facilities-13044  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the measurements, testing and performance validation of a sensitive gamma ray camera designed for radiation detection and quantification in the environment and decommissioning and hold-up measurements in nuclear facilities. The instrument, which is known as RadSearch, combines a sensitive and highly collimated LaBr{sub 3} scintillation detector with an optical (video) camera with controllable zoom and focus and a laser range finder in one detector head. The LaBr{sub 3} detector has a typical energy resolution of between 2.5% and 3% at the 662 keV energy of Cs-137 compared to that of NaI detectors with a resolution of typically 7% to 8% at the same energy. At this energy the tungsten shielding of the detector provides a shielding ratio of greater than 900:1 in the forward direction and 100:1 on the sides and from the rear. The detector head is mounted on a pan/tile mechanism with a range of motion of ±180 degrees (pan) and ±90 degrees (tilt) equivalent to 4 ? steradians. The detector head with pan/tilt is normally mounted on a tripod or wheeled cart. It can also be mounted on vehicles or a mobile robot for access to high dose-rate areas and areas with high levels of contamination. Ethernet connects RadSearch to a ruggedized notebook computer from which it is operated and controlled. Power can be supplied either as 24-volts DC from a battery or as 50 volts DC supplied by a small mains (110 or 230 VAC) power supply unit that is co-located with the controlling notebook computer. In this latter case both power and Ethernet are supplied through a single cable that can be up to 80 metres in length. If a local battery supplies power, the unit can be controlled through wireless Ethernet. Both manual operation and automatic scanning of surfaces and objects is available through the software interface on the notebook computer. For each scan element making up a part of an overall scanned area, the unit measures a gamma ray spectrum. Multiple radionuclides may be selected by the operator and will be identified if present. In scanning operation the unit scans a designated region and superimposes over a video image the distribution of measured radioactivity. For the total scanned area or object RadSearch determines the total activity of operator selected radionuclides present and the gamma dose-rate measured at the detector head. Results of hold-up measurements made in a nuclear facility are presented, as are test measurements of point sources distributed arbitrarily on surfaces. These latter results are compared with the results of benchmarked MCNP Monte Carlo calculations. The use of the device for hold-up and decommissioning measurements is validated. (authors)

Mason, John A.; Looman, Marc R.; Poundall, Adam J.; Towner, Antony C.N. [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom)] [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom); Creed, Richard; Pancake, Daniel [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Comments by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation; Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

127

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934

128

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: Summary status report: Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 through April 19, 1987. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

Doerge, D. H.; Haffner, D. R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project & Identifier Project & Identifier Tech Stage: Deployment In-Situ Decommissioning: SR09171 SRS Area Closure Projects: PBS SR-0040 3-D models of the R reactor building and P reactor vessel were delivered to SRS Area Closure Projects Page 1 of 2 Tech Fact Sheet Savannah River Site South Carolina 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning Challenge Planning for the safe and controlled deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of highly contaminated nuclear facilities requires that engineers and managers fully understand the work space in which personnel and equipment will operate. It also requires that they effectively communicate safety concerns and work sequences to the personnel who will perform the work. This crucial knowledge is conveyed in

130

An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update  

SciTech Connect

Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

NONE

1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

Freedom of Information Act - Costs | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

review of documents located for responsiveness; 16% administrative costs; reproduction cost of .05 per page; and the time it took the FOIA Specialist to process the request....

132

STANDARD OPERATING PROTOCOLS FOR DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning projects at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites are conducted under project-specific decision documents, which involve extensive preparation time, public comment periods, and regulatory approvals. Often, the decision documents must be initiated at least one year before commencing the decommissioning project, and they are expensive and time consuming to prepare. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a former nuclear weapons production plant at which hazardous substances and wastes were released or disposed during operations. As a result of the releases, RFETS was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, and is conducting cleanup activities under a federal facilities compliance agreement. Working closely with interested stakeholders and state and federal regulatory agencies, RFETS has developed and implemented an improved process for obtaining the approvals. The key to streamlining the approval process has been the development of sitewide decision documents called Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Standard Operating Protocols or ''RSOPs.'' RSOPs have broad applicability, and could be used instead of project-specific documents. Although no two decommissioning projects are exactly the same and they may vary widely in contamination and other hazards, the basic steps taken for cleanup are usually similar. Because of this, using RSOPs is more efficient than preparing a separate project-specific decision documents for each cleanup action. Over the Rocky Flats cleanup life cycle, using RSOPs has the potential to: (1) Save over 5 million dollars and 6 months on the site closure schedule; (2) Eliminate preparing one hundred and twenty project-specific decision documents; and (3) Eliminate writing seventy-five closure description documents for hazardous waste unit closure and corrective actions.

Foss, D. L.; Stevens, J. L.; Gerdeman, F. W.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

Safely Decommission about how we  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and make them available to low- income communities, individuals, and community non-profit organizations to information technologies among low-income and disadvantaged groups. #12; Safely Decommission Your PCs Learn more about how we can help you effectively decommission

Blanchette, Robert A.

134

Author's personal copy Cost analysis of the US spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this, a 1987 amendment to the US Nuclear Waste Policy Act mandates the Secretary of Energy to report on a site for a second repository by 2010 (Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act, 1987). HoweverAuthor's personal copy Cost analysis of the US spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility E

Deinert, Mark

135

Accelerating the Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Through the Implementation of a Projectized and Delivery-Focused Organization - 13074  

SciTech Connect

Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research site in Canada that was commissioned in 1964 by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. It covers a total area of approximately 4,375 hectares (10,800 acres) and includes the main campus site, the Waste Management Area (WMA) and outer areas of land identified as not used for or impacted by nuclear development or operations. The WL site employed up to 1100 staff. Site activities included the successful operation of a 60 MW organic liquid-cooled research reactor from 1965 to 1985, and various research programs including reactor safety research, small reactor development, fuel development, biophysics and radiation applications, as well as work under the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. In 1997, AECL made a business decision to discontinue research programs and operations at WL, and obtained government concurrence in 1998. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP) was established in 2006 by the Canadian Government to remediate nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner, including the WL site. The NLLP is being implemented by AECL under the governance of a Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)/AECL Joint Oversight Committee (JOC). Significant progress has since been made, and the WL site currently holds the only Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) nuclear research site decommissioning license in Canada. The current decommissioning license is in place until the end of 2018. The present schedule planned for main campus decommissioning is 30 years (to 2037), followed by institutional control of the WMA until a National plan is implemented for the long-term management of nuclear waste. There is an impetus to advance work and complete decommissioning sooner. To accomplish this, AECL has added significant resources, reorganized and moved to a projectized environment. This presentation outlines changes made to the organization, the tools implemented to foster projectization, and the benefits and positive impacts on schedule and delivery. A revised organizational structure was implemented in two phases, starting 2011 April 1, to align WL staff with the common goal of decommissioning the site through the direction of the WL Decommissioning Project General Manager. On 2011 September 1, the second phase of the reorganization was implemented and WL Decommissioning staff was organized under five Divisions: Programs and Regulatory Compliance, General Site Services, Decommissioning Strategic Planning, Nuclear Facilities and Project Delivery. A new Mission, Vision and Objectives were developed for the project, and several productivity enhancements are being implemented. These include the use of an integrated and fully re-sourced Site Wide Schedule that is updated and reviewed at Plan-of-the-Week meetings, improved work distribution throughout the year, eliminating scheduling 'push' mentality, project scoreboards, work planning implementation, lean practices and various process improvement initiatives. A revised Strategic Plan is under development that reflects the improved project delivery capabilities. As a result of these initiatives, and a culture change towards a projectized approach, the decommissioning schedule will be advanced by approximately 10 years. (authors)

Wilcox, Brian; Mellor, Russ; Michaluk, Craig [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Comparison of carbon dioxide and nuclear waste storage costs in Lithuania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power and carbon capture and storage (CCS) are key greenhouse gas mitigation options under consideration across the world. Both technologies imply long-term waste management challenge. Geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nuclear waste has much in common, and valuable lessons can be learnt from a comparison. Seeking to compare these technologies economic, social and environmental criteria need to be selected and expressed in terms of indicators. Very important issue is costs and economics of geological storage of carbon dioxide and nuclear waste. The costs of storage are one of the main indicators for assessment of technologies in terms of economic criteria. The paper defines the costs of the geological storage of CO2 and nuclear waste in Lithuania, drawing also on insights from other parts of the world. The costs of carbon dioxide and nuclear waste storage are evaluated in UScnt/kWh and compared. The paper critically compares the characteristics and location of the both sources of and storage options for CO2 and nuclear waste in Lithuania. It discusses the main costs categories for carbon dioxide and nuclear waste storage. The full range of potential geological storage options is considered and the most reliable options for carbon dioxide and nuclear waste are selected for the comparative costs assessment.

Dalia Streimikiene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2007  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: An interesting year ahead of us, by Tom Christopher, AREVA NP Inc.; U.S.-India Civil Nuclear Cooperation; Decontamination and recycling of retired components, by Sean P. Brushart, Electric Power Research Institute; and, ANO is 33 and going strong, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The industry innovation article is: Continuous improvement process, by ReNae Kowalewski, Arkansas Nuclear One.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Offshore decommissioning issues: Deductibility and transferability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dealing with the decommissioning of petroleum installations is a relatively new challenge to most producer countries. It is natural to expect that industry's experience in building platforms is much greater than the one of dismantling them. Even if manifold and varied efforts are underway towards establishing international “best practices” standards in this sector, countries still enjoy rather extensive discretionary power as they practice a particular national style in the regulation of decommissioning activities in their state's jurisdiction. The present paper offers a broad panorama of this discussion, concentrating mainly on two controversial aspects. The first one analyses the ex-ante deductibility of decommissioning costs as they constitute an ex-post expense. The second discussion refers to the assignment of decommissioning responsibility in the case of transfer of exploration and production rights to new lessees during the project's life. Finally the paper applies concepts commonly used in project financing as well as structures generally used in organising pension funds to develop insights into these discussions.

Virginia Parente; Doneivan Ferreira; Edmilson Moutinho dos Santos; Estanislau Luczynski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nuclear Fission: For Safe, Globally Sustainable, Proliferation-Resistant, and Cost-Effective Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To varying degrees, under varying priorities, and depending strongly on country/region, the advancement of nuclear energy must deal with four cardinal issues: waste, proliferation, cost, and safety. While solutio...

R. A. Krakowski; L. Bennett; E. Bertel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The costs of generating electricity and the competitiveness of nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides an analysis on the costs of generating electricity from nuclear and fossil sources (coal and natural gas) based on the most recent technical data available in literature. The aim is to discuss the competitiveness of nuclear power in a liberalized market context by considering the impact on the generating costs of the main factors affecting the viability of the nuclear option. Particular attention will be devoted to study the variability of the generating costs regarding the level of risk perceived by investors through a sensitivity analysis of the generating costs with respect to the cost of capital and the debt fraction of initial investment. The impact of environment policies is also considered by including a “tax” on carbon emissions. The analysis reveals that nuclear power could have ample potentiality also in a competitive market, particularly if the level of risk perceived by the investors keeps standing low. For low values of the cost of capital, nuclear power seems to be the most viable solution. Uncertainty about environmental policies and unpredictability of carbon emissions costs might offer further margins of competitiveness.

Carlo Mari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data Table G.1 gives data) power plants constructed in USA. It is required to predict the capital cost involved in the construction of further LWR power plants. The notation used in Table G.1 is explained in Table G.2. The final 6 lines

Reid, Nancy

142

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data Table G.1 gives reactor (LWR) power plants constructed in USA. It is required to predict the capital cost involved in the construction of further LWR power plants. The notation used in Table G.1 is explained in Table G.2. The final 6

Reid, Nancy

143

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Plan Review Module Decommissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 C OFFICE OF D C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Decomm Rev Critical Decisi CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan missioning view Module ion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) g Plan e plicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Oper ration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

144

Decommissioning Implementation Guide  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Department of Energy (DOE) faces an enormous task in the disposition of the nation's excess facilities. Many of these facilities are large and complex and contain potentially hazardous substances. As DOE facilities complete mission operations and are declared excess, they pass into a transition phase which ultimately prepares them for disposition. The disposition phase of a facility's life-cycle usually includes deactivation, decommissioning, and surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities.

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

145

EIS-0080: Decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program Office developed this statement to assess the impacts of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station as well as analyze possible decommissioning alternatives, evaluate potential environmental impacts associated with each alternative, and present cost estimates for each alternative.

146

EIS-0080: Decommissioning of the Shipping port Atomic Power Station, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program Office developed this statement to assess the impacts of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station as well as analyze possible decommissioning alternatives, evaluate potential environmental impacts associated with each alternative, and present cost estimates for each alternative.

147

Fuel cycle cost uncertainty from nuclear fuel cycle comparison  

SciTech Connect

This paper examined the uncertainty in fuel cycle cost (FCC) calculation by considering both model and parameter uncertainty. Four different fuel cycle options were compared in the analysis including the once-through cycle (OT), the DUPIC cycle, the MOX cycle and a closed fuel cycle with fast reactors (FR). The model uncertainty was addressed by using three different FCC modeling approaches with and without the time value of money consideration. The relative ratios of FCC in comparison to OT did not change much by using different modeling approaches. This observation was consistent with the results of the sensitivity study for the discount rate. Two different sets of data with uncertainty range of unit costs were used to address the parameter uncertainty of the FCC calculation. The sensitivity study showed that the dominating contributor to the total variance of FCC is the uranium price. In general, the FCC of OT was found to be the lowest followed by FR, MOX, and DUPIC. But depending on the uranium price, the FR cycle was found to have lower FCC over OT. The reprocessing cost was also found to have a major impact on FCC.

Li, J.; McNelis, D. [Institute for the Environment, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Yim, M.S. [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Commander, J.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D&D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D&D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D&D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Commander, J.C. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning A Strategy for Environmental Management Reducing the Footprint of the Cold War For over a decade, the Department of Energy has focused on reducing the footprint of 60 years of nuclear research and weapons testing and production. While these facilities are no longer needed, they exist with varying degrees of radiation contamination from years of operation. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of closing down a nuclear facility and placing it in a state that reduces or eliminates risk to the pub lic and the environment. This generally includes demolition and transport of the debris to a disposal facility. Another alternative is to dispose of the facility in place (i.e., in-situ). The concept of In-Situ Decommis-

151

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Articles and reports in this issue include: D and D technical paper summaries; The role of nuclear power in turbulent times, by Tom Chrisopher, AREVA, NP, Inc.; Enthusiastic about new technologies, by Jack Fuller, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; It's important to be good citizens, by Steve Rus, Black and Veatch Corporation; Creating Jobs in the U.S., by Guy E. Chardon, ALSTOM Power; and, and, An enviroment and a community champion, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovations article is titled Best of the best TIP achievement 2008, by Edward Conaway, STP Nuclear Operating Company.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Five-Year Technology Development Strategic Plan Targets EM’s Decommissioning Challenges  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Leaders from EM headquarters and field offices and the UK’s Sellafield nuclear site gathered recently to discuss developing technologies needed to address decommissioning challenges across the Cold War cleanup program.

153

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

SciTech Connect

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

YAEC's view of the cause and control of escalating nuclear plant O and M costs  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides insights on this issue in terms of both the genesis and effective long-term control of O and M costs. Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC's) insights stem not only from an analysis of certain industry data, but also from its unique position within the nuclear industry in terms of its age, plant size, and organization. First, at 30 yr of age, the YAEC plant has endured the full swing of the regulatory/institutional pendulum and the associated impact on O and M costs. Second, with a size of only 185 MW(electric), YAEC's imperative since start-up has been the strict control of O and M costs while still achieving operational excellence. Finally, YAEC is an organization strictly focused on nuclear power operations and has not been distracted by fossil plant operations or other utility requirements like distribution, retail sales, etc., that may have plagued other plant operators.

Haseltine, J.D.; Lessard, L.P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Allowable residual contamination levels for decommissioning the 115-F and 117-F facilities at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of a study sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries to determine Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for the 115-F and 117-F facilities at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to provide data useful to UNC engineers in conducting safety and cost comparisons for decommissioning alternatives. The ARCL results are based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for three specific modes of future use of the land and facilities. These modes of use are restricted, controlled, and unrestricted. Information on restricted and controlled use is provided to permit a full consideration of decommissioning alternatives. Procedures are presented for modifying the ARCL values to accommodate changes in the radionuclide mixture or concentrations and to determine instrument responses for various mixtures of radionuclides. Finally, a comparison is made between existing decommissioning guidance and the ARCL values calculated for unrestricted release of the 115-F and 117-F facilities. The comparison shows a good agreement.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research; the experiences of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) field tests; and the acquired knowledge of industries that have been actively drilling wells for more than 100 years. In addition, the BPM provides an overview of the well-

157

The Chernobyl NPP decommissioning: Current status and alternatives  

SciTech Connect

After the Chernobyl accident of April 26, 1986, many contradictory decisions were taken concerning the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) future. The principal source of contradictions was a deadline for a final shutdown of the Chernobyl NPP units. Alterations in a political and socioeconomic environment resulted in the latest decision of the Ukrainian Authorities about 2000 as a deadline for a beginning of the Chernobyl NPP decommissioning. The date seems a sound compromise among the parties concerned. However, in order to meet the data a lot of work should be done. First of all, a decommissioning strategy has to be established. The problem is complicated due to both site-specific aspects and an absence of proven solutions for the RBMK-type reactor decommissioning. In the paper the problem of decommissioning option selection is considered taking into account an influence of the following factors: relevant legislative and regulatory requirements; resources required to carry out decommissioning (man-power, equipment, technologies, waste management infrastructure, etc.); radiological and physical status of the plant, including structural integrity and predictable age and weather effects; impact of planned activities at the destroyed unit 4 and within the 30-km exclusion zone of the Chernobyl NPP; planed use of the site; socio-economic considerations.

Mikolaitchouk, H. [Atomaudit Ltd., Kiev (Ukraine); Steinberg, N. [Atomaudit Ltd., Kiev (Ukraine)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority for exchange of information concerning management of radioactive waste. Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority More Documents & Publications Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority International Agreements Comments

159

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

160

Is Entombment an Acceptable Option for Decommissioning? An International Perspective - 13488  

SciTech Connect

Selection of a decommissioning strategy is one of the key steps in the preparation for decommissioning of nuclear facilities and other facilities using radioactive material. Approaches being implemented or considered by Member States include immediate dismantling, deferred dismantling and entombment. Other options or slight modifications of these strategies are also possible. Entombment has been identified in the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Standards as one of the three basic decommissioning strategies and has been defined as a decommissioning strategy by which radioactive contaminants are encased in a structurally long lived material until radioactivity decays to a level permitting the unrestricted release of the facility, or release with restrictions imposed by the regulatory body. Although all three strategies have been considered, in principle, applicable to all facilities, their application to some facilities may not be appropriate owing to political concerns, safety or environmental requirements, technical considerations, local conditions or financial considerations. The IAEA is currently revising the decommissioning Safety Standards and one of the issues widely discussed has been the applicability of entombment in the context of decommissioning and its general objective to enable removal of regulatory control from the decommissioned facility. The IAEA recently established a consultancy to collect and discuss experience and lessons learned from entombment projects, to identify regulatory requirements and expectations for applying entombment as a decommissioning option strategy, in compliance with the internationally agreed standards. (authors)

Belencan, Helen [US Department of Energy (United States)] [US Department of Energy (United States); Nys, Vincent [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (Belgium)] [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (Belgium); Guskov, Andrey [Scientific and Engineering Centre on Safety in Nuclear Energy (United States)] [Scientific and Engineering Centre on Safety in Nuclear Energy (United States); Francois, Patrice [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (France)] [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (France); Watson, Bruce [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)] [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States); Ljubenov, Vladan [International Atomic Energy Agency (Austria)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (Austria)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rocky Flats Closure Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Project has completed the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating environmental media and closing the Rocky Flats Site (Site). The project cost approximately $4.1 B and included the decommissioning of over 700 structures including 5 major plutonium facilities and 5 major uranium facilities, shipping over 14,600 cubic meters of transuranic and 565,000 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste, and remediating a 385-acre industrial area and the surrounding land. Actual costs were collected for a large variety of closure activities. These costs can be correlated with metrics associated with the facilities and environmental media to capture cost factors from the project that could be applicable to a variety of other closure projects both within and outside of the Department of Energy's weapons complex. The paper covers four general topics: the process to correlate the actual costs and metrics, an example of the correlated data for one large sub-project, a discussion of the results, and the additional activities that are planned to correlate and make this data available to the public. The process to collect and arrange the project control data of the Closure Project relied on the actual Closure Project cost information. It was used to correlate these actual costs with the metrics for the physical work, such as building area or waste generated, to support the development of parametric cost factors. The example provides cost factors for the Industrial Sites Project. The discussion addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the data, followed by a section identifying future activities to improve and extend the analyses and integrate it within the Department's Environmental Cost Analysis System. (authors)

Sanford, P.C. [1129 Business Parkway South, Westminister, MD (United States); Skokan, B. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Allowable residual-contamination levels for decommissioning facilities in the 100 areas of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of a study sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries to determine Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for five generic categories of facilities in the 100 Areas of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to provide ARCL data useful to UNC engineers in conducting safety and cost comparisons for decommissioning alternatives. The ARCL results are based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for three specific modes of future use of the land and facilities. These modes of use are restricted, controlled, and unrestricted. The information on ARCL values for restricted and controlled use provided by this report is intended to permit a full consideration of decommissioning alternatives. ARCL results are presented both for surface contamination remaining in facilities (in dpm/100 cm/sup 2/), and for unconfined surface and confined subsurface soil conditions (in pCi/g). Two confined soil conditions are considered: contamination at depths between 1 and 4 m, and contamination at depths greater than or equal to 5 m. A set of worksheets are presented in an appendix for modifying the ARCL values to accommodate changes in the radionuclide mixture or concentrations, to consider the impacts of radioactive decay, and to predict instrument responses. Finally, a comparison is made between the unrestricted release ARCL values for the 100 Area facilities and existing decommissioning and land disposal regulations. For surface contamination, the comparison shows good agreement. For soil contamination, the comparison shows good agreement if reasonable modification factors are applied to account for the differences in modeling soil contamination and licensed low-level waste.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West 26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the range of reasonable alternatives to decommission and/or maintain long-term stewardship at WNYNSC. The alternatives analyzed in the EIS include the Sitewide Removal Alternative, the Sitewide Close-In-Place Alternative, the Phased Decisionmaking Alternative (Preferred Alternative), and the No Action Alternative. The analysis and information contained in the EIS are intended to assist DOE and NYSERDA with the consideration of environmental

164

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10-01666, Revision 0 10-01666, Revision 0 Key Words: in situ decommissioning sensor remote monitoring end state Retention: Permanent DEVELOPMENT OF A REMOTE MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONED STRUCTURES Panel Report November 2010 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DE-AC09-08SR22470 Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network Page 2 of 34

165

Determination of the optimum fuel burn-up and energy intensities of nuclear fuel by the method of cost calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report gives the procedure for determining the economical efficiency of the utilization of nuclear fuel in a reactor on the basis of calculated costs. The expression obtained for the fuet constituent of the

Yu. I. Koryakin; V. V. Batov; V. G. Smirnov

1964-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments. Volume 9. Summary status report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 to May 5, 1985. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

Doerge, D. H.; Miller, R. L.; Scotti, K. S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) As the DOE complex sites prepare for closure, a large number of buildings and facilities must be deactivated and decommissioned. These facilities contain many complex systems (e.g. ventilation), miles of contaminated pipelines, glove boxes, and unique processing equipment that require labor intensive deactivation and decommissioning methods. Although

168

Issues in UK cleanup and decommissioning; a strategic R and D programme  

SciTech Connect

Nexia Solutions is contracted to manage and carry out research on behalf of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). This paper will describe the nuclear research ongoing and how it fits in with the UK cleanup and decommissioning strategy. The aim of the strategic R and D programme is to assist the NDA in maintaining a technical portfolio which will:- - identify and address challenges and clean-up problems that do not have an existing solution; - resolve potential inconsistencies between sites in the technical bases for certain strategic decisions and their implementation; - maintain options while developing strategy (emerging risks); - save costs by developing multi-site solutions; - provide technology, skills and facilities on the timescale required. The strategy for the R and D programme has been developed from a top-level approach by understanding the challenges which need to be addressed and prioritising these according to the objectives of the programme. The programme has demonstrated that a technical portfolio comprising six areas, each containing a number of key themes, is appropriate to address the technical challenges which the NDA faces and aligns with the NDA's technical issues register. An important aspect of the R and D programme is that it should create opportunities for undertaking the NDA mission more effectively. This arises from the emphasis given in those technical programmes which define the challenge more precisely and thus provide a platform from which to produce innovative solutions. The paper will present an overview of the strategic R and D programme along with the key technical programme areas. Examples will be provided of the technical work ongoing, and the results obtained so far. (author)

Tinsley, T.P.; Ashley, V.B.; Morgan, H.G.; Fairhall, G.A. [Nexia Solutions, British Technology Centre, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Consequence modeling for nuclear weapons probabilistic cost/benefit analyses of safety retrofits  

SciTech Connect

The consequence models used in former studies of costs and benefits of enhanced safety retrofits are considered for (1) fuel fires; (2) non-nuclear detonations; and, (3) unintended nuclear detonations. Estimates of consequences were made using a representative accident location, i.e., an assumed mixed suburban-rural site. We have explicitly quantified land- use impacts and human-health effects (e.g. , prompt fatalities, prompt injuries, latent cancer fatalities, low- levels of radiation exposure, and clean-up areas). Uncertainty in the wind direction is quantified and used in a Monte Carlo calculation to estimate a range of results for a fuel fire with uncertain respirable amounts of released Pu. We define a nuclear source term and discuss damage levels of concern. Ranges of damages are estimated by quantifying health impacts and property damages. We discuss our dispersal and prompt effects models in some detail. The models used to loft the Pu and fission products and their particle sizes are emphasized.

Harvey, T.F.; Peters, L.; Serduke, F.J.D.; Hall, C.; Stephens, D.R.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Fact Sheet  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Program. Objectives for the reactor were fulfilled by 1966, and the Nebraska Public Power District decommissioned and dismantled the facility between 1967 and 1969. Facility...

171

A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presenter: Dr. Kamiar Jamali, Senior Technical Advisor to the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Safety NA-SH

172

Mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The Phase I effort was based on a robot called the Remote Work Vehicle (RWV) that was previously developed by CMU for use in D&D operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement. During Phase I of this program, the RWV was rehabilitated and upgraded with contemporary control and user interface technologies and used as a testbed for remote D&D operations. We established a close working relationship with the DOE Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). In the second phase, we designed and developed a next generation mobile worksystem, called Rosie, and a semi-automatic task space scene analysis system, called Artisan, using guidance from RTDP. Both systems are designed to work with and complement other RTDP D&D technologies to execute selective equipment removal scenarios in which some part of an apparatus is extricated while minimally disturbing the surrounding objects. RTDP has identified selective equipment removal as a timely D&D mission, one that is particularly relevant during the de-activation and de-inventory stages of facility transitioning as a means to reduce the costs and risks associated with subsequent surveillance and monitoring. In the third phase, we tested and demonstrated core capabilities of Rosie and Artisan; we also implemented modifications and enhancements that improve their relevance to DOE`s facility transitioning mission.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Reactor Design and Decommissioning - An Overview of International Activities in Post Fukushima Era1 - 12396  

SciTech Connect

Accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors as a result of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have not only dampened the nuclear renaissance but have also initiated a re-examination of the design and safety features for the existing and planned nuclear reactors. Even though failures of some of the key site features at Fukushima can be attributed to events that in the past would have been considered as beyond the design basis, the industry as well as the regulatory authorities are analyzing what features, especially passive features, should be designed into the new reactor designs to minimize the potential for catastrophic failures. It is also recognized that since the design of the Fukushima BWR reactors which were commissioned in 1971, many advanced safety features are now a part of the newer reactor designs. As the recovery efforts at the Fukushima site are still underway, decisions with respect to the dismantlement and decommissioning of the damaged reactors and structures have not yet been finalized. As it was with Three Mile Island, it could take several decades for dismantlement, decommissioning and clean up, and the project poses especially tough challenges. Near-term assessments have been issued by several organizations, including the IAEA, the USNRC and others. Results of such investigations will lead to additional improvements in system and site design measures including strengthening of the anti-tsunami defenses, more defense-in-depth features in reactor design, and better response planning and preparation involving reactor sites. The question also arises what would the effect be on the decommissioning scene worldwide, and what would the effect be on the new reactors when they are eventually retired and dismantled. This paper provides an overview of the US and international activities related to recovery and decommissioning including the decommissioning features in the reactor design process and examines these from a new perspective in the post Fukushima -accident era. Accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have slowed down the nuclear renaissance world-wide and may have accelerated decommissioning either because some countries have decided to halt or reduce nuclear, or because the new safety requirements may reduce life-time extensions. Even in countries such as the UK and France that favor nuclear energy production existing nuclear sites are more likely to be chosen as sites for future NPPs. Even as the site recovery efforts continue at Fukushima and any decommissioning decisions are farther into the future, the accidents have focused attention on the reactor designs in general and specifically on the Fukushima type BWRs. The regulatory authorities in many countries have initiated a re-examination of the design of the systems, structures and components and considerations of the capability of the station to cope with beyond-design basis events. Enhancements to SSCs and site features for the existing reactors and the reactors that will be built will also impact the decommissioning phase activities. The newer reactor designs of today not only have enhanced safety features but also take into consideration the features that will facilitate future decommissioning. Lessons learned from past management and operation of reactors as well as the lessons from decommissioning are incorporated into the new designs. However, in the post-Fukushima era, the emphasis on beyond-design-basis capability may lead to significant changes in SSCs, which eventually will also have impact on the decommissioning phase. Additionally, where some countries decide to phase out the nuclear power, many reactors may enter the decommissioning phase in the coming decade. While the formal updating and expanding of existing guidance documents for accident cleanup and decommissioning would benefit by waiting until the Fukushima project has progressed sufficiently for that experience to be reliably interpreted, the development of structured on-li

Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States); Laraia, Michele [private consultant, formerly from IAEA, Kolonitzgasse 10/2, 1030, Vienna (Austria); Pescatore, Claudio [OECD, Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux, Paris (France); Dinner, Paul [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield workers to a safe level from the residual radioactivity. Workers then continued preparations for demolishing the structure. Currently, they are isolating utilities, removing asbestos, draining oils, and removing other items not allowed to be disposed in Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The basin's superstructure will be demolished using a heavy industrial excavator equipped with a shear. This portion of the work is expected to be completed in September, with removal of the basin substructure to follow in 2009. D&D of the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream.

GERBER MS

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Interim Storage Facility decommissioning. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Interim Storage Facility were completed. Activities included performing a detailed radiation survey of the facility, removing surface and imbedded contamination, excavating and removing the fuel storage cells, restoring the site to natural conditions, and shipping waste to Hanford, Washington, for burial. The project was accomplished on schedule and 30% under budget with no measurable exposure to decommissioning personnel.

Johnson, R.P.; Speed, D.L.

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from...

177

Solution of resource allocation problem for identification of cost-effective measures to reduce nuclear proliferation risks  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a methodology of selection of cost-effective measures to reduce nuclear proliferation risks. The methodology relies on a graded security model used in practice in different applications. The method is based on the controlled finite Markov chain approach set in combination with discrete dynamic programming and MCDM (Multi Criteria Decision Making) techniques that enables the expert to select the cost-effective measures to reduce nuclear proliferation risks depending on availability of resources. The analysis performed with different number of possible measures confirms the conclusions that the implementation of extra-large costs may not produce the required effect, and the increase in resources above a certain level does not appear sensitive. Diversification in improving the effectiveness of other measures seems more rational and efficient for the whole system than the unlimited improvement of the effectiveness of only one measure.

Andrianov, A.; Kuptsov, I. [Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering, Studgorodok 1, Obninsk, Kaluga region 249030 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A critical study on Kennedys Cost-Benefit-Analysis ‘New nuclear power generation in the UK’.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The demand for energy is forever growing. The technology of extracting power from uranium through nuclear facilities is rather old. Core melting, nuclear bombs,… (more)

Sträng, Jonathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE KLAMATH BASIN HYDROELECTRIC, and steelhead trout on the West Coast of the United States. PacifiCorp's 169-megawatt Klamath Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Project is the only thorough, objective and transparent assessment tool that analyzes the cost

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund financial statements, September 30, 1995 and 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) requires the Department of Energy to retain ownership and responsibility for the costs of environmental cleanup resulting from the Government`s operation of the three gaseous diffusion facilities located at the K-25 site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. The Act transferred the uranium enrichment enterprise to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as of July 1, 1993, and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) to: Pay for the costs of decontamination and decommissioning at the diffusion facilities; pay the annual costs for remedial action at the diffusion facilities to the extent that the amount in the Fund is sufficient; and reimburse uranium/thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government.

NONE

1996-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

182

Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations  

SciTech Connect

This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

EIS-0259: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class and Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants, Hanford Site, Richland (adopted from Navy)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes the alternate ways for disposing of decommissioned, defieled reactor compliments from U.S. Navy nuclear-powered cruisers, (Bainbridge, Truxtun, Long Beach, California Class and Virginia Class) and Los Angeles Class, and Ohio Class submarines.

184

Estimating demolition cost of plutonium buildings for dummies  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Rocky Flats Field Office of the US Department of Energy is to decommission the entire plant. In an effort to improve the basis and the accuracy of the future decommissioning cost, Rocky Flats has developed a powerful but easy-to-use tool to determine budget cost estimates to characterize, decontaminate, and demolish all its buildings. The parametric cost-estimating tool is called the Facilities Disposition Cost Model (FDCM).

Tower, S.E.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Decommissioning of TA-21-153, a /sup 227/Ac contaminated old filter building  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust air filter building contaminated with /sup 227/Ac was decommissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, in 1978. The building was constructed in the late 1940s to clean exhaust air from several buildings at TA-21, DP Site. It was in service until March 1970. The project involved preliminary decontamination, dismantling the building, and burying the debris at an on-site waste disposal/storage area. This report presents the details on the decommissioning procedures, health physics, waste management, environmental surveillance, and costs for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Action Memorandum for General Decommissioning Activities under the Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect

This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative to perform general decommissioning activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). Preparation of this Action Memorandum has been performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the "Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986", and in accordance with the "National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan". An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was prepared and released for public comment and evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of excess buildings and structures whose missions havve been completed.

S. L. Reno

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

Decontamination and decommissioning of building 889 at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

At the Rocky Flats site, the building 889 decommissioning project was the first large-scale decommissioning project of a radiologically contaminated facility at Rocky Flats. The scope consisted of removal of all equipment and utility systems from the interior of the building, decontamination of interior building surfaces, and the demolition of the facility to ground level. Details of the project management plan, including schedule, engineering, cost, characterization methodologies, decontamination techniques, radiological control requirements, and demolition methods, are provided in this article. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Dorr, K.A. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States); Hickman, M.E.; Henderson, B.J. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Golden, CO (United States); Sexton, R.J. [Scientific Ecology Group, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Technology needs for decommissioning and decontamination  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the current view of the most important decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) technology needs for the US Department of Energy facilities for which the D & D programs are the responsibility of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The source of information used in this assessment was a survey of the D & D program managers at each facility. A summary of needs presented in earlier surveys of site needs in approximate priority order was supplied to each site as a starting point to stimulate thinking. This document reflects a brief initial assessment of ongoing needs; these needs will change as plans for D & D are finalized, some of the technical problems are solved through successful development programs, and new ideas for D and D technologies appear. Thus, this assessment should be updated and upgraded periodically, perhaps, annually. This assessment differs from others that have been made in that it directly and solely reflects the perceived need for new technology by key personnel in the D & D programs at the various facilities and does not attempt to consider the likelihood that these technologies can be successfully developed. Thus, this list of technology needs also does not consider the cost, time, and effort required to develop the desired technologies. An R & D program must include studies that have a reasonable chance for success as well as those for which there is a high need. Other studies that considered the cost and probability of successful development as well as the need for new technology are documented. However, the need for new technology may be diluted in such studies; this document focuses only on the need for new technology as currently perceived by those actually charged with accomplishing D & D.

Bundy, R.D.; Kennerly, J.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To ensure development of appropriate levels of engineering detail, DOE-EM’s Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) has prepared this guidance for  tailoring a D...

190

Incremental costs and optimization of in-core fuel management of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with development of methods for optimizing the energy production and refuelling decision for nuclear power plants in an electric utility system containing both nuclear and fossil-fuelled stations. ...

Watt, Hing Yan

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Aspects of operational radiation protection during dismantling of nuclear facilities relevant for the estimation of internal doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......its decommissioning plan. In that period...including clearance from regulatory control, and to...analysis includes a review of the documentation...decommissioning standard review plan. NUREG 1727. 6...Journal Article Review | Humans Nuclear......

T. Labarta

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Decommissioning of the TA-42 plutonium contaminated incinerator facility  

SciTech Connect

During 1978, a plutonium (/sup 239/Pu) contaminated incinerator facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned. The project involved dismantling the facility and burying the debris at an on-site radioactive solid waste disposal/storage area. Contaminated soil from the 5000 m/sup 2/ area was also buried. The facility was constructed in 1951 to incinerate /sup 239/Pu contaminated wastes. It was later used as a decontamination facility. The major features included a 185-m/sup 2/ floor area control building, incinerator, cyclone dust collector, spray cooler, venturi scrubber, air filter bank, ash separator, and two 140 000-liter ash storage tanks. Six-hundred cubic meters of debris and 1200 m/sup 3/ of soil contaminated with less than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of soil were buried at the Laboratory disposal area. Five cubic meters of /sup 239/Pu contaminated ash residues containing more than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of waste were packaged and stored to meet the Department of Energy's 20-year retrievable storage criteria. The operation consumed 80 work days and 5800 manhours at a cost of $150 000. This report presents the details concerning decommissioning procedures, the health physics, the waste management, the environmental surveillance results, and a cost breakdown for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Part 2. Volume 11  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning the cost-benefit analysis for decontamination of the Shippingport reactor and radiation-contamination survey data.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet This Question and Answer (Q&A) Sheet discusses the use of removal authority in the conduct of decommissioning activities, consistent with the Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (May 22, 1995), and the accompanying Decommissioning Implementation Guide . The Policy and Guide establish the approach agreed upon by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It is consistent with CERCLA statutory requirements, as well as CERCLA regulatory requirements found in the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and applicable

195

Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan describes the activities performed between deactivation and final decommissioning of the following facilities located on the Nevada National Security Site, as documented in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order under the Industrial Sites program as decontamination and decommissioning sites: ? Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility: o EMAD Building (Building 25-3900) o Locomotive Storage Shed (Building 25-3901) ? Test Cell C (TCC) Facility: o Equipment Building (Building 25-3220) o Motor Drive Building (Building 25-3230) o Pump Shop (Building 25-3231) o Cryogenic Lab (Building 25-3232) o Ancillary Structures (e.g., dewars, water tower, piping, tanks) These facilities have been declared excess and are in various stages of deactivation (low-risk, long-term stewardship disposition state). This S&M Plan establishes and implements a solid, cost-effective, and balanced S&M program consistent with federal, state, and regulatory requirements. A graded approach is used to plan and conduct S&M activities. The goal is to maintain the facilities in a safe condition in a cost-effective manner until their final end state is achieved. This plan accomplishes the following: ? Establishes S&M objectives and framework ? Identifies programmatic guidance for S&M activities to be conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) ? Provides present facility condition information and identifies hazards ? Identifies facility-specific S&M activities to be performed and their frequency ? Identifies regulatory drivers, NNSA/NFO policies and procedures, and best management practices that necessitate implementation of S&M activities ? Provides criteria and frequencies for revisions and updates ? Establishes the process for identifying and dispositioning a condition that has not been previously identified or documented ? Provides instructions for implementing annual S&M inspections and activities The following facilities that were included in Revision 1 of this plan have reached final disposition and are no longer in the S&M program: ? Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 25-3110 ? Test Cell A Facility, Building 25-3113 ? TCC Facility, Building 25-3210 ? Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 26-2201 ? Super Kukla Facility, Building 27-5400

Poderis, Reed J. [NSTec] [NSTec; King, Rebecca A. [NSTec] [NSTec

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Commercial Decommissioning at DOE's Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect

Due in large part to the number of nuclear facilities that make up the DOE complex, DOE-EM work has historically been paperwork intensive and driven by extensive regulations. Requirements for non-nuclear facilities are often grouped with those of nuclear facilities, driving up costs. Kaiser-Hill was interested in applying a commercial model to demolition of these facilities and wanted to apply necessary and sufficient standards to the work activities, but avoid applying unnecessary requirements. Faced with demolishing hundreds of uncontaminated or non-radiologically contaminated facilities, Kaiser-Hill has developed a subcontracting strategy to drastically reduce the cost of demolishing these facilities at Rocky Flats. Aiming to tailor the demolition approach of such facilities to more closely follow commercial practices, Kaiser-Hill recently released a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the demolition of the site's former central administration facility. The RFP significantly reduced requirements for compliance with specific DOE directives. Instead, the RFP required subcontractors to comply with health and safety requirements commonly found in the demolition of similar facilities in a commercial setting. This resulted in a number of bids from companies who have normally not bid on DOE work previously and at a reduced cost over previous approaches. This paper will discuss the details of this subcontracting strategy.

Freiboth, C.; Sandlin, N.; Schubert, A.; Hansen, S.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

197

Long Term Storage with Surveillance of Canadian Prototype Nuclear Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally formed by the government of Canada in 1952 to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas. In the mid 1950's Canada decided to limit itself to peaceful uses of nuclear energy and AECL embarked on several research and development programs, one of them being the development of nuclear power plants. This led to the development of the CANDU{sup TM} design of heavy water power reactors, of which there are now 29 operating around the world. This presentation discusses the present state of the first two CANDU{sup TM} prototype reactors and a prototype boiling light water reactor and lessons learnt after being in a long-term storage with surveillance state for more than 20 years. AECL facilities undergo decommissioning by either a prompt or a deferred removal approach. Both approaches are initiated after an operating facility has been declared redundant and gone through final operational shutdown. For the deferred approach, initial decommissioning activities are performed to put the facility into a sustainable, safe, shutdown state to minimize the hazards and costs of the ensuing extended storage with surveillance (SWS) or Safestor phase. At the appropriate time, the facility is dismantled and removed, or put into a suitable condition for re-use. AECL has a number of facilities that were built during its history, and some of these are now redundant or will become redundant in the near future. The deferred removal approach is part of AECL's decommissioning strategy for several reasons: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantling, 2. No facilities are available yet in Canada for the management of quantity of wastes arising from decommissioning, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities that will undergo decommissioning, compared to the availability of funds to carry out the work. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that includes all of AECL's redundant and presently operating facilities. Several significant issues have arisen over the decades these reactors have been in the SWS phase. With the long time frames encompassed by this approach to decommissioning, the storage and maintenance of facility information for future decommissioning, and the knowledge and training of successive generations of staff to perform facility inspections and maintenance are major issues. Complacency of both staff and management is a potential issue. The problem arises primarily because these facilities have been put into a comparatively low hazard state, are remotely located, and not much changes over time and changes are slow. During the period that these facilities have been in this state, regulatory scrutiny and expectations have increased. This along with continuing changes in regulatory staff requires a continuous education and communication activity with the regulator. Because of the long time frames involved, the building structures continue to deteriorate slowly, and repairs and maintenance are required upon occasion. The costs can be significant, for example, to replace a roof. When these occasions arise, the balance of cost and benefit is always questioned, i.e., 'Wouldn't it be better to spend the money on dismantling rather than fixing?'. One positive note is that ancillary buildings that either have very low radiation hazards or were decontaminated during the initial decommissioning activities have been used for several alternate uses. This has helped to defray costs, and also keeps an interest in maintaining the building structures and systems in good condition during the SWS phase. Over the past few years, the lessons learnt from these and other facilities in SWS, have been addressed in a holistic manner by moving from a short-term, project-oriented approach to a comprehensive, long term stewardship approach. Key to this approach was the development of an integrated plan to decommission all of AECL's facilities. One of the prime results of the implementation of this plan was the development of an organiza

Janzen, Rick [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Sensor Technology Integration for Efficient and Cost-Effective D&D  

SciTech Connect

The deactivation and decommissioning of radiologically contaminated facilities require the use of a multitude of technologies to perform characterization, decontamination, dismantlement, and waste management. Current baseline technologies do not provide adequate tools to perform this work in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Examples of such tasks that can be modified to enhance the D&D work include: floor and wall decontamination, pipe decontamination, and surveillance and monitoring. FIU-HCET's Technology Development, Integration and Deployment (TDID) group aims to enhance the D&D process by integrating sensor technology to existing decontamination and remote surveillance tools. These integrated systems have been demonstrated throughout the DOE Complex and commercial nuclear facilities undergoing decommissioning. Finding new ways of integrating technologies utilized in the decommissioning and surveillance & monitoring process has been a goal of this group during the past several years. Current and previous integration projects include: Mobile Integrated Piping Decontamination and Characterization System, On-Line Decontamination and Characterization System, In-Situ Pipe Decontamination and Unplugging System, Remote Hazardous Environment Surveyor (RHES), and the Online Handheld grit blasting decontamination system As a result of integrating sensors with D&D tools, the resulting technologies have removed the downtime currently found in baseline processes by allowing operators and project managers to have real-time contamination data during the specified D&D process. This added component allows project managers to verify that full decontamination and surveillance has been conducted. Through successful demonstration and deployments of the TDID-developed technologies, FIU-HCET has provided tools that can impact the cost, schedule and health and safety of D&D operations in a positive way, leading to shorter downtimes and significant cost-savings. This paper will discuss the development of technologies currently modified with sensor technology by the TDID group, from conceptual design to Deployment at a DOE or commercial nuclear facility. Cost information associated with the respective technology will also be discussed.

Varona, J. M.; Lagos, L. E.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

199

Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation.

Ralph E.H. Sims; Hans-Holger Rogner; Ken Gregory

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (WAGR) Decommissioning Project A Close Out Report for WAGR Decommissioning Campaigns 1 to 10 - 12474  

SciTech Connect

The reactor core of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) has been dismantled as part of an ongoing decommissioning project. The WAGR operated until 1981 as a development reactor for the British Commercial Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (CAGR) power programme. Decommissioning began in 1982 with the removal of fuel from the reactor core which was completed in 1983. Subsequently, a significant amount of engineering work was carried out, including removal of equipment external to the reactor and initial manual dismantling operations at the top of the reactor, in preparation for the removal of the reactor core itself. Modification of the facility structure and construction of the waste packaging plant served to provide a waste route for the reactor components. The reactor core was dismantled on a 'top-down' basis in a series of 'campaigns' related to discrete reactor components. This report describes the facility, the modifications undertaken to facilitate its decommissioning and the strategies employed to recognise the successful decommissioning of the reactor. Early decommissioning tasks at the top of the reactor were undertaken manually but the main of the decommissioning tasks were carried remotely, with deployment systems comprising of little more than crane like devices, intelligently interfaced into the existing structure. The tooling deployed from the 3 tonne capacity (3te) hoist consisted either purely mechanical devices or those being electrically controlled from a 'push-button' panel positioned at the operator control stations, there was no degree of autonomy in the 3te hoist or any of the tools deployed from it. Whilst the ATC was able to provide some tele-robotic capabilities these were very limited and required a good degree of driver input which due to the operating philosophy at WAGR was not utilised. The WAGR box proved a successful waste package, adaptable through the use of waste box furniture specific to the waste-forms generated throughout the various decommissioning campaigns. The use of low force compaction for insulation and soft wastes provided a simple, robust and cost effective solution as did the direct encapsulation of LLW steel components in the later stages of reactor decommissioning. Progress through early campaigns was good, often bettering the baseline schedule, especially when undertaking the repetitive tasks seen during Neutron Shield and Graphite Core decommissioning, once the operators had become experienced with the equipment, though delays became more pronounced, mainly as a result of increased failures due to the age and maintainability of the RDM and associated equipment. Extensive delays came about as a result of the unsupported insulation falling away from the pressure vessel during removal and the inability of the ventilation system to manage the sub micron particulate generated during IPOPI cutting operations, though the in house development of revised and new methodologies ultimately led to the successful completion of PV and I removal. In a programme spanning over 12 years, the decommissioning of the reactor pressure vessel and core led to the production 110 ILW and 75 LLW WAGR boxes, with 20 LLW ISO freight containers of primary reactor wastes, resulting in an overall packaged volume of approximately 2500 cubic metres containing the estimated 460 cubic metres of the reactor structure. (authors)

Halliwell, Chris [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Phase I Decommissioning - Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement The Department of Energy, West Valley Demonstration Project (DOE-WVDP) and CH2M Hill B&W West Valley (CHBWV) are committed to continuous improvement and will utilize principles of the DOE Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Partnering Policy to create and foster a team environment to successfully complete the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Phase I Decommissioning - Faciltiy Disposition. West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement More Documents & Publications CX-009527: Categorical Exclusion Determination

202

FAQS Qualification Card - Deactivation and Decommissioning | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation and Decommissioning FAQS Qualification Card - Deactivation and Decommissioning A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-DeactivationDecommissioning.docx Description Deactivation and Decommissioning Qualification Card More Documents & Publications

203

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities consistent with the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This policy ensures protection of the environment, worker health and public health, provides opportunities for stakeholder involvement, and achieves risk reduction without unnecessary delay. Consistent with the jointly issued "Guidance on Accelerating CERCLA Environmental Restoration at Federal Facilities" (August 22, 1994), this decommissioning policy encourages streamlined decision-making. This

204

University of Virginia Reactor Facility Decommissioning Results  

SciTech Connect

The University of Virginia Reactor Facility started accelerated decommissioning in 2002. The facility consists of two licensed reactors, the CAVALIER and the UVAR. This paper will describe the progress in 2002, remaining efforts and the unique organizational structure of the project team.

Ervin, P. F.; Lundberg, L. A.; Benneche, P. E.; Mulder, R. U.; Steva, D. P.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

205

Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Purpose This Policy establishes the approach agreed upon by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the conduct of decommissioning projects [1] consistent with CERCLA requirements. This Policy creates a framework for the conduct of decommissioning of DOE facilities and provides guidance to EPA Regions and DOE Operations Offices on the use of CERCLA response authority to decommission such facilities. The principal objectives of this Policy are to ensure that decommissioning

206

AEC's New Environmental Rules for Nuclear Plant May Open New Debate, Extend Delays, Raise Plant Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such times, and the Vermont Yankee plant would take turn...private power companies, Vermont Central and Green Mountain...majority in-vestors in the Yankee Nuclear Power Company...Among these is the Vermont Yankee plant at Vernon (see...

Robert Gillette

1971-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

207

Costs of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A major reason for the decreased interest in the building of new nuclear power plants in recent years has been the relatively high cost of nuclear power. In this section, we will consider the role of costs in electricity

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Cost-Sensitive Classification Methods for the Detection of Smuggled Nuclear Material in Cargo Containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the container, much like the radiation portal monitors currently in place [24]. For a localized source placed in the center of the cargo container, the near- est detector will be approximately 4 ft away and radiation may have to pass through a significant... with the cargo. This introduces a significant statistical variation to our measurement data, as will be shown in Ch. VI. 4 I.1.3 Current Detection Methods There are several detection systems currently in use to detect nuclear material ? fixed radiation portal...

Webster, Jennifer B

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

209

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

211

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor’s bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor's bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. Pictured here is the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, where major decommissioning milestones were recently reached after the remaining radioactive materials from the facility’s bioshield were shipped to a licensed offsite disposal facility.

212

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is an effective decommissioning practice offering a safe and environmentally-favorable alternative to completely demolishing a facility and transporting its debris elsewhere for disposal. Regulatory approval to decommission a facility through ISD is authorized primarily by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, Federal Facility Agreements and local stakeholder agreements have a direct influence on ISD approval and oversight. The ISD approach limits radiation exposure and industrial hazards to workers to a greater extent than larger scale cleanout and demolition.

213

GRR/Section 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview 20PlantDecommissioningOverview (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies BLM Regulations & Policies 43 CFR 3263.10-3263.15: Well Abandonment Geothermal Resources Operational Order No.3 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 20PlantDecommissioningOverview (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative State and federal laws have specific requirements for the decommissioning process. 20.1 to 20.2 - Will a Geothermal Well be Abandoned?

214

Interim Status of the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) teamed to establish the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning (ID&D) project to increase the use of improved technologies in D&D operations. The project is making the technologies more readily available, providing training, putting the technologies to use, and spreading information about improved performance. The improved technologies are expected to reduce cost, schedule, radiation exposure, or waste volume over currently used baseline methods. They include some of the most successful technologies proven in the large-scale demonstrations and in private industry. The selected technologies are the Pipe Explorer, the GammaCam, the Decontamination Decommissioning and Remediation Optimal Planning System (DDROPS), the BROKK Demolition Robot, the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS), the Oxy-Gasoline Torch, the Track-Mounted Shear, and the Hand-Held Shear.

A. M Smith; G. E. Matthern; R. H. Meservey

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, where Management and Operations are performed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS). In 2004, DOE recognized SRS as structure within the Cold War Historic District of national, state and local significance composed of the first generation of facilities constructed and operated from 1950 through 1989 to produce plutonium and tritium for our nation's defense. DOE agreed to manage the SRS 105-C Reactor Facility as a potentially historic property due to its significance in supporting the U.S. Cold War Mission and for potential for future interpretation. This reactor has five primary areas within it, including a Disassembly Basin (DB) that received irradiated materials from the reactor, cooled them and prepared the components for loading and transport to a Separation Canyon for processing. The 6,317 square meter area was divided into numerous work/storage areas. The walls between the individual basin compartments have narrow vertical openings called 'slots' that permit the transfer of material from one section to another. Data indicated there was over 830 curies of radioactivity associated with the basin sediments and approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated water, not including a large quantity of activated reactor equipment, scrap metal, and debris on the basin floor. The need for an action was identified in 2010 to reduce risks to personnel in the facility and to eliminate the possible release of contaminants into the environment. The release of DB water could potentially migrate to the aquifer and contaminate groundwater. DOE, its regulators [U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)] and the SC Historical Preservation Office (SHPO) agreed/concurred to perform a non-time critical removal action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - application decommissioning models Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE KLAMATH BASIN HYDROELECTRIC... Consultant Report Economic Modeling of Relicensing and Decommissioning Options...

217

Beta Dosimetry at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......function of gamma dose and energy of the beta rays. Measurements...radiation and effective beta energy obtained in the working environment at nuclear power plants during the shut-down...decommissioning. The effective beta energy is most frequently between......

P. Carný; M. Lieskovsky

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

It is the policy of the Department of Energy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Cancels SEN-35-91.

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

MCW Laboratory Decommissioning Checklist P.I.:_______________ Date: ___________ LAB DECOMMISSIONING CHECKLIST rev. 12/12/13  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DECOMMISSIONING CHECKLIST rev. 12/12/13 Timeline Tasks Contacts Completed NA 1 month Inventory sends inventory list to appropriate contact Send email to safetyinfo@mcw.edu "Attn: Chemical, and outline appropriate path of decontamination (e.g. needs oil removed prior to disposal, requires surface

220

Overview of Remote Handling Equipment Used for the NPP A1 Decommissioning - 12141  

SciTech Connect

The first Czechoslovak NPP A1 was in operation from 1972 to 1977 and it was finally shutdown due to an accident (level 4 according to the INES). The presence of radioactive, toxic or hazardous materials limits personnel access to facilities and therefore it is necessary to use remote handling technologies for some most difficult characterization, retrieval, decontamination and dismantling tasks. The history of remote handling technologies utilization started in nineties when the spent nuclear fuel, including those fuel assemblies damaged during the accident, was prepared for the transport to Russia. Subsequent significant development of remote handling equipment continued during implementation of the NPP A1 decommissioning project - Stage I and ongoing Stage II. Company VUJE, Inc. is the general contractor for both mentioned stages of the decommissioning project. Various remote handling manipulators and robotics arms were developed and used. It includes remotely controlled vehicle manipulator MT-15 used for characterisation tasks in hostile and radioactive environment, special robust manipulator DENAR-41 used for the decontamination of underground storage tanks and multi-purposes robotics arms MT-80 and MT-80A developed for variety of decontamination and dismantling tasks. The heavy water evaporator facility dismantling is the current task performed remotely by robotics arm MT-80. The heavy water evaporator is located inside the main production building in the room No. 220 where loose surface contamination varies from 10 Bq/cm{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 3} Bq/cm{sup 2}, dose rate is up to 1.5 mGy/h and the feeding pipeline contained liquid RAW with high tritium content. Presented manipulators have been designed for broad range of decommissioning tasks. They are used for recognition, sampling, waste retrieval from large underground tanks, decontamination and dismantling of technological equipments. Each of the mentioned fields claims specific requirements on design of manipulator, their operation and control systems as well as tools of manipulators. Precise planning of decontamination and dismantling tasks is necessary for its successful performance by remotely controlled manipulator. The example of the heavy water evaporator demonstrates typical procedure for decommissioning of contaminated technological equipment by remotely controlled manipulators - planning of decommissioning tasks, preparatory tasks, modification of applied tools and design of specific supporting constructions for manipulator and finally decontamination and dismantling themselves. Due to the particularly demanding conditions in highly contaminated A1 NPP, a team of experts with special know-how in the field of decommissioning has grown up, and unique technological equipment enabling effective and safe work in environment with a high radiation level has been developed. (authors)

Kravarik, K.; Medved, J.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M. [VUJE, Inc., Okruzna 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Michal, V. [IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O.Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Vargovcik, L. [ZTS VVU Kosice, Inc., Juzna Trieda 95, 041 24 Kosice (Slovakia)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Underground collocation of nuclear power plant reactors and repository to facilitate the post-renaissance expansion of nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

Underground collocation of nuclear power reactors and the nuclear waste management facilities supporting those reactors, termed an underground nuclear park (UNP), appears to have several advantages compared to the conventional approach to siting reactors and waste management facilities. These advantages include the potential to lower reactor capital and operating cost, lower nuclear waste management cost, and increase margins of physical security and safety. Envirorunental impacts related to worker health, facility accidents, waste transportation, and sabotage and terrorism appear to be lower for UNPs compared to the current approach. In-place decommissioning ofUNP reactors appears to have cost, safety, envirorunental and waste disposal advantages. The UNP approach has the potential to lead to greater public acceptance for the deployment of new power reactors. Use of the UNP during the post-nuclear renaissance time frame has the potential to enable a greater expansion of U.S. nuclear power generation than might otherwise result. Technical and economic aspects of the UNP concept need more study to determine the viability of the concept.

Myers, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elkins, Ned Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, EM is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM initiated an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technical barriers and technology development

223

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition.

224

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, EM is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM initiated an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technical barriers and technology development

225

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...capacity of waste repositories for decommissioning waste in the second half of the century will...is returned to the manufacturer for decommissioning and disposal. Because fuel handling is avoided at the...International Forum, “A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

BSc in Nuclear Science and Materials H821 MEng in Nuclear Engineering H822  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BSc in Nuclear Science and Materials H821 MEng in Nuclear Engineering H822 Research and education in nuclear engineering, waste management and decommissioning holds the key to sustainable energy production on an ambitious programme of commissioning nuclear energy, creating opportunities for graduates from plant design

Miall, Chris

227

Safety analysis for Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project. Vol. 9. Pt. 1. Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning the safety analysis for the decommissioning project; and permitting plan.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Plan for fully decontaminating and decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick, Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. This volume contains the following 3 attachments: (1) Plan for Fully Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, PA; and (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation As more countries embrace nuclear power as a cost-effective and clean alternative to fossil fuels, the need exists to ensure that the nuclear fuel cycle is...

230

DECOMMISSIONING OF A CAESIUM-137 SEALED SOURCE PRODUCTION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Amersham owns a former Caesium-137 sealed source production facility. They commissioned RWE NUKEM to carry out an Option Study to determine a strategy for the management of this facility and then the subsequent decommissioning of it. The decommissioning was carried out in two sequential phases. Firstly robotic decommissioning followed by a phase of manual decommissioning. This paper describes the remote equipment designed built and operated, the robotic and manual decommissioning operations performed, the Safety Management arrangements and summarizes the lessons learned. Using the equipment described the facility was dismantled and decontaminated robotically. Some 2300kg of Intermediate Level Waste containing in the order of 4000Ci were removed robotically from the facility. Ambient dose rates were reduced from 100's of R per hour {gamma} to 100's of mR per hour {gamma}. The Telerobotic System was then removed to allow man access to complete the decommissioning. Manual decommissioning reduced ambient dose rates further to less than 1mR per hour {gamma} and loose contamination levels to less than 0.25Bq/cm2. This allowed access to the facility without respiratory protection.

Murray, A.; Abbott, H.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

231

Task 21 - Development of Systems Engineering Applications for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this task are to: Develop a model (paper) to estimate the cost and waste generation of cleanup within the Environmental Management (EM) complex; Identify technologies applicable to decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations within the EM complex; Develop a database of facility information as linked to project baseline summaries (PBSs). The above objectives are carried out through the following four subtasks: Subtask 1--D and D Model Development, Subtask 2--Technology List; Subtask 3--Facility Database, and Subtask 4--Incorporation into a User Model.

Erickson, T.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Assessment of strippable coatings for decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Strippable or temporary coatings were developed to assist in the decontamination of the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) reactor. These coatings have become a viable option during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. A variety of strippable coatings are available to D and D professionals. However, these products exhibit a wide range of performance criteria and uses. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) was commissioned to perform a 2-year investigation into strippable coatings. This investigation was divided into four parts: (1) identification of commercially available strippable coating products; (2) survey of D and D professionals to determine current uses of these coatings and performance criteria; (3) design and implementation of a non-radiological testing program to evaluate the physical properties of these coatings; and (4) design and implementation of a radiological testing program to determine decontamination factors and effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Activities during fiscal year 1997 are described.

Ebadian, M.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

GAO-04-611 Nuclear Waste: Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Committee on Government Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives June 2004 NUCLEAR WASTE Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals GAO-04-611 www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-04-611. To view the full product, including the scope and methodology, click on the link above. For more information, contact Robin M. Nazzaro at (202) 512-3841 or nazzaror@gao.gov. Highlights of GAO-04-611, a report to the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives June 2004 NUCLEAR WASTE Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals DOE's initial approach called for treating 10 percent of the site's high-level waste by 2018 and for operating the plant until treatment was completed in

234

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Deactivation and Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Functional Area Qualification Standard Functional Area Qualification Standard Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) DOE-STD-1166-2003 Step 1 Identify and evaluate tasks - Develop a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job. o A great starting point is the list of Duties and Responsibilities from the FAQS. o Give careful thought to additional tasks that could be considered. o Don't worry about deleting tasks at this point - that is a part of the process further down. - List the tasks (and their sources, e.g., Duties and Responsibilities #1) in the chart below. - Discuss each task as a group and come to a consensus pertaining to Importance and Frequency of the task (i.e., each team member can consent to the assigned value, even if they don't exactly agree with it).

235

DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION  

SciTech Connect

As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also been expanded by FIU-HCET to evaluate a technology integration--shot blasting technology and an ultrasonic rangefinder, which are decontamination and sensor technology, respectively.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics 3: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for low-level radioactive and mixed wastes generated by decontaminating and decommissioning activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's General Atomics' Hot Cell Facility would be transported to either a DOE owned facility, such as the Hanford site in Washington, or to a commercial facility, such as Envirocare in Utah, for treatment and/or storage and disposal. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 14, 1995 EA-1053: Finding of No Significant Impact

237

DOE-EM'S In-Situ Decommissioning Strategy  

SciTech Connect

This paper addressed the current status of decommissioning projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) that have an end state of permanent entombment, referred to as in-situ decommissioning (ISD). The substance of a Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) review of ISD and the development of a strategy are summarized. The strategy first recognizes ISD as a viable decommissioning end state; secondly addresses the integration of this approach within the external and internal regulatory regimes; subsequently identifies tools that need developing; and finally presents guidance for implementation. The overall conclusion is that ISD is a viable mode of decommissioning that can be conducted within the existing structure of rules and regulations. (author)

Negin, C.A.; Urland, C.S. [Chuck, Project Enhancement Corporation, Germantown, MD (United States); Szilagyi, A.P. [Andy, U.S. Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Cost analysis guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

239

EM Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority EM Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (left) and Mark Lesinski, U.K.'s Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Executive Director for Delivery, renewed the Statement of Intent between DOE and NDA in a signing ceremony this week. DOE Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (left) and Mark Lesinski, U.K.'s Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Executive Director for Delivery, renewed the Statement of Intent between DOE and NDA in a signing ceremony this week. Florida International University's DOE Fellows gather for a photo with DOE Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (eighth from left) and DOE Fellows director, Dr. Leo Lagos (tenth from left), at the 2012 Waste Management Symposia in Phoenix this week.

240

An overview of U.S. decommissioning experience -- A basic introduction  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the US experiences in the decommissioning technical area. Sections included are: (1) an overview of the magnitude of the problem, (2) a review of the US decommissioning process, (3) regulation of decommissioning, (4) regulatory and funding requirements for decommissioning, and (5) a general overview of all on-going and completed decommissioning projects to date in the US. The final section presents a review of some issues in the decommissioning area currently being debated in the technical specialists community.

Boing, L.E.

1998-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A real options approach to investing in the first nuclear power plant under cost uncertainty: comparison with natural gas power plant for the Tunisian case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper uses a real options approach to present a method for evaluating the first Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) investment in Tunisia in 2020. The evaluating model integrates the value of real options: option to wait in the standard discount cash flow analysis. According to the IAEA (2007), starting the first stage of a nuclear power programme makes it possible to construct the first NPP in second time. This study considers that the economic worth of the NPP investment depends on the production cost of the natural gas power plant. This study assumes that the profit realised by the NPP project, defined as the difference between natural gas and nuclear production costs, represented the cash flow of the NPP investment. However, the value of this cash flow is uncertain. This is an investment choice problem under uncertainty. The analysis proposes the optimal investment strategy in NPP project for the Tunisian government. Furthermore, the threshold value of investment cash flow defining the timing of starting NPP construction is calculated. [Received: July 10, 2008; Accepted: November 23, 2008

Mohamed Ben Abdelhamid; Chaker Aloui; Corinne Chaton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Minimizing the Cost of Innovative Nuclear Technology Through Flexibility: The Case of a Demonstration Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactor Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented is a methodology to analyze the expected Levelised Cost Of Electricity (LCOE) in the face of technology uncertainty for Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactors (ADSRs). It shows that flexibility in the design and deployment strategy...

Cardin, Michel-Alexandre; Steer, Steven J.; Nuttall, William J.; Parks, Geoffrey T.; Gonçalves, Leonardo V.N.; de Neufville, Richard

243

Decommissioning and Dismantling of the Floating Maintenance Base 'Lepse' - 13316  

SciTech Connect

The Lepse was built in Russia in 1934 and commissioned as a dry cargo ship. In 1961 she was re-equipped for use as a nuclear service ship (NSS), specifically a floating maintenance base (FMB), to support the operation of the civilian nuclear fleet (ice-breakers) of the USSR. In 1988 Lepse was taken out of service and in 1990 she was re-classified as a 'berth connected ship', located at a berth near the port of Murmansk under the ownership of Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) Atomflot. Lepse has special storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel assemblies (SFA) that have been used to store several hundred SFAs for nearly 40 years. High and intermediate-level liquid radioactive waste (LRW) is also present in the spent nuclear fuel assembly storage channels, in special tanks and also in the SFA cooling circuit. Many of the SFAs stored in Lepse are classified as damaged and cannot be removed using standard procedures. The removal of the SFA and LRW from the Lepse storage facilities is a hazardous task and requires specially designed tools, equipment and an infrastructure in which these can be deployed safely. Lepse is a significant environmental hazard in the North West of Russia. Storing spent nuclear fuel and high-level liquid radioactive waste on board Lepse in the current conditions is not acceptable with respect to Russian Federation health, safety and environmental standards and with international best practice. The approved concept design for the removal of the SFA and LRW and dismantling of Lepse requires that the ship be transported to Nerpa shipyard where specialist infrastructure will be constructed and equipment installed. One of the main complexities of the Project lies within the number of interested stakeholders involved in the Project. The Lepse project has been high focus on the international stage for many years with previous international efforts failing to make significant progress towards the objective of decommissioning Lepse. The Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership (NDEP) approved an internationally funded project to identify and prioritise nuclear and environmental hazards in NW Russia. Within this project the Lepse was recognised as being one of the highest nuclear hazards in NW Russia. Removal of SNF, SRW and LRW from Lepse requires innovative design and development of bespoke equipment. The main drivers of the NDEP Donors are first to safely transport Lepse in 2012 from her current berth close to the local population in Murmansk to the nominated dismantling shipyard, and secondly to raise Lepse from the water in 2013 onto the slip-way at the dismantling shipyard. A description is provided of the approach and progress towards preparing the Lepse for the removal of SFAs and other radioactive waste, to decontaminate and then dismantle the vessel under international donor funding. (authors)

Field, D.; Mizen, K. [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)] [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Parametric study of the total system life cycle cost of an alternate nuclear waste management strategy using deep boreholes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy recently submitted a license application for the Yucca Mountain repository to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, yet even the most optimistic timetable projects that the repository will not now ...

Moulton, Taylor Allen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Radiological Survey Approach to Use Prior to Decommissioning: Results from a Technology Scanning and Assessment Project Focused on the Chornobyl NPP  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this project are to learn how to plan and execute the Technology Scanning and Assessment (TSA) approach by conducting a project and to be able to provide the approach as a capability to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) and potentially elsewhere. A secondary objective is to learn specifics about decommissioning and in particular about radiological surveying to be performed prior to decommissioning to help ChNPP decision makers. TSA is a multi-faceted capability that monitors and analyzes scientific, technical, regulatory, and business factors and trends for decision makers and company leaders. It is a management tool where information is systematically gathered, analyzed, and used in business planning and decision making. It helps managers by organizing the flow of critical information and provides managers with information they can act upon. The focus of this TSA project is on radiological surveying with the target being ChNPP's Unit 1. This reactor was stopped on November 30, 1996. At this time, Ukraine failed to have a regulatory basis to provide guidelines for nuclear site decommissioning. This situation has not changed as of today. A number of documents have been prepared to become a basis for a combined study of the ChNPP Unit 1 from the engineering and radiological perspectives. The results of such a study are expected to be used when a detailed decommissioning plan is created.

Milchikov, A.; Hund, G.; Davidko, M.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

246

Seamless remote dismantling system for heavy and highly radioactive components of Korean nuclear power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A seamless remote system for dismantling heavy and highly radioactive components during the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant is proposed. The originality of the dismantling system is in its ability to handle all the processes involved in the dismantling of major components of a nuclear power plant without external intervention. Previous types of dismantling equipment were designed for specific components or a particular process, which required time consuming and risky equipment replacement tasks between different processes. The proposed dismantling system was designed and verified by simulation of all the processes for dismantling the major components of a Korean nuclear power plant. Several challenges such as working in confined spaces and with complex movement lines as well as interference between components were overcome. The proposed system is capable of handling all the dismantling processes without equipment replacement tasks or the need to drain the reactor pool. The system is expected to considerably reduce the time and cost of the entire decommissioning process while also improving safety.

Dongjun Hyun; Sung-Uk Lee; Yong-Chil Seo; Geun-Ho Kim; Jonghwan Lee; Kwan-Seong Jeong; Byung-Seon Choi; Jei-Kwon Moon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation to Decommissioning Transition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Decommissioning Transition to Decommissioning Transition Example Example 80 1.5 OPERATIONAL TRANSITION AND DEACTIVATION STRATEGY According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), the life cycle of a facility makes several transitions over the course of it's existence. The typical stages or phases include operation, (standby), deactivation, S&M, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The life cycle phases may occur as a straight through process or with long interim periods. In Fig. 1.4, "Facility Disposition Scenarios and Associated Hazard Profiles" (Ref. DOE-STD-1120-98), Scenario 2 demonstrates the life cycle phasing that most closely represents that of the 9206 Complex. Since the ultimate disposition of Building 9206 (and associated buildings and operations) is not known, a decision was made to

248

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park April 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Mike Koentop (865) 576-0885 www.oakridge.doe.gov Oak Ridge, Tenn. - As part of its ongoing commitment to cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War at sites across the weapons complex, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract for the remaining environmental cleanup at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC. The $2.2 billion contract will complete cleanup and provide support functions at ETTP, while supporting local jobs and area small businesses. "Today's contract announcement means that we can continue to meet our

249

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decontamination & Decommissioning Project Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park April 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Mike Koentop (865) 576-0885 www.oakridge.doe.gov Oak Ridge, Tenn. - As part of its ongoing commitment to cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War at sites across the weapons complex, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract for the remaining environmental cleanup at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC. The $2.2 billion contract will complete cleanup and provide support functions at ETTP, while supporting local jobs and area small businesses. "Today's contract announcement means that we can continue to meet our

250

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning To ensure development of appropriate levels of engineering detail, DOE-EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) has prepared this guidance for tailoring a D&D project's engineering/design to meet the objectives of the CD milestones. The enhanced rigor in planning and systematic, forward looking approach to engineering/design recommended in this guidance is intended to ensure that the level of detail in technical planning and technical development, integrated with other project aspects such as safety basis modifications, leads to a high confidence that the engineered system as a whole will function as designed. As the level of

251

Completion of decommissioning: Monitoring for site release and license termination  

SciTech Connect

To request termination of a license upon completion of dismantling or decommissioning activities, documenting any residual radioactivity to show that the levels are environmentally acceptable will be necessary. When the regulators approve the decommissioning plan, they establish what the release criteria for the decommissioned site will be at the time of the site release and license termination. The criteria are numeric guidelines for direct radiation in soils and on surfaces. If the regulatory body finds that the measured on-site values are below the guidelines, the site will be acceptable for unrestricted release (no radiological controls or future use). If areas are found above those values, more decontamination or cleanup of these areas may be required unless the regulatory body grants an exemption.

Boing, L.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas  

SciTech Connect

This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tech Assistance Tech Assistance Savannah River National Laboratory- Assess Adequacy of Process Knowledge for D&D Guidance for Determining Adequacy of Process Knowledge Page 1 of 2 Savannah River National Laboratory South Carolina Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Challenge The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. When such excess facilities are scheduled for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), among the tasks the responsible project team is faced with include the evaluation and planning for the removal, characterization, and disposition of all legacy

254

Finding of no significant impact, decontamination and decommissioning of Battelle Columbus Laboratories in Columbus and West Jefferson, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment has been developed by the Department of Energy in accordance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the proposed decommissioning of contaminated areas at the Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio. The discussions in Section 1.0 provide general background information on the proposed action. Section 2.0 describes the existing radiological and non-radiological condition of the Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Section 3.0 identifies the alternatives considered for the proposed action and describes in detail the proposed decommissioning project. Section 4.0 evaluates the potential risks the project poses to human health and the environment. Section 5.0 presents the Department of Energy's proposed action. As a result of nuclear research and development activities conducted over a period of approximately 43 years performed for the Department of Energy, its predecessor agencies, and under commercial contracts, the 15 buildings became contaminated with varying amounts of radioactive material. The Department of Energy no longer has a need to utilize the facilities and is contractually obligate to remove that contamination such that they can be used by their owners without radiological restrictions. This Environmental Assessment for the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project is consistent with the direction from the Secretary of Energy that public awareness and participation be considered in sensitive projects and is an appropriate document to determine action necessary to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. 30 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Implementation of 10 CFR 20.1406, Regarding Minimizing Contamination and the Generation of Waste, and Facilitating Decommissioning through the Design of Facilities and Operating Procedures  

SciTech Connect

In the very near future (perhaps as soon as the fall of 2007), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) anticipates receiving one or more license applications for new nuclear power plants. An important consideration for new facilities is that they be designed and operated to minimize contamination, to minimize the generation of waste, and to facilitate decommissioning. A relatively recent regulation, 10 CFR 20.1406, mandates these requirements. The regulation states, 'Applicants for licenses, other than renewals, after August 20, 1997, shall describe in the application how facility design and procedures for operation will minimize, to the extent practicable, contamination of the facility and the environment, facilitate eventual decommissioning, and minimize, to the extent practicable, the generation of radioactive waste'. This paper summarizes various initiatives taken by the NRC and industry to develop guidance for implementing 10 CFR 20.1406 before submission of license applications. (authors)

O'Donnell, E.; Ott, W.R. [Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The National Nuclear Laboratory's Approach to Processing Mixed Wastes and Residues - 13080  

SciTech Connect

The National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) treats a wide variety of materials produced as by-products of the nuclear fuel cycle, mostly from uranium purification and fuel manufacture but also including materials from uranium enrichment and from the decommissioning of obsolete plants. In the context of this paper, treatment is defined as recovery of uranium or other activity from residues, the recycle of uranium to the fuel cycle or preparation for long term storage and the final disposal or discharge to the environment of the remainder of the material. NNL's systematic but flexible approach to residue assessment and treatment is described in this paper. The approach typically comprises up to five main phases. The benefits of a systematic approach to waste and residue assessments and processing are described in this paper with examples used to illustrate each phase of work. Benefits include early identification of processing routes or processing issues and the avoidance of investment in inappropriate and costly plant or processes. (authors)

Greenwood, Howard; Docrat, Tahera; Allinson, Sarah J.; Coppersthwaite, Duncan P.; Sultan, Ruqayyah; May, Sarah [National Nuclear Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, UK, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, UK, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Quarterly Nuclear Power Deployment Scorecard - January 2013 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Deployment Scorecard - January 2013 Power Deployment Scorecard - January 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Power Deployment Scorecard - January 2013 News Updates On October 22, 2012, Dominion Resources Inc. announced that it would close and decommission its Kewaunee Power Station located in Carlton, Wis. after failing to find a buyer for the plant. The company said that the plant closure was a purely economic decision resulting from low projected wholesale electricity prices. Power production will cease in the second quarter of 2013. On November 20, the Department of Energy announced that it had selected the Generation mPower team as a recipient for Government cost-shared funding as part of its Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support program. The Department also announced plans to issue a follow-on solicitation open to other companies and manufacturers, focused

258

Quarterly Nuclear Power Deployment Scorecard - January 2013 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Deployment Scorecard - January 2013 Power Deployment Scorecard - January 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Power Deployment Scorecard - January 2013 News Updates On October 22, 2012, Dominion Resources Inc. announced that it would close and decommission its Kewaunee Power Station located in Carlton, Wis. after failing to find a buyer for the plant. The company said that the plant closure was a purely economic decision resulting from low projected wholesale electricity prices. Power production will cease in the second quarter of 2013. On November 20, the Department of Energy announced that it had selected the Generation mPower team as a recipient for Government cost-shared funding as part of its Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support program. The Department also announced plans to issue a follow-on solicitation open to other companies and manufacturers, focused

259

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, January 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deployment Summary, January 2013 Deployment Summary, January 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, January 2013 January 30, 2013 - 5:59pm Addthis Quarterly Updates On October 22 Dominion Resources Inc. announced that it would close and decommission its Kewaunee Power Station located in Carlton, Wis. after failing to find a buyer for the plant. The company said that the plant closure was a purely economic decision resulting from low projected wholesale electricity prices. Power production will cease in the second quarter of 2013. On November 20, 2012, the Department of Energy announced that it had selected the Generation mPower team as a recipient for Government cost-shared funding as part of its Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support program. The Department also announced plans to issue a

260

DOE-STD-1166-2003; Deactivation and Decommissioning Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1166-2003 September 2003 DOE STANDARD DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1166-2003 This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

SciTech Connect

This document is the March 1996 listing of NRC issuances. Included are: (1) NRC orders granting Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company`s petition for review of the ASLB order LBP-95-17, (2) NRC orders relating to the potential disqualification of two commissioners in the matter of the decommissioning of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (3) ASLB orders pertaining to the Oncology Services Corporation, (4) ASLB orders pertaining to the Radiation Oncology Center, (5) ASLB orders pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and (6) Director`s decision pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

EM Develops Database for Efficient Solutions to Nuclear Cleanup Challenges Across Complex  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Many deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the EM complex require robotic and remote handling systems to protect workers during nuclear cleanup operations.

263

The gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR), high efficiency, cost competitive, nuclear energy for the next century  

SciTech Connect

The Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is the result of coupling the evolution of a small passively safe reactor with key technology developments in the US during the last decade: large industrial gas turbines, large active magnetic bearings, and compact, highly effective plate-fin heat exchangers. The GT-MHR is the only reactor concept which provides a step increase in economic performance combined with increased safety. This is accomplished through its unique utilization of the Brayton cycle to produce electricity directly with the high temperature helium primary coolant from the reactor directly driving the gas turbine electrical generator. This cannot be accomplished with another reactor concept. It retains the high levels of passive safety and the standardized modular design of the steam cycle MHTGR, while showing promise for a significant reduction in power generating costs by increasing plant net efficiency to a remarkable 47%.

Zgliczynski, J.B.; Silady, F.A.; Neylan, A.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Environmental Impacts, Health and Safety Impacts, and Financial Costs of the Front End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

FEFC processes, unlike many of the proposed fuel cycles and technologies under consideration, involve mature operational processes presently in use at a number of facilities worldwide. This report identifies significant impacts resulting from these current FEFC processes and activities. Impacts considered to be significant are those that may be helpful in differentiating between fuel cycle performance and for which the FEFC impact is not negligible relative to those from the remainder of the full fuel cycle. This report: • Defines ‘representative’ processes that typify impacts associated with each step of the FEFC, • Establishes a framework and architecture for rolling up impacts into normalized measures that can be scaled to quantify their contribution to the total impacts associated with various fuel cycles, and • Develops and documents the bases for estimates of the impacts and costs associated with each of the representative FEFC processes.

Brett W Carlsen; Urairisa Phathanapirom; Eric Schneider; John S. Collins; Roderick G. Eggert; Brett Jordan; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. Ault; Alan G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn; William G. Halsey; Mark Sutton; Clay E. Easterly; Ryan P. Manger; C. Wilson McGinn; Stephen E. Fisher; Brent W. Dixon; Latif Yacout

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Startup Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume No. VIII, Part I  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning the radiation work training program; final plant configuration document; engineering requirements for the preparation of detailed procedures; opportunities for cost-schedule reductions; potential risks and problems; cost-benefit criteria and procedure for keeping occupational radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable; and engineering holds and assumptions.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deactivation & Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Savannah River Site imploded the 455-foot-tall K Reactor Cooling Tower in May 2010. The project was completed safely and contributed 36.5 square miles to the site's total footprint reduction. On August 3, 2013, contractors and the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management successfully completed the explosive demolition of the K-1206-F Fire Water Tower, which for 54 years had been used for fire water supply at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The 382 foot tall, 400,000-gallon water tower tank was drained and isolated from the fire water system prior to the estimated 100-ton steel structure being

268

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D D is devoted to S M at each of the sites. Our S M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Radiation consequences of seawater contamination during floating storage of reactor-compartment units from salvaged nuclear-powered submarines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The storage time before salvaging of decommissioned nuclear-powered submarines and the floating storage time of reactor units from salvaged submarines ... decades. During this time, radioactive contamination of seawater

A. Ya. Blekher; N. L. Kuchin; I. V. Sergeev

270

EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Harford Site, Richland, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

271

EIS-0329: Proposed Construction, Operation, Decontamination/Decommissioning of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6) conversion facilities, at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky.

272

EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

273

Implementation of 10 CFR 20.1406 Through Life Cycle Planning for Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes a regulatory guide that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is currently developing for use in implementing Title 10, Section 20.1406, of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 20.1406), 'Minimization of Contamination'. The intent of the regulation is to diminish the occurrence and severity of 'legacy sites' by taking measures to reduce and control contamination and facilitate eventual decommissioning. The thrust of the regulatory guide is to encourage applicants to use technically sound engineering judgment and a practical risk-informed approach to achieve the objectives of 10 CFR 20.1406. In particular, such an approach should consider the materials and processes involved (e.g., solids, liquids, gases), and focus on (1) the relative significance of potential contamination, (2) areas that are most susceptible to leaks, and (3) the appropriate level of consideration that should be incorporated in facility design and operational procedures to prevent and control contamination. (authors)

O'Donnell, E.; Ott, W.R. [Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Technical program plan for the transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition focus area  

SciTech Connect

Hundreds of aging nuclear materials processing facilities within the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Weapons Complex are now being shut down and deactivated. These facilities, situated throughout the United States, will require a monumental effort to clean up safely and with minimal environmental insult. Current cleanup technologies tend to be labor intensive and expensive, they produce an unacceptably large volume of waste, and they expose workers to radioactive and other hazardous substances. This document describes an emerging program designed to develop and demonstrate new technical approaches to the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program for DOE`s nuclear materials processing facilities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), the program seeks to integrate the strengths of DOE`s technical, managerial, and systems engineering capabilities with those of industry, universities, and other government agencies. Once developed, these technologies will help to provide US industry with a competitive edge in the worldwide market that exists for improved environmental restoration and D&D services.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

FRP Retrofit of the Ring-Beam of a Nuclear Reactor Containment Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Popovic. K. W. Neale. S. Rizkalla. and G. Tadros Synopsis: The Gentilly· l nuclear power plant, in Quebec support. Keywords: concrete repair; fiber optic sensors; nuclear power plant; structural monitoring. 1. HISTORY 1.1 Decommissioning of the Reactor The Gentilly-I nuclear power plant, located

276

DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy and Experience Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning Prepared By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of Engineering and Technology, EM-20 September 2009 This page is deliberately blank. DOE EM Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning i Contents Acknowledgements......................................................................................................................................iv Acronyms...................................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction......................................................................................................................................

277

Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 2: Technology logic diagram  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 2 has been divided into five sections: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Robotics/Automation, and Waste Management. Each section contains logical breakdowns of the Y-12 D and D problems by subject area and identifies technologies that can be reasonably applied to each D and D challenge.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4: Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) problems at 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak K-25 Site technology Logic Diagram, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D&D and waste management activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between the cost and risk. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 presents an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among the environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities. It assists users in gathering, analyzing, storing and sharing knowledge and information within the D&D community. This approach assists in reducing the need to rediscover the knowledge of the past while capturing the new knowledge and experiences gained during

280

DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) The purpose of the "DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning" report is to capture the considerable technical experience gained to date for implementation of In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) projects at DOE facilities. As current and projected budgets for the EM program indicate reduced and flat funding profiles for the foreseeable future, the potential exists for this institutional knowledge to be lost as the ramp-down of project staffing commences with the cessation of ARRA. EM's Office of Deactivation & Decommissioning and Facility Engineering

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cost Containment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost containment in health care involves a wide ... , the growth rate of expenditure or certain costs of health care services. These measures include ... patient education, etc. The reasons for increased cost ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Problem free nuclear power and global change  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fission power reactors represent a solution-in-principle to all aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high- grade heat for electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-driving around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates. However, a substantial number of major issues currently stand between nuclear power implemented with light- water reactors and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems, including long-term fuel supply, adverse public perceptions regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps more seriously - cost. We describe a GW-scale, high-temperature nuclear reactor heat source that can operate with no human intervention for a few decades and that may be widely acceptable, since its safety features are simple, inexpensive and easily understood. We provide first-level details of a reactor system designed to satisfy these requirements. Such a back-solving approach to realizing large-scale nuclear fission power systems potentially leads to an energy source capable of meeting all large-scale stationary demands for high- temperature heat. If widely employed to support such demands, it could, for example, directly reduce present-day world-wide CO{sub 2} emissions by two-fold; by using it to produce non-carbonaceous fuels for small mobile demands, a second two-fold reduction could be attained. Even the first such reduction would permit continued slow power-demand growth in the First World and rapid development of the Third World, both without any governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage.

Teller, E.; Wood, L.; Nuckolls, J.; Ishikawa, M.; Hyde, R.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Application of Risk-Based Cost-Benefit Analysis in the Assessment of Acceptable Public Safety for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1982, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued, for public comment, proposed safety goals for commercial nuclear power plants. In an effort to quantitatively evaluate these proposed goals, a methodolog...

Thomas A. Morgan; Alfred J. Unione; George Sauter

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 68 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nuclear electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... p.344-6) and referred to in my letter of 23 October. The retail price index (RPI) has been used to correct for inflation and a uniform interest rate ... as given by historic costs, and if a previously unconsidered effect of inflation on nuclear fuel costs is included, the margin becomes 34 per cent above that for coal.

J.W. JEFFERY

1981-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

At What Cost? A comparative evaluation of the social costs of selected electricity generation alternatives in Ontario.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the private and external costs of electricity generated in Ontario by natural gas, wind, refurbished nuclear and new nuclear power. The purpose… (more)

Icyk, Bryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Aldana, J. [NES, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA  

SciTech Connect

Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Rosie - mobile robot worksystem for decommissioning and dismantling operations. Final report, April 1, 1996--January 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

RedZone Robotics, Inc. has undertaken development of an advanced remote worksystem - Rosie - specifically designed to meet the challenges of performing a wide range of decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) operations in nuclear environments. The Rosie worksystem includes a locomotor, heavy manipulator, operator console, and control system for remote operations. The locomotor is a highly mobile platform with tether management and hydraulic power onboard. The heavy manipulator is a high-payload, long-reach boom used to deploy a wide variety of tools and/or sensors into the work area. Rosie`s advanced control system, broad work capabilities, and hardening/reliability for hazardous duty make it a new and unique capability that facilitates completion of significant cleanup projects throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) and private sector. Endurance testing of the first Rosie system from September 1995 to March 1996 has proven its capabilities and appropriateness for D&D applications. Design enhancements were incorporated into the second Rosie system to improve and add features necessary for deployment at a DOE facility decommissioning. This second Rosie unit was deployed to the Argonne National Laboratory`s CP-5 reactor facility in early December 1996, and it is currently being used in the decommissioning of the reactor there. This report will overview this second Rosie system and the design enhancements made to it based on the lessons learned during the design, fabrication, and testing of the first Rosie system. The Rosie system has been designed to be a versatile and adaptable tool that can be used in many different applications in D&D work at nuclear facilities. It can carry a wide variety of tooling, sensors, and other robotic equipment at the tip of its heavy manipulator, and it can deploy those items to many different hazardous work areas. Rosie`s capabilities and system design address the need for durability and reliability in these environments.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Office of Nuclear Safety - Directives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives The HSS Office of Nuclear Safety is the responsible office for the development, interpretation, and revision of the following Department of Energy (DOE) directives. Go to DOE's Directives Web Page to view these directives. DOE Order (O) 252.1A, Technical Standards Program DOE O 252.1A promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. HS-30 Contact: Jeff Feit DOE Policy (P) 420.1, Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy DOE P 420.1, documents the Department's nuclear safety policy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment.

291

Sensor Network Demonstration for In Situ Decommissioning - 13332  

SciTech Connect

Florida International University's (FIU's) Applied Research Center is currently supporting the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management Office of D and D and Facility Engineering program. FIU is supporting DOE's initiative to improve safety, reduce technical risks, and limit uncertainty within D and D operations by identifying technologies suitable to meet specific facility D and D requirements, assessing the readiness of those technologies for field deployment, and conducting feasibility studies and large scale demonstrations of promising technologies. During FY11, FIU collaborated with Savannah River National Laboratory in the development of an experimental test site for the demonstration of multiple sensor systems for potential use in the in situ decommissioning process. In situ decommissioning is a process in which the above ground portion of a facility is dismantled and removed, and the underground portion is filled with a cementious material such as grout. In such a scenario, the question remains on how to effectively monitor the structural health of the grout (cracking, flexing, and sinking), as well as track possible migration of contaminants within and out of the grouted monolith. The right types of sensors can aid personnel in better understanding the conditions within the entombed structure. Without sensors embedded in and around the monolith, it will be very difficult to estimate structural integrity and contaminant transport. Yet, to fully utilize the appropriate sensors and the provided data, their performance and reliability must be evaluated outside a laboratory setting. To this end, a large scale experimental setup and demonstration was conducted at FIU. In order to evaluate a large suite of sensor systems, FIU personnel designed and purchased a pre-cast concrete open-top cube, which served as a mock-up of an in situ DOE decommissioned facility. The inside of the cube measures 10 ft x 10 ft x 8 ft. In order to ensure that the individual sensors would be immobilized during the grout pouring activities, a set of nine sensor racks were designed. The 270 sensors provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Mississippi State University (MSU), University of Houston (UH), and University of South Carolina (USC) were secured to these racks based on predetermined locations. Once sensor racks were installed inside the test cube, connected and debugged, approximately 32 cubic yards of special grout material was used to entomb the sensors. MSU provided and demonstrated four types of fiber loop ring-down (FLR) sensors for detection of water, temperature, cracks, and movement of fluids. INL provided and demonstrated time differenced 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), advanced tensiometers for moisture content, and thermocouples for temperature measurements. University of Houston provided smart aggregate (SA) sensors, which detect crack severity and water presence. An additional UH sensor system demonstrated was a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) fiber optic system measuring strain, presence of water, and temperature. USC provided a system which measured acoustic emissions during cracking, as well as temperature and pH sensors. All systems were connected to a Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) data networking and collection system designed, developed and provided by FIU. The purpose of SRAS was to collect and allow download of the raw sensor data from all the sensor system, as well as allow upload of the processed data and any analysis reports and graphs. All this information was made available to the research teams via the Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management and Information Tool (D and D KM-IT). As a current research effort, FIU is performing an energy analysis, and transferring several sensor systems to a Photovoltaic (PV) System to continuously monitor energy consumption parameters and overall power demands. Also, One final component of this research is focusing on developing an integrated data network to capture, log and analyze sensor system data in near real time from a single inte

Lagos, L.; Varona, J.; Awwad, A. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Rivera, J.; McGill, J. [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)] [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Cost Estimator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

293

Operating Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants 89: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA, prepared by the Department of the Navy, evaluates the environmental impacts of the disposal of decommissioned, defueled, naval reactor plants from the USS Enterprise at DOE's Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. DOE participated as a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EA. The Department of the Navy issued its FONSI on August 23, 2012. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 23, 2012

295

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its...

296

Cost Shifting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cost shifting exists when a provider raises prices for one set of buyers because it has lowered prices for some other buyer. In theory, cost shifting can take place only if providers have unexploited market power. The empirical evidence on the extent of cost shifting is mixed. Taken as a whole, the evidence does not support the claims that cost shifting is a large and pervasive feature of the US health-care markets. At most, one can argue that perhaps one-fifth of Medicare payment reductions have been passed on to private payers. The majority of the rigorous studies, however, have found no evidence of cost shifting.

M.A. Morrisey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

EM Hosts Successful Visit from Canadian Nuclear Laboratories at Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Office of D&D and Facility Engineering (D&D/FE) hosted decommissioning professionals from Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) — Canada's premier nuclear technology and engineering organization — for two days at EM’s Hanford site in November this year. CNL was formerly known as Atomic Energy Canada Ltd.

298

Multi-Objective Optimization Analysis of Post-Fukushima Power Generation Planning in Japan with Considering Nuclear Power’s Risk Cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, multi-objective optimization analysis was conducted on the post-Fukushima power generation planning in Japan up to 2030 from economic and environmental perspectives with considering nuclear

Qi Zhang; Tetsuo Tezuka; Keiichi Ishihara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Radioactive waste management and decommissioning of accelerator facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......produced in nuclear power plants and in accelerators is that there...high-energy accelerator is of solid...of magnets, vacuum pipes and components...of particle accelerators are: iron...content. Several nuclear processes contribute......

Luisa Ulrici; Matteo Magistris

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Economic Analysis of the Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High-Temperature-Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating current, AC, to direct current, DC, conversion is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of the plant was also performed using the H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. A required cost of $3.23 per kg of hydrogen produced was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. Approximately 73% of this cost ($2.36/kg) is the result of capital costs associated with the construction of the combined nuclear plant and hydrogen production facility. Operation and maintenance costs represent about 18% of the total cost ($0.57/kg). Variable costs (including the cost of nuclear fuel) contribute about 8.7% ($0.28/kg) to the total cost of hydrogen production, and decommissioning and raw material costs make up the remaining fractional cost.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

cost savings  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

reduced the amount of time involved in the annual chemical inventory for a cost savings of 18,282. Other presentations covered SRNS' award-winning employee suggestion...

303

BPA's Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BPAsCosts Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates...

304

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram: Part A, Decontamination and Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

This report documents activities of decontamination and decommissioning at ORNL. Topics discussed include general problems, waste types, containment, robotics automation and decontamination processes.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Nuclear Systems Capabilities > Nuclear Systems Technologies > Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Overview Process Monitoring & Signal Validation Diagnostic & Advisory Systems Advanced (AI-based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Artificial intelligence Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Bookmark and Share Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control. Click on image to view larger image. The goal of the Nuclear Engineering Division's research on advanced

308

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

309

Energy, environmental, health and cost benefits of cogeneration from fossil fuels and nuclear energy using the electrical utility facilities of a province  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is investigated for increasing the utilization efficiency of energy resources and reducing environmental emissions, focusing on utility-scale cogeneration and the contributions of nuclear energy. A case study is presented for Ontario using the nuclear and fossil facilities of the main provincial electrical utility. Implementation of utility-based cogeneration in Ontario or a region with a similar energy system and attributes is seen to be able to reduce significantly annual and cumulative uranium and fossil fuel use and related emissions, provide economic benefits for the province and its electrical utility, and substitute nuclear energy for fossil fuels. The reduced emissions of greenhouse gases are significant, and indicate that utility-based cogeneration can contribute notably to efforts to combat climate change. Ontario and other regions with similar energy systems and characteristics would benefit from working with the regional electrical utilities and other relevant parties to implementing cogeneration in a careful and optimal manner. Implementation decisions need to balance the interests of the stakeholders when determining which cogeneration options to adopt and barriers to regional utility-based cogeneration need to be overcome.

Marc A. Rosen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Decommissioning and PIE of the MEGAPIE spallation target  

SciTech Connect

A key experiment in the Accelerated Driven Systems roadmap, the MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) (1 MW) was initiated in 1999 in order to design and build a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, then to operate it into the Swiss spallation neutron facility SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute. The target has been designed, manufactured, and tested during integral tests, before irradiation carried out end of 2006. During irradiation, neutron and thermo hydraulic measurements were performed allowing deep interpretation of the experiment and validation of the models used during design phase. The decommissioning, Post Irradiation Examinations and waste management phases were defined properly. The phases dedicated to cutting, sampling, cleaning, waste management, samples preparation and shipping to various laboratories were performed by PSI teams: all these phases constitute a huge work, which allows now to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of structural material, irradiated in relevant conditions. Preliminary results are presented in the paper, they concern chemical characterization. The following radio-nuclides have been identified by ?-spectrometry: {sup 60}Co, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 102}Rh, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 172}Hf/Lu, {sup 173}Lu, {sup 194}Hg/Au, {sup 195}Au, {sup 207}Bi. For some of these nuclides the activities can be easily evaluated from ?-spectrometry results ({sup 207}Bi, {sup 194}Hg/Au), while other nuclides can only be determined after chemical separations ({sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 195}Au, {sup 129}I, {sup 36}Cl and ?-emitting {sup 208-210}Po). The concentration of {sup 129}I is lower than expected. The chemical analysis already performed on spallation and corrosion products in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) are very relevant for further applications of LBE as a spallation media and more generally as a coolant.

Latge, C.; Henry, J. [CEA-Cadarache, DEN-DTN, 13108 Saint-Paul-les-Durance (France); Wohlmuther, M.; Dai, Y.; Gavillet, D.; Hammer, B.; Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.; Thomsen, K.; Tuerler, A.; Wagner, W. [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Gessi, A. [ENEA, Brasimone (Italy); Guertin, A. [CNRS, Subatech, Nantes (France); Konstantinovic, M. [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Lindau, R. [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Maloy, S. [DOE-LANL, Los Alamos (United States); Saito, S. [JAEA, Tokai (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nuclear cheap?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... account of the fact that if there had been no nuclear contribution the additional fossil fuel supplies would have had to come from expanded output at the marginal and most expensive ... a perfectly proper accountancy basis, including allowance for costs yet to be incurred, the price we would be paying for electricity would be higher now had fossil stations been preferred ...

P.M.S. JONES

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

312

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. The "D&D Program Map" presents an integrated overview of DOE's complex-wide D&D project locations, scope, and issues and includes information on: * The affects of the AMERICAN Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

313

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. The "D&D Program Map" presents an integrated overview of DOE's complex-wide D&D project locations, scope, and issues and includes information on: * The affects of the AMERICAN Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

314

ANL CP-5 decontamination and decommissioning project necessary and sufficient pilot. Report of the standards identification team on the selection of the necessary and sufficient standards set  

SciTech Connect

The CP-5 reactor was a heavy-water moderated and cooled, highly-enriched uranium-fueled thermal reactor designed for supplying neutrons for research. The reactor was operated almost continuously for 25 years until its final shutdown in 1979. It is situated on approximately three acres in the southwestern section of Argonne National Laboratory. In 1980, all nuclear fuel and the heavy water that could be drained from the process systems were shipped off-site, and the CP-5 facility was placed into lay-up pending funding for decommissioning. It was maintained in the lay-up condition with a minimum of maintenance until 1990, when the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project began. This D and D project provides for the disassembly and removal of all radioactive components, equipment, and structures that are associated with the CP-5 facility. The experimental area around the CP-5 reactor has been prepared for D and D, and the area outside the facility has been remediated. The reactor primary coolant and support systems have been removed and packaged as waste. The significant remaining tasks are (1) removal of the reactor internals and the biological shield structure; (2) decontamination of the rod storage area; (3) decontamination of the various radioactive material storage and handling facilities, including the fuel pool; and (4) decontamination and dismantlement of the building. This report describes the scope of the project, identification of standards for various aspects of the project, the lessons learned, and consideration for implementation.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

about 440 Million under Cost November 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop...

316

Cost analysis of revisions to 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix J, leak tests for primary and secondary containments of light-water-cooled nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The report examines the differences between the existing and proposed Appendix J and identifies eleven substantive areas where quantifiable impacts will likely result. The analysis indicated that there are four areas of change which tend to dominate all others in terms of cost impacts. The applicable paragraph numbers from Draft E2 of the Appendix J revision and the nature of the change follows: III.A(4) and III.A(6) - Test Pressure and Testing at Reduced Pressure No Longer Allowed; III.A(7)(b)(i) Acceptance Criteria 1.0 L/sub a/ Acceptable ''As Found'' Leakage; III.A(8)(2) Retesting Following Failure of ''As Found'' Type A Test - Corrective Action Plan, and III.A(8)(b)(ii) Option To Do More Frequent Type B and C Testing Rather Than More Type A Penalty Tests. The best estimate is that the proposed Appendix J would result in a cost savings ranging from about $100 million to $160 million, and increase routing occupational exposure on the order of 10,000 person-rem. These estimates capture the total impact to industry and the NRC over the assumed operating life of all existing and planned future power reactors. All dollar impacts projected to occur in future years have been present worthed at discount rates ranging from 5% to 10%.

Sciacca, F.; Nelson, W.; Simpkins, B.; Riordan, B.; Godfrey, P.; Cohen, S.; Beal, S.; Goldin, D.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Nuclear Eclectic Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...much higher future costs for oil and natural gas. However, the...ELECTRICITY GENERATION FROM COAL, OIL, AND NUCLEAR FUEL, NUCLEAR...electricity generation from coal, oil, and nuclear fuel, cite about...possibility that stimu-lated a marathon debate between the Union of...

David J. Rose

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation Revisiting the cost escalation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation Revisiting the cost escalation curse of nuclear power@mines-paristech.fr hal-00780566,version1-24Jan2013 #12;Revisiting the cost escalation curse of nuclear power. New lessons the first wave of nuclear reactors in 1970 to the construction of Generation III+ reactors in Finland

Boyer, Edmond

319

Electricity costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... index is used to correct for inflation. The short answer is given by the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The ... Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The cost per kWh of fuel. . . rose by 18.6 per cent (between 1979 ...

J.W. JEFFERY

1982-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Robotics Laboratory - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Engineering Capabilities > Engineering Experimentation > Robotics Laboratory Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Robotics Laboratory The Robotics Laboratory (RL) houses various remote manipulator systems, including the Dual Arm Work Platform, to support enhancements to teleoperation of remote systems for nuclear applications. Bookmark and Share Argonne scientists are using computer simulation and robot task programming tools to enhance the safety and efficiency of telerobotics in applications such as the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear power

322

Conceptual Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Conceptual Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan (D&D) was developed as a concept for progressing from the final actions of the Disposal Phase, through the Decontamination and Decommissioning Phase, and into the initiation of the Long-Term Monitoring Phase. This plan was written in a manner that coincides with many of the requirements specified in DOE Order 5820.2A. Radioactive Waste Management; ASTM El 167 87, Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations; and other documents listed in Attachment 3 of the D&D Plan. However, this conceptual plan does not meet all of the requirements necessary for a Decontamination and Decommissioning plan necessary for submission to the U.S. Congress in accordance with the Land Withdrawal Act (P.L. 102-579). A complete D&D plan that will meet the requirements of all of these documents and of the Land Withdrawal Act will be prepared and submitted to Congress by October 1997.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division, now Washington TRU Solutions LLC

1995-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

EIS-0364: Decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, Hanford Site, Richland, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), on proposed decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.

324

Allowable Residual Contamination Levels in soil for decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station site  

SciTech Connect

As part of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, a fundamental concern is the determination of Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for radionuclides in the soil at the site. The ARCL method described in this report is based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for unrestricted use of the land after decommissioning. In addition to naturally occurring radionuclides and fallout from weapons testing, soil contamination could potentially come from five other sources. These include operation of the Shippingport Station as a pressurized water reactor, operations of the Shippingport Station as a light-water breeder, operation of the nearby Beaver Valley reactors, releases during decommissioning, and operation of other nearby industries, including the Bruce-Mansfield coal-fired power plants. ARCL values are presented for 29 individual radionculides and a worksheet is provided so that ARCL values can be determined for any mixture of the individual radionuclides for any annual dose limit selected. In addition, a worksheet is provided for calculating present time soil concentration value that will decay to the ARCL values after any selected period of time, such as would occur during a period of restricted access. The ARCL results are presented for both unconfined (surface) and confined (subsurface) soil contamination. The ARCL method and results described in this report provide a flexible means of determining unrestricted-use site release conditions after decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.; Soldat, J.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Spent Nuclear Fuel Fact Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management needs. By coordinating common needs for research, technology development, and testing programs, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is achieving cost efficiencies...

326

Final report on decommissioning of wells, boreholes, and tiltmeter sites, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

In the late 1970s, test holes were drilled in northern Louisiana in the vicinity of Vacherie and Rayburn`s Salt Domes as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) (rename the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM)) program. The purpose of the program was to evaluate the suitability of salt domes for long term storage or disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Institute for Environmental Studies at Louisiana State University (IES/LSU) and Law Engineering Testing Company (LETCo) of Marietta, Georgia performed the initial field studies. In 1982, DOE awarded a contract to the Earth Technology Corporation (TETC) of Long Beach, California to continue the Gulf Coast Salt Dome studies. In 1986, DOE deferred salt domes from further consideration as repository sites. This report describes test well plugging and site abandonment activities performed by SWEC in accordance with Activity Plan (AP) 1--3, Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Work Sites in Louisiana. The objective of the work outlined in this AP was to return test sites to as near original condition as possible by plugging boreholes, removing equipment, regrading, and seeding. Appendices to this report contain forms required by State of Louisiana, used by SWEC to document decommissioning activities, and pertinent documentation related to lease/access agreements.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining-site management or corporate level expenditure · Direct vs. Indirect Costs ­ Direct (or variable) costs apply

Boisvert, Jeff

328

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408 ­ off-site management or corporate level expenditure · Direct vs. Indirect Costs ­ Direct (or variable

Boisvert, Jeff

329

Nuclear power: Chernobyl and the future: when the price is right  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... mention the displeasure of many citizens? The answer is that when the downsides of fossil fuels— including, but not limited to, their carbon dioxide production — are totted up ... Institute of Technology (MIT). After considering the cost of building the plant, buying fuel and operating the reactor, and finally disposing of the waste and decommissioning the facility, ...

Jim Giles

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

DUF6 Management Cost Analysis Report (CAR): Part 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . . Cost Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of May 1997 Figure 4.5 Total Costs of Manufacture of Metal Options 900 800 700 Ctj 300 3 200 100 0 Metal Shielding Oxide Shielding Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride and Oxide Shielding s Decontamination & Decommissioning QI Operations & Maintenance s Regulatory Compliance u Balance of Plant u Manufacturing Facilities s Manufacturing Equipment u Engineering Development 57 ..- . Cost Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride May 1997 4.4 Long-term Storage Storage of depleted uranium is predicated on its use at some later date. In the engineering analysis, storage options are defined by the type of storage facility, and suboptions are defined by the chemical form in which the depleted uranium is stored. The types of storage facilities analyzed are (1) buildings, (2) below ground vaults,

331

Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety » Nuclear and Facility Safety Nuclear Safety » Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives DOE Order (O) 252.1A, Technical Standards Program DOE O 252.1A promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. HS-30 Contact: Jeff Feit DOE Policy (P) 420.1, Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy DOE P 420.1, documents the Department's nuclear safety policy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment. HS-30 Contact: James O'Brien

332

Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites In January 2013, the Department of Energy issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste. Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses. Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the

333

Cost-benefits of a mobile, trailer-contained, vibratory finishing decontamination facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to determine the cost-benefits of a vibratory finishing process, developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which has been used successfully to remove a variety of transuranic (TRU) contaminants from surfaces of metallic and nonmetallic wastes. Once TRU contaminants are removed, the metallic and nonmetallic materials can be disposed of as low-level waste (LLW). Otherwise, these materials would be disposed of in geologic repositories. This study provides an economic evaluation of the vibratory finishing process as a possible method for use in decontaminating and decommissioning retired facilities at Hanford and oher sites. Specifically, the economic evaluation focuses on a scoping design for a mobile, trailer-contained facility, which could be used in the field in conjunction with decontamination and decommissioning operations. The capital cost of the mobile facility is estimated to be about $1.09 million including contingency and working capital. Annual operating costs, including disposal costs, are estimated to be $440,000 for processing about 6340 ft/sup 3//yr of pre-sectioned, TRU-contaminated material. Combining the operating cost and the capital cost, annualized at a discount rate of 10%, the total annual cost estimate is $602,000. The unit cost for vibratory finishing is estimated to be about $11/ft/sup 3/ of original reference glove box volume (Abrams et at. 1980). All costs are in first quarter 1981 dollars. Although not directly comparable, the unit cost for the vibratory finishing process is very favorable when considered beside typical, substantially higher, unit costs for processing and geologically disposing of TUR-contaminated materials. The probable accuracy of this study cost estimate is about +- 30%. It is therefore recommended that a detailed cost estimate be prepared if a mobile facility is designed.

Hazelton, R.F.; McCoy, M.W.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Sandia creates lifelike, cost-effective robotic hand that can...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

creates lifelike, cost-effective robotic hand that can disable IEDs | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

335

Project Profile: Evaluating the Causes of Photovoltaics Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

below the logo shows the cost reduction in photovoltaics compared to other energy-conversion technologies. PV is performing better than coal, natural gas, nuclear fusion, wind,...

336

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

DECOMMISSIONING CHALLENGES AT THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a discussion of the demolition of the Building 788 cluster at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The Building 788 Cluster was a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage facilities and ancillary structures. Topics covered include the methods employed for Project Planning, Regulatory Compliance, Waste Management, Hazard Identification, Radiological Controls, Risk Management, Field Implementation, and Cost Schedule control, and Lessons Learned and Project Closeout.

Dorr, K. A.; Hoover, J.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

338

Estimating Specialty Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Direct costing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oau 5e reduced. Under the same oonOitions, even ~Me on a bread scale entails not mere1y the conduct of the direct oyeraticns cf yrccessing the materials into finished products, but also the performance of auxiliary functions. these may 'ba power y... purposes have been advanced as folkway le Most of a o03RyaxO' 8 products Grc usual13r sold at prices which oovex' full product costs y plus 861ling a%el administrative expenses, plus normal profit. The inventoi~ valuate. on should be consistent...

Browning, Donald Bullock

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cost Analysis Rate Settin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Analysis and Rate Settin for Animal Research Facilities #12;#12;Cost Analysis and Rate ... .. . ...................... . . . ................................. . .... 7 Chapter 2 Preparation for Cost Analysis ......................................................... 9 Chapter 3 Assignment of Costs to Animal Research Facility Cost Centers

Baker, Chris I.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

342

Cost Sharing What is Cost Sharing?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cost Sharing What is Cost Sharing? x Cost sharing is a commitment to use university resources and Expenses o Equipment x Committing to cost share is highly discouraged unless required by the sponsoring agency x Tracking of committed cost share is required to meet federal regulations (OMB A-110) x UCSD has

Tsien, Roger Y.

343

Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory Â… East Argonne, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1483 DOE/EA-1483 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois March 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Chicago Operations Office Argonne Area Office Argonne, Illinois Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois Table of Contents Acronyms....................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Background ..........................................................................................................................1 1.1 Facility History ........................................................................................................1

344

Nuclear Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy ... A brief summary of the history and key concepts of nuclear energy. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Charles D. Mickey

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nuclear batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear batteries ... Describes the structure, operation, and application of nuclear batteries. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Alfred B. Garrett

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit OAS-FS-13-02 October 2012 September 7, 2012 Mr. Gregory Friedman Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Room 5D-039 Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Friedman: We have audited the financial statements of the Department of Energy's (the Department) Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) as of and for the year ended September 30, 2011, and have issued our report thereon dated September 7, 2012. In planning and performing our audit of the consolidated financial statements, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, we considered the Department's internal control

347

Environmental Assessment for decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility, Iberia Parish, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Weeks Island site is one of five underground salt dome crude oils storage facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). It is located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The purpose of the proposed action is to decommission the Weeks Island crude oil storage after the oil inventory has been transferred to other SPR facilities. Water intrusion into the salt dome storage chambers and the development of two sinkholes located near the aboveground facilities has created uncertain geophysical conditions. This Environmental Assessment describes the proposed decommissioning operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. Based on this analyses, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and has issued the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cost Sharing Basics Definitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Sharing Basics Definitions Some funding agencies require the grantee institution the project costs. Cost sharing is defined as project costs not borne by the sponsor. Cost sharing funds may resources or facilities. If the award is federal, only acceptable non-federal costs qualify as cost sharing

Finley Jr., Russell L.

349

Where Now With Nuclear Power?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... disputes, the continuing breakdown of plant, increasing oil prices and soaring capital costs of nuclear power stations have all upset the economic balance between the four electricity generating fuels- coal, ... the chief factors in the energy equation is the fact that the capital cost of nuclear power stations is much greater than that of oil-fired stations: for about Ł200 million ...

1971-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Decommissioning and Demolition of a Redundant UK Research Facility at AWE Aldermaston - 12453  

SciTech Connect

The redundant two-storey brick built research facility on the AWE Site at Aldermaston, UK is in the closing stages of decommissioning and demolition. The facility was used for a variety of purposes up to 1995 predominately involving the use of alpha-emitting isotopes. The two main areas of alpha-based contamination have been decommissioned with the removal of hot -boxes and fume cupboards on the ground floor and HEPA filter units and ventilation equipment on the first floor. Many of these activities were undertaken using both airline fed suits, (supplied via a free standing mobile unit), and full face respirators. Asbestos materials were located and cleared from the first floor by specialist contractor. All sections of active drain running from the building to the site active effluent disposal system were removed early in the program using established techniques with specialist monitoring equipment used to provide confidence in the data required for disposal of the decommissioning debris. In particular a dedicated High Resolution Gamma Spectrometer (radioactive materials scanning unit) was utilized to categorise waste drums and wrapped packages. The building has been decommissioned and the monitoring and sampling of the structure was completed in November 2011 - the results demonstrating that the building was clear of contamination in accordance with UK clearance and exemption requirements. The demolition plan was developed and implemented in December with site excavation of foundations and site clearance currently ongoing in preparation for final site backfill activities and project close. A number of useful lessons have been learnt during the operations and are set out at the rear of the main text. (authors)

Pritchard, Paul [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nuclear Forensics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear...

352

FULL-COST ACCOUNTING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

FULL-COST ACCOUNTING ... Environmental costs would be built into a product's cost, and consumers would be able to make informed purchases. ...

1993-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

353

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S&M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D&D is devoted to S&M at each of the sites. Our S&M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S&M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Cost-Effectiveness Ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost?effectiveness ratio (CER) is a calculation that summarizes the intervention's net cost and effectiveness. The three types of CER are: the average cost?effectiveness ratio (ACER), the marginal cost?...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Cost Share-Cost Reimbursement Invoice Format Example | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Share-Cost Reimbursement Invoice Format Example Effective Date: 102014 File (public): Cost Share-Cost...

356

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

357

Letter from the Nuclear Energy Institute to DOE GC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation; Request for Extension of Public Comment Period

358

Nuclear Power—Success Assured  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Power—Success Assured ... Confidence in nuclear power's future mounts technology shaves costs, improves efficiency ... This informed opinion as to the economic practicality of commercial nuclear power was expressed to C&EN by National Carbon's Clarence E. Larson, a pioneer in the atomic energy field. ...

1955-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

Snap-Together Nuclear Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Snap-Together Nuclear Power ... The U.S. moved further along last month on an experiment to build a new generation of nuclear power plant reactors. ... Supporters hope these physically smaller reactors will have more flexible applications and incur less financial risk and construction cost than the nation’s current fleet of 104 large and aging nuclear power plants. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

360

23rd steam-station cost survey  

SciTech Connect

The results of the 23rd Steam Station Cost Survey covering the year 1982 are summarized. The major categories of the survey are as follows: general data; output data, 1982; fuel consumption, 1982; operation 1982 (mills/net kWh); investment ($/net kWh); energy cost, 1982 (mills/net kWh); and station performance, 1982. Thirty-one fossil-fuel steam plants and four nuclear stations were included in the survey. Fuel and operating cost increases are felt to be responsible for the moderate rise in total busbar-enery costs. 11 figures, 1 table.

Friedlander, G.D.; Going, M.C.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Needs Needs International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development and Needs June 2, 2010 - 12:02pm Addthis VIENNA, Austria - The multi-nation Infrastructure Development Working Group (IDWG) of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) held its sixth meeting on May 26-27, 2010, in Vienna, Austria. The two-day event included workshops on nuclear energy regulatory agency engagement and the infrastructure needs for international nuclear fuel service frameworks. Officials from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.K. Nuclear Decommissioning Authority co-chaired the working group meeting. "As a key component of the international Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the Infrastructure Development Working Group focuses

362

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Innovative Integration of Decommissioning and Deactivation Program with Soil-Groundwater Clean Up Program Has Positive Results on Budget and Schedule: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect

An innovative approach to integrate the activities of a decommissioning and deactivation program (D&D) with a soil-groundwater clean up program has had significant positive results saving both money and time at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. The accomplishments that have been achieved by the combining the two programs have been remarkable including significant cost savings, economies of scale for sampling and document generation, and alignment of common objectives. Because of the coordination of both activities area-wide ''end states'' can be formulated and be consistent with the customers' cleanup goals and federal regulations. This coordinates and aligns both the environmental clean up and D&D objectives because each must be addressed simultaneously and comprehensively. In this respect, resources from both organizations can be pooled to take advantage of the strengths of each. The new approach allows more efficient use of lean financial resources and optimizes workforce activities to attain the common objectives while being more cost effective, more protective of the environment, and optimizing the use existing resources.

Schappell, B; Rucker, G

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

364

Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Utility Scale Solar PV Cost Steven SimmonsSteven Simmons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Generating Station. 4 #12;6/19/2013 3 EVEN MORE SUNNY HEADLINES New solar panels glisten6/19/2013 1 Utility Scale Solar PV Cost Steven SimmonsSteven Simmons Northwest Power Cost Forecast 5. Levelized Costs 1 SOLAR POWER SYSTEM HAS BRIGHT FUTURE 1. Modest environmental impacts

366

Fukushima fallout: Gauging the change in Japanese nuclear energy policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fukushima nuclear disaster is a special case: a major ... technological disaster, which resulted in a serious nuclear accident. Because the various costs are so ... of life in Japan. This article describes nuclear

Elena Shadrina

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer by Helen Caldicott  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer By Helen CaldicottPakistan. Helen Caldicott. Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer.about the true costs of nuclear power, the health effects of

Mirza, Umar Karim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Securing the Sustainability of Global Medical Nuclear Supply Chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Securing the Sustainability of Global Medical Nuclear Supply Chains Through Economic Cost Recovery University of Massachusetts Amherst Securing the Sustainability of Medical Nuclear Supply Chains #12 of Massachusetts Amherst Securing the Sustainability of Medical Nuclear Supply Chains #12;This presentation

Nagurney, Anna

369

Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

370

Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory Â… East Argonne, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois AGENCY: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1483, evaluating the decontamination and decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), in Argonne, Illinois. The decontamination and decommissioning of the reactor is needed to ensure the protection of the health and safety of the public, DOE and contractor employees, and the environment, consistent with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not

371

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Assessment of Accident Commission.in coal mining accidents or value of nuclear nuclear as theaccident of March 1979 predicts that may exceed the cost of nuclear

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Evaluation of desalination costs with DEEP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detailed analysis has shown several discrepancies and pitfalls of coupling an economic evaluation code, such as SEMER to the desalination cost evaluation code DEEP. This paper resumes our findings, which may be of interest to other DEEP users. The paper in particular deals with the following issues: why is it that power costs from nuclear systems are systematically higher in DEEP than those given by the economic evaluations made by individual organisations, (in our case, the SEMER code for example), even when the calculated construction costs are input into DEEP? Why corresponding power costs for fossil energy systems are lower? Why in particular desalination costs from Gas-Turbine Combined Cycle power system, which is now considered to be the cheapest fossil fuel option, are higher than desalination costs by Pulverised Coal system? Why DEEP calculation results with the backup heat source are 40% higher than those without the backup heat source?

S. Nisan; Linda Volpi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

FROM CONCEPT TO REALITY, IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING OF THE P AND R REACTORS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

SRS recently completed an approximately three year effort to decommission two SRS reactors: P-Reactor (Building 105-P) and R-Reactor (Building 105-R). Completed in December 2011, the concurrent decommissionings marked the completion of two relatively complex and difficult facility disposition projects at the SRS. Buildings 105-P and 105-R began operating as production reactors in the early 1950s with the mission of producing weapons material (e.g., tritium and plutonium-239). The 'P' Reactor and was shutdown in 1991 while the 'R' Reactor and was shutdown in 1964. In the intervening period between shutdown and deactivation & decommissioning (D&D), Buildings 105-P and 105-R saw limited use (e.g., storage of excess heavy water and depleted uranium oxide). For Building 105-P, deactivation was initiated in April 2007 and was essentially complete by June 2010. For Building 105-R, deactivation was initiated in August 2008 and was essentially complete by September 2010. For both buildings, the primary objective of deactivation was to remove/mitigate hazards associated with the remaining hazardous materials, and thus prepare the buildings for in-situ decommissioning. Deactivation removed the following hazardous materials to the extent practical: combustibles/flammables, residual heavy water, acids, friable asbestos (as needed to protect workers performing deactivation and decommissioning), miscellaneous chemicals, lead/brass components, Freon(reg sign), oils, mercury/PCB containing components, mold and some radiologically-contaminated equipment. In addition to the removal of hazardous materials, deactivation included the removal of hazardous energy, exterior metallic components (representing an immediate fall hazard), and historical artifacts along with the evaporation of water from the two Disassembly Basins. Finally, so as to facilitate occupancy during the subsequent in-situ decommissioning, deactivation implemented repairs to the buildings and provided temporary power.

Musall, J.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

374

Groundwater Monitoring and Control Before Decommissioning of the Research Reactor VVR-S from Magurele-Bucharest  

SciTech Connect

The research reactor type VVR-S (tank type, water is cooler, moderator and reflector, thermal power- 2 MW, thermal energy- 9. 52 GW d) was put into service in July 1957 and, in December 1997 was shout down. In 2002, Romanian Government decided to put the research reactor in the permanent shut-down in order to start the decommissioning. This nuclear facility was used in nuclear research and radioisotope production for 40 years, without events, incidents or accidents. Within the same site, in the immediate vicinity of the research reactor, there are many other nuclear facilities: Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant, Tandem Van der Graaf heavy ions accelerator, Cyclotron, Industrial Irradiator, Radioisotope Production Center. The objectives of this work were dedicated on the water underground analyses described in the following context: - presentation of the approaches in planning the number of drillings, vertical soil profiles (characteristics, analyses, direction of the flow of underground water, uncertainties in measurements); - presentation of the instrumentation used in analyses of water, soil and vegetation samples - analyses and final conclusions on results of the measurements; - comparison of the results of measurements on underground water from drillings with the measurements results on samples from the town and the system of drinking water - supplied from the second level of underground water. According to the analysis, in general, no values higher than the Minimum Detectable Activity were detected in water samples (MDA) for Pb{sup 212}, Bi{sup 214}, Pb{sup 214}, Ac{sup 228}, but situated under values foreseen in drinking water. Distribution of Uranium As results of the Uranium determination, values higher than 0,004 mg/l (4 ppb) were detected, values that represent the average contents in the underground water. The higher values, 2-3 times higher than background, were detected in the water from the drillings F15, F12, F5, F13, drillings located between RWTP (Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant) - the 300 m{sup 3} tanks and the Spent Filters Storage (SFS). At south of this area, on the leaking direction of the underground water layer, in the drillings F1, F2, F3, F18 and at east, in F6, F7, the natural Uranium values are within the background for the underground-water. Distribution of Radon For the Radon determination with RAD 7 equipment, water samples were taken from the same piezo-metrical drilling, 2 or 4 times during of six months period, and then, the average contents were calculated, which varied between 0,35 - 2,1 Bq/l. The values higher than 1,1 -1,2 Bq/l were detected in the water taken from the drillings located in the northern part (F10, F11) and in the eastern part (F6, F8) of the Institute fences (around of the radioactive waste storage facilities). The concentrations of 0,3 - 0,5 Bq/l are in the underground-water layer 'intercepted' by the piezo-metrical drillings (F1, F2, F3) located near the Nuclear Reactor. Concentration of heavy metals: 0.04-0.08 mg/l Pb in F5, F14, F7, F8 exceeding MCA-Maximum Admissible Concentration (0.01 mg/l) for Pb, and for Zn in F5, F7, F8, F14 are 0.2-0.5 mg/l situated under MCA , and 0.18 mg/l in F18, in accordance with tendency of decreasing of concentration of contaminants. After 50 years of deploying nuclear activities on the site the underground water quality is in very good condition. Taking into consideration the direction of the underground water flow, it results that, only in the area of underground pipe, around of the research reactor and radioactive waste treatment plant, the quality of water is influenced, and remediation actions are not necessary. Based on measurements executed in F18, the water quality is the same with any other part of the region. During the decommissioning of the Research Reactor, the samples from 18 drillings will be analysed monthly, and the contents of the heavy metals, Pb and Zn, will be monitored carefully, together with all the factors: air, soil, vegetation, subsoil, water surface and underground water. A great attention will be paid t

Dragusin, Mitica [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering-Horia Hulubei - IFIN-HH, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania, POBox MG-6, 077125, Ilfov (Romania)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

376

Activity Based Costing  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

Levelized Electricity Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of levelized energy costs responds to the necessity of disclosing the ... in order to recover the total life cycle cost of energy production. This chapter charts the effectiveness of levelized cost fo...

Nuno Luis Madureira

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants This lesson takes a look at the waste from electricity production at nuclear power plants. It considers the different types of waste generated, as well as how we deal with each type of waste. Specific topics covered include: Nuclear Waste Some radioactive Types of radioactive waste Low-level waste High-level waste Disposal and storage Low-level waste disposal Spent fuel storage Waste isolation Reprocessing Decommissioning Lesson 7 - Waste.pptx More Documents & Publications National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

379

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

information NREL has developed the following cost of energy tools: System Advisor Model (SAM): https:sam.nrel.gov SAM makes performance predictions and cost of...

380

DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, Approved: 2-08-2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, Approved: DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, Approved: 2-08-2011 DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, Approved: 2-08-2011 PURPOSE: To document the Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear safety policy. SCOPE: The provisions of this policy apply to all Departmental elements with responsibility for a nuclear facility, except the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is separately covered under Executive Order 12344, Title 50 United States Code, sections 2406 and 2511. This Policy cancels Secretary of Energy Notice 35-91, Nuclear Safety Policy, dated 9-9-91. POLICY: It is the policy of the Department of Energy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

382

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

383

Nuclear Fabrication Consortium  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

Levesque, Stephen

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Contracting with reading costs and renegotiation costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Contracting with Reading Costs andrents, and the competitive contracting process. Journal ofReiche. Foundation of incomplete contracting in a model of

Brennan, James R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Electricity Market Module: Electricity finance and pricing submodule  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the updates to the Electricity Financial Pricing Module (EFP) to reflect the rate impacts of nuclear decommissioning. The EFP is part of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The updates to the EFP related to nuclear decommissioning include both changes to the underlying data base and the methodology. Nuclear decommissioning refers to the activities performed to take a nuclear plant permanently out of service. The costs of nuclear decommissioning are substantial and uncertain. The recovery of these costs from ratepayers is to occur over the operating life of the nuclear plant. Utilities are obligated to make estimates of the nuclear decommissioning cost every few years. Given this estimate, utilities are to assess a charge upon ratepayers, such that over the operating life of the plant they collect sufficient funds to pay for the decommissioning. However, cost estimates for decommissioning have been increasing and it appears that utilities have not been collecting adequate funds to date. In addition, there is a real risk that many nuclear plants may be closed earlier than originally planned, further exacerbating the under collection problem. The updates performed in this project provide the EFP with the capability to analyze these issues. The remainder of this document is divided into two discussions: (1) Nuclear Decommissioning Data Base, and (2) Methodology. Appendix A contains the actual data base developed during the project.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Cost Estimation Package  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Life Cycle Cost Estimate  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

388

A chronicle of costs  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the history of all estimated costs associated with the superconducting super collider.

Elioff, T.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

390

Recent Sodium Technology Development for the Decommissioning of the Rapsodie and Superphenix Reactors and the Management of Sodium Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has recently developed and/or conducted experiments on several processes in support of the decommissioning of two French liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs), Rapsodie and Superphenix, as well as on the treatment of CEA sodium wastes. CEA has demonstrated that it is possible to define appropriate and efficient processes to meet the different situations encountered in decommissioning LMFRs. Mechanical techniques derived from standard technologies have been successfully applied to fast reactor decommissioning to complete primary vessel draining from sodium. In addition, specific chemical processes have been developed to deal safely with metallic sodium reactivity. Sodium-contaminated equipment has been successfully cleaned by reacting sodium with water mist in an atmosphere with carbon dioxide to form inert sodium carbonate. Bulk sodium has been successfully converted into aqueous caustic soda by injection of liquid-metallic sodium into sodium hydroxide solution. Several processes were also defined to deal with specific sodium wastes. In all cases the principle is based on a sodium/water chemical reaction where the released hydrogen and heat are controlled. With the development of a wide variety of processes, all steps in the decommissioning of LMFRs are assumed to be now properly mastered.

Rodriguez, G.; Gastaldi, O.; Baque, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Cadarache (France)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

European Organization for Nuclear Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to participate in the project for adding intersecting storage rings to the 28-GeV proton synchroton of the European Organization for Nuclear Research at a cost of about Ł28 million, ...

1965-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

393

1998 Cost and Quality Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1998 Tables June 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should

394

Just in Time DSA-The Hanford Nuclear Safety Basis Strategy  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for 30 hazard category 2 and 3 nuclear facilities that are operated by its prime contractors, Fluor Hanford Incorporated (FHI), Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The publication of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 830, Subpart B, Safety Basis Requirements (the Rule) in January 2001 imposed the requirement that the Documented Safety Analyses (DSA) for these facilities be reviewed against the requirements of the Rule. Those DSA that do not meet the requirements must either be upgraded to satisfy the Rule, or an exemption must be obtained. RL and its prime contractors have developed a Nuclear Safety Strategy that provides a comprehensive approach for supporting RL's efforts to meet its long term objectives for hazard category 2 and 3 facilities while also meeting the requirements of the Rule. This approach will result in a reduction of the total number of safety basis documents that must be developed and maintained to support the remaining mission and closure of the Hanford Site and ensure that the documentation that must be developed will support: compliance with the Rule; a ''Just-In-Time'' approach to development of Rule-compliant safety bases supported by temporary exemptions; and consolidation of safety basis documents that support multiple facilities with a common mission (e.g. decontamination, decommissioning and demolition [DD&D], waste management, surveillance and maintenance). This strategy provides a clear path to transition the safety bases for the various Hanford facilities from support of operation and stabilization missions through DD&D to accelerate closure. This ''Just-In-Time'' Strategy can also be tailored for other DOE Sites, creating the potential for large cost savings and schedule reductions throughout the DOE complex.

Olinger, S. J.; Buhl, A. R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nuclear Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Programs >> Nuclear Energy Error Error Nuclear Energy Home - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Energy Home - RCC * Increasing...

396

Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V facility turbine building  

SciTech Connect

The Boiling Water Reactor Experiment (BORAX)-V Facility Turbine Building Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project is described in this report. The BORAX series of five National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) reactors pioneered intensive work on boiling water reactor (BWR) experiments conducted between 1953 and 1964. Facility characterization, decision analyses, and D&D plans for the turbine building were prepared from 1979 through 1990. D&D activities of the turbine building systems were initiated in November of 1988 and completed with the demolition and backfill of the concrete foundation in March 1992. Due to the low levels of radioactivity and the absence of loose contamination, the D&D activities were completed with no radiation exposure to the workers. The D&D activities were performed in a manner that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) remain.

Arave, A.E.; Rodman, G.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V facility turbine building  

SciTech Connect

The Boiling Water Reactor Experiment (BORAX)-V Facility Turbine Building Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Project is described in this report. The BORAX series of five National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) reactors pioneered intensive work on boiling water reactor (BWR) experiments conducted between 1953 and 1964. Facility characterization, decision analyses, and D D plans for the turbine building were prepared from 1979 through 1990. D D activities of the turbine building systems were initiated in November of 1988 and completed with the demolition and backfill of the concrete foundation in March 1992. Due to the low levels of radioactivity and the absence of loose contamination, the D D activities were completed with no radiation exposure to the workers. The D D activities were performed in a manner that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) remain.

Arave, A.E.; Rodman, G.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Sa- vannah River Site this month after they safely re- moved its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the work- ers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Workers will cut the dome into smaller pieces for disposal. Removal of the dome allows workers to access the 219,000-pound reactor vessel and two steam generators so they can remove and permanently dispose them onsite. Re- maining equipment will be moved to the cavity vacated by the vessel, and below-grade portions of the reactor will be

399

Source term characterization program for the decommissioning waste from a CANDU reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An automatic source term characterization program was developed, and its structure, logic, and function are explained here in detail. Called the CANDU Activated Source Term Evaluator (CASE), the developed program is equipped with a convenient graphical user interface; it uses MCNP for the neutron transport calculation and ORIGEN2 for activation analysis. CASE can prepare the MCNP input and run MCNP to obtain the neutron flux and the cross section. It can also prepare the ORIGEN2 input for the activation analysis of the region of interest, process the ORIGEN2 output, and compare the estimated specific activity of activated waste with the waste classification standard. CASE is expected to be very useful for reducing the engineering time, minimizing human error, and enhancing the reliability of source term evaluations of decommissioning waste from CANDU reactors.

Dong-Keun Cho; Jeong-Hun Cha; Dong-Hak Kook; Jong-Youl Lee; Heui-Joo Choi; Jongwon Choi; Won-il Ko; Jeong-Ho Park

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Development and Implementation of a Comprehensive Program to Deal with Canada's Nuclear Legacy Liabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Government of Canada nuclear legacy liabilities have resulted from 60 years of nuclear research and development (R and D) carried out on behalf of Canada by the National Research Council (1944 to 1952) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL, 1952 to present). These liabilities are largely located at AECL research sites, and consist of shutdown research buildings (including several prototype and research reactors), a wide variety of buried and stored wastes, and contaminated lands. The shutdown buildings and contaminated lands need to be safely decommissioned to meet federal regulatory requirements, and long-term solutions need to be developed and implemented for management of the wastes. More than half of the liabilities are the result of Cold War activities during the 1940's, 50's and early 60's. The remaining liabilities stem from R and D for medical isotopes and nuclear reactor technology, as well as national science programs. About 70 percent of the liabilities are located at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in Ontario, and a further 20 percent are located at AECL's shutdown Whiteshell Laboratories in Manitoba. The remaining 10 percent relate largely to three shutdown prototype reactors in Ontario and Quebec, which were key to the developmental stage of Canada's CANDU reactor technology. The inventory of legacy waste includes spent fuel, high-level, intermediate-level and low-level solid and liquid radioactive waste, and wastes (largely contaminated soils) from site clean-up work across Canada. Most of the wastes are in raw, unconditioned form, and limited characterization information is available for the wastes generated in past decades. In many cases unique and potentially costly solutions will be required to recover, handle and process the wastes. In conclusion: the Government of Canada has initiated a program to deal with nuclear legacy liabilities dating back to the Cold War and the birth of nuclear technologies and medicine in Canada. The 5-year start-up phase will address immediate health, safety and environmental priorities, as well as provide the facilities, studies and plans required for subsequent phases. Over the next few years, the long-term strategy will be further developed and refined, and public consultations are planned to inform this work and decisions on the next phase of the strategy.

Brown, Peter; Metcalfe, Douglas; Blanchette, Marcia [Natural Resources Canada, 580 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0E4 (Canada); Dolinar, George; Halpenny, Steven; Purdy, Chris; Smith, David; Kupferschmidt, William [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Nuclear Power and its Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... make the effect on the coal industry the deciding factor in determining the development of nuclear power. The implications of technological change have been ignored, as has the effect of development ... been ignored, as has the effect of development on the cost of electricity supplied by nuclear power-stations, which Sir Christopher Hinton stressed very strongly in his Axel Ax:son Johnson ...

1959-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

403

Going beyond the Nuclear Controversy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

atmospheric science and geoscience (e.g., earthquakes, flood, tsunamis, tornadoes); human errors; terrorism; institutions; nuclear proliferation; long-term management of radioactive waste; social costs in case of accident ... For instance, in the engineering view, the system nuclear power is often reduced to the size of the power plant. ...

François Diaz-Maurin

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Cost Effective, Integrated and Smart Radioactive Safeguard System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photographic Experts Group LED Light Emitting Diode MC&A Material Cost & Acoounting MDI Multiple Document Interface MJPEG Motion JPEG MMS Microsoft Media Services MPEG Motion Pictures Expert Group NDA Non-Destructive Analysis NSSPI Nuclear Security... Photographic Experts Group LED Light Emitting Diode MC&A Material Cost & Acoounting MDI Multiple Document Interface MJPEG Motion JPEG MMS Microsoft Media Services MPEG Motion Pictures Expert Group NDA Non-Destructive Analysis NSSPI Nuclear Security...

Singh, Harneet

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

406

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

407

Cost-Benefit Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

cost-benefit analysis is an analytical procedure for determining the economic efficiency of intervention, expressed as the relationship between costs and outcomes, usually measured in monetary terms. In othe...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cost-Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost?efficiency is a goal that has been integrated by policy makers into all modern health care systems to control the expansion of costs over time. It relates to maximizing the quality of a comparable unit ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

About Cost Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from the university, fee-for-service contracts, as well as establishing CAMD as a cost center. We know that our users are reluctant to see CAMD become a cost center, however...

410

Direct/Indirect Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

Cost Optimal Energy Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPBD recast requires Member States (MS) to ensure that minimum energy performance requirements of buildings are set with a view to achieving cost optimal levels using a comparative methodology framework...1]. Cost

Jarek Kurnitski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nuclear Debate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Debate ... This month, the Senate will consider the nominations of two women to serve on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ... Svinicki is a nuclear engineer with experience in the Department of Energy’s nuclear energy programs. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cost Containment and Productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Containment and Productivity Faculty Assembly Presentation January 22, 2013 Arthur G. Ramicone, CFO David N. DeJong, Vice Provost, Academic Planning and Resources Management #12;Cost Containment Resources to Enhance the Student Experience · Reduce the Cost and Complexity of Administrative Operations

Jiang, Huiqiang

414

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Lunch & Learn Cost Sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lunch & Learn Cost Sharing #12;Today's Agenda Policy Procedures OMNI Child Budget Setup Transactions in OMNI FACET Common Issues #12;Cost Sharing Policy http://www.research.fsu.edu/contractsgra nts ­ Not quantified ­ Do not have to account for and report #12;Cost Sharing Procedures http

McQuade, D. Tyler

416

Cost Function Estimates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The cost function describes the cost-minimizing combinations of inputs required for production of different levels of output. Empirical cost function studies take both short-run and long-run approaches and can be structurally consistent with microeconomic theory versus more behavioral or real-world data oriented. Studies of health care providers face numerous challenges including the multiproduct nature of the firm, difficulty in controlling for quality of service, and frequent failure of the profit-maximization assumption. Cost function applications in health care are numerous and include such topics as optimal firm size, performance inefficiency measures, and comparisons of production costs with third-party payments.

K. Carey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Connolly, T.J. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Final Technical Report; NUCLEAR ENGINEERING RECRUITMENT EFFORT  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the summary of a project whose purpose was to support the costs of developing a nuclear engineering awareness program, an instruction program for teachers to integrate lessons on nuclear science and technology into their existing curricula, and web sites for the exchange of nuclear engineering career information and classroom materials. The specific objectives of the program were as follows: OBJECTIVE 1: INCREASE AWARENESS AND INTEREST OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING; OBJECTIVE 2: INSTRUCT TEACHERS ON NUCLEAR TOPICS; OBJECTIVE 3: NUCLEAR EDUCATION PROGRAMS WEB-SITE; OBJECTIVE 4: SUPPORT TO UNIVERSITY/INDUSTRY MATCHING GRANTS AND REACTOR SHARING; OBJECTIVE 5: PILOT PROJECT; OBJECTIVE 6: NUCLEAR ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT SURVEY AT UNIVERSITIES

Kerrick, Sharon S.; Vincent, Charles D.

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

419

Costing plutonium: economics of reprocessing in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relative merits of reprocessing and direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel have been widely debated in Europe and the USA. An important aspect of the debate has been the economics of reprocessing. So far there have been no studies of the subject in the Indian context. This study assesses the economics of reprocessing in India and the cost of producing plutonium for the fast breeder reactor programme. Our results suggest that the cost of reprocessing each kilogram of spent fuel would cost approximately Rs. 26,000 (approx. $600) with assumptions favourable to reprocessing, and close to Rs. 30,000 (approx. $675) under other assumptions. These costs are lower than the corresponding figures for reprocessing plants in Europe, the USA, and Japan. As in their case, however, it is unlikely to be an economically viable method of waste disposal.

M.V. Ramana; J.Y. Suchitra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Cost effective lighting  

SciTech Connect

Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen-hours are determined for each lamp system. We find the most important lighting cost component is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial cost of $15.00, is the most cost effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

Morse, O.; Verderber, R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear decommissioning costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

POLICY POLICY Washington, D.C. Approved: 2-08-2011 SUBJECT: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY POLICY PURPOSE: To document the Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear safety policy. SCOPE: The provisions of this policy apply to all Departmental elements with responsibility for a nuclear facility, except the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is separately covered under Executive Order 12344, Title 50 United States Code, sections 2406 and 2511. This Policy cancels Secretary of Energy Notice 35-91, Nuclear Safety Policy, dated 9-9-91. POLICY: It is the policy of the Department of Energy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the

422

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, Volume 46, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the issuances received in October 1997. Issuances are from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Directors` Decisions. Five issuances were received on the following subjects: (1) decontamination and decommissioning funding for Sequoyah Fuels Corporation and General Atomics; (2) involvement in NRC-licensed activities by Aharon Ben-Haim; (3) Barnett Industrial X-Ray, Inc.; (4) spent fuel storage installation at Northern States Power Company; and (5) Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station. No issuances were received from the the Administrative Law Judges or the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Cost Model for Digital Curation: Cost of Digital Migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steece, B. 2000. Software cost estimation with COCOMO II.Developing a Framework of Cost Elements for PreservingAshley, K. 1999. Digital archive costs: Facts and fallacies.

Kejser, Ulla Břgvad; Nielsen, Anders Bo; Thirifays, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

Bergren, C

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

426

Information on Hydrologic Conceptual Models, Parameters, Uncertainty Analysis, and Data Sources for Dose Assessments at Decommissioning Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses issues related to the analysis of uncertainty in dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The basic conceptual models and mathematical implementations of three dose assessment codes are outlined along with the site-specific conditions under which the codes may provide inaccurate, potentially nonconservative results. In addition, the hydrologic parameters of the codes are identified and compared. A methodology for parameter uncertainty assessment is outlined that considers the potential data limitations and modeling needs of decommissioning analyses. This methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regional databases, sensitivity analysis, probabilistic modeling, and Bayesian updating to incorporate site-specific information. Data sources for best-estimate parameter values and parameter uncertainty information are also reviewed. A follow-on report will illustrate the uncertainty assessment methodology using decommissioning test cases.

Meyer, Philip D.; Gee, Glendon W.; Nicholson, Thomas J.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The collapse of nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bombshell of the UK government statement of 9 November 1989, withdrawing all nuclear stations from privatization and cancelling the three \\{PWRs\\} which were to have followed on from Sizewell B, was a shattering blow to the nuclear industry. The reversal (at least temporarily) of decades of government support for nuclear power, and the figures which were becoming available of its relatively high-cost (confirmed by the levy on electricity sales to subsidize nuclear and other non-fossil generation), caused the House of Commons Energy Select Committee to conduct the inquiry culminating in its Report The Cost of Nuclear Power. This is certainly one of the most important and influential reports from a Committee well known for its effectiveness and is the basis for this article.

J.W. Jeffery

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor defueling and disassembly. Summary status report. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information relating to the preparations for defueling the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor and disassembly activities being performed concurrently with decontamination of the facility. Data have been collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources and entered in a computerized data sysem which permits extraction/manipulation of specific data which can be used in planning for recovery from a loss of coolant event similar to that experienced at TMI-2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains summaries of man-hours, manpower, and radiation exposures incurred during the period of April 23, 1979 to April 16, 1985, in the completion of activities related to preparation for reactor defueling. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are not included within the scope of this report. Computerized reports included in this document are: A chronological summary listing work performed for the period; and summary reports for each major task undertaken in connection with the specific scope of this report. Presented in chronological order for the referenced time period. Manually-assembled table summaries are included for: Labor and exposures by department; and labor and exposures by major activity.

Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination. Summary status report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information relating to decontamination of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor building. The report covers activities for the period of June 1, 1979 through March 29, 1985. The data collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources were entered into a computerized data system which permits extraction/manipulation of specific information which can be used in planning for recovery from an accident similar to that experienced at TMI-2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains summaries of man-hours, manpower, and radiation exposures incurred during decontamination of the reactor building. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are excluded from the scope of this report. Computerized reports included in this document are: a chronological summary listing work performed relating to reactor building decontamination for the period specified; and summary reports for each major task during the period. Each task summary is listed in chronological order for zone entry and subtotaled for the number of personnel entries, exposures, and man-hours. Manually-assembled table summaries are included for: labor and exposures by department and labor and exposures by major activity.

Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nuclear Facility Decommissioning and Site Remedial Actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 14. Environmental Restoration Program: Part 2, Indexes  

SciTech Connect

This Part 2 of this report provides indexes of: Author, Corporate Affiliation, Title Word, Publication Description, Geographic Location, Subject Category, and Key Words.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

433

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

434

Nuclear Returns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Returns ... For the first time since 1978, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has given the green light for a new U.S. nuclear power plant. ... NRC granted a license to Southern Co. to build and operate twin 1,100-MW reactors adjacent to two operating nuclear power plants at its Vogtle nuclear facility, near Waynesboro, Ga. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

435