Sample records for nuclear compact state

  1. Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in deriving the optimum benefit from nuclear and...

  2. Nuclear equation of state at high baryonic density and compact star constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. N. Basu; P. Roy Chowdhury; C. Samanta

    2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A mean field calculation is carried out to obtain the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter from a density dependent M3Y interaction (DDM3Y). The energy per nucleon is minimized to obtain ground state of the symmetric nuclear matter (SNM). The constants of density dependence of the effective interaction are obtained by reproducing the saturation energy per nucleon and the saturation density of SNM. The energy variation of the exchange potential is treated properly in the negative energy domain of nuclear matter. The EoS of SNM, thus obtained, is not only free from the superluminosity problem but also provides excellent estimate of nuclear incompressibility. The EoS of asymmetric nuclear matter is calculated by adding to the isoscalar part, the isovector component of M3Y interaction. The SNM and pure neutron matter EoS are used to calculate the nuclear symmetry energy which is found to be consistent with that extracted from the isospin diffusion in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. The $\\beta$ equilibrium proton fraction calculated from the symmetry energy and related theoretical findings are consistent with the constraints derived from the observations on compact stars.

  3. Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southern States Energy Compact provides for the proper employment and conservation of energy, and for the employment of energy-related facilities, materials, and products, within the context of...

  4. Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Mining Compact is a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states. Currently...

  5. Sabine River Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Sabine River and its tributaries as apportioned...

  6. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  7. Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

  8. Nuclear fuel particles and method of making nuclear fuel compacts therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVelasco, Rubin I. (Encinitas, CA); Adams, Charles C. (San Diego, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for making nuclear fuel compacts exhibiting low heavy metal contamination and fewer defective coatings following compact fabrication from a mixture of hardenable binder, such as petroleum pitch, and nuclear fuel particles having multiple layer fission-product-retentive coatings, with the dense outermost layer of the fission-product-retentive coating being surrounded by a protective overcoating, e.g., pyrocarbon having a density between about 1 and 1.3 g/cm.sup.3. Such particles can be pre-compacted in molds under relatively high pressures and then combined with a fluid binder which is ultimately carbonized to produce carbonaceous nuclear fuel compacts having relatively high fuel loadings.

  9. Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes Maryland's entrance into the Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact, which seeks to promote interstate cooperation for the proper management and disposal...

  10. Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission assists member states efficiently maximize oil and natural gas resources through sound regulatory practices while protecting the nation's health,...

  11. Compact high voltage solid state switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glidden, Steven C.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, solid state, high voltage switch capable of high conduction current with a high rate of current risetime (high di/dt) that can be used to replace thyratrons in existing and new applications. The switch has multiple thyristors packaged in a single enclosure. Each thyristor has its own gate drive circuit that circuit obtains its energy from the energy that is being switched in the main circuit. The gate drives are triggered with a low voltage, low current pulse isolated by a small inexpensive transformer. The gate circuits can also be triggered with an optical signal, eliminating the trigger transformer altogether. This approach makes it easier to connect many thyristors in series to obtain the hold off voltages of greater than 80 kV.

  12. Diffusion Welding of Compact Heat Exchangers for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denis Clark; Ron Mizia; Dr. Michael V. Glazoff; Mr. Michael W. Patterson

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next-­-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is designed to be a flexible source of energy, producing various mixes of electrical energy and process heat (for example, for hydrogen generation) on demand. Compact heat exchangers provide an attractive way to move energy from the helium primary reactor coolant to process heat uses. For process heat efficiency, reactor outlet temperatures of 750-­-900°C are desirable. There are minor but deleterious components in the primary coolant; the number of alloys that can handle this environment is small. The present work concentrates on Alloys 800H and 617.

  13. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptemberState Nuclear Profiles 2010

  14. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, W.C.

    1983-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the confinement of field reversed plasma rings and, more particularly, to the steady state maintainance of field reversed plasma rings produced by coaxial plasma guns.

  15. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION OFFICE OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL SAFETY AND SAFEGUARDS ON RADIATION THERAPY OVEREXPOSURES IN PANAMA Addressees All medical licensees. Purpose The U.S. Nuclear persons in your institution who are involved with radiation therapy should review this notice

  16. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    60 Vermont Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347...

  17. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and...

  18. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Maryland Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and...

  19. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Iowa Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage...

  20. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Virginia Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and...

  1. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and...

  2. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Illinois Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and...

  3. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and...

  4. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,594 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and...

  5. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and...

  6. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and...

  7. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and...

  8. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Nebraska Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,363 63.8 Hydro and...

  9. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and...

  10. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped...

  11. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Georgia Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.4 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 53.3 Hydro and...

  12. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Arizona Total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and...

  13. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped...

  14. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and...

  15. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Michigan Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and...

  16. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Missouri Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and...

  17. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Texas Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped...

  18. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped...

  19. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Florida Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and...

  20. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and...

  1. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Ohio Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped...

  2. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    net generation, 2010 Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1 1,160 9,556 100.0 Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp 1 Plant 1 Reactor 1,160 9,556 100.0 Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum...

  3. Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management, enacted in 1981, was ratified by Congress in 1985. The Compact is a cooperative effort of the party states to protect...

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region About U.S.Arkansas Nuclear

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region AboutGeorgia Nuclear Profile 2010

  6. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region AboutGeorgia Nuclear Profile

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region AboutGeorgia Nuclear ProfileIowa

  8. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region AboutGeorgia Nuclear

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region AboutGeorgia NuclearLouisiana

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region AboutGeorgiaMassachusetts Nuclear

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippi Nuclear Profile 2010

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippi Nuclear Profile

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippi Nuclear

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippi NuclearHampshire

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippi NuclearHampshireJersey

  16. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippiNorth Carolina Nuclear

  17. Nuclear Activity in UZC Compact Groups of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Martinez; A. del Olmo; P. Focardi; J. Perea

    2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse the level of nuclear activity in galaxies belonging to UZC-CGs. Spectra are available for 868 galaxies (90% of the whole catalog); 67 % of them show nuclear activity (AGN or Star formation). To carry out a detailed study about the nuclear activity and its relationship with properties of the host galaxy and parent group we select a sample of 215 groups with spectra available for all their members. From the analysis of this sample and using diagnostic diagrams to do the nuclear classification we found that 37% of emission galaxies host an HII nuclear region, 43% an AGN and 20% a Transition Object. AGNs are located mainly in bright early type galaxies meanwhile HII are in fainter and later types. Groups dominated by HII show significant lower velocity dispersions and larger sizes than groups dominated by AGNs or TO.

  18. United States Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Programs to Manage High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel in the United States and Other-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel in the United States and Other Countries A Report to CongressUnited States Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Experience Gained From Programs to Manage High

  19. Nuclear threats from small states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahan, J.H.

    1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the policy implications regarding proliferation and counter proliferation of nuclear weapons among Third World states. How does deterrence operate outside the parameters of superpower confrontation as defined by the cold war elaborate system of constraints enforced by concepts like mutual assured destruction, and counter-value and counter-force targeting. How can US policymakers devise contingencies for dealing with nuclear threats posed by countries like North Korea, Libya, Iraq, Iran, and Syria. These are some of the unsettling but nevertheless important questions addressed by the author in this monograph. In his analysis, Mr. Jerome Kahan examines the likelihood that one or more of these countries will use nuclear weapons before the year 2000. He also offers a framework that policymakers and planners might use in assessing US interests in preempting the use of nuclear weapons or in retaliating for their use. Ironically, with the end of the cold war, it is imperative that defense strategists, policymakers, and military professionals think about the `unthinkable`. In the interest of fostering debate on this important subject, the Strategic Studies Institute commends this insightful monograph.

  20. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JEC187V3 UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Secretary O'Leary: At the Nuclear Waste UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington, VA

  1. Compact endocavity diagnostic probes for nuclear radiation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph; Bolotnikov, Aleksey

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the field of radiation imaging. In particular, the invention relates to an apparatus and a method for imaging tissue or an inanimate object using a novel probe that has an integrated solid-state semiconductor detector and complete readout electronics circuitry.

  2. United States Government National Nuclear Security Administration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    United States Government National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Savannah River Field Office (SRFO) Memorandum DATE: January 10, 2014 REPLY TO ATTN OF: sv (McAlhany,...

  3. Midwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact is an agreement between the states of Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin that provides for the cooperative and safe...

  4. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    con144vf UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Dear Speaker Hastert, Senator Thurmond, and Secretary Richardson: The Nuclear Waste Technical Review with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Public Law 100-203. The Act requires the Board

  5. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington are pleased to transmit a technical report prepared by the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (Board. Based on its review of data gathered by the DOE and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

  6. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington.C. 20585 Dear Speaker Hastert, Senator Stevens, and Secretary Bodman: The Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board was created by Congress in the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) of 1987 and charged

  7. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington Dear Speaker Pelosi, Senator Byrd, and Secretary Bodman: The Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, and transporting high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. The Board is required to report its findings

  8. Summary report. Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Volume 4, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    `Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  9. Summary report, low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Vol. 4. No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    `Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  10. Sequence Compaction for Probabilistic Analysis of Finite-State Machines* Diana Marculescu, Radu Marculescu, Massoud Pedram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Sequence Compaction for Probabilistic Analysis of Finite-State Machines* Diana Marculescu, Radu for accurate modeling of the external input sequences that affect the behavior of Finite State Machines (FSMs. The input model itself is derived through a one-pass traversal of the input sequence and can be used

  11. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the overall system for managing spent fuel and defense high-level waste. The Board includes its findingsjlc029va UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300, D.C. 20585 Dear Speaker Gingrich, Senator Thurmond, and Secretary Peña: The Nuclear Waste Technical

  12. Summary report: Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts, Volume 5, Number 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, C. [ed.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is given on the ten compacts and their host state, describing the governing body, member states, date established, current waste management, and siting, licensing, and projected date of a disposal facility. Reports are also given on the eight states that remain unaffiliated with a compact commission.

  13. Summary report: Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts, Volume 5, Number 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, C. [ed.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is given on the ten compacts and their host state, describing the governing body, member states, date established, current waste management, and siting, licensing, and projected date of a disposal facility. Reports are also given on the eight states that remain unaffiliated with a compact commission.

  14. Coherent states, quantum gravity and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, II: Compact Lie Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Stottmeister; Thomas Thiemann

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, the second of three, we discuss and develop the basis of a Weyl quantisation for compact Lie groups aiming at loop quantum gravity-type models. This Weyl quantisation may serve as the main mathematical tool to implement the program of space adiabatic perturbation theory in such models. As we already argued in our first article, space adiabatic perturbation theory offers an ideal framework to overcome the obstacles that hinder the direct implementation of the conventional Born-Oppenheimer approach in the canonical formulation of loop quantum gravity. Additionally, we conjecture the existence of a new form of the Segal-Bargmann-Hall "coherent state" transform for compact Lie groups $G$, which we prove for $G=U(1)^{n}$ and support by numerical evidence for $G=SU(2)$. The reason for conjoining this conjecture with the main topic of this article originates in the observation, that the coherent state transform can be used as a basic building block of a coherent state quantisation (Berezin quantisation) for compact Lie groups $G$. But, as Weyl and Berezin quantisation for $\\mathbb{R}^{2d}$ are intimately related by heat kernel evolution, it is natural to ask, whether a similar connection exists for compact Lie groups, as well. Moreover, since the formulation of space adiabatic perturbation theory requires a (deformation) quantisation as minimal input, we analyse the question to what extent the coherent state quantisation, defined by the Segal-Bargmann-Hall transform, can serve as basis of the former.

  15. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimummore »combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.« less

  16. Pecos River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

  17. Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is administered by the Compact Commission. The Compact provides for rotating responsibility for the region's low-level...

  18. Detection of Compact Nuclear X-Ray Emission in NGC 4736

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Cui; Dan Feldkun; Robert Braun

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results from a deep ROSAT PSPC observation of LINER galaxy NGC 4736. Two bright sources are detected, separated by only about 1', with the brighter one coinciding with the center of the galaxy. Neither source shows apparent X-ray variability on time-scales of minutes to hours in the ROSAT band. Simple power-law models, typical of AGN X-ray spectra, produce poor fits to the observed X-ray spectrum of the nuclear source. The addition of a Raymond-Smith component improves the fits significantly. This is consistent with the presence of hot gas in the nuclear region with kT=~0.3 keV, in addition to a compact nuclear source. However, a careful examination of the residuals reveal apparent features at low energies (< 0.25 keV). We find that the addition of a narrow emission line at about 0.22 keV is a significant improvement to the parameterization of the spectrum. We examine the results in the light of the accuracy of the PSPC spectral calibration. The derived photon index is about 2.3, which is similar to those for Seyfert 1 galaxies measured in the ROSAT energy range. On the other hand, the 0.1-2 keV luminosity for the compact source is only about 3.4x10^{39} erg/s, much fainter than typical Seyfert galaxies. We discuss the implications of these results on the connection between LINERs and AGNs. The off-center source is transient in nature. It has a hard X-ray spectrum, with a photon index of about 1.5, so is likely to be an X-ray binary. There is still some ambiguity regarding its association with the galaxy. If it is indeed located in the galaxy, the 0.1-2 keV luminosity would be greater than 5.1x10^{38} erg/s, making it a stellar-mass black hole candidate.

  19. Managing nuclear weapons in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.

    1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the management and security of nuclear weapons in the post-cold war United States. The definition of what constitutes security is clearly changing in the US. It is now a much more integrated view that includes defense and the economy. The author tries to bring some semblance of order to these themes in this brief adaptation of a presentation.

  20. Composite Sequence Compaction for Finite-State Machines Using Block Entropy and High-Order Markov Models*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Composite Sequence Compaction for Finite-State Machines Using Block Entropy and High-Order Markov an effective technique for accurate modeling of the external input sequences that affect the behavior of Finite propose an effective approach to compact an initial sequence into a much shorter, equivalent one

  1. United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) Annual Steering Committee Meeting United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International...

  2. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 29 (2006) 105117 Electron-nuclear cross polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 29 (2006) 105­117 Electron-nuclear cross polarization V from an unpaired electron to neighboring nuclei via electron-nuclear cross polarization (e­Hahn cross polarization (CP) process introduced by Pines et al., that is widely used in solid-state nuclear

  3. Bounds on the energy densities of ground states on static spacetimes of compact objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Marecki

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate quantum fields propagating on given, static, spherically symmetric spacetimes, which are isometric to a part of the Schwarzschild spacetime. Without specifying the internal geometry we show, that there exist bounds on the energy densities of ground states of a quantum scalar field on such spacetimes. The bounds (from above and below) come from the so-called Quantum Energy Inequalities, and are centered around the energy density of the Boulware state (the ground state for Schwarzschild spacetime). The specific value of the bound from below depends critically on the distance $\\ell$ from the horizon, where the spacetimes of compact objects cease to be isometric to the Schwarzschild spacetime. In the limit of small $\\ell$ we prove, that the energy densities of ground states cannot be below the Boulware level.

  4. NSTX LTXPEGASUS Compact CTF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    isotope retention. ST-CTF Compact ST-CTF at ~ 10 MA range provide a compact nuclear component test to NSTX. Large vacuum vessel, no stabilizing plates, excellent set of profile and boundary diagnostics

  5. Nuclear New Build in the United States 1990-2010: A Three State Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffron, Raphael J.

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This research examines nuclear energy policy across three states in the United States (US) - Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Texas - from 1990-2010. The main research question seeks to ascertain what the prerequisites are for successful nuclear new build...

  6. Rio Grande Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Rio Grande Compact, a joint agreement between the states of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. The compact is administered by the Rio Grande...

  7. Canadian River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

  8. Minimal nuclear deterrence : a nuclear arsenal reduction plan for the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laderman, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global political climate has called for reductions to nuclear arsenals around the world. This thesis researches how potential deep cuts to the United States' large strategic nuclear arsenal would affect its current ...

  9. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007" "January through December 2007"...

  10. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004" "January through December 2004"...

  11. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005" "January through December 2005"...

  12. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003" "January through December 2003"...

  13. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008" "January through December 2008"...

  14. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    In the Matter of CALVERT CLIFFS 3 NUCLEAR PROJECT, LLC, and UNISTAR NUCLEAR OPERATING SERVICES, LLC (Combined, 2009 MEMORANDUM AND ORDER (Ruling on Joint Petitioners' Standing and Contentions) I. Introduction This case arises from an application by UniStar Nuclear Operating Services, LLC and Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear

  15. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's mission, continuing role, and refocused goals as the U.S. approach to managing spent nuclear fuel and high an ongoing and integrated technical peer review of all DOE activities related to managing spent nuclear fuel, and the characteristics and quantities of waste associated with adopting alternatives for spent nuclear fuel management

  16. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and issues related to the waste- management system, including transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high of Energy, including the possible development of a repository for disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high activities related to the possible disposal, packaging, and transportation of the country's spent nuclear

  17. ANIMAS-LA PLATA PROJECT COMPACT The state of Colorado and the state of New Mexico, in order to implement the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    ANIMAS-LA PLATA PROJECT COMPACT The state of Colorado and the state of New Mexico, in order to implement the operation of the Animas-La Plata federal reclamation project, Colorado-New Mexico, a proposed the following articles: ARTICLE I A. The right to store and divert water in Colorado and New Mexico from the La

  18. Design Options for Ultra-compact Nuclear Driven Power Sources for Field Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Dean

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor LWR Light Water Reactor ? Mean Generation Time Decay Constant for Argon-41 MA Minor Actinides MCNP Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Dynamic Viscosity Number Density of Argon-40 in Air Number of Fuel Elements... that are suited to these aspects separately. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) is used to design and analyze a critical, 6 controllable, compact core. Microsoft Excel is used to automate calculations using Fourier’s law of conduction2...

  19. Interstate Mining Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Interstate Mining Compact, a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental...

  20. Design of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for medium charge state light ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Button, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Sydney, NSW 2234 (Australia); Milford, G. N. [University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization we are developing a new isotope ratio mass spectrometer based on the measurement of multiple charge state ions. We have carried out a review of our existing ECR ion source and identified a number of design flaws. For the new instrument, we are producing a new ECR source and have refined the design, in particular by using 3D simulations to improve the magnetic confinement field and by a combination of simulations and experiments to improve the design of the microwave coupling.

  1. Spin-On for the Renaissance? The Current State of China's Nuclear Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Jing-dong

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and oversee and review nuclear technology trans- fers andwith China’s State Nuclear Power Technology Corpora- tion,China’s own technologies in developing nuclear power proj-

  2. OPTIONS FOR A STEADY-STATE COMPACT FUSION NEUTRON SOURCE M.P. Gryaznevich1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Nuclear Power production: the emerging shortage of fissile fuel, disposal and storage of nuclear waste. This can be achieved in several ways: by recycling high level nuclear waste from conventional nuclear of nuclear waste and fuel and removing Pu from the spent fuel. This combination of "fission + fusion

  3. The Nuclear Equation of State at high densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fuchs

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ab inito calculations for the nuclear many-body problem make predictions for the density and isospin dependence of the nuclear equation-of-state (EOS) far away from the saturation point of nuclear matter. I compare predictions from microscopic and phenomenological approaches. Constraints on the EOS derived from heavy ion reactions, in particular from subthreshold kaon production, as well as constraints from neutron stars are discussed.

  4. United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

  5. Nuclear elastic scattering effects on fusion product transport in compact tori

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVeaux, J.; Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper seeks to advance previous work including the effects of nuclear elastic scattering (NES) on fusion-product transport. We have found that NES may dominate the slowing-down process for high-temperature, advance-fuel plasmas which burn Cat.D or D-/sup 3/He. A modified version of the Monte Carlo fusion product transport code, MCFRM, was used to evaluate the effects of NES on discrete fusion-product orbits in the FRM.

  6. Nuclear power industry in the United States: status and projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, T.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One sixth of the electricity in the United States is now being generated in nuclear power plants, a remarkable achievement for a technology whose basic nuclear reaction was not even known 50 years ago. On the other hand, many of the nation's electric utilities are experiencing great difficulties completing the construction of their nuclear plants; 41 partially constructed plants have been abandoned. Those abandoned plants plus about 110 in operation and 15 still to be completed comprise the first generation of nuclear power plants in the United States. When, and even if, there will be a second generation is much in doubt. Data are presented to show that the absence of a second generation of nuclear plants will place large demands on the fossil fuels, with attendant high energy prices and high environmental costs the expected outcome. It appears that the future will bring large economic forces to start new orders for nuclear plants. On the other hand, the opposing institutional forces appear equally strong. Among the problems creating these institutional forces are the difficulty the United States is having in finding a politically acceptable approach to nuclear waste disposal and the vulnerability of power plant builders and operators to litigation and high financial risk. At present, the issue of a second generation of nuclear plants is stalemated. 17 references.

  7. Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

  8. Nuclear Equation of State and Neutron Star Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeunhwan Lim; Chang Ho Hyun; Chang-Hwan Lee

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of the nuclear equation of state (EoS) to the neutron star cooling. New era for nuclear EoS has begun after the discovery of $\\sim 2\\msun$ neutron stars PSR J1614$-$2230 and PSR J0348$+$0432 [1, 2]. Also recent works on the mass and radius of neutron stars from low-mass X-ray binaries [3] strongly constrain the EoS of nuclear matter. On the other hand, observations of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A (Cas A) more than 10 years confirmed the existence of nuclear superfluidity [4, 5]. Nuclear superfluidity reduces the heat capacities as well as neutrino emissivities. With nuclear superfluidity the neutrino emission processes are highly suppressed, and the existence of superfluidity makes the cooling path quite different from that of the standard cooling process. Superfluidity also allows new neutrino emission process, which is called `Pair Breaking and Formation'(PBF). PBF is a fast cooling process and can explain the fast cooling rate of neutron star in Cas A. Therefore, it is essential to add the superfluidity effect in the neutron star cooling process. In this work, we simulate neutron star cooling curves using both non-relativistic and relativistic nuclear models. The existence of too early direct Urca process shows that some of nuclear models do not fit for the cooling simulation. After this first selection process, the nuclear pairing gaps are searched using the observational neutron star's age and temperature data.

  9. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorbom, B N; Palmer, T R; Mangiarotti, F J; Sierchio, J M; Bonoli, P; Kasten, C; Sutherland, D A; Barnard, H S; Haakonsen, C B; Goh, J; Sung, C; Whyte, D G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design study aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q_p~13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ~63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ~23 T peak field on coil with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External cu...

  10. Ground state energy fluctuations in the Nuclear Shell Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Velazquez; Jorge G. Hirsch; Alejandro Frank; Jose Barea; Andres P. Zuker

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical fluctuations of the nuclear ground state energies are estimated using shell model calculations in which particles in the valence shells interact through well defined forces, and are coupled to an upper shell governed by random 2-body interactions. Induced ground-state energy fluctuations are found to be one order of magnitude smaller than those previously associated with chaotic components, in close agreement with independent perturbative estimates based on the spreading widths of excited states.

  11. Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

  12. Fission involves a new state of nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Ythier; S. Hachem; G. Mouze

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The rearrangement step of nuclear fission occurs within 0.17 yoctosecond, in a new state of nuclear matter characterized by the formation of closed shells of nucleons. The determination of its lifetime is now based on the prompt neutron emission law. The width of isotopic distributions measures the uncertainty in the neutron number of the fragments. Magic mass numbers, 82 and 126, play a major role in the mass distributions. Arguments are presented in favour of an all-neutron state. The boson field responsible for the new collective interaction has to be searched for.

  13. Evaluating Russian space nuclear reactor technology for United States applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polansky, G.F. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schmidt, G.L. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Voss, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Reynolds, E.L. [Applied Physics Lab., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space nuclear power and nuclear electric propulsion are considered important technologies for planetary exploration, as well as selected earth orbit applications. The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) was intended to provide an early flight demonstration of these technologies at relatively low cost through extensive use of existing Russian technology. The key element of Russian technology employed in the program was the Topaz II reactor. Refocusing of the activities of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), combined with budgetary pressures, forced the cancellation of the NEPSTP at the end of the 1993 fiscal year. The NEPSTP was faced with many unique flight qualification issues. In general, the launch of a spacecraft employing a nuclear reactor power system complicates many spacecraft qualification activities. However, the NEPSTP activities were further complicated because the reactor power system was a Russian design. Therefore, this program considered not only the unique flight qualification issues associated with space nuclear power, but also with differences between Russian and United States flight qualification procedures. This paper presents an overview of the NEPSTP. The program goals, the proposed mission, the spacecraft, and the Topaz II space nuclear power system are described. The subject of flight qualification is examined and the inherent difficulties of qualifying a space reactor are described. The differences between United States and Russian flight qualification procedures are explored. A plan is then described that was developed to determine an appropriate flight qualification program for the Topaz II reactor to support a possible NEPSTP launch.

  14. Bounds on the entanglability of thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Terri M. (Terri Mak), 1981-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theorists have recently shown that the states used in current nuclear magnetic resonance (NMIR) quantum computing experiments are not entangled. Yet it is widely believed that entanglement is a necessary resource in the ...

  15. Performance of a 229 Thorium solid-state nuclear clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazakov, G A; Romanenko, V I; Yatsenko, L P; Romanenko, A V; Schreitl, M; Winkler, G; Schumm, T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 7.8 eV nuclear isomer transition in 229 Thorium has been suggested as an etalon transition in a new type of optical frequency standard. Here we discuss the construction of a "solid-state nuclear clock" from Thorium nuclei implanted into single crystals transparent in the vacuum ultraviolet range. We investigate crystal-induced line shifts and broadening effects for the specific system of Calcium fluoride. At liquid Nitrogen temperatures, the clock performance will be limited by decoherence due to magnetic coupling of the Thorium nucleus to neighboring nuclear moments, ruling out the commonly used Rabi or Ramsey interrogation schemes. We propose a clock stabilization based on counting of flourescence photons and present optimized operation parameters. Taking advantage of the high number of quantum oscillators under continuous interrogation, a fractional instability level of 10^{-19} might be reached within the solid-state approach.

  16. Performance of a 229 Thorium solid-state nuclear clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Kazakov; A. N. Litvinov; V. I. Romanenko; L. P. Yatsenko; A. V. Romanenko; M. Schreitl; G. Winkler; T. Schumm

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The 7.8 eV nuclear isomer transition in 229 Thorium has been suggested as an etalon transition in a new type of optical frequency standard. Here we discuss the construction of a "solid-state nuclear clock" from Thorium nuclei implanted into single crystals transparent in the vacuum ultraviolet range. We investigate crystal-induced line shifts and broadening effects for the specific system of Calcium fluoride. At liquid Nitrogen temperatures, the clock performance will be limited by decoherence due to magnetic coupling of the Thorium nucleus to neighboring nuclear moments, ruling out the commonly used Rabi or Ramsey interrogation schemes. We propose a clock stabilization based on counting of flourescence photons and present optimized operation parameters. Taking advantage of the high number of quantum oscillators under continuous interrogation, a fractional instability level of 10^{-19} might be reached within the solid-state approach.

  17. Gluon Radiation and Coherent States in Ultrarelativistic Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei G. Matinyan; Berndt Mueller; Dirk H. Rischke

    1997-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the correspondence between classical gluon radiation and quantum radiation in a coherent state for gluons produced in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions. The expectation value of the invariant momentum distribution of gluons in the coherent state is found to agree with the gluon number distribution obtained classically from the solution of the Yang-Mills equations. A criterion for the applicability of the coherent state formalism to the problem of radiation in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. This criterion is found to be fulfilled for midrapidity gluons with perturbative transverse momenta larger than about 1-2 GeV and produced in collisions between valence partons.

  18. Critical review of deeply bound kaonic nuclear states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Magas; E. Oset; A. Ramos; H. Toki

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We critically revise the recent claims of narrow deeply bound kaonic states and show that at present there is no convincing experimental evidence for their existence. In particular, we discuss in details the claim of K- pp deeply bound state associated to a peak seen in the Lambda p invariant mass spectrum from K- nuclear absorption reactions by the FINUDA collaboration. An explicit theoretical simulation shows that the peak is simply generated from a two-nucleon absorption process, like K- pp --> Lambda p, followed by final-state interactions of the produced particles with the residual nucleus.

  19. Technosocial Modeling for Determining the Status and Nature of a State’s Nuclear Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Harvey, Julia B.

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Atomic Energy Agency State Evaluation Process: The Role of Information Analysis in Reaching Safeguards Conclusions (Mathews et al. 2008), several examples of nonproliferation models using analytical software were developed that may assist the IAEA with collecting, visualizing, analyzing, and reporting information in support of the State Evaluation Process. This paper focuses on one of the examples a set of models developed in the Proactive Scenario Production, Evidence Collection, and Testing (ProSPECT) software that evaluates the status and nature of a state’s nuclear activities. The models use three distinct subject areas to perform this assessment: the presence of nuclear activities, the consistency of those nuclear activities with national nuclear energy goals, and the geopolitical context in which those nuclear activities are taking place. As a proof-of-concept for the models, a crude case study was performed. The study, which attempted to evaluate the nuclear activities taking place in Syria prior to September 2007, yielded illustrative, yet inconclusive, results. Due to the inconclusive nature of the case study results, changes that may improve the model’s efficiency and accuracy are proposed.

  20. A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume...

  1. Utility of Social Modeling in Assessment of a State’s Propensity for Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Dalton, Angela C.; Olson, Jarrod; White, Amanda M.; Cooley, Scott K.; Youchak, Paul M.; Stafford, Samuel V.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third and final report out of a set of three reports documenting research for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Security Administration (NASA) Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling program that investigates how social modeling can be used to improve proliferation assessment for informing nuclear security, policy, safeguards, design of nuclear systems and research decisions. Social modeling has not to have been used to any significant extent in a proliferation studies. This report focuses on the utility of social modeling as applied to the assessment of a State's propensity to develop a nuclear weapons program.

  2. proteinsSTRUCTURE O FUNCTION O BIOINFORMATICS Compact dimension of denatured states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Division, National Nano Device Laboratories, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan 6 Institute of Physics, Academy folding/unfolding proc- esses would not be solved completely even the protein native state might have been the methods of fluorescence stopped-flow kinetics and efficiency of energy transfer (EET)12­14 to monitor

  3. An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste Glass Compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste of Mo in glasses containing simplified simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW) streams has been originating from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Experiments using simulated nuclear waste streams

  4. Compact statis stars with polytropic equation of state in minimal dilatonic gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamen Fiziev; Kalin Marinov

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present solution of the equations for relativistic static spherically symmetric stars (SSSS) in the model of minimal dilatonic gravity (MDG) using the polytropic equation of state. A polytropic equation of state, which has a good fitting with a more realistic one, is used. Results are obtained for all variables of a single neutron star in the model of MDG. The maximum mass about two solar masses is in accordance with the latest observations of pulsars. Several new effects are observed for the variables related with the dilaton $\\Phi$ and the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. The mass-radius relation is also obtained. Special attention is paid to the behavior of the quantities which describe the effects analogous to those of dark energy and dark matter in MDG. The results of the present paper confirm the conclusion that the dilaton $\\Phi$ is able to play simultaneously the role of dark energy and dark matter.

  5. Soft nuclear equations of state for super-massive neutron star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soft nuclear equations of state for super-massive neutron star K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro@rio.odn.ne.jp Abstract Two new nuclear equations of state (EOSs) are proposed and are applied to neutron star (NS). They predict the incompressibilities K0 = 179MeV and 230MeV, respectively. The density dependencies of nuclear

  6. The low-energy nuclear density of states and the saddle point approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjay K. Ghosh; Byron K. Jennings

    2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear density of states plays an important role in nuclear reactions. At high energies, above a few MeV, the nuclear density of states is well described by a formula that depends on the smooth single particle density of states at the Fermi surface, the nuclear shell correction and the pairing energy. In this paper we present an analysis of the low energy behaviour of the nuclear density of states using the saddle point approximation and extensions to it. Furthermore, we prescribe a simple parabolic form for excitation energy, in the low energy limit, which may facilitate an easy computation of level densities.

  7. Probing the softest region of the nuclear equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    th s Ma l y t lead the throug RAPID COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C SEPTEMBER 1998VOLUME 58, NUMBER 3 model ART @11#, which treats consistently the final freeze- out. The possibility of describing the main features of lattice QCD phase...-2813/98/58~3!/1382~3!/$15.00 e nuclear equation of state d C. M. Ko A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 y 1998! for baryons is introduced in order to generate a soft recent lattice QCD calculations of baryon-free matter , we find that although this equation...

  8. State Nuclear Power Technology Corporation SNPTC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern IL Elec Coop,Lanka-DLRStandard EthanolEnergyState Nuclear

  9. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  10. THE COUNCIL OF STATE GOVERNMENTS THE ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION LINE SITING COMPACT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,ZaleskiThis Decision considers anExercise PlanningCOUNCIL OF STATE

  11. The future of nuclear power in the United States : economic and regulatory challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the economic and regulatory challenges that must be faced by potential investors in new nuclear power plants in the United States. The historical development of the existing fleet of over 100 nuclear ...

  12. Viability of an expanded United States nuclear power program and its effects on energy markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Tanzeer S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The four biggest energy sources in the United States are coal, crude oil, natural gas, and nuclear power. While coal and nuclear power are produced domestically, more than 70% of crude oil and 20% of natural gas is imported. ...

  13. The distribution of nuclear quantum states in cold'' rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, J.D.; German, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Courtney, L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Espino, J.M. (Seville Univ. (Spain))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of level spacings for states with the same spin and parity is described in which the average spacing is calculated for the total ensemble. The resulting distribution of level spacings for states of deformed nuclei with A = 155--185 and Z = 62--77 is the closest to that of a Poisson distribution yet obtained for nuclear levels. However, when only the even-spin, positive-parity data for even-even nuclei are considered, the level-spacing distribution becomes double peaked. The anomalously-large separations are shown to be the result of the low energy of the strongly-correlated, completely-paired yrast configuration of even-even nuclei. Average values of the level spacings also are discussed as a function of spin, parity, and nuclear type (even-even, even-Z- odd-N, etc.). Likewise, deviations from a Poisson distribution for several spacings (s) less than about 60 keV are compared with similar values for {sup 116}Sn on an absolute scale. Such discrepancies are attributed to interactions (level repulsions) which become increasingly significant for s {le} 60 keV. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states,...

  15. Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states,...

  16. United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of a global nuclear energy infrastructure as envisioned in GNEP to develop innovative nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technologies. GNEP seeks to bring about a significant,...

  17. Strange Quark Matter and Compact Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridolin Weber

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysicists distinguish between three different types of compact stars. These are white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. The former contain matter in one of the densest forms found in the Universe which, together with the unprecedented progress in observational astronomy, make such stars superb astrophysical laboratories for a broad range of most striking physical phenomena. These range from nuclear processes on the stellar surface to processes in electron degenerate matter at subnuclear densities to boson condensates and the existence of new states of baryonic matter--like color superconducting quark matter--at supernuclear densities. More than that, according to the strange matter hypothesis strange quark matter could be more stable than nuclear matter, in which case neutron stars should be largely composed of pure quark matter possibly enveloped in thin nuclear crusts. Another remarkable implication of the hypothesis is the possible existence of a new class of white dwarfs. This article aims at giving an overview of all these striking physical possibilities, with an emphasis on the astrophysical phenomenology of strange quark matter. Possible observational signatures associated with the theoretically proposed states of matter inside compact stars are discussed as well. They will provide most valuable information about the phase diagram of superdense nuclear matter at high baryon number density but low temperature, which is not accessible to relativistic heavy ion collision experiments.

  18. Nuclear quadrupole resonances in compact vapor cells: the crossover from the NMR to the NQR interaction regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Donley; J. L. Long; T. C. Liebisch; E. R. Hodby; T. A. Fisher; J. Kitching

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first experimental study that maps the transformation of nuclear quadrupole resonances from the pure nuclear quadrupole regime to the quadrupole-perturbed Zeeman regime. The transformation presents an interesting quantum-mechanical problem, since the quantization axis changes from being aligned along the axis of the electric-field gradient tensor to being aligned along the magnetic field. We achieve large nuclear quadrupole shifts for I = 3/2 131-Xe by using a 1 mm^3 cubic cell with walls of different materials. When the magnetic and quadrupolar interactions are of comparable size, perturbation theory is not suitable for calculating the transition energies. Rather than use perturbation theory, we compare our data to theoretical calculations using a Liouvillian approach and find excellent agreement.

  19. NUCLEAR HOLE STATES AS A PROBE OF THE NUCLEAR MANY BODY SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doll, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bohr and B. R. Mottelson, Nuclear Structure, Vol. 1 Chapt.Bohr andRe Mottelson, Nuclear Structure, Vol. 2 (Benjamin,Bohr and B. R. futtelson, Nuclear Structure, Vol. 2, Coopt.

  20. Oregon State University Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiation Health Physics NeutronSpring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    THE Oregon State University Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiation Health Physics NeutronSpring 2011 4 Continued on page 3 2 2 Nuclear Career Horizons Expand in France NERHP Senior Alison Arnold's Study Abroad Program. Arnold will earn a B.S. in Nuclear Engineering with a minor in French when she

  1. Thirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago Representatives of more than 30 countries signed a deal on Tuesday to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor nuclear reactors, but critics argue it could be at least 50 years before a commercially viable reactor

  2. Tour of Entergy's Nuclear Power Plant in River Bend Owner: Entergy Gulf States Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ervin, Elizabeth K.

    Tour of Entergy's Nuclear Power Plant in River Bend Owner: Entergy Gulf States Inc. Reactor Type a nuclear power plant. Plant was Entergy, a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) type. Built in the 80's, it has of the veteran plant workers. The presentation gave the nuclear plant engineering basics and built

  3. LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K. [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Takano, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Sato, S. [Hokkaido University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Shimazu, Y. [Fukui University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

  4. SOCIAL MODELING IN ASSESSEMENT OF A STATE’S PROPENSITY FOR NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, Angela C.; Whitney, Paul D.; Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.

    2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents approach for assessing a State’s propensity for nuclear weapons proliferation using social modeling. We supported this modeling by first reviewing primarily literature by social scientists on factors related to the propensity of a State to proliferation and by leveraging existing relevant data compiled by social scientists. We performed a number of validation tests on our model including one that incorporates use of benchmark data defining the proliferation status of countries in the years between 1945 and 2000. We exercise the BN model against a number of country cases representing different perceived levels of proliferation risk. We also describe how the BN model could be further refined to be a proliferation assessment tool for decision making.

  5. Quantitative Methodology for Assessing State-Level Nuclear Security Measures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Christopher 1985-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    international agreements that are either binding or non-binding. Unlike the international safeguards regime, which is governed primarily by the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, there is no verification regime for nuclear security or even...

  6. Impact of the equation-of-state -- gravity degeneracy on constraining the nuclear symmetry energy from astrophysical observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Tao He; F. J. Fattoyev; Bao-An Li; W. G. Newton

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a degeneracy between the equation of state (EOS) of superdense neutron-rich nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity in understanding properties of neutron stars. While the EOS is still poorly known, there are also longstanding ambiguities in choosing General Relativity or alternative gravity theories in the not-so-well tested strong-field regime. Besides possible appearance of hyperons and new phases, the most uncertain part of the nucleonic EOS is currently the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy. To provide information that may help break the EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of symmetry energy within its uncertain range determined by terrestrial nuclear laboratory experiments on the gravitational binding energy and spacetime curvature of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor (ST) theory of gravity. In particular, we focus on effects of the following parameters characterizing the EOS of neutron-rich nucleonic matter: (1) the incompressibility $K_0$ of symmetric nuclear matter, (2) the slope $L$ of symmetry energy at saturation density and (3) the high-density behavior of symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope $L$ or the high-density behavior of symmetry energy leads to large changes in both the binding energy and curvature of neutron stars while effects of varying the more constrained $K_0$ are negligibly small. The difference in predictions using the GR and the ST theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and is significantly smaller than the differences resulting from variations in the symmetry energy. We conclude that within the ST theory of gravity, the EOS-gravity degeneracy has been broken by the recent relativistic pulsar measurements, and that measurements of neutron star properties sensitive to the compactness constrain mainly the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  7. Indication of a deeply bound compact K-pp state formed in the pp -> p Lambda K+ reaction at 2.85 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Yamazaki; M. Maggiora; P. Kienle; K. Suzuki; A. Amoroso; M. Alexeev; F. Balestra; Y. Bedfer; R. Bertini; L. C. Bland; A. Brenschede; F. Brochard; M. P. Bussa; Seonho Choi; M. L. Colantoni; R. Dressler; M. Dzemidzic; J. -Cl. Faivre; L. Ferrero; J. Foryciarz; I. Froehlich; V. Frolov; R. Garfagnini; A. Grasso; S. Heinz; W. W. Jacobs; W. Kuhn; A. Maggiora; D. Panzieri; H. -W. Pfaff; G. Pontecorvo; A. Popov; J. Ritman; P. Salabura; S. Sosio; V. Tchalyshev; S. E. Vigdor

    2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed data of the DISTO experiment on the exclusive pp -> p Lambda K+ reaction at 2.85 GeV to search for a strongly bound compact K-pp (= X) state to be formed in the pp -> K+ + X reaction. The observed spectra of the K+ missing-mass and the p Lambda invariant-mass with high transverse momenta of p and K+ revealed a broad distinct peak with a mass M_X = 2265 +- 2 (stat) +- 5 (syst) MeV/c2 and a width Gamma_X = 118 +- 8 (stat) +- 10 (syst) MeV.

  8. Nuclear Equation of State: Picture from Medium Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Danielewicz

    2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) and its importance, in particular for astrophysics, are discussed. Selected observables in nuclear collisions are sensitive to the EOS and can be used to constrain it. For central collisions, these include collective flow asymmetries, subthreshold kaon yields and isospin diffusion. Comparisons between the data and transport theory suggest an energy per nucleon that rises relatively slowly with density for symmetric matter and symmetry energy that rises relatively quickly around the normal nuclear density.

  9. INL Director Discusses the Future for Nuclear Energy in the United States

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Grossenbacher, John

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains that the United States should develop its energy policies based on an assessment of the current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear reactors and the costs and benefits of providing electricity through various energy sources. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. INL Director Discusses the Future for Nuclear Energy in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossenbacher, John

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains that the United States should develop its energy policies based on an assessment of the current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear reactors and the costs and benefits of providing electricity through various energy sources. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Nuclear matter equation of state and three-body forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, H. M. M.; Algamoudi, A. M. A. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy per particle, symmetry energy, pressure, and free energy are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter using BHF approach with modern nucleon-nucleon CD-Bonn, Nijm1, Argonne v{sub 18}, and Reid 93 potentials. To obtain saturation in nuclear matter we add three-body interaction terms which are equivalent to a density-dependent two-nucleon interaction a la Skyrme force. Good agreement is obtained in comparison with previous theoretical estimates and experimental data.

  12. Maintenance practices for emergency diesel generator engines onboard United States Navy Los Angeles class nuclear submarines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawks, Matthew Arthur

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Navy has recognized the rising age of its nuclear reactors. With this increasing age comes increasing importance of backup generators. In addition to the need for decay heat removal common to all (naval ...

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization in biomolecular solid state NMR : methods and applications in peptides and membrane proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajaj, Vikram Singh

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state NMR can probe structure and dynamics on length scales from the atomic to the supramolecular. However, low sensitivity limits its application in macromolecules. NMR sensitivity can be improved by dynamic nuclear ...

  14. United States Nuclear Tests, July 1945 through September 1992, December 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document list chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Revision 15, dated December 2000.

  15. Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as...

  16. A compact 10 kW, 476 MHz solid state radio frequency amplifier for pre-buncher cavity of free electron laser injector linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohania, Praveen; Mahawar, Ashish; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Gupta, P. D. [Raja Rammana Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore 452013 (India)] [Raja Rammana Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore 452013 (India)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 10 kW, 476 MHz, 0.1% duty cycle solid state RF amplifier system for driving sub-harmonic, pre-buncher cavity of IR-FEL injector LINAC, has been developed at RRCAT. The 10 kW power is achieved by combining output of eight 1400 W amplifier modules using 8-way planar corporate combiner. The solid state amplifier modules have been developed using 50 V RF LDMOS transistors which although meant for push-pull operation are being used in single ended configuration with matching circuit developed on a thin (25 mils), high dielectric constant (9.7), low loss microwave laminate with an aim to have a compact structure. Ease of fabrication, modularity, small size, and low cost are the important features of this design which could be used as a template for low duty cycle medium to high pulsed power UHF amplifier system.

  17. United States Nuclear Command and Control System Support Staff. Directive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.

    1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Directive establishes, pursuant to National Security Decision Directive, August 21, 1987, and the authority vested in the Secretary of Defense, the U.S. Nuclear Command and Control System Support Staff under the direction, authority, and control of the Secretary of Defense, who also serves as the Executive Agent for the Nuclear Command and Control System (NCCS) (hereafter referred to as Executive Agent). The Directive establishes the DoD NCCS Executive Review Committee (ERC) in support of the Secretary of Defense. It assigns the responsibilities, functions, relationships and authorities of the U.S. NCCS Support Staff (NSS) and its Director, and those of the ERC.

  18. Nuclear matter equation of state including few-nucleon correlations $(A\\leq 4)$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Röpke

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Light clusters (mass number $A \\leq 4$) in nuclear matter at subsaturation densities are described using a quantum statistical approach. In addition to self-energy and Pauli-blocking, effects of continuum correlations are taken into account to calculate the quasiparticle properties and abundances of light elements. Medium-modified quasiparticle properties are important ingredients to derive a nuclear matter equation of state applicable in the entire region of warm dense matter below saturation density. Moreover, the contribution of continuum states to the equation of state is considered. The effect of correlations within the nuclear medium on the quasiparticle energies is estimated. The properties of light clusters and continuum correlations in dense matter are of interest for nuclear structure calculations, heavy ion collisions, and for astrophysical applications such as the formation of neutron stars in core-collapse supernovae.

  19. Quantitative Methodology for Assessing State-Level Nuclear Security Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Christopher 1985-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................................................................. 60 Figure 15. Significant Quantities of Nuclear Materials ................................................... 69 Figure 16. Critical Mass of a Beryllium-Reflected Uranium Sphere As a Function of U-235 Enrichment... .......................................................................................... 71 Figure 17. Probability of a Spontaneous-Fission-Free Millisecond in One Bare Critical Mass of Uranium of Varying Enrichment .......................................... 72 ix Figure 18. Bare Critical Mass for Unreflected...

  20. Fault Diagnosis with Multi-State Alarms in a Nuclear Power Control Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart A. Ragsdale; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research addresses how alarm systems can increase operator performance within nuclear power plant operations. The experiment examined the effects of two types of alarm systems (two-state and three-state alarms) on alarm compliance and diagnosis for two types of faults differing in complexity. We hypothesized the use of three-state alarms would improve performance in alarm recognition and fault diagnoses over that of two-state alarms. Sensitivity and criterion based on the Signal Detection Theory were used to measure performance. We further hypothesized that operator trust would be highest when using three-state alarms. The findings from this research showed participants performed better and had more trust in three-state alarms compared to two-state alarms. Furthermore, these findings have significant theoretical implications and practical applications as they apply to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear power plant operations.

  1. FAULT DIAGNOSIS WITH MULTI-STATE ALARMS IN A NUCLEAR POWER CONTROL SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin Ragsdale; Roger Lew; Brian P. Dyre; Ronald L. Boring

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research addresses how alarm systems can increase operator performance within nuclear power plant operations. The experiment examined the effect of two types of alarm systems (two-state and three-state alarms) on alarm compliance and diagnosis for two types of faults differing in complexity. We hypothesized three-state alarms would improve performance in alarm recognition and fault diagnoses over that of two-state alarms. We used sensitivity and criterion based on Signal Detection Theory to measure performance. We further hypothesized that operator trust would be highest when using three-state alarms. The findings from this research showed participants performed better and had more trust in three-state alarms compared to two-state alarms. Furthermore, these findings have significant theoretical implications and practical applications as they apply to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear power plant operations.

  2. United States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and Development Collaboration in Nuclear Energy and Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Director General of the Russian Federation State Corporation “Rosatom” Sergey Kirienko today signed the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation on Cooperation in Nuclear- and Energy-Related Scientific Research and Development

  3. Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation’s electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit...

  4. The Parton Momentum Distribution and the Equation of State in Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozynek, Jacek [Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We will present the model for the modification of the parton distribution in nuclei (EMC effect) using a suitably altered nuclear Fermi motion and final state interactions between the scattered nucleon and the rest of the nucleus. The medium effects concern the nucleon structure, namely the changes in the nucleon rest energy, the enhancement of sea quark contribution (simulated with ''nuclear pions'') and the modifications of the transverse parton momentum distribution inside Nuclear Matter (NM). The good agreement with experimental data of the EMC effect for x > 0.15 and nuclear lepton pair production data has been obtained essentially without free parameters. The possible influence of these modifications to the Equation Of State (EOS) in NM will be discussed.

  5. Amplification of Gamma Radiation from X-Ray Excited Nuclear States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silviu Olariu

    1999-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of the excitation of nuclear electromagnetic transitions by the absorption of X-ray quanta produced in appropriate inner-shell atomic transitions, and the relevance of this process for the amplification of the gamma radiation from the excited nuclear states. It is concluded that the X-ray pumping technique might provide a useful approach for the development of a gamma ray laser.

  6. United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3E AmbassadorsUS-EU-Japan-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan

  7. United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3E AmbassadorsUS-EU-Japan-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action

  8. United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3E AmbassadorsUS-EU-Japan-Japan JointGreen7/053/03Nuclear Damage

  9. National Nuclear Security Administration United States Department of Energy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica Treaty Organization NCT Nuclear Counterterrorism

  10. National Nuclear Security Administration United States Department of Energy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica Treaty Organization NCT Nuclear

  11. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON. D. C. 20556

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*Thee n0738F 241.3NUCLEAR

  12. Nuclear Navy United States Atomic Energy Commission Historical Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-Based Rates from theLiability Nuclear Liability

  13. Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials in United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Wachs

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been engaged in an effort to develop and qualify next generation LWR fuel with enhanced performance and safety and reduced waste generation since 2010. This program, which has emphasized collaboration between the DOE, U.S. national laboratories and nuclear industry, was refocused from enhanced performance to enhanced accident tolerance following the events at Fukushima in 2011. Accident tolerant fuels have been specifically described as fuels that, in comparison with standard UO2-Zircaloy, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The program maintains an ambitious goal to insert a lead test assembly (LTA) of the new design into a commercial power reactor by 2022 .

  14. Few-body calculations of $?$-nuclear quasibound states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Barnea; E. Friedman; A. Gal

    2015-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on precise hyperspherical-basis calculations of $\\eta NN$ and $\\eta NNN$ quasibound states, using energy dependent $\\eta N$ interaction potentials derived from coupled-channel models of the $S_{11}$ $N^{\\ast}(1535)$ nucleon resonance. The $\\eta N$ attraction generated in these models is too weak to generate a two-body bound state. No $\\eta NN$ bound-state solution was found in our calculations in models where Re $a_{\\eta N}\\lesssim 1$ fm, with $a_{\\eta N}$ the $\\eta N$ scattering length, covering thereby the majority of $N^{\\ast}(1535)$ resonance models. A near-threshold $\\eta NNN$ bound-state solution, with $\\eta$ separation energy of less than 1 MeV and width of about 15 MeV, was obtained in the 2005 Green-Wycech model where Re $a_{\\eta N}\\approx 1$ fm. The role of handling self consistently the subthreshold $\\eta N$ interaction is carefully studied.

  15. Few-body calculations of $?$-nuclear quasibound states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Barnea; E. Friedman; A. Gal

    2015-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on precise hyperspherical-basis calculations of $\\eta NN$ and $\\eta NNN$ quasibound states, using energy dependent $\\eta N$ interaction potentials derived from coupled-channel models of the $S_{11}$ $N^{\\ast}(1535)$ nucleon resonance. The $\\eta N$ attraction generated in these models is too weak to generate a two-body bound state. No $\\eta NN$ bound-state solution was found in our calculations in models where Re $a_{\\eta N}\\lesssim 1$ fm, with $a_{\\eta N}$ the $\\eta N$ scattering length, covering thereby the majority of $N^{\\ast}(1535)$ resonance models. A near-threshold $\\eta NNN$ bound-state solution, with $\\eta$ separation energy of less than 1 MeV and width of about 15 MeV, was obtained in the 2005 Green-Wycech model where Re $a_{\\eta N}\\approx 1$ fm. The role of handling self consistently the subthreshold $\\eta N$ interaction is carefully studied.

  16. Assessing State Nuclear Weapons Proliferation: Using Bayesian Network Analysis of Social Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Olson, Jarrod; Whitney, Paul D.

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A Bayesian network (BN) model of social factors can support proliferation assessments by estimating the likelihood that a state will pursue a nuclear weapon. Social factors including political, economic, nuclear capability, security, and national identity and psychology factors may play as important a role in whether a State pursues nuclear weapons as more physical factors. This paper will show how using Bayesian reasoning on a generic case of a would-be proliferator State can be used to combine evidence that supports proliferation assessment. Theories and analysis by political scientists can be leveraged in a quantitative and transparent way to indicate proliferation risk. BN models facilitate diagnosis and inference in a probabilistic environment by using a network of nodes and acyclic directed arcs between the nodes whose connections, or absence of, indicate probabilistic relevance, or independence. We propose a BN model that would use information from both traditional safeguards and the strengthened safeguards associated with the Additional Protocol to indicate countries with a high risk of proliferating nuclear weapons. This model could be used in a variety of applications such a prioritization tool and as a component of state safeguards evaluations. This paper will discuss the benefits of BN reasoning, the development of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) BN state proliferation model and how it could be employed as an analytical tool.

  17. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore CA 94551 (United States)

    2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  18. Ultrafast control of nuclear spins using only microwave pulses: towards switchable solid-state quantum gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Mitrikas; Yiannis Sanakis; Georgios Papavassiliou

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the control of the alpha-proton nuclear spin, I=1/2, coupled to the stable radical CH(COOH)2, S=1/2, in a gamma-irradiated malonic acid single crystal using only microwave pulses. We show that, depending on the state of the electron spin mS=+/-1/2, the nuclear spin can be locked in a desired state or oscillate between mI=+1/2 and mI=-1/2 on the nanosecond time scale. This approach provides a fast and efficient way of controlling nuclear spin qubits and also enables the design of switchable spin-based quantum gates by addressing only the electron spin.

  19. 1880 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 46, NO. 6, DECEMBER 1999 A Compact Readout System for Multi-pixel Hybrid Photodiodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhong

    a chip of our own design. The common anode signal is processed by a fast amplifier and discriminator-out system in a compact gamma-camera and with a small muon tracking-chamber demonstrate the low-noise. For example, the application of M-HPD sensors in a PET imaging system designed specifically to provide high

  20. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13 CO to Lipid 31 P ABSTRACT: Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane

  1. DOE, State of Idaho Sign Agreement on Nuclear Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear EnergyMeetingMetricDOE, State of

  2. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  3. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada); Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela [TAPIR, MC 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D., E-mail: mbdeaton@wsu.edu, E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ?} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ?} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ?} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ?} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ? 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ?} ? 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

  4. Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States conditions from war-related smoke. We combined observed climate conditions for the states of Iowa, Illinois phases also had an important effect. 1 Introduction In the event of nuclear war, targets in cities

  5. Advanced international training course on state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the Advanced International Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material held April 27 through May 12, 1981 at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards. Major emphasis for the 1981 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at both the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, Richland, Washington.

  6. Preparation of Non-equilibrium Nuclear Spin States in Double Quantum Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gullans; J. J. Krich; J. M. Taylor; B. I. Halperin; M. D. Lukin

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study the dynamic polarization of lattice nuclear spins in GaAs double quantum dots containing two electrons. In our prior work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 226807 (2010)] we identified three regimes of long-term dynamics, including the build up of a large difference in the Overhauser fields across the dots, the saturation of the nuclear polarization process associated with formation of so-called "dark states," and the elimination of the difference field. In particular, when the dots are different sizes we found that the Overhauser field becomes larger in the smaller dot. Here we present a detailed theoretical analysis of these problems including a model of the polarization dynamics and the development of a new numerical method to efficiently simulate semiclassical central-spin problems. When nuclear spin noise is included, the results agree with our prior work indicating that large difference fields and dark states are stable configurations, while the elimination of the difference field is unstable; however, in the absence of noise we find all three steady states are achieved depending on parameters. These results are in good agreement with dynamic nuclear polarization experiments in double quantum dots.

  7. Transition of an X-ray binary to the hard ultraluminous state in the blue compact dwarf galaxy VII Zw 403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brorby, Matthew; Feng, Hua

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the X-ray spectra of VII Zw 403, a nearby low-metallicity blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy. The galaxy has been observed to contain an X-ray source, likely a high mass X-ray binary (HMXB), with a luminosity of 1.3-23x10^38 erg s^-1 in the 0.3-8 keV energy range. A new Suzaku observation shows a transition to a luminosity of 1.7x10^40 erg s^-1 [0.3-8 keV], higher by a factor of 7-130. The spectra from the high flux state are hard, best described by a disk plus Comptonization model, and exhibit curvature at energies above 5 keV. This is consistent with many high-quality ultraluminous X-ray source spectra which have been interpreted as stellar mass black holes (StMBH) accreting at super-Eddington rates. However, this lies in contrast to another HMXB in a low-metallicity BCD, I Zw 18, that exhibits a soft spectrum at high flux, similar to Galactic black hole binaries and has been interpreted as a possible intermediate mass black hole. Determining the spectral properties of HMXBs in BCDs has important im...

  8. Compact wavefunctions from compressed imaginary time evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrod R. McClean; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of quantum systems promises to deliver physical and chemical predictions for the frontiers of technology. Unfortunately, the exact representation of these systems is plagued by the exponential growth of dimension with the number of particles, or colloquially, the curse of dimensionality. The success of approximation methods has hinged on the relative simplicity of physical systems with respect to the exponentially complex worst case. Exploiting this relative simplicity has required detailed knowledge of the physical system under study. In this work, we introduce a general and efficient black box method for many-body quantum systems that utilizes technology from compressed sensing to find the most compact wavefunction possible without detailed knowledge of the system. It is a Multicomponent Adaptive Greedy Iterative Compression (MAGIC) scheme. No knowledge is assumed in the structure of the problem other than correct particle statistics. This method can be applied to many quantum systems such as spins, qubits, oscillators, or electronic systems. As an application, we use this technique to compute ground state electronic wavefunctions of hydrogen fluoride and recover 98% of the basis set correlation energy or equivalently 99.996% of the total energy with $50$ configurations out of a possible $10^7$. Building from this compactness, we introduce the idea of nuclear union configuration interaction for improving the description of reaction coordinates and use it to study the dissociation of hydrogen fluoride and the helium dimer.

  9. Compact binary mergers: an astrophysical perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Rosswog

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the current understanding of double neutron star and neutron star black hole binaries. It addresses mainly (nuclear) astrophysics aspects of compact binary mergers and thus complements recent reviews that have emphasized the numerical relativity viewpoint. In particular, the paper discusses different channels to release neutron-rich matter into the host galaxy, connections between compact binary mergers and short Gamma-ray bursts and accompanying electromagnetic signals.

  10. Preservation and Implementation of Decommissioning Lessons Learned in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Rafael L. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has actively worked to capture and preserve lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. More recently, NRC has involved industry groups, the Organization of Agreement States (OAS), and the Department of Energy (DOE) in the effort to develop approaches to capture, preserve and disseminate decommissioning lessons learned. This paper discusses the accomplishments of the working group, some lessons learned by the NRC in the recent past, and how NRC will incorporate these lessons learned into its regulatory framework. This should help ensure that the design and operation of current and future nuclear facilities will result in less environmental impact and more efficient decommissioning. In summary, the NRC will continue capturing today's experience in decommissioning so that future facilities can take advantage of lessons learned from today's decommissioning projects. NRC, both individually and collectively with industry groups, OAS, and DOE, is aggressively working on the preservation and implementation of decommissioning lessons learned. The joint effort has helped to ensure the lessons from the whole spectrum of decommissioning facilities (i.e., reactor, fuel cycle, and material facilities) are better understood, thus maximizing the amount of knowledge and best practices obtained from decommissioning activities. Anticipated regulatory activities at the NRC will make sure that the knowledge gained from today's decommissioning projects is preserved and implemented to benefit the nuclear facilities that will decommission in the future.

  11. Utilizing a Russian space nuclear reactor for a United States space mission: Systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, E.; Schaefer, E. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Polansky, G.; Lacy, J. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bocharov, A. [GDBMB, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) has developed a cooperative relationship with several institutes of the former Soviet Union to evaluate Russian space hardware on a US spacecraft One component is the Topaz II Nuclear Power System; a built and flight qualified nuclear reactor that has yet to be tested in space. The access to the Topaz II reactor provides the NEPSTP with a rare opportunity; to conduct an early flight demonstration of nuclear electric propulsion at a relatively low cost. This opportunity, however, is not without challenges. Topaz II was designed to be compatible with Russian spacecraft and launch vehicles. It was manufactured and flight qualified by Russian techniques and standards and conforms to safety requirements of the former Soviet Union, not the United States. As it is desired to make minimal modifications to the Topaz II, integrating the reactor system with a United States spacecraft and launch vehicle presents an engineering challenge. This paper documents the lessons teamed regarding the integration of reactor based spacecraft and also some insight about integrating Russian hardware. It examines the planned integration flow along with specific reactor requirements that affect the spacecraft integration including American-Russian space system compatibility.

  12. SAMQUA - Quantum Numbers of Compound Nuclear States for R-Matrix Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouland, Olivier; Babut, Richard [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - DEN/LEPh - C.E. Cadarache, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Larson, Nancy M. [Nuclear Data Group, ORNL/Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the results of a collaborative effort between CEA of France and the DOE of the United States (in particular between le Laboratoire d'Etudes de Physique de Cadarache and the Nuclear Data Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory): In preparing input for analyses of differential nuclear data using multilevel multi-channel R-matrix theory, a sometimes daunting and often error-prone task is the generation of quantum-number information for all channels for each compound nuclear state (i.e., for each 'spin group', defined by quantum numbers J{pi}). For many years, the code SAMQUA has been available to users of the R-matrix code SAMMY to assist in preparation of that input; the original SAMQUA code, however, was limited to single-channel spin group information. In this paper, an improved version of the SAMQUA code is described. The new SAMQUA permits inclusion of all open reaction channels in the low-energy interaction between one particle (neutron or charged particle) and a nuclear target, and considerably simplifies the determination of the quantum numbers needed for the definition of the reaction channels. SAMQUA, in addition to its primary function of preparing quantum numbers for the SAMMY input file, also provides the possibility to visualize immediately all open reaction channels. This paper gives two examples of the use of SAMQUA, with emphasis on the notions of reaction channels and penetrability.

  13. Long-term measurements of unattached radon progeny concentrations using solid-state nuclear track detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Long-term measurements of unattached radon progeny concentrations using solid-state nuclear track of radon progeny from a set of measured (f1, f2, f3) values, where fi¼Ci/C0 (i¼1, 2, 3), and C0, C1, C2 is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e., 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po, but not to the radon

  14. Historical Perspective on the United States Fusion Program Invited paper presented at American Nuclear Society 16th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    controlled thermonuclear reactions, or nuclear fusion as it is now more commonly called, has remained elusiveHistorical Perspective on the United States Fusion Program Invited paper presented at American Nuclear Society 16th Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy 14-16 September, 2004 in Madison

  15. Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States and soybeans to cooler, drier, and darker conditions from war-related smoke. We combined observed climate had an important effect. 1 Introduction In the event of nuclear war, targets in cities and industrial

  16. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance methodology and applications to structure determination of peptides, proteins and amyloid fibrils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methodological developments and applications of multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance to biomolecular structure determination are presented. Studies are performed in uniformly 3C, 15N isotope ...

  17. Red River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

  18. Spin-On for the Renaissance? The Current State of China's Nuclear Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Jing-dong

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power; 2) expansion of nuclear plants from coastal regionsprovide four AP1000 nuclear power plants to China. AP1000sadvanced, yet proven nuclear power plant currently available

  19. Solid-State Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at 263 GHz: Spectrometer Design and Experimental Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosay, Melanie

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) experiments transfer polarization from electron spins to nuclear spins with microwave irradiation of the electron spins for enhanced sensitivity in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) ...

  20. Job Creation Due to Nuclear Power Resurgence in The United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. R. Kenley; R. D. Klingler; C. M. Plowman; R. Soto; R. J. Turk; R. L. Baker; S. A. Close; V. L. McDonnell; S. W. Paul; L. R. Rabideau; S. S. Rao; B. P. Reilly

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent revival of global interest in the next generation of nuclear power reactors is causing a reexamination of the role of nuclear power in the United States. This renewed interest has led to questions regarding the capability and capacity of current U.S. industries to support a renewal of nuclear power plant deployment. Key among the many questions currently being asked is what potential exists for the creation of new jobs as a result of developing and operating these new plants? Idaho National Laboratory and Bechtel Power Corporation collaborated to perform a Department of Energy-sponsored study that evaluated the potential for job creation in the U.S. should these new next generation nuclear power plants be built. The study focused primarily on providing an initial estimate of the numbers of new manufacturing jobs that could be created, including those that could be repatriated from overseas, resulting from the construction of these new reactors. In addition to the growth in the manufacturing sector, the study attempted to estimate the potential increase in construction trades necessary to accomplish the new construction.

  1. State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report.

  2. Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact, which provides for the cooperative management of low-level radioactive waste....

  3. United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success|Sustainable EnergyMotorUncleStates-Japanand Nuclear

  4. In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Concepts and Approaches for Excess Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning End State - 13367

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, Michael G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Musall, John C.; Bergren, Christopher L. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently has numerous radiologically contaminated excess nuclear facilities waiting decommissioning throughout the Complex. The traditional decommissioning end state is complete removal. This commonly involves demolishing the facility, often segregating various components and building materials and disposing of the highly contaminated, massive structures containing tons of highly contaminated equipment and piping in a (controlled and approved) landfill, at times hundreds of miles from the facility location. Traditional demolition is costly, and results in significant risks to workers, as well as risks and costs associated with transporting the materials to a disposal site. In situ decommissioning (ISD or entombment) is a viable alternative to demolition, offering comparable and potentially more protective protection of human health and the environment, but at a significantly reduced cost and worker risk. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has completed the initial ISD deployment for radiologically contaminated facilities. Two reactor (P and R Reactors) facilities were decommissioned in 2011 using the ISD approach through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SRS ISD approach resolved programmatic, regulatory and technical/engineering issues associated with avoiding the potential hazards and cost associated with generating and disposing of an estimated 124,300 metric tons (153,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated debris per reactor. The DOE Environmental Management Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering, through the Savannah River National Laboratory, is currently investigating potential monitoring techniques and strategies to assess ISD effectiveness. As part of SRS's strategic planning, the site is seeking to leverage in situ decommissioning concepts, approaches and facilities to conduct research, design end states, and assist in regulatory interactions in broad national and international government and private industry decommissioning applications. SRS offers critical services based upon the SRS experience in decommissioning and reactor entombment technology (e.g., grout formulations for varying conditions, structural and material sciences). The SRS ISD approach follows a systems engineering framework to achieve a regulatory acceptable end state based on established protocols, attains the final end state with minimal long stewardship requirements, protects industrial workers, and protects groundwater and the environment. The ISD systems engineering framework addresses key areas of the remedial process planning, technology development and deployment, and assessment to attain the ultimate goal of natural resource stewardship and protecting the public. The development and deployment of the SRS ISD approach has established a path for ISD of other large nuclear facilities in the United States and around the globe as an acceptable remedial alternative for decommissioning nuclear facilities. (authors)

  5. VALIDATION OF A THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR FUEL COMPACTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Phillips; Colby Jensen; Changhu Xing; Heng Ban

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow measurement system has been built to measure the thermal conductivity of a composite nuclear fuel compact. It is a steady-state measurement device designed to operate over a temperature range of 300 K to 1200 K. No existing apparatus is currently available for obtaining the thermal conductivity of the composite fuel in a non-destructive manner due to the compact’s unique geometry and composite nature. The current system design has been adapted from ASTM E 1225. As a way to simplify the design and operation of the system, it uses a unique radiative heat sink to conduct heat away from the sample column. A finite element analysis was performed on the measurement system to analyze the associated error for various operating conditions. Optimal operational conditions have been discovered through this analysis and results are presented. Several materials have been measured by the system and results are presented for stainless steel 304, inconel 625, and 99.95% pure iron covering a range of thermal conductivities of 10 W/m*K to 70 W/m*K. A comparison of the results has been made to data from existing literature.

  6. compactness in transport theory Mustapha Mokhtar-Kharroubi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A main feature of spectra of transport operators in nuclear reactor theory relies on the compactness (orOn L1 compactness in transport theory Mustapha Mokhtar-Kharroubi Département de Mathématiques spectral theory of neutron transport equations on both n-dimensional torus and spatial domains with ...nite

  7. Compact Ultradense Objects in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Rafelski; Ch. Dietl; L. Labun

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe properties and gravitational interactions of meteor-mass and greater compact ultra dense objects with nuclear density or greater (CUDO s). We discuss possible enclosure of CUDO s in comets, stability of these objects on impact with the Earth and Sun and show that the hypothesis of a CUDO core helps resolve issues challenging the understanding of a few selected cometary impacts.

  8. Recent progress on the accurate determination of the equation of state of neutron and nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Armani; Alexey Yu. Illarionov; Diego Lonardoni; Francesco Pederiva; Stefano Gandolfi; Kevin E. Schmidt; Stefano Fantoni

    2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of accurately determining the equation of state of nuclear and neutron matter at density near and beyond saturation is still an open challenge. In this paper we will review the most recent progress made by means of Quantum Monte Carlo calculations, which are at present the only ab-inito method capable to treat a sufficiently large number of particles to give meaningful estimates depending only on the choice of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. In particular, we will discuss the introduction of density-dependent interactions, the study of the temperature dependence of the equation of state, and the possibility of accurately studying the effect of the onset of hyperons by developing an accurate hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-nucleon-nucleon interaction.

  9. Mesoscale Simulations of Power Compaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, I; Fujino, D; Antoun, T; Liu, B

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line also observed in experiments. They found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations.

  10. Technical cooperation on nuclear security between the United States and China : review of the past and opportunities for the future.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States and China are committed to cooperation to address the challenges of the next century. Technical cooperation, building on a long tradition of technical exchange between the two countries, can play an important role. This paper focuses on technical cooperation between the United States and China in the areas of nonproliferation, arms control and other nuclear security topics. It reviews cooperation during the 1990s on nonproliferation and arms control under the U.S.-China Arms Control Exchange, discusses examples of ongoing activities under the Peaceful Uses of Technology Agreement to enhance security of nuclear and radiological material, and suggests opportunities for expanding technical cooperation between the defense nuclear laboratories of both countries to address a broader range of nuclear security topics.

  11. Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaynak, Burak Tevfik, E-mail: burak.kaynak@boun.edu.tr; Teoman Turgut, O., E-mail: turgutte@boun.edu.tr

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound-state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist. -- Highlights: •Schrödinger operator with singular interactions supported on compact submanifolds. •Exact bound-state solution in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold. •Generalization of the variational approach to a collection of submanifolds. •Existence of a lower bound for a unique ground state energy.

  12. Colloquium: Majorana Fermions in nuclear, particle and solid-state physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Elliott; M. Franz

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ettore Majorana (1906-1938) disappeared while traveling by ship from Palermo to Naples in 1938. His fate has never been fully resolved and several articles have been written that explore the mystery itself. His demise intrigues us still today because of his seminal work, published the previous year, that established symmetric solutions to the Dirac equation that describe a fermionic particle that is its own anti-particle. This work has long had a significant impact in neutrino physics, where this fundamental question regarding the particle remains unanswered. But the formalism he developed has found many uses as there are now a number of candidate spin-1/2 neutral particles that may be truly neutral with no quantum number to distinguish them from their anti-particles. If such particles exist, they will influence many areas of nuclear and particle physics. Most notably the process of neutrinoless double beta decay can only exist if neutrinos are massive Majorana particles. Hence, many efforts to search for this process are underway. Majorana's influence doesn't stop with particle physics, however, even though that was his original consideration. The equations he derived also arise in solid state physics where they describe electronic states in materials with superconducting order. Of special interest here is the class of solutions of the Majorana equation in one and two spatial dimensions at exactly zero energy. These Majorana zero modes are endowed with some remarkable physical properties that may lead to advances in quantum computing and, in fact, there is evidence that they have been experimentally observed. This review first summarizes the basics of Majorana's theory and its implications. It then provides an overview of the rich experimental programs trying to find a fermion that is its own anti-particle in nuclear, particle, and solid state physics.

  13. The Cooling of Compact Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dany Page; Ulrich Geppert; Fridolin Weber

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cooling of a compact star depends very sensitively on the state of dense matter at supranuclear densities, which essentially controls the neutrino emission, as well as on the structure of the stellar outer layers which control the photon emission. Open issues concern the hyperon population, the presence of meson condensates, superfluidity and superconductivity, and the transition of confined hadronic matter to quark matter. This paper describes these issues and presents cooling calculations based on a broad collection of equations of state for neutron star matter and strange matter. These results are tested against the body of observed cooling data.

  14. PROGRESS IN REDUCING THE NUCLEAR THREAT: UNITED STATES PLUTONIUM CONSOLIDATION AND DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J.; Koenig, R.; Davies, S.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the end of the Cold War, the United States identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium and larger quantities of enriched uranium that are permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs. The Department of Energy (DOE) also began shutting down, stabilizing, and removing inventories from production facilities that were no longer needed to support weapons programs and non-weapons activities. The storage of 'Category I' nuclear materials at Rocky Flats, Sandia National Laboratories, and several smaller sites has been terminated to reduce costs and safeguards risks. De-inventory continues at the Hanford site and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Consolidation of inventories works in concert with the permanent disposition of excess inventories, including several tonnes of plutonium that have already been disposed to waste repositories and the preparation for transfers to the planned Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (for the bulk of the excess plutonium) and alternative disposition methods for material that cannot be used readily in the MOX fuel cycle. This report describes status of plutonium consolidation and disposition activities and their impacts on continuing operations, particularly at the Savannah River Site.

  15. Gamma-ray induced Doppler broadening and the determination of lifetimes of excited nuclear states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boerner, H.G.; Jolie, J.; Robinson, S.J. (Institut Laue-Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Kessler, E.G.; Dewey, S.M.; Greene, G.; Deslattes, R. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA)); Ulbig, S.; Lieb, K.P. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Casten, R.F. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Krusche, B. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Cizewski, J.A. (Rutgers--the

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of lifetimes of excited states in nuclei yield crucial information for sensitive tests of nuclear models. Here a novel method will be discussed which involves the GRID (Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening) technique, in which Doppler broadening is observed in a transition from a nucleus recoiling from the emission of a previous gamma ray. As the recoil energy is extremely small, ultra-high energy resolving power has to be used. To date all such experiments have been carried out at ILL using the GAMS4 double flat crystal spectrometer which is operated in a NIST-ILL collaboration. The method can be used for all lifetimes below a few picoseconds. The wide range of applicability, together with the very exhaustive set of data often obtained, is an advantage with respect to many other methods. The characteristic features of GRID will be discussed using some selected examples. 21 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delphia, John Girard

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the maximum dry unit weight during compaction. Three different laboratory compaction methods were used: 1) Standard Proctor', 2) Modified Proctor; and 3) Vibrating hammer. The effects of the grain size distribution, particle shape and laboratory compaction...

  17. International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held October 17 through November 4, 1983, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a State system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1983 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Fast Flux Test Facility Visitor Center, and Washington Public Power System nuclear reactor facilities in Richland, Washington. Individual presentations were indexed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  18. Molybdenum in Nuclear Waste Glasses -Incorporation and Redox state R.J. Short, R.J. Hand, N.C. Hyatt,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Molybdenum in Nuclear Waste Glasses - Incorporation and Redox state R.J. Short, R.J. Hand, N form in simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW) glass melts have been studied. It was found less attention has been paid to the effects of redox on nuclear waste glasses. One particular element

  19. Effects of the nuclear equation of state on the r-mode instability and evolution of neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ch. C. Moustakidis

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    I study the effect of nuclear equation of state on the r-mode instability of a rotating neutron star. I consider the case where the crust of the neutron star is perfectly rigid and I employ the related theory introduced by Lindblom {\\it et al.} \\cite{Lidblom-2000}. The gravitational and the viscous time scales, the critical angular velocity and the critical temperature are evaluated by employing a phenomenological nuclear model for the neutron star matter. The predicted equations of state for the $\\beta$-stable nuclear matter are parameterized by varying the slope $L$ of the symmetry energy at saturation density on the interval $72.5 \\ {\\rm MeV} \\leq L \\leq 110 \\ {\\rm MeV}$. The effects of the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy on r-mode instability properties and the time evolution of the angular velocity are presented and analyzed. A comparison of theoretical predictions with observed neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) and millisecond radio pulsars (MSRPs) is also performed and analyzed. I estimate that it may be possible to impose constraints on the nuclear equation of state, by a suitable treatment of observations and theoretical predictions of the rotational frequency and spindown rate evolution of known neutron stars.

  20. U.S. Job Creation Due to Nuclear Power Resurgence in The United States — Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catherine M. Plowman

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent revival of interest in nuclear power is causing a reexamination of the role of nuclear power in the United States. This renewed interest has led to questions regarding the capability and capacity of current U.S. industries to support a renewal of nuclear power plant deployment. This study was conducted to provide an initial estimate of jobs to be gained in the U.S. through the repatriation of the nuclear manufacturing industry. In the course of the study, related job categories were also modeled to provide an additional estimate of the potential expansion of existing industries (i.e., plant construction and operations) in conjunction with the repatriation of manufacturing jobs.

  1. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Zueqian

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  2. About the inconsistency between Bohr-Wheelers transition-state method and Kramers' escape rate in nuclear fission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -H. Schmidt

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of an apparent inconsistency between the fission rates derived on the basis of Bohr-Wheeler's transition-state method and Kramers' dynamical model of nuclear fission, first pointed out by Strutinsky in 1973, is revisited. The study is based on studying the features of individual trajectories on the fission path.

  3. Long-term determination of airborne radon progeny concentrations using LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Long-term determination of airborne radon progeny concentrations using LR 115 solid-state nuclear. Introduction The radon-related absorbed dose in the lung is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e., 218-term measurements of the concentrations of radon progeny or the equilibrium factor F, among other information

  4. An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable success of future nuclear power plant ...

  5. Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

  6. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for an Extended Strand Conformation of the Membrane-Bound HIV-1 Fusion Peptide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for an Extended Strand Conformation of the Membrane-Bound HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Jun Yang, Charles M. Gabrys, and David P. Weliky* Department of ChemistryVed May 4, 2001 ABSTRACT: Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied

  7. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Huff, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history.

  8. Solid-State NMR Examination of Alteration Layers on a Nuclear Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Kelly A. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Science Lab.; Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Mueller, Karl T. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Science Lab.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state NMR is a powerful tool for probing the role and significance of alteration layers in determining the kinetics for the corrosion of nuclear waste glass. NMR methods are used to probe the chemical structure of the alteration layers to elucidate information about their chemical complexity, leading to increased insight into the mechanism of altered layer formation. Two glass compositions were examined in this study: a glass preliminarily designed for nuclear waste immobilization (called AFCI) and a simplified version of this AFCI glass (which we call SA1R). Powdered glasses with controlled and known particles sizes were corroded at 90 °C for periods of one and five months with a surface-area to solution-volume ratio of 100,000 m-1. 1H-29Si CP-CPMG MAS NMR, 1H-27Al CP-MAS NMR, 1H-11B CP-MAS NMR, and 1H-23Na CP-MAS NMR experiments provide isolated structural information about the alteration layers, which differ in structure from that of the pristine glass. Both glasses studied here develop alteration layers composed primarily of [IV]Si species. Aluminum is also retained in the alteration layers, perhaps facilitated by the observed increase in coordination from [IV]Al to [VI]Al, which correlates with a loss of charge balancing cations. 1H-11B CP-MAS NMR observations indicated a retention of boron in hydrated glass layers, which has not been characterized by previous work. For the AFCI glass, secondary phase formation begins during the corrosion times considered here, and these neophases are detected within the alteration layers. We identify precursor phases as crystalline sodium metasilicates. An important finding is that layer thickness depends on the length of the initial alteration stages and varies only with respect to silicon species during the residual rate regime.

  9. Compact microchannel system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  10. International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held June 3 through June 21, 1985, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and San Clemente, California. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1985 course was placed on safeguards methods used at item-control facilities, particularly nuclear power generating stations and test reactors. An introduction to safeguards methods used at bulk handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants, was also included. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Southern California Edison Company. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, San Clemente, California.

  11. Design-Basis Flood Estimation for Site Characterization at Nuclear Power Plants in the United States of America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Rajiv; Hibler, Lyle F.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe approaches and methods for estimation of the design-basis flood at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 defines the design-basis flood and lists the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations that require estimation of the design-basis flood. For comparison, the design-basis flood estimation methods used by other Federal agencies are also described. A brief discussion of the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency for estimation of the design-basis floods in its member States is also included.

  12. Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle [Tish

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

  13. Isospin asymmetric nuclear matter and properties of axisymmetric neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partha Roy Chowdhury; Abhijit Bhattacharyya; D. N. Basu

    2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure hadronic compact stars, above a limiting value ($\\approx$1.6 M$_\\odot$) of their gravitational masses, to which predictions of most of other equations of state (EoSs) are restricted, can be reached from the equation of state (EoS) obtained using DDM3Y effective interaction. This effective interaction is found to be quite successful in providing unified description of elastic and inelastic scattering, various radioactivities and nuclear matter properties. We present a systematic study of the properties of pure hadronic compact stars. The $\\beta$-equilibrated neutron star matter using this EoS with a thin crust is able to describe highly-massive compact stars, such as PSR B1516+02B with a mass M=1.94$^{+0.17}_{-0.19}$ M$_\\odot$ and PSR J0751+1807 with a mass M=2.1$\\pm$0.2 M$_\\odot$ to a 1$\\sigma$ confidence level.

  14. Phase Transition of Trapped Nuclear Exciton of Long-lived Rhodium Mossbauer States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Cheng; Bing Xia

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report experimental observations of the long-lived rhodium Mossbauer emissions by the time- and energy-resolved spectroscopy. The extraordinary observations manifest the open-up of photonic band gap in analogy to the superconducting gap of remarkable symmetry breakings at transition point. These observations are of potential importance for detecting gravitational waves and development of the two-photon gamma laser. Firstly, phase transitions shown by spectral evolution of characteristic emissions reveal the different aggregate exciton orderings at room temperature. Six different phases are identified by spectra profiles emitted from the color centers. Secondly, the cascade branching of the multipolar nuclear transition is discovered being the spontaneous cascade down-conversion to generate entangled gammas. The macroscopic angular distribution of entangled gammas from the polycrystalline sample manifests a global photon-nucleus-photon bound state across the grain boundaries. Thirdly, the gamma-energy distributions depending on exciton phases reveal the photonic band gap typically on the order of several hundred eV.

  15. Predictions for the Spatial Distribution of Gluons in the Initial Nuclear State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. S. Jackson; W. A. Horowitz

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We make predictions for the t-differential cross section of exclusive vector meson production (EVMP) in electron-ion collisions, with the aim of comparing DGLAP evolution to CGC models. In the current picture for the high-energy nucleus, nonlinear effects need to be understood in terms of low-$x$ gluon radiation and recombination as well as how this leads to saturation. EVMP grants experimental access to the edge region of the highly-boosted nuclear wavefunction, where the saturation scale for CGC calculations becomes inaccessible to pQCD. On the other hand, DGLAP evolution requires careful consideration of unitarity effects. The existing $J/{\\psi}$ photoproduction data in ep collisions provides a baseline for these theoretical calculations. Under different small-$x$ frameworks we obtain a measurable distinction in both the shape and normalization of the differential cross section predictions. These considerations are relevant for heavy ion collisions because the initial state may be further constrained, thus aiding in quantitative study of the quark-gluon plasma.

  16. Commercial Nuclear Power 1984: prospects for the United States and the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gielecki, M.; Diedrich, R.; Hewlett, J.; Murphy, T.

    1984-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis report presents the current status and outlook for commercial nuclear power reactors for all countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 1995 that are presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1983. Additionally, US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2020 are presented for various nuclear power supply scenarios. These long-term projections are provided in support of the Department of Energy's activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The projections for foreign nuclear capacity through 1990 supplant the preliminary foreign WOCA projection presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1983 and are supplemented by WOCA country-specific projections through 2000.

  17. Compact heat exchangers for condensation applications: Yesterday, today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact heat exchangers are being increasingly considered for condensation applications in the process, cryogenic, aerospace, power and refrigeration industries. In this paper, different configurations available for condensation applications are analyzed and the current state-of-the-knowledge for the design of compact condensers is evaluated. The key technical issues for the design and development of compact heat exchangers for condensation applications are analyzed and major advantages are identified. The experimental data and performance prediction methods reported in the literature are analyzed to evaluate the present design capabilities for different compact heat-exchanger configurations. The design flexibility is evaluated for the development of new condensation applications, including integration with other process equipment.

  18. Design of a circuit for measuring the lifetimes of excited nuclear states of the order of nanoseconds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuritzky, Clarence Samuel

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Inverter 10th Dynode Detector and Phototube 0 Source 10th Dynod Detector and Phototube Amplifier Anode Amplifier Delay Cable Single Channel Analyzer Pulse Single Channel Analyzer Time-to-pulse Stop Signal Height Converter Start Signal... the pulse shaper circuit. ABSTRACT Design of a Circuit for Measuring the Lifetimes of Excited Nuclear States of the Order of Nanoseconds (January 1964) Clarence S. Kuritzky, B. S. Air Force Institute of Technology Directed by Dr. Harnam S. Hans and Dr...

  19. A comparison of the additional protocols of the five nuclear weapon states and the ensuing safeguards benefits to international nonproliferation efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leitch, Rosalyn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the 6 January 2009 entry into force of the Additional Protocol by the United States of America, all five declared Nuclear Weapon States that are part of the Nonproliferation Treaty have signed, ratified, and put into force the Additional Protocol. This paper makes a comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the five Additional Protocols in force by the five Nuclear Weapon States with respect to the benefits to international nonproliferation aims. This paper also documents the added safeguards burden to the five declared Nuclear Weapon States that these Additional Protocols put on the states with respect to access to their civilian nuclear programs and the hosting of complementary access activities as part of the Additional Protocol.

  20. Quantum state tomography of large nuclear spins in a semiconductor quantum well: Robustness against errors as quantified by condition numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Miranowicz; Sahin K. Ozdemir; Jiri Bajer; Go Yusa; Nobuyuki Imoto; Yoshiro Hirayama; Franco Nori

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss methods of quantum state tomography for solid-state systems with a large nuclear spin $I=3/2$ in nanometer-scale semiconductors devices based on a quantum well. Due to quadrupolar interactions, the Zeeman levels of these nuclear-spin devices become nonequidistant, forming a controllable four-level quantum system (known as quartit or ququart). The occupation of these levels can be selectively and coherently manipulated by multiphoton transitions using the techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) [Yusa et al., Nature (London) 434, 101 (2005)]. These methods are based on an unconventional approach to NMR, where the longitudinal magnetization $M_z$ is directly measured. This is in contrast to the standard NMR experiments and tomographic methods, where the transverse magnetization $M_{xy}$ is detected. The robustness against errors in the measured data is analyzed by using condition numbers. We propose several methods with optimized sets of rotations. The optimization is applied to decrease the number of NMR readouts and to improve the robustness against errors, as quantified by condition numbers. An example of state reconstruction, using Monte Carlo methods, is presented. Tomographic methods for quadrupolar nuclei with higher-spin numbers (including $I=7/2$) are also described.

  1. Industrial Optimization Compact Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirches, Christian

    Industrial Optimization Compact Course and Challenge Workshop Optimization plays a crucial role of the processes are typically nonlinear and dyna- mic. Thus, complex dynamic optimization or optimal control in industrial optimization. February 17­20, 2014 ·9.00­17.00 IWR ·Im Neuenheimer Feld 368 ·69120 Heidelberg www

  2. Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Science Foundation of the United States of America concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in Nuclear and Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Science Foundation of the United States of America concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in Nuclear and Particle Physics

  3. Classification of Certain Compact Riemannian Manifolds with Harmonic Curvature a...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derdzinski, Andrzej

    Classification of Certain Compact Riemannian Manifolds with Harmonic Curvature a... Derdzinski and University Library provides access to digitized documents strictly for noncommercial educational, research) requires prior written permission from the Goettingen State- and University Library. Each copy of any part

  4. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  5. High-resolution high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization for biomolecular solid state NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Alexander B. (Alexander Benjamin)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has exploded in popularity over the last few years, finally realizing its potential to overcome the detrimental lack of sensitivity that has plagued performing NMR experiments. Applied ...

  6. Solid-State NMR Examination of Alteration Layers on a Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the role and significance of alteration layers in determining the kinetics for the corrosion of nuclear waste glass. NMR methods are used to probe the chemical structure of the...

  7. Progress in Understanding the Nuclear Equation of State at the Quark Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.W. Thomas; P.A.M. Guichon

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time there is a lively debate within the nuclear community concerning the relevance of quark degrees of freedom in understanding nuclear structure. We outline the key issues and review the impressive progress made recently within the framework of the quark-meson coupling model. In particular, we explain in quite general terms how the modification of the internal structure of hadrons in-medium leads naturally to three- and four-body forces, or equivalently, to density dependent effective interactions.

  8. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    , for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL; determining rate of spread and social network for smallpox epidemic in Abakaliki, Nigeria (1972) · Studying

  9. Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L. (ed.) (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Schultz, V. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA)); Schultz, S.C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. Primary sources of information in preparing this bibliography were bibliographies on Oceania, citations in published papers, CIS Index and Abstracts, Monthly Catalog of United States Government Publications, Nuclear Science Abstracts, Energy Research Abstracts, numerous bibliographies on radiation ecology, and suggestions by many individuals whom we contacted. One goal in this bibliography is to include complete documentation of the source of congressional reports and other government-related publications. In addition, page numbers for material in this bibliography are provided in parentheses when the subject matter of a book or document is not restricted to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands.

  10. A Computer Program Predicting Steady-State Performance of a Nuclear Research Reactor's Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamel Sidi Ali [Nuclear Research Center of Birine (Algeria)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performances of a nuclear reactor are directly affected by its cooling system, especially when it uses wet towers to evacuate the heat generated in the nuclear reactor core. Failure of the cooling system can yield very serious damages to most of the components of the nuclear reactor core. In this work, a computer program simulating the thermal behavior of a nuclear research reactor's cooling system is presented. Starting from the proposed start-up data of the reactor, the program predicts the cooling capacity of the nuclear reactor while taking into account the current climate conditions and also monitors the behavior of the thermal equipment involved in this process and this for different levels of power. The proposed simulation is based on a set of heat transfer equations representing all the equipment making up the cooling system up to the nuclear reactor core. Owing to the proposed inter-connected set of equations used to predict the thermal behaviour of the system, this program allows the user to modify at will a specified parameter and study the induced resulting effects on the rest of the system. The computer program developed has been experimentally validated on an operational system generating 6.8 MW and the obtained results are in good agreement with experiment. The results produced by the program concern the capacity of the cooling system to evacuate all the heat generated in the nuclear reactor core while taking into account the current climate conditions, the determination of the optimal number of thermal equipment that need to be engaged, the monitoring of the reactor core's entry end exit temperatures as well as the temperatures of all the components of the cooling system. Moreover, the program gives all the characteristics of air at the exit of the cooling towers and the loss of water due to the cooling process. (authors)

  11. Functional and shunt states of bacteriorhodopsin resolved by 250 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajaj, Vikram S.

    Observation and structural studies of reaction intermediates of proteins are challenging because of the mixtures of states usually present at low concentrations. Here, we use a 250 GHz gyrotron (cyclotron resonance maser) ...

  12. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  13. Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions Communicating on Progress for Université Laval Guide to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global Compact

  14. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, S.C.; Grossman, R.F.; Mullen, A.A.; Potter, G.D.; Smith, D.D.; Hopper, J.L. (comps.)

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, prepared in accordance with the guidelines in DOE/E-0023 (DOE 1981), covers the program activities conducted around Nevada Test Site (NTS) for calendar year 1981. It contains descriptions of pertinent features of the NTS and its environs, summaries of the dosimetry and sampling methods, analytical procedures, and the analytical results from environmental measurements. Where applicable, dosimetry and sampling data are compared to appropriate guides for external and internal exposures of humans to ionizing radiation. The monitoring networks detected no radioactivity in the various media which could be attributed to US nuclear testing. Small amounts of fission products were detected in air samples as a result of the People's Republic of China nuclear test and atmospheric krypton-85 increased, following the trend beginning in 1960, due to increased use of nuclear technology. Strontium-90 in milk and cesium-137 in meat samples continued the slow decline as observed for the last several years.

  15. ( )Ministers delay decision on site for 10-billion-dollar nuclear fusion reactor 20/12/2003 The European Union, the United States and four other countries failed in talks agree on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of transporting nuclear material and storing dangerous long-term radioactive waste. Nuclear fusion takes( )Ministers delay decision on site for 10-billion-dollar nuclear fusion reactor 20-dollar international nuclear fusion reactor. Delegates from the European Union, the United States, China, Japan, South

  16. Oregon State University nuclear chemistry progress report, August 1, 1992--July 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loveland, W.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics related to nuclear chemistry: Element 110; synthesis of heavy nuclei with complete fusion reactions involving radioactive nuclear beams; the interaction of 21--44 MeV/nucleon Xe with Au; MeV/nucleon {sup 86}Kr with {sup 197}Au; intermediate energy Ar-Th collisions; target-like fragments from the interaction of 29 MeV/nucleon {sup 208}Pb with {sup 197}Au; the intermediate of 22 and 32 MeV/nucleon {sup 16}O with {sup 197}Au; Au projectile fragmentation at 20 MeV/nucleon; relativistic heavy ion research; and pulse height defect measurements for very heavy ions.

  17. Alpha-Cluster Model, Charge Symmetry of Nuclear Force and Single Particle Bound State Potential in Symmetrical Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. K. Nie

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomenological alpha-cluster model based on the charge symmetry of nuclear force allows one to estimate the last proton position radius (LPPR) in a symmetrical nucleus. The values of LPPR obtained for the symmetrical nuclei with 5=15 it is inappropriate to represent a single particle bound state by the Woods-Saxon potential. For the nuclei with 5<=Z<=14 the error of the spectroscopic factor obtained with standard parameters in DWBA analysis of pure peripheral one nucleon transfer reactions is estimated. It is shown that for some nuclei using the standard parameters brings an error more than 20%.

  18. Version 3.0 Relativistic, QED, and finite nuclear mass corrections for lowlying states of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    and QED effects all together. For heavy few electron systems, electron interactions can be treated to determine nuclear properties from isotope shift measurements of transition energies. For example, the most] and lithium isotopes [12, 13] together with the intensive calculations of theoretical energy levels [7, 14

  19. Daniel E. Archer Ph.D., Experimental Nuclear Structure Physics, Florida State University, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in radiation detectors for Homeland Security, the NMIS ­ Nuclear materials Identification System, and CMTB credits grew to include the position of Detector Lead at PANY/NJ CMTB ­ Port Authority of New York and New system that can detect radioactive materials traveling up to 60 mph. ARAM was also developed

  20. ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS, AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT - 11052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, C.; Flora, M.; Belencan, H.

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical Separation Facilities (canyons).

  1. ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, C

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

  2. Tabulated equation of state for supernova matter including full nuclear ensemble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buyukcizmeci, N.; Botvina, A. S.; Mishustin, I. N. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.W. Goethe University, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an introduction to the tabulated database of stellar matter properties calculated within the framework of the Statistical Model for Supernova Matter (SMSM). The tables present thermodynamical characteristics and nuclear abundances for 31 values of baryon density (10{sup –8} < ?/?{sub 0} < 0.32, ?{sub 0} = 0.15 fm{sup –3} is the normal nuclear matter density), 35 values of temperature (0.2 MeV < T < 25 MeV), and 28 values of electron-to-baryon ratio (0.02 < Y{sub e} < 0.56). The properties of stellar matter in ? equilibrium are also considered. The main ingredients of the SMSM are briefly outlined, and the data structure and content of the tables are explained.

  3. HOW MANY DID YOU SAY? HISTORICAL AND PROJECTED SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL SHIPMENTS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1964 - 2048

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halstead, Robert J.; Dilger, Fred

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    No comprehensive, up-to-date, official database exists for spent nuclear fuel shipments in the United States. The authors review the available data sources, and conclude that the absence of such a database can only be rectified by a major research effort, similar to that carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1990s. Based on a variety of published references, and unpublished data from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the authors estimate cumulative U.S. shipments of commercial spent fuel for the period 1964-2001. The cumulative estimates include quantity shipped, number of cask-shipments, and shipment-miles, by truck and by rail. The authors review previous estimates of future spent fuel shipments, including contractor reports prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NRC, and the State of Nevada. The DOE Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Yucca Mountain includes projections of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive was te shipments for two inventory disposal scenarios (24 years and 38 years) and two national transportation modal scenarios (''mostly legal-weight truck'' and ''mostly rail''). Commercial spent fuel would compromise about 90 percent of the wastes shipped to the repository. The authors estimate potential shipments to Yucca Mountain over 38 years (2010-2048) for the DOE ''mostly legal-weight truck'' and ''mostly rail'' scenarios, and for an alternative modal mix scenario based on current shipping capabilities of the 72 commercial reactor sites. The cumulative estimates of future spent fuel shipments include quantity shipped, number of cask-shipments, and shipment-miles, by legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, rail and barge.

  4. Before the deluge? Assessing the threat of nuclear leakage from the post-Soviet states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, W.C.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most nuclear security problems are linked to the Russian Federation and the region`s troubled economic, political and social conditions. They are unlikely to be resolved without substantial progress in stabilizing the economy and renewing public trust in government institutions. The author makes a risk assessment of the threat and cites specific cases of theft and diversion of fissile materials and the need for action to control this activity. 17 refs.

  5. Accretion in Compact Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew R. King

    2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact binaries have long been a paradigm for accretion theory. Much of our present view of how accretion occurs comes directly from the comparison of theory with observations of these sources. Since theory differs little for other objects such as active galaxies, increasing efforts have recently gone into searching for correspondences in observed behaviour. This chapter aims at giving a concise summary of the field, with particular emphasis on new developments since the previous edition of this book. These developments have been significant. Much of the earlier literature implicitly assumed that accreting binaries were fairly steady sources accreting most of the mass entering their vicinity, often with main-sequence companions, and radiating the resulting accretion luminosity in rough isotropy. We shall see that in reality these assumptions fail for the majority of systems. Most are transient; mass ejection in winds and jets is extremely common; a large (sometimes dominant) fraction of even short-period systems have evolved companions whose structure deviates significantly from the zero-age main sequence; and the radiation pattern of many objects is significantly anisotropic. It is now possible to give a complete characterization of the observed incidence of transient and persistent sources in terms of the disc instability model and formation constraints. X-ray populations in external galaxies, particularly the ultraluminous sources, are revealing important new insights into accretion processes and compact binary evolution.

  6. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  7. Phase Transition of Trapped Nuclear Exciton of Long-lived Rhodium Mossbauer States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Bing

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report two experimental observations from the long-lived rhodium Mossbauer emissions by means of the time- and energy-resolved spectroscopy. Firstly, phase transitions in time evolution indicated by characteristic spectral profiles reveal the aggregate exciton orderings of inverted nuclei at room temperature. Depending on the exciton density in polycrystal, six different phases featured by multiple ionizations are identified. Secondly, broad-band background emissions are discovered and are believed to be ascribed to branching channels of gamma radiation. More than half gamma radiation goes to these anisotropic channels. Cascade scheme to catalyze the E3 multipolar nuclear transition is thus suggested.

  8. United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 -Helicopter-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy ActionEnergy Italy

  9. Disparities in nuclear power plant performance in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Kent F.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data comparing the performance of light water reactors in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The comparisons are made for the years 1980-1983 and include 21 Westinghouse ...

  10. Structure and dynamics studies by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itin, Boris

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goal of this work is the development of high resolution solid state 205T1 NMR techniques and their application to the elucidation of the mechanism and dynamics of ion exchange in biological solids. The thesis ...

  11. Towards a beyond 1 GHz solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: External lock operation in an external current mode for a 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki [RIKEN Systems and Structural Biology Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan); Graduate School of Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan); Ebisawa, Yusuke; Tennmei, Konosuke [Graduate School of Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan); Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Nakagome, Hideki [Graduate School of Chiba University, Chiba, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Hosono, Masami; Takasugi, Kenji [JEOL RESONANCE Inc., Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Hase, Takashi; Miyazaki, Takayoshi [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe, Hyogo 651-2271 (Japan); Fujito, Teruaki [Probe Laboratory Inc., Hamura, Tokyo 205-0021 (Japan); Kiyoshi, Tsukasa [Superconducting Wire Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0003 (Japan); Yamazaki, Toshio [RIKEN Systems and Structural Biology Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving a higher magnetic field is important for solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). But a conventional low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet cannot exceed 1 GHz (23.5 T) due to the critical magnetic field. Thus, we started a project to replace the Nb{sub 3}Sn innermost coil of an existing 920 MHz NMR (21.6 T) with a Bi-2223 high temperature superconducting (HTS) innermost coil. Unfortunately, the HTS magnet cannot be operated in persistent current mode; an external dc power supply is required to operate the NMR magnet, causing magnetic field fluctuations. These fluctuations can be stabilized by a field-frequency lock system based on an external NMR detection coil. We demonstrate here such a field-frequency lock system in a 500 MHz LTS NMR magnet operated in an external current mode. The system uses a {sup 7}Li sample in a microcoil as external NMR detection system. The required field compensation is calculated from the frequency of the FID as measured with a frequency counter. The system detects the FID signal, determining the FID frequency, and calculates the required compensation coil current to stabilize the sample magnetic field. The magnetic field was stabilized at 0.05 ppm/3 h for magnetic field fluctuations of around 10 ppm. This method is especially effective for a magnet with large magnetic field fluctuations. The magnetic field of the compensation coil is relatively inhomogeneous in these cases and the inhomogeneity of the compensation coil can be taken into account.

  12. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  13. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  14. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  15. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  16. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  17. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  18. POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power Plant Reliability-Availability and State Regulation,"Report on Equipment Availability: Fossil and NuclearBasic Definitions* Availability: Reliability: Base Loading:

  19. High-Sensitivity Delayed-Coincidence Spectrometer to Search for Short-Lived Nuclear States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morozov, V A; Norseev, Yu V; Sereeter, Z; Zlokazov, V B

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-sensitivity four-dimensional triple-coincidence spectrometer with two detectors is developed on the basis of an autocorrelation single-crystal scintillation time 4{\\pi} spectrometer and a semiconductor HPGe detector. The delayed-coincidence spectrometer is designed for searching for isomeric nano- and microsecond states in short-lived nuclei and for their related gamma-rays. Half-lives of short-lived states are measured in the range from 4 ns to 4 {\\mu}s. The sufficient activity of the monoisotopic source for the investigations does not exceed 0.01 {\\mu}Ci.

  20. Neutron star-black hole mergers with a nuclear equation of state and neutrino cooling: Dependence in the binary parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francois Foucart; M. Brett Deaton; Matthew D. Duez; Evan O'Connor; Christian D. Ott; Roland Haas; Lawrence E. Kidder; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Mark A. Scheel; Bela Szilagyi

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a first exploration of the results of neutron star-black hole mergers using black hole masses in the most likely range of $7M_\\odot-10M_\\odot$, a neutrino leakage scheme, and a modeling of the neutron star material through a finite-temperature nuclear-theory based equation of state. In the range of black hole spins in which the neutron star is tidally disrupted ($\\chi_{\\rm BH}\\gtrsim 0.7$), we show that the merger consistently produces large amounts of cool ($T\\lesssim 1\\,{\\rm MeV}$), unbound, neutron-rich material ($M_{\\rm ej}\\sim 0.05M_\\odot-0.20M_\\odot$). A comparable amount of bound matter is initially divided between a hot disk ($T_{\\rm max}\\sim 15\\,{\\rm MeV}$) with typical neutrino luminosity $L_\

  1. Use of a BCD for compaction control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yanfeng

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compaction of soil is essential in the construction of highways, airports, buildings, and bridges. Typically compaction is controlled by measuring the dry density and the water content of the compacted soil and checking that target values have been...

  2. On the origin of high- spin states in nuclear fission fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mouze; C. Ythier; S. Hachem

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the "nucleon-phase" model of binary fission, the transfer of nucleons between an A =126 {\\guillemotleft} nucleon core {\\guillemotright} and the primordial "cluster" can explain both the formation of high- spin states and the saw-tooth behavior of the variation, as a function of fragment mass, of the average angular momentum.

  3. Collective enhancement of nuclear state densities by the shell model Monte Carlo approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Özen; Y. Alhassid; H. Nakada

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The shell model Monte Carlo (SMMC) approach allows for the microscopic calculation of statistical and collective properties of heavy nuclei using the framework of the configuration-interaction shell model in very large model spaces. We present recent applications of the SMMC method to the calculation of state densities and their collective enhancement factors in rare-earth nuclei.

  4. 3He- and 4He-induced nuclear fission - a test of the transition state method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Th. Rubehn; K. X. Jing; L. G. Moretto; L. Phair; K. Tso; G. J. Wozniak

    1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Fission in 3He and 4He induced reactions at excitation energies between the fission barrier and 140 MeV has been investigated. Twentythree fission excitation functions of various compound nuclei in different mass regions are shown to scale exactly according to the transition state prediction once the shell effects are accounted for. New precise measurements of excitation functions in a mass region where shell effects are very strong, allow one to test the predictions with an even higher accuracy. The fact that no deviations from the transition state method have been observed within the experimentally investigated excitation energy regime allows one to assign limits for the fission transient time. The precise measurement of fission excitation functions of neighboring isotopes enables us to experimentally estimate the first chance fission probability. Even if only first chance fission is investigated, no evidence for fission transient times larger than 30 zs can be found.

  5. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  6. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  7. Compact neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  8. Theoretical direct WIMP detection rates for transitions to nuclear excited states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vergados, J D; Pirinen, P; Srivastava, P C; Kortelainen, M; Suhonen, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent WMAP and Planck data have confirmed that exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (cosmological constant) dominate in the flat Universe. Many extensions of the standard model provide dark matter candidates, in particular Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Thus the direct dark matter detection is central to particle physics and cosmology. Most of the research on this issue has hitherto focused on the detection of the recoiling nucleus. In this paper we study transitions to the excited states, possible in some nuclei, which have sufficiently low lying excited states. Examples considered previously were the first excited states of $^{127}$I and $^{129}$Xe. We examine here $^{83}$Kr, which offers some kinematical advantages and is currently considered as a possible target. We find appreciable branching ratios for the inelastic scattering mediated by the spin cross sections, with an inelastic event rate of $4.4\\times 10^{-4}$kg$^{-1}$d$^{-1}$. So, the extra signature of the gamma ra...

  9. Observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment of $^{173}$Yb from precise measurements of hyperfine structure in the ${^3P}_2$ state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Alok K; Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure hyperfine structure in the metastable ${^3P}_2$ state of $^{173}$Yb and extract the nuclear magnetic octupole moment. We populate the state using dipole-allowed transitions through the ${^3P}_1$ and ${^3S}_1$ states. We measure frequencies of hyperfine transitions of the ${^3P}_2 \\rightarrow {^3S}_1$ line at 770 nm using a Rb-stabilized ring cavity resonator with a precision of 200 kHz. Second-order corrections due to perturbations from the nearby ${^3P}_1$ and ${^1P}_1$ states are below 30 kHz. We obtain the hyperfine coefficients as: $A=-742.11(2)$ MHz, $B=1339.2(2)$ MHz, which represent two orders-of-magnitude improvement in precision, and $C=0.54(2)$ MHz. From atomic structure calculations, we obtain the nuclear moments: quadrupole $Q=2.46(12)$ b and octupole $\\Omega=-34.4(21)$ b\\,$\\times \\mu_N$.

  10. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douglas, David (Yorktown, VA)

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  11. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidiropoulos, Nikolaos D.

    , for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94ALT i For example: #12;Semantic Graphs · Different types of edges · Attribute or relationship labels type of edge. DEDICOM PARAFAC Multilinear algebra Adjacency matrix Adjacency tensor #12;Using Tensors

  12. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for Parallel and Antiparallel Strand Arrangements in the Membrane-Associated HIV-1 Fusion Peptide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weliky, David

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for Parallel and Antiparallel Strand Arrangements in the Membrane-Associated HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Jun Yang and David P. Weliky* Department of Chemistry, Michigan 7, 2003 ABSTRACT: The HIV-1 fusion peptide serves as a useful model system for understanding viral

  13. United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy Research

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success|Sustainable EnergyMotorUncleStates-Japan

  14. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  15. New considerations for compact cyclotrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Eric S. (Eric Scott)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact cyclotron built with superconducting magnets could be a transformative solution to many scientific problems facing the defense, medical, and energy industries today. This thesis discusses three potential applications ...

  16. A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this document is to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry with the basis for a plan to ensure the availability of near-term nuclear energy options that...

  17. Terminating states as a unique laboratory for testing nuclear energy density functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Zalewski; W. Satula

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic calculations of favored signature maximum-spin I_max and unfavored signature I_max - 1 terminating states for [f 7/2 ^ n] and [d 3/2 ^ (-1) f 7/2 ^ (n+1)] configurations (n denotes number of valence particles) in A ~ 44 mass region are presented. Following the result of Zdunczuk et al., Phys. Rev. C71 (2005) 024305 the calculations are performed using Skyrme energy density functional with empirical Landau parameters and slightly reduced spin-orbit strength. The aim is to identify and phenomenologically restore rotational symmetry broken by the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock solutions. In particular, it is shown that correlation energy due to symmetry restoration is absolutely crucial in order to reproduce energy splitting E(I_max) - E(I_max -1) in [f 7/2 ^ n] configurations but is relatively less important for [d 3/2 ^ (-1) f 7/2 ^ (n+1)] configurations.

  18. Compact reactor/ORC power source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, K.L.; Kirchner, W.L.; Willcutt, G.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for component development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite moderated reactor by heat pipes operating at 500/sup 0/C. Outside the reactor vessel and connected to the heat pipes are vaporizers in which the toluene ORC working fluid is heated to 370/sup 0/C. In the turbine-alternator-pump (TAP) combined-rotating unit, the thermal energy of the toluene is converted to 25 kWe of electric power. Lumped parameter systems analyses combined with a finite element thermal analysis have aided in the power source design. The analyses have provided assurance of reliable multiyear normal operation as well as full power operation with upset conditions, such as failed heat pipes and inoperative ORC vaporizers. Because of inherent high reliability, long life, and insensitivity to upset conditions, this power source is especially suited for use in remote, inaccessible locations where fuel delivery and maintenance costs are high. 10 refs.

  19. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  20. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  1. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  2. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  3. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  4. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  5. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  6. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  7. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  8. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  9. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  10. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  11. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  13. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  14. Characteristics of potential repository wastes: Volume 4, Appendix 4A, Nuclear reactors at educational institutions of the United States; Appendix 4B, Data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions; Appendix 4C, Supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; Appendix 4D, Supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; Appendix 4E, Supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 4 contains the following appendices: nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States; data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States(operational reactors and shut-down reactors); supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; and supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility.

  15. Recent progress on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignat, D.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work done on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), both at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and at other fusion laboratories in the United States. The goal of CIT is to reach ignition in a tokamak fusion device in the mid-1990's. Scientific and engineering features of the design are described, as well as projected cost and schedule.

  16. Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence of the release Pu from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station to the local environment and surrounding communities and estimates on fraction of total fuel inventory released

  17. Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lyons, Peter

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

  18. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Vernon, George E. (Rio Rancho, NM); Hoke, Darren A. (Albuquerque, NM); De Marquis, Virginia K. (Tijeras, NM); Harris, Steven M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  19. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  20. Hegemony and nuclear proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Nicholas L. (Nicholas LeSuer)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to longstanding of predictions of nuclear tipping points, the number of states interested in nuclear weapons has sharply declined in recent decades. In contrast to existing explanations, this dissertation argues ...

  1. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurber, Kent R., E-mail: thurberk@niddk.nih.gov; Tycko, Robert [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0520 (United States)] [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0520 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  2. Proton Dynamics in ZnO Nanorods Quantified by In Situ Solid-State 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Li Q.; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Pederson, Larry R.; Wang, Chong M.; Windisch, Charles F.; Yao, Chunhua

    2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) adopts wurtzite structure and possesses a direct wide band gap (Eg ~ 3.3 eV at 300 K), similar to that of GaN (Eg ~ 3.4 eV at 300 K), which enables ZnO as an alternative candidate to replace GaN for use in optoelectronic devices. The present controversy is centered at the microscopic origin of the “native donors”, particularly after ab initio calculations by Van de Walle, which indicate that hydrogen is soluble in ZnO at the interstitial sites, effectively forming a donor level just below the conduction band in ZnO. Hence, the origin of n type conductivity in ZnO is proposed due to the presence of hydrogen. Electron paramagnetic resonance and spectroscopic observations of muons provide experimental evidence of hydrogen presence in ZnO. Whereas, Look et al. suggests that the complex of zinc interstitial and nitrogen defect is a stronger candidate for donor than hydrogen interstitials under N ambient. Hydrogen-oxygen complex is claimed to be stable even at T > 1000°C in the hydrothermally synthesized ZnO. Therefore, the thermodynamic nature of hydrogen characteristics remains controversial, particularly its role on resident defects. In this letter, in situ temperature dependent solid state 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is employed to probe the local chemical environments of hydrogen in ZnO nanorods. To best knowledge of ours, this is the first time that the presence of hydrogen, its concentration, and local transport dynamics are directly chemically determined. Moreover, in situ NMR allows a new approach to investigate the absorption and desorption of protons from different sites on the ZnO nanorods, thus study of site-specific proton dynamics in ZnO becomes feasible.

  3. Primary system fission product release and transport: A state-of-the-art report to the committee on the safety of nuclear installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the status of research activities associated with fission product behavior (release and transport) under severe accident conditions within the primary systems of water-moderated and water-cooled nuclear reactors. For each of the areas of fission product release and fission product transport, the report summarizes relevant information on important phenomena, major experiments performed, relevant computer models and codes, comparisons of computer code calculations with experimental results, and general conclusions on the overall state of the art. Finally, the report provides an assessment of the overall importance and knowledge of primary system release and transport phenomena and presents major conclusions on the state of the art.

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Sources: Form EIA-860, "Annual...

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual...

  6. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual...

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source:Form EIA-860, "Annual...

  8. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  9. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  10. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  11. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb Mar

  12. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb Mar9

  13. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb Mar91

  14. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb Mar913

  15. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb Mar9137

  16. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb

  17. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb20

  18. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb2021

  19. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb20215

  20. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb202153

  1. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb2021537

  2. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan Feb20215379

  3. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan

  4. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan1 Missouri

  5. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan1 Missouri7

  6. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan1 Missouri79

  7. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan1

  8. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan13 New York

  9. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan13 New

  10. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan13 New6 Ohio

  11. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan13 New6

  12. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan13 New61

  13. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan13 New614

  14. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan13 New6146

  15. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan13 New614660

  16. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  17. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3Year Jan1363

  18. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region About U.S. NaturalStorageAlabama

  19. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region About U.S.

  20. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region About U.S.Arkansas

  1. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region About U.S.ArkansasConnecticut

  2. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region About

  3. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region AboutGeorgia

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region AboutGeorgiaMassachusetts

  5. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region

  6. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippi

  7. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippiNorth Carolina

  8. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippiNorth

  9. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippiNorthSouth Carolina

  10. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippiNorthSouth

  11. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippiNorthSouthTexas profile

  12. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippiNorthSouthTexas

  13. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest RegionMississippiNorthSouthTexasVirginia

  14. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest

  15. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877SouthwestWisconsin profile Wisconsin total

  16. Compact neutron generator development at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generator Development at LBNL J. Reijonen, G. English, R.Technology Group in LBNL. The compact axial extraction

  17. Comparative analysis of United States and French nuclear power plant siting and construction regulatory policies and their economic consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golay, Michael Warren.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the substantial commitments of time and money which are devoted to the nuclear power plant siting process, the effectiveness of the system in providing a balanced evaluation of the technical, environmental and ...

  18. United Nations Global Compact The UN Global Compact is a strategic policy initiative for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatziantoniou, Damianos

    United Nations Global Compact The UN Global Compact is a strategic policy initiative for businesses in the world. The Global Compact pursues two complementary objectives: 1. Mainstream the ten principles the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Participation in the Global Compact is open to degree-granting academic

  19. Nuclear Spectra from Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manton, N. S. [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures of Skyrmions, especially for baryon numbers 4, 8 and 12, are reviewed. The quantized Skyrmion states are compared with nuclear spectra.

  20. Isospin asymmetric nuclear matter and properties of axisymmetric neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, Partha Roy; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Basu, D. N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure hadronic compact stars that are above a limiting value (approx =1.6M{sub c}entre dot) of their gravitational masses, to which predictions of most of other equations of state are restricted, can be reached from the equation of state (EOS) obtained using the density-dependent M3Y (DDM3Y) effective interaction. This effective interaction is found to be quite successful in providing a unified description of elastic and inelastic scattering, various radioactivities, and nuclear matter properties. We present a systematic study of the properties of pure hadronic compact stars. The beta-equilibrated neutron star matter using this EOS with a thin crust is able to describe highly massive compact stars, such as PSR B1516+02B with a mass M=1.94{sub -0.19}{sup +0.17}M{sub c}entre dot and PSR J0751+1807 with a mass M=2.1+-0.2M{sub c}entre dot to a 1sigma confidence level.

  1. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Shelley, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  2. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  3. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

  4. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

  5. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laws, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance." J.and R. V. Pound. "Nuclear audiofrequency spectroscopy byresonant heating of the nuclear spin system." Phys. Rev. ,

  6. Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval...

  7. Department of Energy Awards $15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    nuclear fuel cycle technology development, meet the need for advanced nuclear energy production and help to close the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States. "Today's awards...

  8. Calibration of a solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) with high detection threshold to search for rare events in cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dey; D. Gupta; A. Maulik; Sibaji Raha; Swapan K. Saha; D. Syam; J. Pakarinen; D. Voulot; F. Wenander

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated a commercially available polymer for its suitability as a solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD). We identified that polymer to be polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and found that it has a higher detection threshold compared to many other widely used SSNTDs which makes this detector particularly suitable for rare event search in cosmic rays as it eliminates the dominant low Z background. Systematic studies were carried out to determine its charge response which is essential before any new material can be used as an SSNTD. In this paper we describe the charge response of PET to 129Xe, 78Kr and 49Ti ions from the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN, present the calibration curve for PET and characterize it as a nuclear track detector.

  9. Proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. Cross-statement of the United States Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE cross-statement in the matter of proposed rulemaking in the storage and disposal of nuclear wastes is presented. It is concluded from evidence contained in the document that: (1) spent fuel can be disposed of in a manner that is safe and environmentally acceptable; (2) present plans for establishing geological repositories are an effective and reasonable means of disposal; (3) spent nuclear fuel from licensed facilities can be stored in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner on-site or off-site until disposal facilities are ready; (4) sufficient additional storage capacity for spent fuel will be established; and (5) the disposal and interim storage systems for spent nuclear fuel will be integrated into an acceptable operating system. It was recommended that the commission should promulgate a rule providing that the safety and environmental implications of spent nuclear fuel remaining on site after the anticipated expiration of the facility licenses involved need not be considered in individual facility licensing proceedings. A prompt finding of confidence in the nuclear waste disposal and storage area by the commission is also recommeded. (DMC)

  10. Constitutional Restrictions on Regulation by American States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    statute prohibiting nuclear plant operation until theor economic benefits of a nuclear plant to the state throughreleases from nuclear power plants did not fall within any

  11. Expectations on Documented Safety Analysis for Deactivated Inactive Nuclear Facilities in a State of Long Term Surveillance & Maintenance or Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JACKSON, M.W.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE promulgated 10 CFR 830 ''Nuclear Safety Management'' on October 10, 2000. Section 204 of the Rule requires that contractors at DOE hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities develop a ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (DSA) that summarizes the work to be performed, the associated hazards, and hazard controls necessary to protect workers, the public, and the environment. Table 2 of Appendix A to the rule has been provided to ensure that DSAs are prepared in accordance with one of the available predetermined ''safe harbor'' approaches. The table presents various acceptable safe harbor DSAs for different nuclear facility operations ranging from nuclear reactors to decommissioning activities. The safe harbor permitted for decommissioning of a nuclear facility encompasses methods described in DOE-STD-1 120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Facility Disposition Activities,'' and provisions in 29 CFR 1910.120 or 29 CFR 1926.65 (HAZWOPER). Additionally, an evaluation of public safety impacts and development of necessary controls is required when the facility being decommissioned contains radiological inventory or contamination exceeding the Rule's definition for low-level residual fixed radioactivity. This document discusses a cost-effective DSA approach that is based on the concepts of DOE-STD-I 120 and meets the 10 CFR 830 safe harbor requirements for both transition surveillance and maintenance as well as decommissioning. This DSA approach provides continuity for inactive Hanford nuclear facilities that will eventually transition into decommissioning. It also uses a graded approach that meets the expectations of DOE-STD-3011 and addresses HAZWOPER requirements to provide a sound basis for worker protection, particularly where intrusive work is being conducted.

  12. Compact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov1 COMMUNITY

  13. Connection between the nuclear matter mean-field equation of state and the quark and gluon condensates at high density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malheiro, M.; Dey, M.; Delfino, A.; Dey, J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Maryland College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States); [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-340, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil; [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Calcutta 700073 (India); [Azad Physics Centre, Maulana Azad College, Calcutta 700013 (India)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known now that chiral symmetry restoration requires the meson-nucleon couplings to be density-dependent in nuclear-matter mean-field models. We further show that, quite generally, the quark and gluon condensates in medium are related to the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of nuclear matter and in these models the incompressibility K must be less than 3 times the chemical potential {mu}. In the critical density {rho}{sub c}, the gluon condensate is only reduced by 20{percent}, indicating a larger effective nucleon mass. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Nucleomorph genome of Hemiselmis andersenii reveals complete intron loss and compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archibald, John

    Nucleomorph genome of Hemiselmis andersenii reveals complete intron loss and compaction as a driver, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 3J5; and Atlantic Genome Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada B3J 1S5) in size (the smallest nuclear genomes known) and to a similar three-chromosome architecture. The mo

  15. Application of fuzzy logic in nuclear reactor control Part I: An assessment of state-of-the-art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herger, A.S.; Jamshidl, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alang-Rashid, N.K. [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research, Bangi (Malaysia)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the application of fuzzy logic to nuclear reactor control. The method has been suggested by many investigators in many control applications. Reviews of the application of fuzzy logic in process control are given by Tong and Sugeno. Because fuzzy logic control (FLC) provides a pathway for transforming human abstractions into the numerical domain, it has the potential to assist nuclear reactor operators in the control room. With this transformation, linguistically expressed control principles can be coded into the fuzzy controller rule base. Having acquired the skill of the operators, the FLC can assist an operator in controlling the complex system. The thrust of FLC is to derive a conceptual model of the control operation, without expressing the process as mathematical equations, to assist the human operator in interpreting incoming plant variables and arriving at a proper control action. To introduce the concept of FLC in nuclear reactor operation, an overview of the mythology and a review of its application in both nuclear and nonnuclear control application domains are presented along with subsequent discussion of fuzzy logic controllers, their structures, and their method of information processing. The article concludes with the application of a tunable FLC to a typical reactor control problem.

  16. Application of fuzzy logic in nuclear reactor control: Part 1: An assessment of state-of-the-art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heger, A.S.; Alang-Rashid, N.K.; Jamshidi, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the application of fuzzy logic of nuclear reactor control. The method has been suggested by many investigators in many control applications. Reviews of the application of fuzzy logic in process control are given by Tong and Sugeno. Because fuzzy logic control (FLC) provides a pathway for transforming human abstractions into the numerical domain, it has the potential to assist nuclear reactor operators in the control room. With this transformation, linguistically expressed control principles can be coded into the fuzzy controller rule base. Having acquired the skill of he operators, the FLC can assist an operator in controlling the complex system. The thrust of FLC is to derive a conceptual model of the control operation, without expressing the process as mathematical equations, to assist the human operator in interpreting incoming plant variables and arriving at a proper control action. To introduce the concept of FLC in nuclear reactor operation, an overview of the mythology and a review of its application in both nuclear and nonnuclear control application domains are presented along with subsequent discussion of fuzzy logic controllers, their structures, and their method of information processing. The article concludes with the application of a tunable FLC to a typical reactor control problem. 49 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Two Piece Compaction Die Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffey, Ethan N [ORNL

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compaction dies used to create europium oxide and tantalum control plates were modeled using ANSYS 11.0. Two-piece designs were considered in order to make the dies easier to assemble than the five-piece dies that were previously used. The two areas of concern were the stresses at the interior corner of the die cavity and the distortion of the cavity wall due to the interference fit between the two pieces and the pressure exerted on the die during the compaction process. A successful die design would have stresses less than the yield stress of the material and a maximum wall distortion on the order of 0.0001 in. Design factors that were investigated include the inner corner radius, the value of the interference fit, the compaction force, the size of the cavity, and the outer radius and geometry of the outer ring. The results show that for the europium oxide die, a 0.01 in. diameter wire can be used to create the cavity, leading to a 0.0055 in. radius corner, if the radial interference fit is 0.003 in. For the tantalum die, the same wire can be used with a radial interference fit of 0.001 in. Also, for the europium oxide die with a 0.003 in. interference fit, it is possible to use a wire with a diameter of 0.006 in. for the wire burning process. Adding a 10% safety factor to the compaction force tends to lead to conservative estimates of the stresses but not for the wall distortion. However, when the 10% safety factor is removed, the wall distortion is not affected enough to discard the design. Finally, regarding the europium oxide die, when the cavity walls are increased by 0.002 in. per side or the outer ring is made to the same geometry as the tantalum die, all the stresses and wall distortions are within the desired range. Thus, the recommendation is to use a 0.006 in. diameter wire and a 0.003 in. interference fit for the europium oxide die and a 0.01 in. diameter wire and a 0.001 in. interference fit for the tantalum die. The dies can also be made to have the same outer geometry if desired.

  18. Compact star constraints on the high-density EoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Grigorian; D. Blaschke; T. Klahn

    2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A new scheme for testing the nuclear matter (NM) equation of state (EoS) at high densities using constraints from compact star (CS) phenomenology is applied to neutron stars with a core of deconfined quark matter (QM). An acceptable EoS shall not to be in conflict with the mass measurement of 2.1 +/- 0.2 M_sun (1 sigma level) for PSR J0751+1807 and the mass-radius relation deduced from the thermal emission of RX J1856-3754. Further constraints for the state of matter in CS interiors come from temperature-age data for young, nearby objects. The CS cooling theory shall agree not only with these data, but also with the mass distribution inferred via population synthesis models as well as with LogN-LogS data. The scheme is applied to a set of hybrid EsoS with a phase transition to stiff, color superconducting QM which fulfills all above constraints and is constrained otherwise from NM saturation properties and flow data of heavy-ion collisions. We extrapolate our description to low temperatures and draw conclusions for the QCD phase diagram to be explored in heavy-ion collision experiments.

  19. GET TO KNOW National Nuclear Science Week

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from 104 operating reactors across the United States. Nearly half of South Carolina's electricity and one-fourth of Georgia's electric power come from nuclear energy. Nuclear...

  20. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  1. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  2. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  3. "Spectral Implementation" for creating a labeled pseudo-pure state and the Bernstein-Vazirani's algorithm in a four-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xinhua Peng; Xiwen Zhu; Ximing Fang; Mang Feng; Maili Liu; Kelin Gao

    2004-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum circuit is introducted to describe the preparation of a labeled pseudo-pure state by mutiplet-component excitation scheme which has been experimentally implemented on a 4-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum processor. Meanwhile, we theoretically analyze and numerically inverstigate the low-power selective single-pulse implementation of a controlled-rotation gate, which manifests its validity in our experiment. Based on the labeled pseudo-pure state prepared, a 3-qubit Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm has been experimentally demonstrated by spectral implementation. The "answers" of the computations are indentified from the split speak positions in the spectra of the observer spin, which are equivalent to projective measurements required by the algorithms.

  4. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

  5. Hydrostatic compaction of Microtherm HT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two samples of jacketed Microtherm{reg_sign}HT were hydrostatically pressurized to maximum pressures of 29,000 psi to evaluate both pressure-volume response and change in bulk modulus as a function of density. During testing, each of the two samples exhibited large irreversible compactive volumetric strains with only small increases in pressure; however at volumetric strains of approximately 50%, the Microtherm{reg_sign}HT stiffened noticeably at ever increasing rates. At the maximum pressure of 29,000 psi, the volumetric strains for both samples were approximately 70%. Bulk modulus, as determined from hydrostatic unload/reload loops, increased by more than two-orders of magnitude (from about 4500 psi to over 500,000 psi) from an initial material density of {approx}0.3 g/cc to a final density of {approx}1.1 g/cc. An empirical fit to the density vs. bulk modulus data is K = 492769{rho}{sup 4.6548}, where K is the bulk modulus in psi, and {rho} is the material density in g/cm{sup 3}. The porosity decreased from 88% to {approx}20% indicating that much higher pressures would be required to compact the material fully.

  6. Compact approach to fusion power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. These compact systems promise to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that largely substantiate these promising results have since been completed. This 1000-MWe(net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion.

  7. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  8. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  9. EOSDB: The Database for Nuclear EoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikako Ishizuka; Takuma Suda; Hideyuki Suzuki; Akira Ohnishi; Kohsuke Sumiyoshi; Hiroshi Toki

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear equation of state (EoS) plays an important role in understanding the formation of compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes. The true nature of the EoS has been a matter of debate at any density range not only in the nuclear physics but also in the astronomy and astrophysics. We have constructed a database of EoSs by compiling data from the literature. Our database contains the basic properties of the nuclear EoS of symmetric nuclear matter and of pure neutron matter. It also includes the detailed information about the theoretical models, for example the adopted methods and assumptions in individual models. The novelty of the database is to consider new experimental probes such as the symmetry energy, its slope relative to the baryon density, and the incompressibility, which enables the users to check their model dependences. We demonstrate the performance of the EOSDB through the examinations of the model dependence among different nuclear EoSs. It is reveled that some theoretical EoSs, which is commonly used in astrophysics, do not satisfactorily agree with the experimental constraints.

  10. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute/United States Integral Neutronics Experiments and Analyses for tritium breeding, nuclear heating, and induced radioactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.A.; Youssef, M.; Kumar, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large member of integral experiments for fusion blanket neutronics were performed using deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutrons at the Fusion Neutronics Source facility as part of a 10-yr collaborative program between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the United States. A number of measurement techniques were developed for tritium production, induced radioactivity, and nuclear heating. Transport calculations were performed using three-dimensional Monte Carlo and two-dimensional discrete ordinates codes and the latest nuclear data libraries in Japan and the United States. Significant differences among measurement techniques and calculation methods were found. To assure a 90% confidence level for tritium breeding calculations not to exceed measurements, designers should use a safety factor > 1.1 to 1.2, depending on the calculation method. Such a safety factor may not be affordable with most candidate blanket designs. Therefore, demonstration of tritium self-sufficiency is recommended as a high priority for testing in near-term fusion facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The radioactivity measurements were performed for > 20 materials with the focus on gamma emitters with half-lives < 5 yr. Most discrepancies were attributed directly to deficiencies in the activation libraries, particularly errors in cross sections for certain reactions. 71 refs., 30 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Screening evaluation of radionuclide groundwater concentrations for the end state basement fill model Zion Nuclear Power Station decommissioning project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan T.

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled with clean material. The final selection of fill material has not been made.

  12. Convolution type operators on locally compact groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shtein--~erg, Convolution Type Operators on Locally Compact Groups [in Russian],. Manuscript Deposited in the All-Union Institute of Scientific and Technical ...

  13. Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category.

  14. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nihei, K.T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compaction and chemical diagenesis on the microfabric andAt early stages of diagenesis, clay-rich sediments can

  15. Electronic quantum effects mapped onto non-Born-Oppenheimer nuclear paths: Nonclassical surmounting over potential barriers and trapping above the transition states due to nonadiabatic path-branching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Kentaro, E-mail: kyamamoto@mns2.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Takatsuka, Kazuo, E-mail: kaztak@mns2.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Basic Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Basic Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the path-branching representation for nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics [T. Yonehara and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 244102 (2010)] so as to treat dynamics in an energy range comparable to the barrier height of adiabatic potential energy curves. With this representation two characteristic chemical reaction dynamics are studied, in which an incident nuclear wavepacket encounters a potential barrier, on top of which lies another nonadiabatically coupled adiabatic potential curve: (1) Dynamics of initial paths coming into the nonadiabatic interaction region with energy lower than the barrier height. They branch into two pieces (and repeat branching subsequently), the upper counterparts of which can penetrate into a classically inaccessible high energy region and eventually branch back to the product region on the ground state curve. This is so to say surmounting the potential barrier via nonadiabatically coupled excited state, and phenomenologically looks like the so-called deep tunneling. (2) Dynamics of classical paths whose initial energies are a little higher than the barrier but may be lower than the bottom of the excited state. They can undergo branching and some of those components are trapped on top of the potential barrier, being followed by the population decay down to the lower state flowing both to product and reactant sites. Such expectations arising from the path-branching representation are numerically confirmed with full quantum mechanical wavepacket dynamics. This phenomenon may be experimentally observed as time-delayed pulses of wavepacket trains.

  16. The nucleation of false vacuum bubbles with compact geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bum-Hoon Lee; Chul H. Lee; Wonwoo Lee; Changheon Oh

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nucleation process for the possible types of vacuum bubbles. We classify false vacuum bubbles of a self-gravitating scalar field with compact geometries. We show that there exist numerical solutions representing the tunneling from the true vacuum state to the false vacuum state. The solutions are possible only gravity taken into account. We present the analytic computations for the radius and nucleation rate of a vacuum bubble using the thin-wall approximation. We discuss possible cosmological implications of our solutions.

  17. Walk the Line: The Development of Route Selection Standards for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-level Radioactive Waste in the United States - 13519

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States)] [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States)] [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)] [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) are widely dispersed throughout the United States, these materials are also relatively concentrated in terms of geographic area. That is, the impacts of storage occur in a very small geographic space. Once shipments begin to a national repository or centralized interim storage facility, the impacts of SNF and HLRW will become more geographically distributed, more publicly visible, and almost certainly more contentious. The selection of shipping routes will likely be a major source of controversy. This paper describes the development of procedures, regulations, and standards for the selection of routes used to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The paper begins by reviewing the circumstances around the development of HM-164 routing guidelines. The paper discusses the significance of New York City versus the Department of Transportation and application of HM-164. The paper describes the methods used to implement those regulations. The paper will also describe the current HM-164 designated routes and will provide a summary data analysis of their characteristics. This analysis will reveal the relatively small spatial scale of the effects of HM 164. The paper will then describe subsequent developments that have affected route selection for these materials. These developments include the use of 'representative routes' found in the Department of Energy (DOE) 2008 Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the formerly proposed Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The paper will describe recommendations related to route selection found in the National Academy of Sciences 2006 report Going the Distance, as well as recommendations found in the 2012 Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. The paper will examine recently promulgated federal regulations (HM-232) for selection of rail routes for hazardous materials transport. The paper concludes that while the HM 164 regime is sufficient for certain applications, it does not provide an adequate basis for a national plan to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to centralized storage and disposal facilities over a period of 30 to 50 years. (authors)

  18. Cooling of Color Superconducting Compact Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Blaschke

    2006-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the status of research on the cooling of compact stars, with emphasis on the influence of color superconducting quark matter phases. Although a consistent microscopic approach is not yet available, severe constraints on the phase structure of matter at high densities come from recent mass and cooling observations of compact stars.

  19. The Compressor: Concurrent, Incremental, and Parallel Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrank, Erez

    The Compressor: Concurrent, Incremental, and Parallel Compaction Haim Kermany Erez Petrank Dept non-intrusive compactor is still missing. In this paper we present the Compressor, a novel compaction, thereby allowing acceptable runs on large heaps. Furthermore, the Compressor is the first compactor

  20. Exploration of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Exploration of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants: Initial Results from ARIES-CS Study Farrokh, see: http://aries.ucsd.edu/ #12;Exploration and Optimization of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants in the context of power plant studies, e.g., particle loss Divertor (location, particle and energy distribution

  1. Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soil­soil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. © 2012 American

  2. Why Python? 1) readable, compact, simple syntax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Starting with Python #12;Why Python? 1) readable, compact, simple syntax 2) documented 3) memory output shown using green text 5 True 27 10/19/2010 6 #12;Scope · Declarations are global · Cannot for usually compacter, while more general. for - doing X for each element of S. can simulate while loops

  3. Non-compact versions of Edwards' Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogus, Nihat G; Poletsky, Evgeny A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Edwards' Theorem establishes duality between a convex cone in the space of continuous functions on a compact space and the set of representing or Jensen measures for this cone. In this paper we prove non-compact versions of this theorem.

  4. Nuclear disarmament verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification.

  5. United States-Russian laboratory-to-laboratory cooperation on protection, control, and accounting for naval nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhoruchkin, V. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Yurasov, N.; Goncharenko, Y. [Russian Navy, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mullen, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); McConnell, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1995, the Russian Navy contacted safeguards experts at the Kurchatov Institute (KI) and proposed the initiation of work to enhance nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) at Russian Navy facilities. Because of KI`s successful experience in laboratory-to-laboratory MPC and A cooperation with US Department of Energy Laboratories, the possibility of US participation in the work with the Russian Navy was explored. Several months later, approval was received from the US Government and the Russian Navy to proceed with this work on a laboratory-to-laboratory basis through Kurchatov Institute. As a first step in the cooperation, a planning meeting occurred at KI in September, 1995. Representatives from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Department of Defense (DOD), the Russian Navy, and KI discussed several areas for near-term cooperative work, including a vulnerability assessment workshop and a planning study to identify and prioritize near-term MPC and A enhancements that might be implemented at Russian facilities which store or handle unirradiated highly enriched uranium fuel for naval propulsion applications. In subsequent meetings, these early proposals have been further refined and extended. This MPC and A cooperation will now include enhanced protection and control features for storage facilities and refueling service ships, computerized accounting systems for naval fuel, methods and equipment for rapid inventories, improved security of fresh fuel during truck transportation, and training. This paper describes the current status and future plans for MPC and A cooperation for naval nuclear materials.

  6. Equation of state in the pion condensation phase in the asymmetric nuclear matter using a holographic QCD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroki Nishihara; Masayasu Harada

    2014-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the asymmetric nuclear matter using a holographic QCD model by introducing a baryonic charge in the infrared boundary. We first show that, in the normal hadron phase, the predicted values of the symmetry energy and it's slope parameter are comparable with the empirical values. We find that the phase transition from the normal phase to the pion condensation phase is delayed compared with the pure mesonic matter: The critical chemical potential is larger than the pion mass which is obtained for the pure mesonic matter. We also show that, in the pion condensation phase, the pion contribution to the isospin number density increases with the chemical potential, while the baryonic contribution is almost constant. Furthermore, the value of chiral condensation implies that the enhancement of the chiral symmetry breaking occurs in the asymmetric nuclear matter as in the pure mesonic matter. We also give a discussion on how to understand the delay in terms of the 4-dimensional chiral Lagrangian including the rho and omega mesons based on the hidden local symmetry.

  7. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

  8. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  9. long-Term Tritium Transport through Field-Scale Compacted Soil Liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was conducted by the illinois State Geological Survey to detennine the long-term performance of compacted soil and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801. 5Geochemist, Illinois State Geological Survey., Natural Resources Building, 615 Peabody Dr., Champaign, IL 61820. 6professor, Dept

  10. Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    development, Nuclear Operations Division (NOD) waste management and storage activities and other laboratoryNuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear

  11. Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line: the lowest energy states in $^9$He via their T=5/2 isobaric analogs in $^9$Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uberseder, E; Goldberg, V Z; Koshchiy, E; Roeder, B T; Alcorta, M; Chubarian, G; Davids, B; Fu, C; Hooker, J; Jayatissa, H; Melconian, D; Tribble, R E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound $^9$He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy $^9$He states exist with spins $J^\\pi=1/2^+$ and $J^\\pi=1/2^-$ and widths on the order of hundreds of keV. These findings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. The present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the $^8$He$+n$ system, performed via a search for the T=5/2 isobaric analog states in $^9$Li populated through $^8$He+p elastic scattering. The present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad $J^{\\pi}=1/2^+$ state in $^9$He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.

  12. Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line: the lowest energy states in $^9$He via their T=5/2 isobaric analogs in $^9$Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Uberseder; G. V. Rogachev; V. Z. Goldberg; E. Koshchiy; B. T. Roeder; M. Alcorta; G. Chubarian; B. Davids; C. Fu; J. Hooker; H. Jayatissa; D. Melconian; R. E. Tribble

    2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound $^9$He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy $^9$He states exist with spins $J^\\pi=1/2^+$ and $J^\\pi=1/2^-$ and widths on the order of hundreds of keV. These findings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. The present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the $^8$He$+n$ system, performed via a search for the T=5/2 isobaric analog states in $^9$Li populated through $^8$He+p elastic scattering. The present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad $J^{\\pi}=1/2^+$ state in $^9$He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.

  13. State-of-the-Art of Non-Destructive Testing Methods and Technologies for Application to Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggenhauser, Dr. Herbert [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)] [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM); Naus, Dan J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The inspection of nuclear power plant concrete structures presents challenges different from conventional civil engineering structures. Wall thicknesses can be in excess of one meter and the structures often have increased steel reinforcement density with more complex detailing. The accessibility for any testing method may be limited due to the presence of liners and other components and there can be a number of penetrations or cast-in-place items present. The objective of the report is to present the state-of-the art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for the inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced nuclear power plant concrete cross-sections with particular respect to: locating steel reinforcement and identification of its cover depth locating tendon ducts and identification of the condition of the grout materials detection of cracking, voids, delamination, and honeycombing in concrete structures detection of inclusions of different materials or voids adjacent to the concrete side of the containment liner methods capable of identification of corrosion occurrence on the concrete side of the containment liner

  14. State-of-the-art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for application to nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggenhauser, Herbert [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin, D (Germany); Naus, Dan J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The inspection of nuclear power plant concrete structures presents challenges different from conventional civil engineering structures. Wall thicknesses can be in excess of one meter and the structures often have increased steel reinforcement density with more complex detailing. The accessibility for any testing method may be limited due to the presence of liners and other components and there can be a number of penetrations or cast-in-place items present. The objective of the report is to present the state-of-the art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for the inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced nuclear power plant concrete cross-sections with particular respect to: •locating steel reinforcement and identification of its cover depth •locating tendon ducts and identification of the condition of the grout materials •detection of cracking, voids, delamination, and honeycombing in concrete structures •detection of inclusions of different materials or voids adjacent to the concrete side of the containment liner •methods capable of identification of corrosion occurrence on the concrete side of the containment liner.

  15. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy.

  16. Color superconducting quark matter in compact stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Blaschke; T. Klahn; F. Sandin

    2007-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent indications for high neutron star masses (M \\sim 2 M_sun) and large radii (R > 12 km) could rule out soft equations of state and have provoked a debate whether the occurence of quark matter in compact stars can be excluded as well. We show that modern quantum field theoretical approaches to quark matter including color superconductivity and a vector meanfield allow a microscopic description of hybrid stars which fulfill the new, strong constraints. For these objects color superconductivity turns out to be an essential ingredient for a successful description of the cooling phenomenology in accordance with recently developed tests. We discuss the energy release in the neutrino untrapping transition as a new aspect of the problem that hybrid stars masquerade themselves as neutron stars. Quark matter searches in future generations of low-temperature/high-density nucleus-nucleus collision experiments such as low-energy RHIC and CBM @ FAIR might face the same problem of an almost crossover behavior of the deconfinement transition. Therefore, diagnostic tools shall be derived from effects of color superconductivity.

  17. Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

  18. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  19. Elongation/Compaction of Giant DNA Caused by Depletion Interaction with a Flexible Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kojima; K. Kuobo; K. Yoshikawa

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural changes in giant DNA induced by the addition of the flexible polymer PEG were examined by the method of single-DNA observation. In dilute DNA conditions, individual DNA assumes a compact state via a discrete coil-globule transition, whereas in concentrated solution, DNA molecules exhibit an extended conformation via macroscopic phase segregation. The long axis length of the stretched state in DNA is about 1000 times larger than that of the compact state. Phase segregation at high DNA concentrations occurs at lower PEG concentrations than the compaction at low DNA concentrations. These opposite changes in the conformation of DNA molecule are interpreted in terms of the free energy, including depletion interaction.

  20. Compact, electro-hydraulic, variable valve actuation system providing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact, electro-hydraulic, variable valve actuation system providing variable lift, timing and duration to enable high efficiency engine combustion control Compact,...

  1. A compact tritium AMS system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiarappa, M L; Dingley, K H; Hamm, R W; Love, A H; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Tritium ({sup 3}H) is a radioisotope that is extensively utilized in biological and environmental research. For biological research, {sup 3}H is generally quantified by liquid scintillation counting requiring gram-sized samples and counting times of several hours. For environmental research, {sup 3}H is usually quantified by {sup 3}He in-growth which requires gram-sized samples and in-growth times of several months. In contrast, provisional studies at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry have demonstrated that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be used to quantify {sup 3}H in milligram-sized biological samples with a 100 to 1000-fold improvement in detection limits when compared to scintillation counting. This increased sensitivity is expected to have great impact in the biological and environmental research community. However in order to make the {sup 3}H AMS technique more broadly accessible, smaller, simpler, and less expensive AMS instrumentation must be developed. To meet this need, a compact, relatively low cost prototype {sup 3}H AMS system has been designed and built based on a LLNL ion source/sample changer and an AccSys Technology, Inc. Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac. With the prototype system, {sup 3}/{sup 1}H ratios ranging from 1 x 10{sup -10} to 1 x 10{sup -13} have to be measured from milligram sized samples. With improvements in system operation and sample preparation methodology, the sensitivity limit of the system is expected to increase to approximately 1 x 10{sup -15}.

  2. Ultra-Compact High-Efficiency Luminaire for General Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Lowes

    2012-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Cree has developed a new ultra-compact light emitting diode (LED) luminaire capable of providing high efficacy with excellent color quality that can lead to significant energy savings in todayâ??s commercial and retail applications. This success was based on an integrated development effort tailoring the LED component characteristics, optics, thermal management and driver design for the small footprint to achieve an overall system efficiency of â?¥ 70%. A new LED component was designed to provide high brightness and efficacy in a form factor that allowed for a small directional beam with a luminaire housing design able to dissipate the heat effectively using a small physical envelope. A very compact, 90% efficient driver was developed to meet the system performance while not taking away any thermal mass from the heat sink. A 91% efficient secondary optics was designed to maximize efficiency while providing a smooth beam. The reliability of the new LED component was robust under accelerated testing conditions. Luminaires were assembled integrating the novel LED component, secondary optics, heat sink and driver technology to demonstrate the system improvement. Cree has successfully completed this project by developing an ultra-compact LED luminaire that provided 380 lumens at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2822 K and color rendering index (CRI) of 94 with an efficacy of 94 lumens per watt (LPW) when operating at 4 W input power (steady state) with an overall system efficiency of 81%. At a higher input power of 9 Watts, the lamp provided 658 lumens at 71 LPW.

  3. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  4. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  5. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Columbia Generating Station Unit...

  6. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  7. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Duane Arnold Energy Center Unit...

  8. A CMOS-compatible compact display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Andrew R. (Andrew Raymond)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portable information devices demand displays with high resolution and high image quality that are increasingly compact and energy-efficient. Microdisplays consisting of a silicon CMOS backplane integrated with light ...

  9. Gravitational waves from merging compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Scott A.

    Largely motivated by the development of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors, our understanding of merging compact binaries and the gravitational waves they generate has improved dramatically in recent years. ...

  10. Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

  11. Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA)

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

  12. Technology Selections for Cylindrical Compact Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey A. Phillips

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of process approaches are available and have been used historically for manufacture of cylindrical fuel compacts. The jet milling, fluid bed overcoating, and hot press compacting approach being adopted in the U.S. AGR Fuel Development Program for scale-up of the compacting process involves significant paradigm shifts from historical approaches. New methods are being pursued because of distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of process mixed waste. Recent advances in jet milling technology allow simplified dry matrix powder preparation. The matrix preparation method is well matched with patented fluid bed powder overcoating technology recently developed for the pharmaceutical industry and directly usable for high density fuel particle matrix overcoating. High density overcoating places fuel particles as close as possible to their final position in the compact and is matched with hot press compacting which fully fluidizes matrix resin to achieve die fill at low compacting pressures and without matrix end caps. Overall the revised methodology provides a simpler process that should provide very high yields, improve homogeneity, further reduce defect fractions, eliminate intermediate grading and QC steps, and allow further increases in fuel packing fractions.

  13. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

  14. Water-Steel Canister Interaction and H2 Gas Pressure Buildup in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Senger, Rainer; Finstele, Stefan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Waste Repository T. Xu & S. Finsteiie Earth Sciencesdeep lying repositories for nuclear waste. Nagra Techni­ calthe system state in a nuclear waste re­ pository. 2 PROCESS

  15. A Characteristics-Based Approach to Radioactive Waste Classification in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djokic, Denia

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m source, special nuclear, and waste   byproduct directly  United   States   Nuclear   Waste   Technical   Review  12,  2009.   NWPA  1982   Nuclear  Waste  Policy  Act  of  

  16. Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of several radionuclides within environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Company website following the recent tsunami-initiated catastrophe were evaluated for the purpose of identifying the source term, reconstructing the release mechanisms, and estimating the extent of the release. 136Cs/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs ratios identified Units 1-3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil close to the facility. A trend was observed between the fraction of the total core inventory released for a number of fission product isotopes and their corresponding Gibbs Free Energy of formation for the primary oxide form of the isotope, suggesting that release was dictated primarily by chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the primary containment vessels of the vented reactors. The absence of any major fractionation beyond volatilization suggested all coolant had evaporated by the time of venting. High estimates for the fraction of the total inventory released of more volatile species (Te, Cs, I) indicated the damage to fuel bundles was likely extensive, minimizing any potential containment due to physical migration of these species through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall. 238Pu/239,240Pu ratios close-in and at 30 km from the facility indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of Pu to surface soil at the source but that this contribution likely decreased rapidly with distance from the facility. The fraction of the total Pu inventory released to the environment from venting units 1 and 3 was estimated to be ~0.003% based upon Pu/Cs isotope ratios relative to the within-reactor modeled inventory prior to venting and was consistent with an independent model evaluation that considered chemical volatility based upon measured fission product release trends. Significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel at the time of venting but not as yet observed and reported within environmental samples are suggested as potential analytes of concern for future environmental surveys around the site.

  17. FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE PROGRAM & SUPPORTING FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY (FNSF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE PROGRAM & SUPPORTING FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY (FNSF): UPDATE · It was well recognized there were also critical materials and technology issues that needed to be addressed in order to apply the knowledge we gained about burning plasma state #12;FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE PROGRAM

  18. Compact Gamma-ray Source Technology Development Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Rusnak, B

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on the applicability of current accelerator and laser technologies to the construction of compact, narrow bandwidth, gamma-ray sources for DHS missions in illicit materials detection. It also identifies research and development areas in which advancement will directly benefit these light sources. In particular, we review the physics of Compton scattering based light sources and emphasize the source properties most important to Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) applications of interest. The influences of laser and electron beam properties on the light source are examined in order to evaluate the utility of different technologies for this application. Applicable bulk and fiber-based laser systems and laser recirculation technologies are discussed and Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerator (linac) technologies are examined to determine the optimal frequency and pulse formats achievable.

  19. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 4 What is compaction? Soil compaction occurs when moist or wet soil aggregates are pressed together and the pore space between them is reduced. Compaction changes

  20. Compact Proof Certificates For Linear Logic Kaustuv Chaudhuri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Kaustuv

    Compact Proof Certificates For Linear Logic Kaustuv Chaudhuri INRIA, France http://kaustuv.chaudhuri

  1. Compact, Isolated High-Velocity Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Burton; R. Braun; V. de Heij

    2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider here the class of compact, isolated, high-velocity HI clouds, CHVCs, which are sharply bounded in angular extent down to a limiting column density of 1.5x10^18 cm^-2. We describe our automated search algorithm and it's application to the LDS north of dec= -28 deg. and the HIPASS data south of dec=0, resulting in an all--sky catalog numbering 246 CHVCs. We argue that these objects are more likely to represent a single phenomenon in a similar evolutionary state than would a sample which included any of the major HVC complexes. Five principal observables are defined for the CHVC population: (1) the spatial deployment of the objects on the sky, (2) the kinematic distribution, (3) the number distribution of observed HI column densities, (4) the number distribution of angular sizes, and (5) the number distribution of line widths. We show that the spatial and kinematic deployments of the ensemble of CHVCs contain various clues regarding their characteristic distance. These clues are not compatible with a location of the ensemble within the Galaxy proper. The deployments resemble in several regards those of the Local Group galaxies. We describe a model testing the hypothesis that the CHVCs are a Local Group population. The agreement of the model with the data is judged by extracting the observables from simulations, in a manner consistent with the sensitivities of the observations and explicitly taking account of Galactic obscuration. We show that models in which the CHVCs are the HI counterparts of dark-matter halos evolving in the Local Group potential provide a good match to the observables, if account is taken of tidal and ram--pressure disruption, the consequences of obscuration due to Galactic HI and of differing sensitivities and selection effects pertaining to the surveys.

  2. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  3. Environmental assessment for the manufacture and shipment of nuclear reactor fuel from the United States to Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangel, R.C.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has declared 41.9 tons (38 metric tons) of weapons-usable plutonium surplus to the United States` defense needs. A DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement analyzed strategies for plutonium storage and dispositioning. In one alternative, plutonium as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel would be irradiated (burned) in a reengineered heavy-water-moderated reactor, such as the Canadian CANDU design. In an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE proposes to fabricate and transport to Canada a limited amount of MOX fuel as part of the Parallex (parallel experiment) Project. MOX fuel from the US and Russia would be used by Canada to conduct performance tests at Chalk River Laboratories. MOX fuel would be fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory and transported in approved container(s) to a Canadian port(s) of entry on one to three approved routes. The EA analyzes the environmental and human health effects from MOX fuel fabrication and transportation. Under the Proposed Action, MOX fuel fabrication would not result in adverse effects to the involved workers or public. Analysis showed that the shipment(s) of MOX fuel would not adversely affect the public, truck crew, and environment along the transportation routes.

  4. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

  5. Strategy Guideline: Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Strategy Guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. Traditional systems sized by 'rule of thumb' (i.e., 1 ton of cooling per 400 ft2 of floor space) that 'wash' the exterior walls with conditioned air from floor registers cannot provide appropriate air mixing and moisture removal in low-load homes. A compact air distribution system locates the HVAC equipment centrally with shorter ducts run to interior walls, and ceiling supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls along the ceiling plane; alternatively, high sidewall supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls. Potential drawbacks include resistance from installing contractors or code officials who are unfamiliar with compact air distribution systems, as well as a lack of availability of low-cost high sidewall or ceiling supply outlets to meet the low air volumes with good throw characteristics. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  6. Implications of an Improvised Nuclear Device Detonation on Command and Control for Surrounding Regions at the Local, State and Federal Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquale, David A.; Hansen, Richard G.

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses command and control issues relating to the operation of Incident Command Posts (ICPs) and Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs) in the surrounding area jurisdictions following the detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). Although many aspects of command and control will be similar to what is considered to be normal operations using the Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS), the IND response will require many new procedures and associations in order to design and implement a successful response. The scope of this white paper is to address the following questions: • Would the current command and control framework change in the face of an IND incident? • What would the management of operations look like as the event unfolded? • How do neighboring and/or affected jurisdictions coordinate with the state? • If the target area’s command and control infrastructure is destroyed or disabled, how could neighboring jurisdictions assist with command and control of the targeted jurisdiction? • How would public health and medical services fit into the command and control structure? • How can pre-planning and common policies improve coordination and response effectiveness? • Where can public health officials get federal guidance on radiation, contamination and other health and safety issues for IND response planning and operations?

  7. South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River J. Michael Jess Platte, and Arkansas rivers, for example, have been resolved through litigation brought before the U and Kansas are examples. In the Platte River watershed the State of Nebraska has experience allocating water

  8. Mechanized fuel treatment effects on soil compaction in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer stands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Scott L.

    Mechanized fuel treatment effects on soil compaction in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer stands Emily E need to treat forest fuels is often justified as a need to reduce potential fire behavior as well in the United States, and fuel treatments are being prescribed at unprecedented scales. In many cases

  9. Automatic generation of RF compact models from device simulation S. Luryi and A. Pacelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luryi, Serge

    , parasitic elements, and complex physical effects such as self- heating and hot-carrier transport. Keywords: Compact models; device simulation; RF; inter- connects; self-heating 1 INTRODUCTION Conventional RF of Electrical and Computer Engineering State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2350, (serge

  10. 22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Sidney

    Fundamentals of nuclear physics for engineering students. Basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations. Elementary quantum mechanical calculations of bound-state energies and barrier transmission probability. ...

  11. Cylindrically Symmetric Models of Anisotropic Compact Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Abbas; Sumara Nazeer; M. A. Meraj

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have discussed the possibility of forming anisotropic compact stars from cosmological constant as one of the competent candidates of dark energy with cylindrical symmetry. For this purpose, we have applied the analytical solution of Krori and Barua metric to a particular cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The unknown constants in Krori and Barua metric have been determined by using masses and radii of class of compact stars like 4$U$1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658. The properties of these stars have been analyzed in detail. In this setting the cosmological constant has been taken as a variable which depends on the radial coordinates. We have checked all the regularity conditions, stability and surface redshift of the compact stars 4$U$1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658.

  12. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

    1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

  13. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

  14. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  15. Closing the circle on the splitting of the atom: The environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production in the United States and what the Department of Energy is doing about it

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the grand scheme of things we are a little more than halfway through the cycle of splitting the atom for weapons purposes. If we visualize this historic cycle as the full sweep of a clockface, at zero hour we would find the first nuclear chain reaction by Enrico Fermi, followed immediately by the Manhattan Project and the explosion of the first atomic bombs. From two o`clock until five, the United States built and ran a massive industrial complex that produced tens of thousands of nuclear weapons. At half past, the Cold War ended, and the United States shut down most of its nuclear weapons factories. The second half of this cycle involves dealing with the waste and contamination from nuclear weapons production - a task that had, for the most part, been postponed into the indefinite future. That future is now upon us. Dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War is in many ways as big a challenge for us today as the building of the atomic bomb was for the Manhattan Project pioneers in the 1940s. Our challenges are political and social as well as technical, and we are meeting those challenges. We are reducing risks, treating wastes, developing new technologies, and building democratic institutions for a constructive debate on our future course.

  16. Model Action Plan for Nuclear Forensics and Nuclear Attribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudder, G B; Niemeyer, S; Smith, D K; Kristo, M J

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear forensics and nuclear attribution have become increasingly important tools in the fight against illegal trafficking in nuclear and radiological materials. This technical report documents the field of nuclear forensics and nuclear attribution in a comprehensive manner, summarizing tools and procedures that have heretofore been described independently in the scientific literature. This report also provides national policy-makers, decision-makers, and technical managers with guidance for responding to incidents involving the interdiction of nuclear and radiological materials. However, due to the significant capital costs of the equipment and the specialized expertise of the personnel, work in the field of nuclear forensics has been restricted so far to a handful of national and international laboratories. In fact, there are a limited number of specialists who have experience working with interdicted nuclear materials and affiliated evidence. Most of the laboratories that have the requisite equipment, personnel, and experience to perform nuclear forensic analysis are participants in the Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group or ITWG (see Section 1.8). Consequently, there is a need to disseminate information on an appropriate response to incidents of nuclear smuggling, including a comprehensive approach to gathering evidence that meets appropriate legal standards and to developing insights into the source and routes of nuclear and radiological contraband. Appendix A presents a ''Menu of Options'' for other Member States to request assistance from the ITWG Nuclear Forensics Laboratories (INFL) on nuclear forensic cases.

  17. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

  18. A key factor to the spin parameter of uniformly rotating compact stars: crust structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, B; Sun, B Y; Wang, S Y; Gao, J H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the key factor to determine the dimensionless spin parameter $j\\equiv cJ/(GM^2)$ of different kinds of uniformly rotating compact stars, including the traditional neutron stars, hyperonic neutron stars, and hybrid stars, and check the reliability of the results on various types of equations of state of dense matter. The equations of state from the relativistic mean field theory and the MIT bag model are adopted to simulate compact stars. Numerical calculations of rigidly rotating neutron stars are performed using the RNS code in the framework of general relativity by solving the Einstein equations for stationary axis-symmetric spacetime. The crust structure of compact stars is found to be a key factor to determine the maximum value of the spin parameter $j_{\\rm max}$. For the stars with inclusion of the crust, $j_{\\rm max}\\sim 0.7$ is sustained for various kinds of compact stars with $M>0.5 M_{\\odot}$, and is found to be insensitive to the mass of star and selected equations of state. For the traditi...

  19. EU, U.S., Russia, Asian States Sign Nuclear-Fusion Reactor May 24 (Bloomberg) --The European Union, the U.S., Russia and Asian nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -gas emissions from fossil fuels, rising oil prices and worries about the safety of existing nuclear plants nuclear-fusion reactor, forging ahead with a 4.6 billion- euro ($5.9 billion) project to cut oil demand. ``It's a historic moment,'' Janez Potocnik, EU commissioner for science and research, told reporters

  20. Preferential Path Profiling: Compactly Numbering Interesting Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilimbi, Trishul

    preferential path profiling (PPP), that reduces the overhead of path profiling. PPP leverages the observation that most consumers of path profiles are only inter- ested in a subset of all program paths. PPP achieves produced by PPP. This compact path numbering enables our PPP implementation to record path information

  1. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  2. A Global Compact to End Poverty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Global Compact to End Poverty Jeffrey Sachs on stabilisation, transition and weapons of mass progress. We can realistically envision a world without extreme poverty by the year 2025 because. Sachs, The End of Poverty, 2005. WORLD ECONOMICS · Vol. 6 · No. 4 · October­December 2005 11 Jeffrey D

  3. Pathway to a Compact SASE FEL Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dattoli, G; Petrillo, V; Rau, J V; Sabia, E; Spassovsky, I; Biedron, S G; Einstein, J; Milton, S V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newly developed high peak power lasers have opened the possibilities of driving coherent light sources operating with laser plasma accelerated beams and wave undulators. We speculate on the combination of these two concepts and show that the merging of the underlying technologies could lead to new and interesting possibilities to achieve truly compact, coherent radiator devices.

  4. Nuclear weapons and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassel, C.; McCally, M.; Abraham, H.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book examines the potential radiation hazards and environmental impacts of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include medical responsibility and thermonuclear war, the threat of nuclear war, nuclear weaponry, biological effects, radiation injury, decontamination, long-term effects, ecological effects, psychological aspects, the economic implications of nuclear weapons and war, ethics, civil defense, arms control, nuclear winter, and long-term biological consequences of nuclear war.

  5. Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Colonna

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

  6. Nuclear winter. The human and environmental consequences of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwell, M.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Winter is an analysis of the consequences of nuclear war for humans and the environment. It is an account of the world after nuclear war that includes both effects on humans and the phenomenon of nuclear winter. Contents: Foreward by Russell W. Peterson. Introduction. Scenario Development. Initial Conditions: Human Health Effects; State of Physical and Biological Systems; State of Atmospheric Systems; Local Fallout Patterns; Summary of Immediate Effects. Intermediate and Long-Term Consequences: Major Problem Areas: Effects of Reduced Temperatures; Effects of Reduced Light Levels; Effects on Agricultural Production; Societal Disruptions. Relatively Lesser Problem Areas. Recovery Processes. Summary of Consequences.

  7. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;IDEC. i' ,' ,'

  8. Department of Nuclear Engineering The University of Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    #12;Department of Nuclear Engineering The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Twenty ............................................................14 Nuclear Engineering Student Awards and Honors...................................................20 of the University of Tennessee Nuclear Engineering Department (UTNE) is intended to serve as a State

  9. Production, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodson, Beth

    , Crook County Soil and Water Conservation District, Prineville, OR 97754. ABSTRACT: Harvesting trialsProduction, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper Extraction Systems, production rates, and soil compaction impacts of two systems for harvesting western juniper (Juniperus

  10. Fundamental building blocks for a compact optoelectronic neural network processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruedlinger, Benjamin Franklin, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this thesis is interconnects within the Compact Optoelectronic Neural Network Processor. The goal of the Compact Optoelectronic Neural Network Processor Project (CONNPP) is to build a small, rugged neural ...

  11. A thermodynamic approach for compaction of asphaltic composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koneru, Saradhi

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and Focus of Current Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 B. Outline of the Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 C. Notations Used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 II LITERATURE REVIEW... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 b. Asphalt Binder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 C. Compaction Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1. Field Compaction Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 a. Static Steel Wheel Rollers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 b...

  12. Sustainability Features of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passerini, Stefano

    The nuclear fuel cycle is the series of stages that nuclear fuel materials go through in a cradle to grave framework. The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is the current fuel cycle implemented in the United States; in which an ...

  13. Nuclear Physics of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Piekarewicz

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of cold nuclear matter, namely, the relation between the pressure and energy density, is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova, all depend critically on the equation of state of hadronic matter. In this contribution I will concentrate on the special role that nuclear physics plays in constraining the EOS of cold baryonic matter and its impact on the properties of neutron stars.

  14. Nuclear World Order and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joeck, N

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The decision by India and Pakistan in May 1998 to conduct nuclear weapon tests and declare themselves as nuclear weapon states challenged South Asian regional stability calculations, US nonproliferation policy, and prevailing assumptions about international security. A decade later, the effects of those tests are still being felt and policies are still adjusting to the changed global conditions. This paper will consider non- and counter-proliferation policy options for the United States and Pakistan as they work as partners to prevent the transfer of nuclear technology and further nuclear proliferation.

  15. A study of compaction methods for lunar soil simulants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekkad, Rama Varadarajan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , compaction by vibration, compaction under vacuum pressure under the simultaneous effect of vibration are examined. Duc to the increasing confining pressure, the air voids decrease and the particles will be more closely packed, thus increasing the relative... density. The research will be used to identify a convenient method for compacting samples for laboratory digging experiments. The results of the research conclude that compaction by using vacuum and vibration produce results which can be used to predict...

  16. Super strong nuclear force caused by migrating Kbar mesons - Revival of the Heitler-London-Heisenberg scheme in kaonic nuclear clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshimitsu Yamazaki; Yoshinori Akaishi

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the structure of K- pp comprehensively by solving this three-body system in a variational method, starting from the Ansatz that the Lambda(1405) resonance (~ Lambda*) is a K-p bound state. The structure of K-pp reveals a molecular feature, namely, the K- in Lambda* as an "atomic center" plays a key role in producing strong covalent bonding with the other proton. We point out that strongly bound Kbar nuclear systems are formed by ``super strong" nuclear force due to migrating real bosonic particles Kbar a la Heitler-London-Heisenberg, whereas the normal nuclear force is caused by mediating virtual pions. We have shown that the elementary process, p + p --> K+ + Lambda* + p, which occurs in a short impact parameter and with a large momentum transfer, leads to unusually large self-trapping of Lambda* by the involved proton, since the Lambda*-p system exists as a compact doorway state propagating to K-pp.

  17. Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallenbach, Gene A. (Bosque Farms, NM); Noda, Frank T. (Albuquerque, NM); Mitchell, Dean J. (Tijeras, NM); Etzkin, Joshua L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

  18. Cooperation between the Russian Federation and the United States to enhance the existing nuclear-material protection, control, and accounting systems at Mayak Production Association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starodubtsev, G.S.; Prishchepov, A.I.; Zatorsky, Y.M.; James, L.T. [and others

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ministry of the Russian Federation for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) are engaged in joint, cooperative efforts to reduce the likelihood of nuclear proliferation by enhancing Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) systems in both countries. Mayak Production Association (MPA) is a major Russian nuclear enterprise within the nuclear complex that is operated by MINATOM. This paper describes the nature, scope, and status of the joint, cooperative efforts to enhance existing MPC&A systems at MPA. Current cooperative efforts are focused on enhancements to the existing MPC&A systems at four plants that are operated by MPA and that produce, process, handle and/or store proliferation-sensitive nuclear materials.

  19. Cooperation between the Russian Federation and the United States to enhance the existing nuclear-material protection, control, and accounting systems at Mayak Production Association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prishchepov, A.I.; Starodubtsev, G.S.; Zatorsky, Y.M. [Mayak Production Association, Ozersk City (Russian Federation); James, L.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ehinger, M.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manatt, D.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Voss, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lundgren, R.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Suda, S.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ministry of the Russian Federation for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) are engaged in joint, cooperative efforts to reduce the likelihood of nuclear proliferation by enhancing Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) systems in both countries. Mayak Production Association (Mayak) is a major Russian nuclear enterprise within the nuclear complex that is operated by MINATOM. This paper describes the nature, scope, and status of the joint, cooperative efforts to enhance existing MPC and A systems at Mayak. Current cooperative efforts are focused on enhancements to the existing MPC and A systems at two plants that are operated by Mayak and that produce, process, handle and/or store proliferation-sensitive nuclear materials.

  20. Cooperation Between the Russia Federation and the United States to Enhance the Existing Nuclear-Material Protection, Control, and Accounting Systems at Mayak Production Association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahalane, P.T.; Ehinger, M.H.; James, L.T.; Jarrett, J.H.; Lundgren, R.A.; Manatt, D.R.; Niederauer, G.F.; Olivos, J.D.; Prishchepov, A.I.; Starodubtsev, G.S.; Suda, S.C.; Tittemore, G.W.; Zatorsky, Y.M.

    1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ministry of the Russian Federation for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) are engaged in joint, cooperative efforts to reduce the likelihood of nuclear proliferation by enhancing Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) systems in both countries. Mayak Production Association (Mayak) is a major Russian nuclear enterprise within the nuclear complex that is operated by lylINATOM. This paper describes the nature, scope, and status of the joint, cooperative efforts to enhance existing MPC&A systems at Mayak. Current cooperative efforts are focused on enhancements to the existing MPC&A systems at two of the plants operated by Mayak that work with proliferation-sensitive nuclear materials.