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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in deriving the optimum benefit from nuclear and...

2

Nuclear equation of state at high baryonic density and compact star constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mean field calculation is carried out to obtain the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter from a density dependent M3Y interaction (DDM3Y). The energy per nucleon is minimized to obtain ground state of the symmetric nuclear matter (SNM). The constants of density dependence of the effective interaction are obtained by reproducing the saturation energy per nucleon and the saturation density of SNM. The energy variation of the exchange potential is treated properly in the negative energy domain of nuclear matter. The EoS of SNM, thus obtained, is not only free from the superluminosity problem but also provides excellent estimate of nuclear incompressibility. The EoS of asymmetric nuclear matter is calculated by adding to the isoscalar part, the isovector component of M3Y interaction. The SNM and pure neutron matter EoS are used to calculate the nuclear symmetry energy which is found to be consistent with that extracted from the isospin diffusion in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. The $\\beta$ equilibrium proton fraction calculated from the symmetry energy and related theoretical findings are consistent with the constraints derived from the observations on compact stars.

D. N. Basu; P. Roy Chowdhury; C. Samanta

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Interstate Mining Compact is a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states. Currently...

4

Sabine River Compact (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Sabine River and its tributaries as apportioned...

5

Steady state compact toroidal plasma production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

Turner, William C. (Livermore, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Compact high voltage solid state switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact, solid state, high voltage switch capable of high conduction current with a high rate of current risetime (high di/dt) that can be used to replace thyratrons in existing and new applications. The switch has multiple thyristors packaged in a single enclosure. Each thyristor has its own gate drive circuit that circuit obtains its energy from the energy that is being switched in the main circuit. The gate drives are triggered with a low voltage, low current pulse isolated by a small inexpensive transformer. The gate circuits can also be triggered with an optical signal, eliminating the trigger transformer altogether. This approach makes it easier to connect many thyristors in series to obtain the hold off voltages of greater than 80 kV.

Glidden, Steven C.

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

8

Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes Maryland's entrance into the Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact, which seeks to promote interstate cooperation for the proper management and disposal...

9

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission assists member states efficiently maximize oil and natural gas resources through sound regulatory practices while protecting the nation's health,...

10

Diffusion Welding of Compact Heat Exchangers for Nuclear Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The next-­-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is designed to be a flexible source of energy, producing various mixes of electrical energy and process heat (for example, for hydrogen generation) on demand. Compact heat exchangers provide an attractive way to move energy from the helium primary reactor coolant to process heat uses. For process heat efficiency, reactor outlet temperatures of 750-­-900°C are desirable. There are minor but deleterious components in the primary coolant; the number of alloys that can handle this environment is small. The present work concentrates on Alloys 800H and 617.

Denis Clark; Ron Mizia; Dr. Michael V. Glazoff; Mr. Michael W. Patterson

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

ULTRA-COMPACT ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR APPLICATION IN NUCLEAR TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on compact accelerator technology development for potential use as a pulsed neutron source quantitative post verifier. The technology is derived from our on-going compact accelerator technology development program for radiography under the US Department of Energy and for a clinic sized compact proton therapy systems under an industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. The accelerator technique relies on the synchronous discharge of a prompt pulse generating stacked transmission line structure with the beam transit. The goal of this technology is to achieve {approx}10 MV/m gradients for 10s of nanoseconds pulses and to {approx}100 MV/m gradients for {approx}1 ns systems. As a post verifier for supplementing existing x-ray equipment, this system can remain in a charged, stand-by state with little or no energy consumption. We detail the progress of our overall component development effort with the multilayer dielectric wall insulators (i.e., the accelerator wall), compact power supply technology, kHz repetition-rate surface flashover ion sources, and the prompt pulse generation system consisting of wide-bandgap switches and high performance dielectric materials.

Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Carazo, V; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Guse, S; Harris, J R; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Paul, A C; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Schmidt, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sitaraman, S; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

12

Steady state compact toroidal plasma production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the confinement of field reversed plasma rings and, more particularly, to the steady state maintainance of field reversed plasma rings produced by coaxial plasma guns.

Turner, W.C.

1983-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION OFFICE OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL SAFETY AND SAFEGUARDS ON RADIATION THERAPY OVEREXPOSURES IN PANAMA Addressees All medical licensees. Purpose The U.S. Nuclear times resulted in significant radiation overexposures to patients. The hospital staff did not perform

14

Oregon State University NUCLEAR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oregon State University NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 3Year STA-21 2010-2011 School Year Nuclear Engineering & Discrimination (3): NE 451 3 Neutronic Analysis I NE 452 3 Neutronic Analysis II NE 457 2 Nuclear Reactor Lab Western Culture (3): NE 467 4 Nucl Reac Therm Hyd NE 474 4 Nucl Engineering Design I NE 475 4 Nucl

Tullos, Desiree

15

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60 Vermont Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347...

16

UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN COMPACT The state of Arizona, the state of Colorado, the state of New Mexico, the state of Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN COMPACT The state of Arizona, the state of Colorado, the state of New for the state of Arizona, Clifford H. Stone for the state of Colorado, Fred. E. Wilson for the state of New of the United States of America, have agreed, subject to the provisions of the Colorado River Compact [72

Johnson, Eric E.

17

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri Nuclear ProfileYork Nuclear

18

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri Nuclear ProfileYork NuclearNorth

19

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

net generation, 2010 Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1 1,160 9,556 100.0 Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp 1 Plant 1 Reactor 1,160 9,556 100.0 Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum...

20

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Maryland Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and...

22

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Iowa Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage...

23

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Virginia Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and...

24

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and...

25

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Illinois Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and...

26

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and...

27

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,594 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and...

28

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and...

29

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and...

30

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and...

31

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Nebraska Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,363 63.8 Hydro and...

32

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and...

33

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped...

34

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Georgia Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.4 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 53.3 Hydro and...

35

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Arizona Total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and...

36

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped...

37

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and...

38

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 New York New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and...

39

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Michigan Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and...

40

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Missouri Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Texas Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped...

42

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped...

43

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Florida Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and...

44

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and...

45

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Ohio Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped...

46

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management, enacted in 1981, was ratified by Congress in 1985. The Compact is a cooperative effort of the party states to protect...

47

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity ProfileArkansas Nuclear

48

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas ElectricityGeorgia Nuclear Profile 2010

49

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas ElectricityGeorgia Nuclear Profile

50

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas ElectricityGeorgia Nuclear ProfileIowa

51

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas ElectricityGeorgia Nuclear

52

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas ElectricityGeorgia NuclearLouisiana

53

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas ElectricityGeorgiaMassachusetts Nuclear

54

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri

55

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri Nuclear Profile 2010

56

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri Nuclear Profile 2010Hampshire

57

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri Nuclear Profile

58

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri Nuclear ProfileYork

59

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri Nuclear ProfileYorkPennsylvania

60

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri Nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri NuclearTennessee profile Tennessee

62

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri NuclearTennessee profile

63

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri NuclearTennessee profileVermont

64

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri NuclearTennessee

65

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri NuclearTennesseeWashington profile

66

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexasMissouri NuclearTennesseeWashington

67

Compact  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement and Making aCompact soft x-ray multichord

68

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota (MillionState Heating Oil

69

Nuclear Activity in UZC Compact Groups of Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse the level of nuclear activity in galaxies belonging to UZC-CGs. Spectra are available for 868 galaxies (90% of the whole catalog); 67 % of them show nuclear activity (AGN or Star formation). To carry out a detailed study about the nuclear activity and its relationship with properties of the host galaxy and parent group we select a sample of 215 groups with spectra available for all their members. From the analysis of this sample and using diagnostic diagrams to do the nuclear classification we found that 37% of emission galaxies host an HII nuclear region, 43% an AGN and 20% a Transition Object. AGNs are located mainly in bright early type galaxies meanwhile HII are in fainter and later types. Groups dominated by HII show significant lower velocity dispersions and larger sizes than groups dominated by AGNs or TO.

M. A. Martinez; A. del Olmo; P. Focardi; J. Perea

2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

70

Design Options for Ultra-compact Nuclear Driven Power Sources for Field Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be compact, able to discharge its waste heat into the environment without a local water source, and have low logistical overhead. An air-cooled fast-spectrum nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton cycle would be a viable and suitable design concept...

Mathis, Dean

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

71

Nuclear threats from small states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

What are the policy implications regarding proliferation and counter proliferation of nuclear weapons among Third World states. How does deterrence operate outside the parameters of superpower confrontation as defined by the cold war elaborate system of constraints enforced by concepts like mutual assured destruction, and counter-value and counter-force targeting. How can US policymakers devise contingencies for dealing with nuclear threats posed by countries like North Korea, Libya, Iraq, Iran, and Syria. These are some of the unsettling but nevertheless important questions addressed by the author in this monograph. In his analysis, Mr. Jerome Kahan examines the likelihood that one or more of these countries will use nuclear weapons before the year 2000. He also offers a framework that policymakers and planners might use in assessing US interests in preempting the use of nuclear weapons or in retaliating for their use. Ironically, with the end of the cold war, it is imperative that defense strategists, policymakers, and military professionals think about the `unthinkable`. In the interest of fostering debate on this important subject, the Strategic Studies Institute commends this insightful monograph.

Kahan, J.H.

1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

United States Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United States Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Experience Gained From Programs to Manage High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel in the United States and Other Countries A Report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy April 2011 #12;#12;U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Experience Gained From

73

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JEC187V3 UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Secretary O'Leary: At the Nuclear Waste UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington, VA

74

Compact endocavity diagnostic probes for nuclear radiation detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the field of radiation imaging. In particular, the invention relates to an apparatus and a method for imaging tissue or an inanimate object using a novel probe that has an integrated solid-state semiconductor detector and complete readout electronics circuitry.

Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph; Bolotnikov, Aleksey

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy...

76

Midwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact is an agreement between the states of Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin that provides for the cooperative and safe...

77

United States Government National Nuclear Security Administration...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States Government National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Savannah River Field Office (SRFO) Memorandum DATE: January 10, 2014 REPLY TO ATTN OF: sv (McAlhany,...

78

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

jlc029va UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300, D.C. 20585 Dear Speaker Gingrich, Senator Thurmond, and Secretary Peña: The Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (the Board) herewith submits this second report of 1997 as required by the Nuclear Waste

79

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

con202vf UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300, the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (Board) submits its second report of 2003 in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Public Law 100-203. The Act requires the Board

80

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington are pleased to transmit a technical report prepared by the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (Board. Based on its review of data gathered by the DOE and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington is intended to update Congress and the Secretary of Energy on the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board-level radioactive waste (HLW) is evolving. The letter is issued in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste

82

COLORADO RIVER COMPACT The states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO RIVER COMPACT The states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah of Colorado, J. G. Scrugham for the state of Nevada, Stephen B. Davis, Jr., for the state of New Mexico, R. E of the Colorado river system; to establish the relative importance of different beneficial uses of water

Johnson, Eric E.

83

Summary report. Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Volume 4, No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

`Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Summary report, low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Vol. 4. No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

`Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Summary report: Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts, Volume 5, Number 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is given on the ten compacts and their host state, describing the governing body, member states, date established, current waste management, and siting, licensing, and projected date of a disposal facility. Reports are also given on the eight states that remain unaffiliated with a compact commission.

Norris, C. [ed.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Summary report: Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts, Volume 5, Number 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is given on the ten compacts and their host state, describing the governing body, member states, date established, current waste management, and siting, licensing, and projected date of a disposal facility. Reports are also given on the eight states that remain unaffiliated with a compact commission.

Norris, C. [ed.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is administered by the Compact Commission. The Compact provides for rotating responsibility for the region's low-level...

88

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

89

Managing nuclear weapons in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the management and security of nuclear weapons in the post-cold war United States. The definition of what constitutes security is clearly changing in the US. It is now a much more integrated view that includes defense and the economy. The author tries to bring some semblance of order to these themes in this brief adaptation of a presentation.

Miller, G.

1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

90

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Department of Energy's (DOE) work related to the packaging and transport of such waste. Consistent with its and waste package performance. In light of continuing technical challenges, the Board believes that the DOEcon144vf UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300

91

Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear...

92

Quantitative Methodology for Assessing State-Level Nuclear Security Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The international community faces a growing threat from nuclear terrorism. The complexity of the threats of nuclear terrorism, the variety of nuclear security measures that States can devote resources towards to address the threats, and the limited...

Myers, Christopher 1985-

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

93

Bounds on the energy densities of ground states on static spacetimes of compact objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we investigate quantum fields propagating on given, static, spherically symmetric spacetimes, which are isometric to a part of the Schwarzschild spacetime. Without specifying the internal geometry we show, that there exist bounds on the energy densities of ground states of a quantum scalar field on such spacetimes. The bounds (from above and below) come from the so-called Quantum Energy Inequalities, and are centered around the energy density of the Boulware state (the ground state for Schwarzschild spacetime). The specific value of the bound from below depends critically on the distance $\\ell$ from the horizon, where the spacetimes of compact objects cease to be isometric to the Schwarzschild spacetime. In the limit of small $\\ell$ we prove, that the energy densities of ground states cannot be below the Boulware level.

P. Marecki

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

94

United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) Annual Steering Committee Meeting United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International...

95

NSTX LTXPEGASUS Compact CTF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

isotope retention. ST-CTF Compact ST-CTF at ~ 10 MA range provide a compact nuclear component test to NSTX. Large vacuum vessel, no stabilizing plates, excellent set of profile and boundary diagnostics

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

96

Nuclear New Build in the United States 1990-2010: A Three State Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research examines nuclear energy policy across three states in the United States (US) - Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Texas - from 1990-2010. The main research question seeks to ascertain what the prerequisites are for successful nuclear new build...

Heffron, Raphael J.

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Canadian River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

98

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Matter of CALVERT CLIFFS 3 NUCLEAR PROJECT, LLC, and UNISTAR NUCLEAR OPERATING SERVICES, LLC (Combined, 2009 MEMORANDUM AND ORDER (Ruling on Joint Petitioners' Standing and Contentions) I. Introduction This case arises from an application by UniStar Nuclear Operating Services, LLC and Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear

Laughlin, Robert B.

99

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007" "January through December 2007"...

100

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004" "January through December 2004"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005" "January through December 2005"...

102

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003" "January through December 2003"...

103

Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008" "January through December 2008"...

104

Minimal nuclear deterrence : a nuclear arsenal reduction plan for the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The global political climate has called for reductions to nuclear arsenals around the world. This thesis researches how potential deep cuts to the United States' large strategic nuclear arsenal would affect its current ...

Laderman, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ANIMAS-LA PLATA PROJECT COMPACT The state of Colorado and the state of New Mexico, in order to implement the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANIMAS-LA PLATA PROJECT COMPACT The state of Colorado and the state of New Mexico, in order to implement the operation of the Animas-La Plata federal reclamation project, Colorado-New Mexico, a proposed the following articles: ARTICLE I A. The right to store and divert water in Colorado and New Mexico from the La

Johnson, Eric E.

106

Interstate Mining Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Interstate Mining Compact, a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental...

107

Design of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for medium charge state light ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization we are developing a new isotope ratio mass spectrometer based on the measurement of multiple charge state ions. We have carried out a review of our existing ECR ion source and identified a number of design flaws. For the new instrument, we are producing a new ECR source and have refined the design, in particular by using 3D simulations to improve the magnetic confinement field and by a combination of simulations and experiments to improve the design of the microwave coupling.

Button, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Sydney, NSW 2234 (Australia); Milford, G. N. [University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

State of Nevada, Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office narrative report, January 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) is the State of Nevada agency designated by State law to monitor and oversee US Department of Energy (DOE) activities relative to the possible siting, construction, operation and closure of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and to carry out the State of Nevada`s responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During the reporting period the NWPO continued to work toward the five objectives designed to implement the Agency`s oversight responsibilities: (1) Assure that the health and safety of Nevada`s citizens are adequately protected with regard to any federal high-level radioactive waste program within the State; (2) Take the responsibilities and perform the duties of the State of Nevada as described in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987; (3) Advise the Governor, the State Commission on Nuclear Projects and the Nevada State Legislature on matters concerning the potential disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the State; (4) Work closely and consult with affected local governments and State agencies; (5) Monitor and evaluate federal planning and activities regarding high-level radioactive waste disposal. Plan and conduct independent State studies regarding the proposed repository.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

OPTIONS FOR A STEADY-STATE COMPACT FUSION NEUTRON SOURCE M.P. Gryaznevich1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Nuclear Power production: the emerging shortage of fissile fuel, disposal and storage of nuclear waste. This can be achieved in several ways: by recycling high level nuclear waste from conventional nuclear of nuclear waste and fuel and removing Pu from the spent fuel. This combination of "fission + fusion

110

The Nuclear Equation of State at high densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ab inito calculations for the nuclear many-body problem make predictions for the density and isospin dependence of the nuclear equation-of-state (EOS) far away from the saturation point of nuclear matter. I compare predictions from microscopic and phenomenological approaches. Constraints on the EOS derived from heavy ion reactions, in particular from subthreshold kaon production, as well as constraints from neutron stars are discussed.

Christian Fuchs

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 1992 by the National Academy Press in a report titled Ground Water at Yucca Mountain--How High Can of affiliation with the Yucca Mountain Project, and their lack of previous involvement in evaluating Mr General's office on possible future upwelling of water into the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca

113

Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A Comparison of the Performance of Compact Neutrino Detector Designs for Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There has been an increasing interest in the monitoring of nuclear fuel for power reactors by detecting the anti-neutrinos produced during operation. Small liquid scintillator detectors have already demonstrated sensitivity to operational power levels, but more sensitive monitoring requires improvements in the efficiency and uniformity of these detectors. In this work, we use a montecarlo simulation to investigate the detector performance of four different detector configurations. Based on the analysis of neutron detection efficiency and positron energy response, we find that the optimal detector design will depend on the goals and restrictions of the specific installation or application. We have attempted to present the relevant information so that future detector development can proceed in a profitable direction.

McKeown, R W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group Meeting United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear...

116

Ground state energy fluctuations in the Nuclear Shell Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical fluctuations of the nuclear ground state energies are estimated using shell model calculations in which particles in the valence shells interact through well defined forces, and are coupled to an upper shell governed by random 2-body interactions. Induced ground-state energy fluctuations are found to be one order of magnitude smaller than those previously associated with chaotic components, in close agreement with independent perturbative estimates based on the spreading widths of excited states.

Victor Velazquez; Jorge G. Hirsch; Alejandro Frank; Jose Barea; Andres P. Zuker

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design study aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q_p~13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ~63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ~23 T peak field on coil with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External cu...

Sorbom, B N; Palmer, T R; Mangiarotti, F J; Sierchio, J M; Bonoli, P; Kasten, C; Sutherland, D A; Barnard, H S; Haakonsen, C B; Goh, J; Sung, C; Whyte, D G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Report of the State of Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This third biennial Report of the Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects has been prepared in fulfillment of the requirements of NRS 459.0092, which stipulates that the Commission shall report to the Governor and Legislature on any matter relating to radioactive waste disposal the Commission deems appropriate and advise and make recommendations on the policy of the State concerning nuclear waste disposal projects. Chapter One of the Report presents a brief overview of the Commission`s functions and statutory charges. It also contains a summary of developments which have affected the overall nuclear waste disposl issue since the last Commission Report was published in November, 1988. Chapter Two contains a synthesis of Commission activities and reports on the findings of the Commission relative to the geotechnical, environmental, socioeconomic, transportation, intergovernmental and legal aspects of federal and State nuclear waste program efforts.

NONE

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Some aspects of the phase diagram of nuclear matter relevant to compact stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dense matter as it can be found in core-collapse supernovae and neutron stars is expected to exhibit different phase transitions which impact the matter composition and the equation of state, with important consequences on the dynamics of core-collapse supernova explosion and on the structure of neutron stars. In this paper we will address the specific phenomenology of two of such transitions, namely the crust-core solid-liquid transition at sub-saturation density, and the possible strange transition at super-saturation density in the presence of hyperonic degrees of freedom. Concerning the neutron star crust-core phase transition at zero and finite temperature, it will be shown that, as a consequence of the presence of long-range Coulomb interactions, a clusterized phase is expected which is not accessible in the grand-canonical ensemble. A specific quasi-particle model will be introduced and some quantitative results relevant for the supernova dynamics will be shown. The opening of hyperonic degrees of freedom at higher densities corresponding to the neutron stars core also modifies the equation of state. The general characteristics and order of phase transitions in this regime will be analyzed in the framework of a self-consistent mean-field approach.

F. Gulminelli; Ad-R. Raduta; J. Margueron; P. Papakonstantinou; M. Oertel

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Evaluating Russian space nuclear reactor technology for United States applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Space nuclear power and nuclear electric propulsion are considered important technologies for planetary exploration, as well as selected earth orbit applications. The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) was intended to provide an early flight demonstration of these technologies at relatively low cost through extensive use of existing Russian technology. The key element of Russian technology employed in the program was the Topaz II reactor. Refocusing of the activities of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), combined with budgetary pressures, forced the cancellation of the NEPSTP at the end of the 1993 fiscal year. The NEPSTP was faced with many unique flight qualification issues. In general, the launch of a spacecraft employing a nuclear reactor power system complicates many spacecraft qualification activities. However, the NEPSTP activities were further complicated because the reactor power system was a Russian design. Therefore, this program considered not only the unique flight qualification issues associated with space nuclear power, but also with differences between Russian and United States flight qualification procedures. This paper presents an overview of the NEPSTP. The program goals, the proposed mission, the spacecraft, and the Topaz II space nuclear power system are described. The subject of flight qualification is examined and the inherent difficulties of qualifying a space reactor are described. The differences between United States and Russian flight qualification procedures are explored. A plan is then described that was developed to determine an appropriate flight qualification program for the Topaz II reactor to support a possible NEPSTP launch.

Polansky, G.F. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schmidt, G.L. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Voss, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Reynolds, E.L. [Applied Physics Lab., Laurel, MD (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Bounds on the entanglability of thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theorists have recently shown that the states used in current nuclear magnetic resonance (NMIR) quantum computing experiments are not entangled. Yet it is widely believed that entanglement is a necessary resource in the ...

Yu, Terri M. (Terri Mak), 1981-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Performance of a 229 Thorium solid-state nuclear clock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 7.8 eV nuclear isomer transition in 229 Thorium has been suggested as an etalon transition in a new type of optical frequency standard. Here we discuss the construction of a "solid-state nuclear clock" from Thorium nuclei implanted into single crystals transparent in the vacuum ultraviolet range. We investigate crystal-induced line shifts and broadening effects for the specific system of Calcium fluoride. At liquid Nitrogen temperatures, the clock performance will be limited by decoherence due to magnetic coupling of the Thorium nucleus to neighboring nuclear moments, ruling out the commonly used Rabi or Ramsey interrogation schemes. We propose a clock stabilization based on counting of flourescence photons and present optimized operation parameters. Taking advantage of the high number of quantum oscillators under continuous interrogation, a fractional instability level of 10^{-19} might be reached within the solid-state approach.

Kazakov, G A; Romanenko, V I; Yatsenko, L P; Romanenko, A V; Schreitl, M; Winkler, G; Schumm, T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Performance of a 229 Thorium solid-state nuclear clock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 7.8 eV nuclear isomer transition in 229 Thorium has been suggested as an etalon transition in a new type of optical frequency standard. Here we discuss the construction of a "solid-state nuclear clock" from Thorium nuclei implanted into single crystals transparent in the vacuum ultraviolet range. We investigate crystal-induced line shifts and broadening effects for the specific system of Calcium fluoride. At liquid Nitrogen temperatures, the clock performance will be limited by decoherence due to magnetic coupling of the Thorium nucleus to neighboring nuclear moments, ruling out the commonly used Rabi or Ramsey interrogation schemes. We propose a clock stabilization based on counting of flourescence photons and present optimized operation parameters. Taking advantage of the high number of quantum oscillators under continuous interrogation, a fractional instability level of 10^{-19} might be reached within the solid-state approach.

G. A. Kazakov; A. N. Litvinov; V. I. Romanenko; L. P. Yatsenko; A. V. Romanenko; M. Schreitl; G. Winkler; T. Schumm

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

Critical review of deeply bound kaonic nuclear states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We critically revise the recent claims of narrow deeply bound kaonic states and show that at present there is no convincing experimental evidence for their existence. In particular, we discuss in details the claim of K- pp deeply bound state associated to a peak seen in the Lambda p invariant mass spectrum from K- nuclear absorption reactions by the FINUDA collaboration. An explicit theoretical simulation shows that the peak is simply generated from a two-nucleon absorption process, like K- pp --> Lambda p, followed by final-state interactions of the produced particles with the residual nucleus.

V. K. Magas; E. Oset; A. Ramos; H. Toki

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nuclear Density Functional Theory and the Equation of State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nuclear density functional can be used to find the binding energy and shell structure of nuclei and the energy gap in superconducting nuclear matter. In this paper, we study the possible application of a nuclear density functional theory to nuclear astrophysics. From energy density functional theory, we can deduce the interaction between nucleons to find a rough estimate of the charge radius of the specific nuclei. Compared to the Finite-Range Thomas Fermi model, we include three-body forces, which might be important at densities several times that of nuclear matter density. We also add the momentum dependent interaction to take into account the effective mass of the nucleons. We study matter in the neutron star crust using the Wigner-Seitz cell method. By constructing the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and investigating lepton-rich nuclear matter in proto-neutron stars, we find that the density functional can be used to construct an equation of state of hot dense matter.

Yeunhwan Lim

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nuclear Equation of State and Neutron Star Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effects of the nuclear equation of state (EoS) to the neutron star cooling. New era for nuclear EoS has begun after the discovery of $\\sim 2\\msun$ neutron stars PSR J1614$-$2230 and PSR J0348$+$0432 [1, 2]. Also recent works on the mass and radius of neutron stars from low-mass X-ray binaries [3] strongly constrain the EoS of nuclear matter. On the other hand, observations of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A (Cas A) more than 10 years confirmed the existence of nuclear superfluidity [4, 5]. Nuclear superfluidity reduces the heat capacities as well as neutrino emissivities. With nuclear superfluidity the neutrino emission processes are highly suppressed, and the existence of superfluidity makes the cooling path quite different from that of the standard cooling process. Superfluidity also allows new neutrino emission process, which is called `Pair Breaking and Formation'(PBF). PBF is a fast cooling process and can explain the fast cooling rate of neutron star in Cas A. Therefore, it is essent...

Lim, Yeunhwan; Lee, Chang-Hwan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Technosocial Modeling for Determining the Status and Nature of a State’s Nuclear Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency State Evaluation Process: The Role of Information Analysis in Reaching Safeguards Conclusions (Mathews et al. 2008), several examples of nonproliferation models using analytical software were developed that may assist the IAEA with collecting, visualizing, analyzing, and reporting information in support of the State Evaluation Process. This paper focuses on one of the examples a set of models developed in the Proactive Scenario Production, Evidence Collection, and Testing (ProSPECT) software that evaluates the status and nature of a state’s nuclear activities. The models use three distinct subject areas to perform this assessment: the presence of nuclear activities, the consistency of those nuclear activities with national nuclear energy goals, and the geopolitical context in which those nuclear activities are taking place. As a proof-of-concept for the models, a crude case study was performed. The study, which attempted to evaluate the nuclear activities taking place in Syria prior to September 2007, yielded illustrative, yet inconclusive, results. Due to the inconclusive nature of the case study results, changes that may improve the model’s efficiency and accuracy are proposed.

Gastelum, Zoe N.; Harvey, Julia B.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume...

130

Utility of Social Modeling in Assessment of a State’s Propensity for Nuclear Proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the third and final report out of a set of three reports documenting research for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Security Administration (NASA) Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling program that investigates how social modeling can be used to improve proliferation assessment for informing nuclear security, policy, safeguards, design of nuclear systems and research decisions. Social modeling has not to have been used to any significant extent in a proliferation studies. This report focuses on the utility of social modeling as applied to the assessment of a State's propensity to develop a nuclear weapons program.

Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Dalton, Angela C.; Olson, Jarrod; White, Amanda M.; Cooley, Scott K.; Youchak, Paul M.; Stafford, Samuel V.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Regime Security Theory: Why Do States With No Clear Strategic Security Concerns Obtain Nuclear Weapons? .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Current realist explanations of why states decide to develop nuclear weapons cannot account for the behavior of states that lack a clear strategic threat. An… (more)

Beasley, Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Charged particle assisted nuclear reactions in solid state environment: renaissance of low energy nuclear physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The features of electron assisted neutron exchange processes in crystalline solids are survayed. It is stated that, contrary to expectations, the cross section of these processes may reach an observable magnitude even in the very low energy case because of the extremely huge increment caused by the Coulomb factor of the electron assisted processes and by the effect of the crystal-lattice. The features of electron assisted heavy charged particle exchange processes, electron assisted nuclear capure processes and heavy charged particle assisted nuclear processes are also overviewed. Experimental observations, which may be related to our theoretical findings, are dealt with. The anomalous screening phenomenon is related to electron assisted neutron and proton exchange processes in crystalline solids. A possible explanation of observations by Fleischmann and Pons is presented. The possibility of the phenomenon of nuclear transmutation is qualitatively explained with the aid of usual and charged particle assisted r...

Kálmán, Péter

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Quantitative Methodology for Assessing State-Level Nuclear Security Measures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The international community faces a growing threat from nuclear terrorism. The complexity of the threats of nuclear terrorism, the variety of nuclear security measures that… (more)

Myers, Christopher 1985-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

State of Nevada, Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office narrative report, October 1--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) is the State of Nevada agency designated by State law to monitor and oversee US Department of Energy (DOE) activities relative to the possible siting, construction, operation and closure of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and to carry out the State of Nevada`s responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During the reporting period the NWPO continued to work toward the five objectives designed to implement the Agency`s oversight responsibilities. (1) Assure that the health and safety of Nevada`s citizens are adequately protected with regard to any federal high-level radioactive waste program within the State. (2) Take the responsibilities and perform the duties of the State of Nevada as described in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. (3) Advise the Governor, the State Commission on Nuclear Projects and the Nevada State Legislature on matters concerning the potential disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the State. (4) Work closely and consult with affected local governments and State agencies. (5) Monitor and evaluate federal planning and activities regarding high-level radioactive waste disposal. Plan and conduct independent State studies regarding the proposed repository.

NONE

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Compact statis stars with polytropic equation of state in minimal dilatonic gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present solution of the equations for relativistic static spherically symmetric stars (SSSS) in the model of minimal dilatonic gravity (MDG) using the polytropic equation of state. A polytropic equation of state, which has a good fitting with a more realistic one, is used. Results are obtained for all variables of a single neutron star in the model of MDG. The maximum mass about two solar masses is in accordance with the latest observations of pulsars. Several new effects are observed for the variables related with the dilaton $\\Phi$ and the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. The mass-radius relation is also obtained. Special attention is paid to the behavior of the quantities which describe the effects analogous to those of dark energy and dark matter in MDG. The results of the present paper confirm the conclusion that the dilaton $\\Phi$ is able to play simultaneously the role of dark energy and dark matter.

Plamen Fiziev; Kalin Marinov

2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

136

An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste Glass Compositions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste of Mo in glasses containing simplified simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW) streams has been originating from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Experiments using simulated nuclear waste streams

Sheffield, University of

137

Soft nuclear equations of state for super-massive neutron star  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft nuclear equations of state for super-massive neutron star K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro@rio.odn.ne.jp Abstract Two new nuclear equations of state (EOSs) are proposed and are applied to neutron star (NS). They predict the incompressibilities K0 = 179MeV and 230MeV, respectively. The density dependencies of nuclear

138

The low-energy nuclear density of states and the saddle point approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear density of states plays an important role in nuclear reactions. At high energies, above a few MeV, the nuclear density of states is well described by a formula that depends on the smooth single particle density of states at the Fermi surface, the nuclear shell correction and the pairing energy. In this paper we present an analysis of the low energy behaviour of the nuclear density of states using the saddle point approximation and extensions to it. Furthermore, we prescribe a simple parabolic form for excitation energy, in the low energy limit, which may facilitate an easy computation of level densities.

Sanjay K. Ghosh; Byron K. Jennings

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

140

The distribution of nuclear quantum states in cold'' rotating nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistical analysis of the distribution of level spacings for states with the same spin and parity is described in which the average spacing is calculated for the total ensemble. The resulting distribution of level spacings for states of deformed nuclei with A = 155--185 and Z = 62--77 is the closest to that of a Poisson distribution yet obtained for nuclear levels. However, when only the even-spin, positive-parity data for even-even nuclei are considered, the level-spacing distribution becomes double peaked. The anomalously-large separations are shown to be the result of the low energy of the strongly-correlated, completely-paired yrast configuration of even-even nuclei. Average values of the level spacings also are discussed as a function of spin, parity, and nuclear type (even-even, even-Z- odd-N, etc.). Likewise, deviations from a Poisson distribution for several spacings (s) less than about 60 keV are compared with similar values for {sup 116}Sn on an absolute scale. Such discrepancies are attributed to interactions (level repulsions) which become increasingly significant for s {le} 60 keV. 18 refs., 10 figs.

Garrett, J.D.; German, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Courtney, L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Espino, J.M. (Seville Univ. (Spain))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The future of nuclear power in the United States : economic and regulatory challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper examines the economic and regulatory challenges that must be faced by potential investors in new nuclear power plants in the United States. The historical development of the existing fleet of over 100 nuclear ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Viability of an expanded United States nuclear power program and its effects on energy markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The four biggest energy sources in the United States are coal, crude oil, natural gas, and nuclear power. While coal and nuclear power are produced domestically, more than 70% of crude oil and 20% of natural gas is imported. ...

Khan, Tanzeer S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states,...

144

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states,...

145

Charged particle assisted nuclear reactions in solid state environment: renaissance of low energy nuclear physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The features of electron assisted neutron exchange processes in crystalline solids are survayed. It is stated that, contrary to expectations, the cross section of these processes may reach an observable magnitude even in the very low energy case because of the extremely huge increment caused by the Coulomb factor of the electron assisted processes and by the effect of the crystal-lattice. The features of electron assisted heavy charged particle exchange processes, electron assisted nuclear capure processes and heavy charged particle assisted nuclear processes are also overviewed. Experimental observations, which may be related to our theoretical findings, are dealt with. The anomalous screening phenomenon is related to electron assisted neutron and proton exchange processes in crystalline solids. A possible explanation of observations by Fleischmann and Pons is presented. The possibility of the phenomenon of nuclear transmutation is qualitatively explained with the aid of usual and charged particle assisted reactions. The electron assisted neutron exchange processes in pure $Ni$ and $Li-Ni$ composite systems (in the Rossi-type E-Cat) are analyzed and it is concluded that these reactions may be responsible for recent experimental observations.

Péter Kálmán; Tamás Keszthelyi

2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Nuclear matter equation of state from relativistic heavy ions to supernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation the relationship between relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions and the nuclear equation of state is discussed. The connection between observables measured in the experiments and thermodynamic variables used to describe the system is made. Through this connection a semi-empirical nuclear equation of state is extracted from the data. The resulting equation of state is discussed in terms of nuclear matter calculations, neutron star stability and supernova collapse. 22 refs., 7 figs.

Harris, J.W.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nuclear quadrupole resonances in compact vapor cells: the crossover from the NMR to the NQR interaction regimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first experimental study that maps the transformation of nuclear quadrupole resonances from the pure nuclear quadrupole regime to the quadrupole-perturbed Zeeman regime. The transformation presents an interesting quantum-mechanical problem, since the quantization axis changes from being aligned along the axis of the electric-field gradient tensor to being aligned along the magnetic field. We achieve large nuclear quadrupole shifts for I = 3/2 131-Xe by using a 1 mm^3 cubic cell with walls of different materials. When the magnetic and quadrupolar interactions are of comparable size, perturbation theory is not suitable for calculating the transition energies. Rather than use perturbation theory, we compare our data to theoretical calculations using a Liouvillian approach and find excellent agreement.

E. A. Donley; J. L. Long; T. C. Liebisch; E. R. Hodby; T. A. Fisher; J. Kitching

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

NUCLEAR HOLE STATES AS A PROBE OF THE NUCLEAR MANY BODY SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bohr and B. R. Mottelson, Nuclear Structure, Vol. 1 Chapt.Bohr andRe Mottelson, Nuclear Structure, Vol. 2 (Benjamin,Bohr and B. R. futtelson, Nuclear Structure, Vol. 2, Coopt.

Doll, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Strange Quark Matter and Compact Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astrophysicists distinguish between three different types of compact stars. These are white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. The former contain matter in one of the densest forms found in the Universe which, together with the unprecedented progress in observational astronomy, make such stars superb astrophysical laboratories for a broad range of most striking physical phenomena. These range from nuclear processes on the stellar surface to processes in electron degenerate matter at subnuclear densities to boson condensates and the existence of new states of baryonic matter--like color superconducting quark matter--at supernuclear densities. More than that, according to the strange matter hypothesis strange quark matter could be more stable than nuclear matter, in which case neutron stars should be largely composed of pure quark matter possibly enveloped in thin nuclear crusts. Another remarkable implication of the hypothesis is the possible existence of a new class of white dwarfs. This article aims at giving an overview of all these striking physical possibilities, with an emphasis on the astrophysical phenomenology of strange quark matter. Possible observational signatures associated with the theoretically proposed states of matter inside compact stars are discussed as well. They will provide most valuable information about the phase diagram of superdense nuclear matter at high baryon number density but low temperature, which is not accessible to relativistic heavy ion collision experiments.

Fridolin Weber

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

The nuclear density of states and the role of the residual interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the role of mean-field and moment methods in microscopic models for calculating the nuclear density of states (also known as the nuclear level density). Working in a shell-model framework, we use moments of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian to illustrate the importance of the residual interaction for accurate representations.

Calvin W. Johnson; Edgar Teran

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

151

Top UN officials call on hold-out States to ratify treaty banning nuclear tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Top UN officials call on hold-out States to ratify treaty banning nuclear tests 29 August 2011 War, hundreds of nuclear weapon tests left behind a devastating legacy for local citizens and their natural environment," he said in a message marking the International Day against Nuclear Tests. "Current

152

Thirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago Representatives of more than 30 countries signed a deal on Tuesday to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor nuclear reactors, but critics argue it could be at least 50 years before a commercially viable reactor

153

Tour of Entergy's Nuclear Power Plant in River Bend Owner: Entergy Gulf States Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tour of Entergy's Nuclear Power Plant in River Bend Owner: Entergy Gulf States Inc. Reactor Type a nuclear power plant. Plant was Entergy, a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) type. Built in the 80's, it has of the veteran plant workers. The presentation gave the nuclear plant engineering basics and built

Ervin, Elizabeth K.

154

Oregon State University Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiation Health Physics NeutronSpring 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE Oregon State University Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiation Health Physics Neutron's Study Abroad Program. Arnold will earn a B.S. in Nuclear Engineering with a minor in French when she graduates this spring. INSIDE Why would a nuclear engineering student add a French minor to an already

Tullos, Desiree

155

High Energy Density Physics and Applications with a State-of-the-Art Compact X-Pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in technology has made possible to create matter with extremely high energy density (energy densities and pressure exceeding 1011 J/m3 and 1 Mbar respectively). The field is new and complex. The basic question for high energy density physics (HEDP) is how does matter behave under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, density and electromagnetic radiation? The conditions for studying HEDP are normally produced using high intensity short pulse laser, x-rays, particle beams and pulsed power z-pinches. Most of these installations occupy a large laboratory floor space and require a team consisting of a large number of scientists and engineers. This limits the number of experiments that can be performed to explore and understand the complex physics. A novel way of studying HEDP is with a compact x-pinch in university scale laboratory. The x-pinch is a configuration in which a pulsed current is passed through two or more wires placed between the electrodes making the shape of the letter ‘X’. Extreme conditions of magnetic field (> 200 MGauss for less than 1 ns), temperature (1 keV) and density (~ 1022 cm-3) are produced at the cross-point, where two wires make contact. Further, supersonic jets are produced on either side of the cross-point. The physics of the formation of the plasma at the cross-point is complex. It is not clear what role radiation plays in the formation of high energy density plasma (>> 1011 J/m3) at the cross-point. Nor it is understood how the supersonic jets are formed. Present numerical codes do not contain complex physics that can take into account some of these aspects. Indeed, a comprehensive experimental study could answer some of the questions, which are relevant to wide-ranging fields such as inertial confinement fusion, astrophysical plasmas, high intensity laser plasma interactions and radiation physics. The main aim of the proposal was to increase the fundamental understanding of high energy density physics and particularly address the key issues associated with x-pinches, which include radiation transport, energetic particle transport, supersonic jet formation, using state-of-the-art compact pulsed power drivers. All the primary objectives of the proposed work were met. These objectives include: • Understanding of the fundamental physics of hot and dense plasma formation, implosion to less than 1 µm size due to the radiation enhanced collapse and energetic electron heating, • Study of the jet formation mechanism, which is of interest due to the astrophysical jets and deposition of energy by energetic electrons in jets, • Characterization of an x-pinch as a point x-ray source for the phase contrast radiography of beryllium cryogenic targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments. The work carried out included a strong educational component involving both undergraduate and graduate students. Several undergraduate students from University of California San Diego participated in this project. A post-doctoral fellow, Dr. Simon Bott and two graduate students, David Haas and Erik Shipton contributed to every aspect of this project. The success of the project can be judged from the fact that fifteen peer-reviewed papers were published in high quality journals. In addition several presentations were made to a number of scientific meetings.

Beg, Farhat N [University of California San Diego

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Revision 9 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 9 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through September 30, 1990. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346. Persons using this Digest are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in support of any position before the Commission or any of its adjudicatory tribunals. Persons using this Digest are also placed on notice that it is intended for use only as an initial research tool, that it may, and likely does, contain errors, including errors in analysis and interpretation of decisions, and that the user should not rely on the Digest analyses and interpretations but must read, analyze and rely on the user's own analysis of the actual Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions cited. Further, neither the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Aspen Systems Corporation, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any material presented in the Digest. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on general matters. Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. (JF)

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K. [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Takano, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Sato, S. [Hokkaido University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Shimazu, Y. [Fukui University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Daniel E. Archer Ph.D., Experimental Nuclear Structure Physics, Florida State University, 1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daniel E. Archer Ph.D., Experimental Nuclear Structure Physics, Florida State University, 1996 M with particular expertise in experimental nuclear physics, including "hands-on" laboratory experience · Leadership.S., Physics, Florida State University, 1993 B.S., Physics (Major), Computer Based Honors Program (Minor

159

United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials.

Newton, J. W.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nuclear equation of state and finite nucleon volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown how the Equation of State (EoS) depends on nucleon properties inside Nuclear Matter (NM). We propose to benefit from the concept of enthalpy in order to include volume corrections to the nucleon rest energy, which are proportional to pressure and absent in a standard Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) with point-like nucleons. As a result, the nucleon mass can decrease inside NM, making the model nonlinear and the EoS softer. The course of the EoS in our RMF model agrees with a semi-empirical estimate and is close to the results obtained from extensive DBHF calculations with a Bonn A potential, which produce an EoS stiff enough to describe neutron star properties (mass--radius constraint), especially the masses of PSR J1614_2230 and PSR J0348_0432, known as the most massive ($\\sim 2 M_\\odot$) neutron stars. The presented model has proper saturation properties, including a good value of compressibility.

Ro?ynek, Jacek

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Impact of the equation-of-state -- gravity degeneracy on constraining the nuclear symmetry energy from astrophysical observables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a degeneracy between the equation of state (EOS) of superdense neutron-rich nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity in understanding properties of neutron stars. While the EOS is still poorly known, there are also longstanding ambiguities in choosing General Relativity or alternative gravity theories in the not-so-well tested strong-field regime. Besides possible appearance of hyperons and new phases, the most uncertain part of the nucleonic EOS is currently the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy. To provide information that may help break the EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of symmetry energy within its uncertain range determined by terrestrial nuclear laboratory experiments on the gravitational binding energy and spacetime curvature of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor (ST) theory of gravity. In particular, we focus on effects of the following parameters characterizing the EOS of neutron-rich nucleonic matter: (1) the incompressibility $K_0$ of symmetric nuclear matter, (2) the slope $L$ of symmetry energy at saturation density and (3) the high-density behavior of symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope $L$ or the high-density behavior of symmetry energy leads to large changes in both the binding energy and curvature of neutron stars while effects of varying the more constrained $K_0$ are negligibly small. The difference in predictions using the GR and the ST theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and is significantly smaller than the differences resulting from variations in the symmetry energy. We conclude that within the ST theory of gravity, the EOS-gravity degeneracy has been broken by the recent relativistic pulsar measurements, and that measurements of neutron star properties sensitive to the compactness constrain mainly the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

Xiao-Tao He; F. J. Fattoyev; Bao-An Li; W. G. Newton

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Indication of a deeply bound compact K-pp state formed in the pp -> p Lambda K+ reaction at 2.85 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have analyzed data of the DISTO experiment on the exclusive pp -> p Lambda K+ reaction at 2.85 GeV to search for a strongly bound compact K-pp (= X) state to be formed in the pp -> K+ + X reaction. The observed spectra of the K+ missing-mass and the p Lambda invariant-mass with high transverse momenta of p and K+ revealed a broad distinct peak with a mass M_X = 2265 +- 2 (stat) +- 5 (syst) MeV/c2 and a width Gamma_X = 118 +- 8 (stat) +- 10 (syst) MeV.

T. Yamazaki; M. Maggiora; P. Kienle; K. Suzuki; A. Amoroso; M. Alexeev; F. Balestra; Y. Bedfer; R. Bertini; L. C. Bland; A. Brenschede; F. Brochard; M. P. Bussa; Seonho Choi; M. L. Colantoni; R. Dressler; M. Dzemidzic; J. -Cl. Faivre; L. Ferrero; J. Foryciarz; I. Froehlich; V. Frolov; R. Garfagnini; A. Grasso; S. Heinz; W. W. Jacobs; W. Kuhn; A. Maggiora; D. Panzieri; H. -W. Pfaff; G. Pontecorvo; A. Popov; J. Ritman; P. Salabura; S. Sosio; V. Tchalyshev; S. E. Vigdor

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Application of the nuclear equation of state obtained by the variational method to core-collapse supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The equation of state (EOS) for hot asymmetric nuclear matter which is constructed with the variational method starting from the Argonne v18 and Urbana IX nuclear forces is applied to spherically symmetric core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We first investigate the EOS of isentropic beta-stable SN matter, and find that the matter with the variational EOS is more neutron-rich than that with the Shen EOS. Using the variational EOS for uniform matter supplemented by the Shen EOS of non-uniform matter at low densities, we perform general-relativistic spherically symmetric simulations of core-collapse SNe with and without neutrino transfer, starting from a presupernova model of 15 solar mass. In the adiabatic simulation without neutrino transfer, the explosion is successful, and the explosion energy with the variational EOS is larger than that with the Shen EOS. In the case of the simulation with neutrino transfer, the shock wave stalls and then the explosion fails, as in other spherically symmetric simulations. The inner core with the variational EOS is more compact than that with the Shen EOS, due to the relative softness of the variational EOS. This implies that the variational EOS is more advantageous for SN explosions than the Shen EOS.

H. Togashi; M. Takano; K. Sumiyoshi; K. Nakazato

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nuclear matter equation of state and three-body forces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy per particle, symmetry energy, pressure, and free energy are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter using BHF approach with modern nucleon-nucleon CD-Bonn, Nijm1, Argonne v{sub 18}, and Reid 93 potentials. To obtain saturation in nuclear matter we add three-body interaction terms which are equivalent to a density-dependent two-nucleon interaction a la Skyrme force. Good agreement is obtained in comparison with previous theoretical estimates and experimental data.

Mansour, H. M. M.; Algamoudi, A. M. A. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Nuclear Equation of State: Picture from Medium Energy Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristics of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) and its importance, in particular for astrophysics, are discussed. Selected observables in nuclear collisions are sensitive to the EOS and can be used to constrain it. For central collisions, these include collective flow asymmetries, subthreshold kaon yields and isospin diffusion. Comparisons between the data and transport theory suggest an energy per nucleon that rises relatively slowly with density for symmetric matter and symmetry energy that rises relatively quickly around the normal nuclear density.

P. Danielewicz

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

166

Workshop on exotic hadronic atoms, deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and antihydrogen: present results, future challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

These are the miniproceedings of the workshop "Exotic hadronic atoms, deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and antihydrogen: present results, future challenges," which was held at the European Centre for Theoretical Nuclear Physics and Related Studies (ECT*), Trento (Italy), June 19-24, 2006. The document includes a short presentation of the topics, the list of participants, and a short contribution from each speaker.

Catalina Curceanu; Akaki Rusetsky; Eberhard Widmann

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

INL Director Discusses the Future for Nuclear Energy in the United States  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains that the United States should develop its energy policies based on an assessment of the current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear reactors and the costs and benefits of providing electricity through various energy sources. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Grossenbacher, John

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

INL Director Discusses the Future for Nuclear Energy in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory's Director John Grossenbacher explains that the United States should develop its energy policies based on an assessment of the current events at Japan's Fukushima nuclear reactors and the costs and benefits of providing electricity through various energy sources. For more information about INL's nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Grossenbacher, John

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Dynamic nuclear polarization in biomolecular solid state NMR : methods and applications in peptides and membrane proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid state NMR can probe structure and dynamics on length scales from the atomic to the supramolecular. However, low sensitivity limits its application in macromolecules. NMR sensitivity can be improved by dynamic nuclear ...

Bajaj, Vikram Singh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Maintenance practices for emergency diesel generator engines onboard United States Navy Los Angeles class nuclear submarines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The United States Navy has recognized the rising age of its nuclear reactors. With this increasing age comes increasing importance of backup generators. In addition to the need for decay heat removal common to all (naval ...

Hawks, Matthew Arthur

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

United States Nuclear Tests, July 1945 through September 1992, December 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document list chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Revision 15, dated December 2000.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as...

173

A compact 10 kW, 476 MHz solid state radio frequency amplifier for pre-buncher cavity of free electron laser injector linear accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 10 kW, 476 MHz, 0.1% duty cycle solid state RF amplifier system for driving sub-harmonic, pre-buncher cavity of IR-FEL injector LINAC, has been developed at RRCAT. The 10 kW power is achieved by combining output of eight 1400 W amplifier modules using 8-way planar corporate combiner. The solid state amplifier modules have been developed using 50 V RF LDMOS transistors which although meant for push-pull operation are being used in single ended configuration with matching circuit developed on a thin (25 mils), high dielectric constant (9.7), low loss microwave laminate with an aim to have a compact structure. Ease of fabrication, modularity, small size, and low cost are the important features of this design which could be used as a template for low duty cycle medium to high pulsed power UHF amplifier system.

Mohania, Praveen; Mahawar, Ashish; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Gupta, P. D. [Raja Rammana Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore 452013 (India)] [Raja Rammana Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore 452013 (India)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Nuclear Navy United States Atomic Energy Commission Historical Advisory  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy Advanced1, 2014Nuclear FacilitiesNuclearNavy United

175

Neutron drip line and the equation of state of nuclear matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate how the neutron drip line is related to the density dependence of the symmetry energy, by using a macroscopic nuclear model that allows us to calculate nuclear masses in a way dependent on the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. The neutron drip line obtained from these masses is shown to appreciably shift to a neutron-rich side in a nuclear chart as the density derivative of the symmetry energy increases. Such shift is clearly seen for light nuclei, a feature coming mainly from the surface property of neutron-rich nuclei.

Kazuhiro Oyamatsu; Kei Iida; Hiroyuki Koura

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

176

Nonextensive effects on the relativistic nuclear equation of state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Walecka many-body field theory is investigated in the context of quantum nonextensive statistical mechanics, characterized by a dimensionless parameter $q$. We consider nuclear matter described statistically by a power-law distribution which generalizes the standard Fermi-Dirac distribution ($q = 1$). We show that the scalar and vector meson fields become more intense due to the nonextensive effects ($q \

F. I. M. Pereira; R. SIlva; J. S. Alcaniz

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Nuclear matter equation of state including few-nucleon correlations $(A\\leq 4)$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light clusters (mass number $A \\leq 4$) in nuclear matter at subsaturation densities are described using a quantum statistical approach. In addition to self-energy and Pauli-blocking, effects of continuum correlations are taken into account to calculate the quasiparticle properties and abundances of light elements. Medium-modified quasiparticle properties are important ingredients to derive a nuclear matter equation of state applicable in the entire region of warm dense matter below saturation density. Moreover, the contribution of continuum states to the equation of state is considered. The effect of correlations within the nuclear medium on the quasiparticle energies is estimated. The properties of light clusters and continuum correlations in dense matter are of interest for nuclear structure calculations, heavy ion collisions, and for astrophysical applications such as the formation of neutron stars in core-collapse supernovae.

G. Röpke

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

178

United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is on Track| DepartmentPinakin2Nuclear Damage |

179

United States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and Development Collaboration in Nuclear Energy and Security  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Director General of the Russian Federation State Corporation “Rosatom” Sergey Kirienko today signed the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation on Cooperation in Nuclear- and Energy-Related Scientific Research and Development

180

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation’s electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Parton Momentum Distribution and the Equation of State in Nuclear Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We will present the model for the modification of the parton distribution in nuclei (EMC effect) using a suitably altered nuclear Fermi motion and final state interactions between the scattered nucleon and the rest of the nucleus. The medium effects concern the nucleon structure, namely the changes in the nucleon rest energy, the enhancement of sea quark contribution (simulated with ''nuclear pions'') and the modifications of the transverse parton momentum distribution inside Nuclear Matter (NM). The good agreement with experimental data of the EMC effect for x > 0.15 and nuclear lepton pair production data has been obtained essentially without free parameters. The possible influence of these modifications to the Equation Of State (EOS) in NM will be discussed.

Rozynek, Jacek [Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

182

Constraining the nuclear matter equation of state around twice saturation density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using FOPI data on elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions between 0.4 and 1.5A GeV we extract constraints for the equation of state (EOS) of compressed symmetric nuclear matter using the transport code IQMD by introducing an observable describing the evolution of the size of the elliptic flow as a function of rapidity. This observable is sensitive to the nuclear EOS and a robust tool to constrain the compressibility of nuclear matter up to 2 $\\rho_0$.

Fèvre, A Le; Reisdorf, W; Aichelin, J; Hartnack, Ch

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials in United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been engaged in an effort to develop and qualify next generation LWR fuel with enhanced performance and safety and reduced waste generation since 2010. This program, which has emphasized collaboration between the DOE, U.S. national laboratories and nuclear industry, was refocused from enhanced performance to enhanced accident tolerance following the events at Fukushima in 2011. Accident tolerant fuels have been specifically described as fuels that, in comparison with standard UO2-Zircaloy, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The program maintains an ambitious goal to insert a lead test assembly (LTA) of the new design into a commercial power reactor by 2022 .

Daniel M. Wachs

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Modern compact star observations and the quark matter EoS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A hybrid equation of state for dense matter is presented that satisfies phenomenological constraints from modern compact star observations which indicate high maximum masses of about 2 M_sun and large radii of R> 12 km. The corresponding isospin symmetric equation of state is consistent with flow data analyses of heavy-ion collisions. The transition from nuclear to two-flavor color superconducting quark matter at n approximately 0.55 fm^{-3} is almost a crossover.

T. Klahn

2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

185

Disappearance of fusionlike residues and the nuclear equation of state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross sections for massive residues from {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 27}Al collisions were calculated with an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation. The calculated residue cross sections decrease with incident energy, an effect which does not appear related to the residue excitation energy. Larger residue cross sections result from calculations with larger in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections or with equations of state which are less attractive at subnuclear density. This dual sensitivity may be eliminated by measurements of observables associated with the coincident light particles.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P.; Bertsch, G.F. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA) Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA))

1990-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

186

DOE, State of Idaho Sign Agreement on Nuclear Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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187

Quantum State Engineering using Single Nuclear Spin Qubit of Optically Manipulated Ytterbium Atom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A single Yb atom is loaded into a high-finesse optical cavity with a moving lattice, and its nuclear spin state is manipulated using a nuclear magnetic resonance technique. A highly reliable quantum state control with fidelity and purity greater than 0.98 and 0.96, respectively, is confirmed by the full quantum state tomography; a projective measurement with high speed (500us) and high efficiency (0.98) is accomplished using the cavity QED technique. Because a hyperfine coupling is induced only when the projective measurement is operational, the long coherence times (T_1 = 0.49 s and T_2 = 0.10 s) are maintained. Our technique can be applied for implementing a scalable one-way quantum computation with a cluster state in an optical lattice.

Atsushi Noguchi; Yujiro Eto; Masahito Ueda; Mikio Kozuma

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore CA 94551 (United States)

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Americium separation from nuclear fuel dissolution using higher oxidation states.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of the complexity in current AFCI proposals is driven by the need to separate the minor actinides from the lanthanides. Partitioning and recycling Am, but not Cm, would allow for significant simplification because Am has redox chemistry that may be exploited while Cm does not. Here, we have explored methods based on higher oxidation states of Am (AmV and AmVI) to partition Am from the lanthanides. In a separate but related approach we have also initiated an investigation of the utility of TRUEX Am extraction from thiocyanate solution. The stripping of loaded TRUEX by Am oxidation or SCN- has not yet proved successful; however, the partitioning of inextractable AmV by TRUEX shows promise.

Bruce J. Mincher

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Ultrafast control of nuclear spins using only microwave pulses: towards switchable solid-state quantum gates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate the control of the alpha-proton nuclear spin, I=1/2, coupled to the stable radical CH(COOH)2, S=1/2, in a gamma-irradiated malonic acid single crystal using only microwave pulses. We show that, depending on the state of the electron spin mS=+/-1/2, the nuclear spin can be locked in a desired state or oscillate between mI=+1/2 and mI=-1/2 on the nanosecond time scale. This approach provides a fast and efficient way of controlling nuclear spin qubits and also enables the design of switchable spin-based quantum gates by addressing only the electron spin.

George Mitrikas; Yiannis Sanakis; Georgios Papavassiliou

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13 CO to Lipid 31 P ABSTRACT: Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane

Weliky, David

192

Transition Operators Entering Neutrinoles Double Electron Capture to Excited Nuclear States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct the effective transition operators relevant for neutrinoless double electron capture leading to final nuclear states different than $0^{+}$. From the structure of these operators we see that, if such a process is observed experimentally, it will be very helpful in singling out the very important light neutrino mass contribution from the other lepton violating mechanisms

J. D. Vergados

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

193

Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

194

BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ?} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ?} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ?} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ?} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ? 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ?} ? 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada); Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela [TAPIR, MC 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D., E-mail: mbdeaton@wsu.edu, E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

195

Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States conditions from war-related smoke. We combined observed climate conditions for the states of Iowa, Illinois phases also had an important effect. 1 Introduction In the event of nuclear war, targets in cities

Robock, Alan

196

Advanced international training course on state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the Advanced International Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material held April 27 through May 12, 1981 at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards. Major emphasis for the 1981 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at both the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, Richland, Washington.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Transition of an X-ray binary to the hard ultraluminous state in the blue compact dwarf galaxy VII Zw 403  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the X-ray spectra of VII Zw 403, a nearby low-metallicity blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy. The galaxy has been observed to contain an X-ray source, likely a high mass X-ray binary (HMXB), with a luminosity of 1.3-23x10^38 erg s^-1 in the 0.3-8 keV energy range. A new Suzaku observation shows a transition to a luminosity of 1.7x10^40 erg s^-1 [0.3-8 keV], higher by a factor of 7-130. The spectra from the high flux state are hard, best described by a disk plus Comptonization model, and exhibit curvature at energies above 5 keV. This is consistent with many high-quality ultraluminous X-ray source spectra which have been interpreted as stellar mass black holes (StMBH) accreting at super-Eddington rates. However, this lies in contrast to another HMXB in a low-metallicity BCD, I Zw 18, that exhibits a soft spectrum at high flux, similar to Galactic black hole binaries and has been interpreted as a possible intermediate mass black hole. Determining the spectral properties of HMXBs in BCDs has important im...

Brorby, Matthew; Feng, Hua

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Disappearance of Elliptic Flow: A New Probe for the Nuclear Equation of State  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a relativistic hadron transport model, we investigate the utility of the elliptic flow excitation function as a probe for the stiffness of nuclear matter and for the onset of a possible quark-gluon-plasma phase transition at alternating-gradient synchrotron energies 1{approx_lt}E{sub beam}{approx_lt}11A GeV . The excitation function shows a strong dependence on the nuclear equation of state, and exhibits characteristic signatures which could signal the onset of the transition. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

Lacey, R.A.; Pinkenburg, C.; Chung, P.; Alexander, J.M.; McGrath, R.L. [Departments of Chemistry and Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3400 (United States); Danielewicz, P.; Gossiaux, P. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Gossiaux, P. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines, F-44070 Nantes (France)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Sideband Cooling while Preserving Coherences in the Nuclear Spin State in Group-II-like Atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a method for laser cooling group-II-like atoms without changing the quantum state of their nuclear spins, thus preserving coherences that are usually destroyed by optical pumping in the cooling process. As group-II-like atoms have a {sup 1}S{sub 0} closed-shell ground state, nuclear spin and electronic angular momentum are decoupled, allowing for their independent manipulation. The hyperfine interaction that couples these degrees of freedom in excited states can be suppressed through the application of external magnetic fields. Our protocol employs resolved-sideband cooling on the forbidden clock transition, {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}P{sub 0}, with quenching via coupling to the rapidly decaying {sup 1}P{sub 1} state, deep in the Paschen-Back regime. This makes it possible to laser cool neutral atomic qubits without destroying the quantum information stored in their nuclear spins, as shown in two examples, {sup 171}Yb and {sup 87}Sr.

Reichenbach, Iris; Deutsch, Ivan H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

Compact wavefunctions from compressed imaginary time evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of quantum systems promises to deliver physical and chemical predictions for the frontiers of technology. Unfortunately, the exact representation of these systems is plagued by the exponential growth of dimension with the number of particles, or colloquially, the curse of dimensionality. The success of approximation methods has hinged on the relative simplicity of physical systems with respect to the exponentially complex worst case. Exploiting this relative simplicity has required detailed knowledge of the physical system under study. In this work, we introduce a general and efficient black box method for many-body quantum systems that utilizes technology from compressed sensing to find the most compact wavefunction possible without detailed knowledge of the system. It is a Multicomponent Adaptive Greedy Iterative Compression (MAGIC) scheme. No knowledge is assumed in the structure of the problem other than correct particle statistics. This method can be applied to many quantum systems such as spins, qubits, oscillators, or electronic systems. As an application, we use this technique to compute ground state electronic wavefunctions of hydrogen fluoride and recover 98% of the basis set correlation energy or equivalently 99.996% of the total energy with $50$ configurations out of a possible $10^7$. Building from this compactness, we introduce the idea of nuclear union configuration interaction for improving the description of reaction coordinates and use it to study the dissociation of hydrogen fluoride and the helium dimer.

Jarrod R. McClean; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Utilizing a Russian space nuclear reactor for a United States space mission: Systems integration issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) has developed a cooperative relationship with several institutes of the former Soviet Union to evaluate Russian space hardware on a US spacecraft One component is the Topaz II Nuclear Power System; a built and flight qualified nuclear reactor that has yet to be tested in space. The access to the Topaz II reactor provides the NEPSTP with a rare opportunity; to conduct an early flight demonstration of nuclear electric propulsion at a relatively low cost. This opportunity, however, is not without challenges. Topaz II was designed to be compatible with Russian spacecraft and launch vehicles. It was manufactured and flight qualified by Russian techniques and standards and conforms to safety requirements of the former Soviet Union, not the United States. As it is desired to make minimal modifications to the Topaz II, integrating the reactor system with a United States spacecraft and launch vehicle presents an engineering challenge. This paper documents the lessons teamed regarding the integration of reactor based spacecraft and also some insight about integrating Russian hardware. It examines the planned integration flow along with specific reactor requirements that affect the spacecraft integration including American-Russian space system compatibility.

Reynolds, E.; Schaefer, E. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Polansky, G.; Lacy, J. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bocharov, A. [GDBMB, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Preservation and Implementation of Decommissioning Lessons Learned in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has actively worked to capture and preserve lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. More recently, NRC has involved industry groups, the Organization of Agreement States (OAS), and the Department of Energy (DOE) in the effort to develop approaches to capture, preserve and disseminate decommissioning lessons learned. This paper discusses the accomplishments of the working group, some lessons learned by the NRC in the recent past, and how NRC will incorporate these lessons learned into its regulatory framework. This should help ensure that the design and operation of current and future nuclear facilities will result in less environmental impact and more efficient decommissioning. In summary, the NRC will continue capturing today's experience in decommissioning so that future facilities can take advantage of lessons learned from today's decommissioning projects. NRC, both individually and collectively with industry groups, OAS, and DOE, is aggressively working on the preservation and implementation of decommissioning lessons learned. The joint effort has helped to ensure the lessons from the whole spectrum of decommissioning facilities (i.e., reactor, fuel cycle, and material facilities) are better understood, thus maximizing the amount of knowledge and best practices obtained from decommissioning activities. Anticipated regulatory activities at the NRC will make sure that the knowledge gained from today's decommissioning projects is preserved and implemented to benefit the nuclear facilities that will decommission in the future.

Rodriguez, Rafael L. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Long-term measurements of unattached radon progeny concentrations using solid-state nuclear track detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term measurements of unattached radon progeny concentrations using solid-state nuclear track of radon progeny from a set of measured (f1, f2, f3) values, where fi¼Ci/C0 (i¼1, 2, 3), and C0, C1, C2 is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e., 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po, but not to the radon

Yu, K.N.

204

Non-gaussian statistics and the relativistic nuclear equation of state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate possible effects of quantum power-law statistical mechanics on the relativistic nuclear equation of state in the context of the Walecka quantum hadrodynamics theory. By considering the Kaniadakis non-Gaussian statistics, characterized by the index $\\kappa$ (Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy is recovered in the limit $\\kappa\\to 0$), we show that the scalar and vector meson fields become more intense due to the non-Gaussian statistical effects ($\\kappa \

F. I. M. Pereira; R. Silva; J. S. Alcaniz

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

205

Contribution of two particle-two hole final states to the nuclear response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The excitation of two particle-two hole final states in neutrino-nucleus scattering has been advocated by many authors as the source of the excess cross section observed by the MiniBooNE Collaboration in the quasi elastic sector. We analyse the mechanisms leading to the appearance of these final states, and illustrate their significance through the results of accurate calculations of the nuclear electromagnetic response in the transverse channel. A novel approach, allowing for a consistent treatment of the amplitudes involving one- and two-nucleon currents in the kinematical region in which the non relativistic approximation breaks down, is outlined.

Benhar, Omar; Rocco, Noemi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL

Siefert, Chris

207

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

208

Secure or seclude : U.S. nuclear policy and nuclear states, a comparison of India and Pakistan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The U.S. has implemented a two-track nuclear policy since the Cold War. The first track is non-proliferation and the second track involves securing all nuclear… (more)

Chaney, Brent Buie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States and soybeans to cooler, drier, and darker conditions from war-related smoke. We combined observed climate had an important effect. 1 Introduction In the event of nuclear war, targets in cities and industrial

Robock, Alan

210

Historical Perspective on the United States Fusion Program Invited paper presented at American Nuclear Society 16th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlled thermonuclear reactions, or nuclear fusion as it is now more commonly called, has remained elusiveHistorical Perspective on the United States Fusion Program Invited paper presented at American Nuclear Society 16th Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy 14-16 September, 2004 in Madison

211

Equation of state of neutron star matter, and the nuclear symmetry energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear mean-field potentials obtained in the Hartree-Fock method with different choices of the in-medium nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction have been used to study the equation of state (EOS) of the neutron star (NS) matter. The EOS of the uniform NS core has been calculated for the npe{mu} composition in the {beta} equilibrium at zero temperature, using version Sly4 of the Skyrme interaction as well as two density-dependent versions of the finite-range M3Y interaction (CDM3Yn and M3Y-Pn), and versions D1S and D1N of the Gogny interaction. Although the considered effective NN interactions were proven to be quite realistic in numerous nuclear structure and/or reaction studies, they give quite different behaviors of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter at supranuclear densities that lead to the soft and stiff scenarios discussed recently in the literature. Different EOS's of the NS core and the EOS of the NS crust given by the compressible liquid drop model have been used as input of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations to study how the nuclear symmetry energy affects the model prediction of different NS properties, like the cooling process as well as the gravitational mass, radius, and moment of inertia.

Loan, Doan Thi; Tan, Ngo Hai; Khoa, Dao T. [Institute for Nuclear Science and Technique, VAEC, 179 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Nghia Do, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Margueron, Jerome [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS/Universite Paris-Sud, F-91406 Orsay (France)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Job Creation Due to Nuclear Power Resurgence in The United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent revival of global interest in the next generation of nuclear power reactors is causing a reexamination of the role of nuclear power in the United States. This renewed interest has led to questions regarding the capability and capacity of current U.S. industries to support a renewal of nuclear power plant deployment. Key among the many questions currently being asked is what potential exists for the creation of new jobs as a result of developing and operating these new plants? Idaho National Laboratory and Bechtel Power Corporation collaborated to perform a Department of Energy-sponsored study that evaluated the potential for job creation in the U.S. should these new next generation nuclear power plants be built. The study focused primarily on providing an initial estimate of the numbers of new manufacturing jobs that could be created, including those that could be repatriated from overseas, resulting from the construction of these new reactors. In addition to the growth in the manufacturing sector, the study attempted to estimate the potential increase in construction trades necessary to accomplish the new construction.

C. R. Kenley; R. D. Klingler; C. M. Plowman; R. Soto; R. J. Turk; R. L. Baker; S. A. Close; V. L. McDonnell; S. W. Paul; L. R. Rabideau; S. S. Rao; B. P. Reilly

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Spin-On for the Renaissance? The Current State of China's Nuclear Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power; 2) expansion of nuclear plants from coastal regionsprovide four AP1000 nuclear power plants to China. AP1000sadvanced, yet proven nuclear power plant currently available

Yuan, Jing-dong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance methodology and applications to structure determination of peptides, proteins and amyloid fibrils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several methodological developments and applications of multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance to biomolecular structure determination are presented. Studies are performed in uniformly 3C, 15N isotope ...

Jaroniec, Christopher P

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Concepts and Approaches for Excess Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning End State - 13367  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently has numerous radiologically contaminated excess nuclear facilities waiting decommissioning throughout the Complex. The traditional decommissioning end state is complete removal. This commonly involves demolishing the facility, often segregating various components and building materials and disposing of the highly contaminated, massive structures containing tons of highly contaminated equipment and piping in a (controlled and approved) landfill, at times hundreds of miles from the facility location. Traditional demolition is costly, and results in significant risks to workers, as well as risks and costs associated with transporting the materials to a disposal site. In situ decommissioning (ISD or entombment) is a viable alternative to demolition, offering comparable and potentially more protective protection of human health and the environment, but at a significantly reduced cost and worker risk. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has completed the initial ISD deployment for radiologically contaminated facilities. Two reactor (P and R Reactors) facilities were decommissioned in 2011 using the ISD approach through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SRS ISD approach resolved programmatic, regulatory and technical/engineering issues associated with avoiding the potential hazards and cost associated with generating and disposing of an estimated 124,300 metric tons (153,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated debris per reactor. The DOE Environmental Management Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering, through the Savannah River National Laboratory, is currently investigating potential monitoring techniques and strategies to assess ISD effectiveness. As part of SRS's strategic planning, the site is seeking to leverage in situ decommissioning concepts, approaches and facilities to conduct research, design end states, and assist in regulatory interactions in broad national and international government and private industry decommissioning applications. SRS offers critical services based upon the SRS experience in decommissioning and reactor entombment technology (e.g., grout formulations for varying conditions, structural and material sciences). The SRS ISD approach follows a systems engineering framework to achieve a regulatory acceptable end state based on established protocols, attains the final end state with minimal long stewardship requirements, protects industrial workers, and protects groundwater and the environment. The ISD systems engineering framework addresses key areas of the remedial process planning, technology development and deployment, and assessment to attain the ultimate goal of natural resource stewardship and protecting the public. The development and deployment of the SRS ISD approach has established a path for ISD of other large nuclear facilities in the United States and around the globe as an acceptable remedial alternative for decommissioning nuclear facilities. (authors)

Serrato, Michael G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Musall, John C.; Bergren, Christopher L. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Intermediate/high energy nuclear physics. [Iowa State Univ. , Ames, Iowa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress during the last year is reviewed under the following topics: relativistic hadron--nucleus and nucleus--nucleus collisions (heavy meson production, photon production and fragmentation functions--direct photon production with the QCM and photon fragmentation functions, Cronin efffect and multiple scattering, effective nuclear parton distributions); solving quantum field theories in nonperturbative regime; light-front dynamics and high-spin states (soft form factor of the pion and nucleon for transverse and longitudinal momentum transfers, light front spinors for high-spin objects); high-energy spin physics; relativistic wave equations, quarkonia, and e[sup +]e[sup [minus

Vary, J.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact, which provides for the cooperative management of low-level radioactive waste....

219

"This awesome field"; a history of United States nuclear testing and its influence on nuclear thought, 1945-1963.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The history of U. S. nuclear testing between 1945 and 1963 is not only a vivid and exciting story but also one of profound historical… (more)

Blades, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Recent progress on the accurate determination of the equation of state of neutron and nuclear matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of accurately determining the equation of state of nuclear and neutron matter at density near and beyond saturation is still an open challenge. In this paper we will review the most recent progress made by means of Quantum Monte Carlo calculations, which are at present the only ab-inito method capable to treat a sufficiently large number of particles to give meaningful estimates depending only on the choice of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. In particular, we will discuss the introduction of density-dependent interactions, the study of the temperature dependence of the equation of state, and the possibility of accurately studying the effect of the onset of hyperons by developing an accurate hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-nucleon-nucleon interaction.

Paolo Armani; Alexey Yu. Illarionov; Diego Lonardoni; Francesco Pederiva; Stefano Gandolfi; Kevin E. Schmidt; Stefano Fantoni

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

VALIDATION OF A THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR FUEL COMPACTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high temperature guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow measurement system has been built to measure the thermal conductivity of a composite nuclear fuel compact. It is a steady-state measurement device designed to operate over a temperature range of 300 K to 1200 K. No existing apparatus is currently available for obtaining the thermal conductivity of the composite fuel in a non-destructive manner due to the compact’s unique geometry and composite nature. The current system design has been adapted from ASTM E 1225. As a way to simplify the design and operation of the system, it uses a unique radiative heat sink to conduct heat away from the sample column. A finite element analysis was performed on the measurement system to analyze the associated error for various operating conditions. Optimal operational conditions have been discovered through this analysis and results are presented. Several materials have been measured by the system and results are presented for stainless steel 304, inconel 625, and 99.95% pure iron covering a range of thermal conductivities of 10 W/m*K to 70 W/m*K. A comparison of the results has been made to data from existing literature.

Jeff Phillips; Colby Jensen; Changhu Xing; Heng Ban

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Compact Ultradense Objects in the Solar System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe properties and gravitational interactions of meteor-mass and greater compact ultra dense objects with nuclear density or greater (CUDO s). We discuss possible enclosure of CUDO s in comets, stability of these objects on impact with the Earth and Sun and show that the hypothesis of a CUDO core helps resolve issues challenging the understanding of a few selected cometary impacts.

J. Rafelski; Ch. Dietl; L. Labun

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL ­ Supply chains and logistics ­ Systems of systems (e.g., the nuclear fuel cycle, fleet management) #12

Langerhans, Brian

224

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 486 (2002) 126130 Development of a compact photon detector for Anke at Cosy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of direct identifica- tion of short-lived neutral final states. Therefore, it is intended to build with excellent timing and good energy resolution, applicable also for photon energies below 1 Ge to obtain information about particles produced in hadronic interactions. Nearly all neutral mesons below 1

Magiera, Andrzej

225

Colloquium: Majorana Fermions in nuclear, particle and solid-state physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ettore Majorana (1906-1938) disappeared while traveling by ship from Palermo to Naples in 1938. His fate has never been fully resolved and several articles have been written that explore the mystery itself. His demise intrigues us still today because of his seminal work, published the previous year, that established symmetric solutions to the Dirac equation that describe a fermionic particle that is its own anti-particle. This work has long had a significant impact in neutrino physics, where this fundamental question regarding the particle remains unanswered. But the formalism he developed has found many uses as there are now a number of candidate spin-1/2 neutral particles that may be truly neutral with no quantum number to distinguish them from their anti-particles. If such particles exist, they will influence many areas of nuclear and particle physics. Most notably the process of neutrinoless double beta decay can only exist if neutrinos are massive Majorana particles. Hence, many efforts to search for this process are underway. Majorana's influence doesn't stop with particle physics, however, even though that was his original consideration. The equations he derived also arise in solid state physics where they describe electronic states in materials with superconducting order. Of special interest here is the class of solutions of the Majorana equation in one and two spatial dimensions at exactly zero energy. These Majorana zero modes are endowed with some remarkable physical properties that may lead to advances in quantum computing and, in fact, there is evidence that they have been experimentally observed. This review first summarizes the basics of Majorana's theory and its implications. It then provides an overview of the rich experimental programs trying to find a fermion that is its own anti-particle in nuclear, particle, and solid state physics.

S. R. Elliott; M. Franz

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Technical cooperation on nuclear security between the United States and China : review of the past and opportunities for the future.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States and China are committed to cooperation to address the challenges of the next century. Technical cooperation, building on a long tradition of technical exchange between the two countries, can play an important role. This paper focuses on technical cooperation between the United States and China in the areas of nonproliferation, arms control and other nuclear security topics. It reviews cooperation during the 1990s on nonproliferation and arms control under the U.S.-China Arms Control Exchange, discusses examples of ongoing activities under the Peaceful Uses of Technology Agreement to enhance security of nuclear and radiological material, and suggests opportunities for expanding technical cooperation between the defense nuclear laboratories of both countries to address a broader range of nuclear security topics.

Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound-state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist. -- Highlights: •Schrödinger operator with singular interactions supported on compact submanifolds. •Exact bound-state solution in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold. •Generalization of the variational approach to a collection of submanifolds. •Existence of a lower bound for a unique ground state energy.

Kaynak, Burak Tevfik, E-mail: burak.kaynak@boun.edu.tr; Teoman Turgut, O., E-mail: turgutte@boun.edu.tr

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Cooling of Compact Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cooling of a compact star depends very sensitively on the state of dense matter at supranuclear densities, which essentially controls the neutrino emission, as well as on the structure of the stellar outer layers which control the photon emission. Open issues concern the hyperon population, the presence of meson condensates, superfluidity and superconductivity, and the transition of confined hadronic matter to quark matter. This paper describes these issues and presents cooling calculations based on a broad collection of equations of state for neutron star matter and strange matter. These results are tested against the body of observed cooling data.

Dany Page; Ulrich Geppert; Fridolin Weber

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

PROGRESS IN REDUCING THE NUCLEAR THREAT: UNITED STATES PLUTONIUM CONSOLIDATION AND DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the end of the Cold War, the United States identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium and larger quantities of enriched uranium that are permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs. The Department of Energy (DOE) also began shutting down, stabilizing, and removing inventories from production facilities that were no longer needed to support weapons programs and non-weapons activities. The storage of 'Category I' nuclear materials at Rocky Flats, Sandia National Laboratories, and several smaller sites has been terminated to reduce costs and safeguards risks. De-inventory continues at the Hanford site and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Consolidation of inventories works in concert with the permanent disposition of excess inventories, including several tonnes of plutonium that have already been disposed to waste repositories and the preparation for transfers to the planned Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (for the bulk of the excess plutonium) and alternative disposition methods for material that cannot be used readily in the MOX fuel cycle. This report describes status of plutonium consolidation and disposition activities and their impacts on continuing operations, particularly at the Savannah River Site.

Allender, J.; Koenig, R.; Davies, S.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Gamma-ray induced Doppler broadening and the determination of lifetimes of excited nuclear states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of lifetimes of excited states in nuclei yield crucial information for sensitive tests of nuclear models. Here a novel method will be discussed which involves the GRID (Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening) technique, in which Doppler broadening is observed in a transition from a nucleus recoiling from the emission of a previous gamma ray. As the recoil energy is extremely small, ultra-high energy resolving power has to be used. To date all such experiments have been carried out at ILL using the GAMS4 double flat crystal spectrometer which is operated in a NIST-ILL collaboration. The method can be used for all lifetimes below a few picoseconds. The wide range of applicability, together with the very exhaustive set of data often obtained, is an advantage with respect to many other methods. The characteristic features of GRID will be discussed using some selected examples. 21 refs., 8 figs.

Boerner, H.G.; Jolie, J.; Robinson, S.J. (Institut Laue-Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Kessler, E.G.; Dewey, S.M.; Greene, G.; Deslattes, R. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA)); Ulbig, S.; Lieb, K.P. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Casten, R.F. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Krusche, B. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Cizewski, J.A. (Rutgers--the

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Spectroscopy of particle-phonon coupled states in 133Sb by the cluster transfer reaction of 132Sn on 7Li: an advanced test of nuclear interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopy of particle-phonon coupled states in 133Sb by the cluster transfer reaction of 132Sn on 7Li: an advanced test of nuclear interactions

Leoni S, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Bocchi G, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Bottoni S, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Bracco A, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Camera F, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy; Crespi F, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Morales A, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Fornal B, IFJ-PAN Krakow (Poland); Szpak B, IFJ-PAN Krakow (Poland); Bednarczyk P, IFJ-PAN Krakow (Poland); Cieplicka N, IFJ-PAN Krakow (Poland); Krolas W, IFJ-PAN Krakow ( Poland); Maj A, IFJ-PAN Krakow (Poland); Rusek K, Heavy Ion Laboratory University of Warsaw (Poland); Bazzacco D, INFN Padova (Italy); Lunardi S, University of Padova and INFN Padova (Italy); Mengoni D, University of Padova and INFN Padova (Italy); Recchia F, University of Padova and INFN Padova (Italy); Ur C, INFN Padova (Italy); Valiente-Dobon J, LNL-INFN (Italy); Gramegna F, LNL-INFN (Italy); Marchi T, LNL-INFN (Italy); Huyse M, KU Leuven (Belgium); Raabe R, KU Leuven (Belgium); VanDuppen P, KU Leuven (Belgium); Sferrazza M, Université libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Georgiev G, CSNSM Orsay (France); Blazhev A, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Köln (Germany); Rosiak D, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Köln (Germany); Siebeck B, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Köln (Germany); Seidlitz M, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Köln (Germany); Reiter P, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Köln (Germany); Warr N, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Koln (Germany); Hartig AL, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Henrich C, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Ilieva S, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Kroell T, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Thurauf M, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Gernhaeuser R, TU Munchen (Germany); Mucher D, TU Munchen (Germany); Janssens R, Argonne National Laboratory (USA); Carpenter MP, Argonne National Laboratory (USA); Zhu S, Argonne National Laboratory (USA); Kowalska M, ISOLDE-CERN (Switzerland); CERN. Geneva. ISOLDE and neutron Time-of-Flight Experiments Committee; INTC

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the maximum dry unit weight during compaction. Three different laboratory compaction methods were used: 1) Standard Proctor', 2) Modified Proctor; and 3) Vibrating hammer. The effects of the grain size distribution, particle shape and laboratory compaction...

Delphia, John Girard

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held October 17 through November 4, 1983, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a State system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1983 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Fast Flux Test Facility Visitor Center, and Washington Public Power System nuclear reactor facilities in Richland, Washington. Individual presentations were indexed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

Kong, Zueqian

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of green-state ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective is the development of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques and technology applicable to the nondestructive characterization of green-state ceramics. To this end, a three-dimensional (3-D) NMR imaging technique has been developed, based on a back-projection acquisition protocol in combination with image reconstruction techniques that are based on 3-D Radon transform inversion. The method incorporates the experimental flexibility to overcome many of the difficulties associated with imaging of solid and semisolid broad-line materials, and also provides contiguously sampled data in three dimensions. This technique has been evaluated as a nondestructive characterizauon method for determining the spatial distribution of organic additves in green-state injection-molded cylindrical Si{sub 3}N{sup 4} tensile specimens. The technique has been evaluated on the basis of providing moderate image resolution over large sample volumes, high resolution over smaller specimen volumes, and sensitivity to variations in the concentration of organics. Resolution of 200{mu}m has been obtained with excellent sensitivity to concentration. A detailed account of the 3-D imaging results obtained from the study, a discussion of the difficulties and limitations of the imaging technique, and suggestions for technique and system improvements are included.

Dieckman, S.L.; Gopalsami, N.; Ford, J.M.; Raptis, A.C.; Ellingson, W.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rizo, P. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France). Lab. d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Informatique); Tracey, D.M.; Pujari, V.K. (Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Effects of the nuclear equation of state on the r-mode instability and evolution of neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I study the effect of nuclear equation of state on the r-mode instability of a rotating neutron star. I consider the case where the crust of the neutron star is perfectly rigid and I employ the related theory introduced by Lindblom {\\it et al.} \\cite{Lidblom-2000}. The gravitational and the viscous time scales, the critical angular velocity and the critical temperature are evaluated by employing a phenomenological nuclear model for the neutron star matter. The predicted equations of state for the $\\beta$-stable nuclear matter are parameterized by varying the slope $L$ of the symmetry energy at saturation density on the interval $72.5 \\ {\\rm MeV} \\leq L \\leq 110 \\ {\\rm MeV}$. The effects of the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy on r-mode instability properties and the time evolution of the angular velocity are presented and analyzed. A comparison of theoretical predictions with observed neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) and millisecond radio pulsars (MSRPs) is also performed and analyzed. I estimate that it may be possible to impose constraints on the nuclear equation of state, by a suitable treatment of observations and theoretical predictions of the rotational frequency and spindown rate evolution of known neutron stars.

Ch. C. Moustakidis

2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

238

U.S. Job Creation Due to Nuclear Power Resurgence in The United States — Volumes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent revival of interest in nuclear power is causing a reexamination of the role of nuclear power in the United States. This renewed interest has led to questions regarding the capability and capacity of current U.S. industries to support a renewal of nuclear power plant deployment. This study was conducted to provide an initial estimate of jobs to be gained in the U.S. through the repatriation of the nuclear manufacturing industry. In the course of the study, related job categories were also modeled to provide an additional estimate of the potential expansion of existing industries (i.e., plant construction and operations) in conjunction with the repatriation of manufacturing jobs.

Catherine M. Plowman

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Molybdenum in Nuclear Waste Glasses -Incorporation and Redox state R.J. Short, R.J. Hand, N.C. Hyatt,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molybdenum in Nuclear Waste Glasses - Incorporation and Redox state R.J. Short, R.J. Hand, N form in simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW) glass melts have been studied. It was found less attention has been paid to the effects of redox on nuclear waste glasses. One particular element

Sheffield, University of

240

Long-term determination of airborne radon progeny concentrations using LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term determination of airborne radon progeny concentrations using LR 115 solid-state nuclear. Introduction The radon-related absorbed dose in the lung is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e., 218-term measurements of the concentrations of radon progeny or the equilibrium factor F, among other information

Yu, K.N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 82, 083301 (2011) Increasing the energy dynamic range of solid-state nuclear track detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This allows simultaneous imaging of both high and low energy particles from the fusion reactions D + 3 He 4REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 82, 083301 (2011) Increasing the energy dynamic range of solid-state nuclear track detectors using multiple surfaces A. B. Zylstra,a) H. G. Rinderknecht, N. Sinenian, M. J

242

Nuclear chemistry progress report, Oregon State University. August 1, 1995--August 1, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, the authors summarize the highlights of the work done between August 1, 1995, and August 1, 1996. The work reported herein is the result of a collaborative effort between the nuclear chemists at Oregon State University and many other individuals and research groups. Each project discussed was the result of a joint effort of the groups, interchanging roles in data acquisition and analysis. The work described is part of a project involving the study of low energy (< 10 MeV/nucleon), and intermediate energy (10--100 MeV/nucleon) heavy ion reactions. Their work in the low energy regime included: the first US studies of fusion utilizing radioactive beams. Half of their effort was spent in the study of intermediate energy nuclear collisions. Among the accomplishments were: the establishment of a systematics of angular momentum transfer in peripheral collisions; completion of the first portion of high resolution studies of heavy residue formation in reactions induced by 20 MeV/nucleon {sup 197}Au utilizing the MSU A1200 separator; synthesis of several new neutron-deficient nuclides in reactions of 20 MeV/nucleon {sup 197}Au with heavy targets (Ti, Zr and Au); their participation in exclusive studies of heavy residue formation in the reaction of 35 MeV/nucleon {sup 86}Kr with {sup 197}Au in which it was found that the residues had large associated particle multiplicities indicating their formation in highly dissipative collisions, and that particle emission leading to residue formation relative to fission was favored as the dissipated energy increased.

Loveland, W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history.

Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Huff, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable success of future nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Compact microchannel system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

Griffiths, Stewart

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for an Extended Strand Conformation of the Membrane-Bound HIV-1 Fusion Peptide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for an Extended Strand Conformation of the Membrane-Bound HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Jun Yang, Charles M. Gabrys, and David P. Weliky* Department of ChemistryVed May 4, 2001 ABSTRACT: Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied

Weliky, David

248

International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held June 3 through June 21, 1985, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and San Clemente, California. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1985 course was placed on safeguards methods used at item-control facilities, particularly nuclear power generating stations and test reactors. An introduction to safeguards methods used at bulk handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants, was also included. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Southern California Edison Company. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, San Clemente, California.

Not Available

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle [Tish

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Predictions for the Spatial Distribution of Gluons in the Initial Nuclear State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We make predictions for the t-differential cross section of exclusive vector meson production (EVMP) in electron-ion collisions, with the aim of comparing DGLAP evolution to CGC models. In the current picture for the high-energy nucleus, nonlinear effects need to be understood in terms of low-$x$ gluon radiation and recombination as well as how this leads to saturation. EVMP grants experimental access to the edge region of the highly-boosted nuclear wavefunction, where the saturation scale for CGC calculations becomes inaccessible to pQCD. On the other hand, DGLAP evolution requires careful consideration of unitarity effects. The existing $J/{\\psi}$ photoproduction data in ep collisions provides a baseline for these theoretical calculations. Under different small-$x$ frameworks we obtain a measurable distinction in both the shape and normalization of the differential cross section predictions. These considerations are relevant for heavy ion collisions because the initial state may be further constrained, thus aiding in quantitative study of the quark-gluon plasma.

G. S. Jackson; W. A. Horowitz

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Design-Basis Flood Estimation for Site Characterization at Nuclear Power Plants in the United States of America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe approaches and methods for estimation of the design-basis flood at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 defines the design-basis flood and lists the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations that require estimation of the design-basis flood. For comparison, the design-basis flood estimation methods used by other Federal agencies are also described. A brief discussion of the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency for estimation of the design-basis floods in its member States is also included.

Prasad, Rajiv; Hibler, Lyle F.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Compact heat exchangers for condensation applications: Yesterday, today and tomorrow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compact heat exchangers are being increasingly considered for condensation applications in the process, cryogenic, aerospace, power and refrigeration industries. In this paper, different configurations available for condensation applications are analyzed and the current state-of-the-knowledge for the design of compact condensers is evaluated. The key technical issues for the design and development of compact heat exchangers for condensation applications are analyzed and major advantages are identified. The experimental data and performance prediction methods reported in the literature are analyzed to evaluate the present design capabilities for different compact heat-exchanger configurations. The design flexibility is evaluated for the development of new condensation applications, including integration with other process equipment.

Panchal, C.B.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Isospin asymmetric nuclear matter and properties of axisymmetric neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pure hadronic compact stars, above a limiting value ($\\approx$1.6 M$_\\odot$) of their gravitational masses, to which predictions of most of other equations of state (EoSs) are restricted, can be reached from the equation of state (EoS) obtained using DDM3Y effective interaction. This effective interaction is found to be quite successful in providing unified description of elastic and inelastic scattering, various radioactivities and nuclear matter properties. We present a systematic study of the properties of pure hadronic compact stars. The $\\beta$-equilibrated neutron star matter using this EoS with a thin crust is able to describe highly-massive compact stars, such as PSR B1516+02B with a mass M=1.94$^{+0.17}_{-0.19}$ M$_\\odot$ and PSR J0751+1807 with a mass M=2.1$\\pm$0.2 M$_\\odot$ to a 1$\\sigma$ confidence level.

Partha Roy Chowdhury; Abhijit Bhattacharyya; D. N. Basu

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

254

Quantum state tomography of large nuclear spins in a semiconductor quantum well: Robustness against errors as quantified by condition numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss methods of quantum state tomography for solid-state systems with a large nuclear spin $I=3/2$ in nanometer-scale semiconductors devices based on a quantum well. Due to quadrupolar interactions, the Zeeman levels of these nuclear-spin devices become nonequidistant, forming a controllable four-level quantum system (known as quartit or ququart). The occupation of these levels can be selectively and coherently manipulated by multiphoton transitions using the techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) [Yusa et al., Nature (London) 434, 101 (2005)]. These methods are based on an unconventional approach to NMR, where the longitudinal magnetization $M_z$ is directly measured. This is in contrast to the standard NMR experiments and tomographic methods, where the transverse magnetization $M_{xy}$ is detected. The robustness against errors in the measured data is analyzed by using condition numbers. We propose several methods with optimized sets of rotations. The optimization is applied to decrease the number of NMR readouts and to improve the robustness against errors, as quantified by condition numbers. An example of state reconstruction, using Monte Carlo methods, is presented. Tomographic methods for quadrupolar nuclei with higher-spin numbers (including $I=7/2$) are also described.

Adam Miranowicz; Sahin K. Ozdemir; Jiri Bajer; Go Yusa; Nobuyuki Imoto; Yoshiro Hirayama; Franco Nori

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Industrial Optimization Compact Course  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial Optimization Compact Course and Challenge Workshop Optimization plays a crucial role of the processes are typically nonlinear and dyna- mic. Thus, complex dynamic optimization or optimal control in industrial optimization. February 17­20, 2014 ·9.00­17.00 IWR ·Im Neuenheimer Feld 368 ·69120 Heidelberg www

Kirches, Christian

256

A comparison of the additional protocols of the five nuclear weapon states and the ensuing safeguards benefits to international nonproliferation efforts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the 6 January 2009 entry into force of the Additional Protocol by the United States of America, all five declared Nuclear Weapon States that are part of the Nonproliferation Treaty have signed, ratified, and put into force the Additional Protocol. This paper makes a comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the five Additional Protocols in force by the five Nuclear Weapon States with respect to the benefits to international nonproliferation aims. This paper also documents the added safeguards burden to the five declared Nuclear Weapon States that these Additional Protocols put on the states with respect to access to their civilian nuclear programs and the hosting of complementary access activities as part of the Additional Protocol.

Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leitch, Rosalyn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Solid-State NMR Examination of Alteration Layers on a Nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the role and significance of alteration layers in determining the kinetics for the corrosion of nuclear waste glass. NMR methods are used to probe the chemical structure of the...

258

High-resolution high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization for biomolecular solid state NMR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has exploded in popularity over the last few years, finally realizing its potential to overcome the detrimental lack of sensitivity that has plagued performing NMR experiments. Applied ...

Barnes, Alexander B. (Alexander Benjamin)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Progress in Understanding the Nuclear Equation of State at the Quark Level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the present time there is a lively debate within the nuclear community concerning the relevance of quark degrees of freedom in understanding nuclear structure. We outline the key issues and review the impressive progress made recently within the framework of the quark-meson coupling model. In particular, we explain in quite general terms how the modification of the internal structure of hadrons in-medium leads naturally to three- and four-body forces, or equivalently, to density dependent effective interactions.

A.W. Thomas; P.A.M. Guichon

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

260

Functional and shunt states of bacteriorhodopsin resolved by 250 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observation and structural studies of reaction intermediates of proteins are challenging because of the mixtures of states usually present at low concentrations. Here, we use a 250 GHz gyrotron (cyclotron resonance maser) ...

Bajaj, Vikram S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Science Foundation of the United States of America concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in Nuclear and Particle Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Science Foundation of the United States of America concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in Nuclear and Particle Physics

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. Primary sources of information in preparing this bibliography were bibliographies on Oceania, citations in published papers, CIS Index and Abstracts, Monthly Catalog of United States Government Publications, Nuclear Science Abstracts, Energy Research Abstracts, numerous bibliographies on radiation ecology, and suggestions by many individuals whom we contacted. One goal in this bibliography is to include complete documentation of the source of congressional reports and other government-related publications. In addition, page numbers for material in this bibliography are provided in parentheses when the subject matter of a book or document is not restricted to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands.

Robison, W.L. (ed.) (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Schultz, V. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA)); Schultz, S.C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Compact Spreader Schemes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

Further evidence for a stiff nuclear equation of state from a transverse-momentum analysis of Ar(1800 MeV/nucleon) + KCl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The novel momentum analysis technique introduced by Danielewicz and Odyniec can be used to detect and exhibit collective flow in the light system Ar(1800 MeV/nucleon) + KCl where the usual kinetic energy flow analysis fails. The microscopic Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck theory which includes the nuclear mean field, two-body collisions, and Pauli blocking is used to study this phenomenon. The resulting transverse momentum transfers turn out to be quite sensitive to the nuclear equation of state. From a comparison with experimental data, evidence is presented for a rather stiff nuclear equation of state. The cascade model is unable to describe the data.

Molitoris, J.J.; Stoecker, H.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Version 3.0 Relativistic, QED, and finite nuclear mass corrections for lowlying states of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and QED effects all together. For heavy few electron systems, electron interactions can be treated to determine nuclear properties from isotope shift measurements of transition energies. For example, the most] and lithium isotopes [12, 13] together with the intensive calculations of theoretical energy levels [7, 14

Pachucki, Krzysztof

266

Implementation of IAEA /1/INT/054 Project in Nuclear Analytical Techniques Group of Argentina: Current State  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the implementation of the training received through the IAEA Project 'Preparation of Reference Materials and Organization of Proficiency Tests Rounds' in the Nuclear Analytical (NAT) Group of CNEA. Special emphasis is done on those activities related to the first Proficiency Test being carried out by the NAT Group.

Sara, Resnizky; Rita, Pla [Nuclear Analytical Techniques Group, Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Av. Del Libertador 8250 (1429) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alba, Zaretzky [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry Group(CRRD), Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Av. Del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

267

State-of-the-art review of materials properties of nuclear waste forms.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) was established at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assemble a standardized nuclear waste materials data base for use in research, systems and facility design, safety analyses, and waste management decisions. This centralized data base will be provided through the means of a Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook. The first issue of the Handbook will be published in the fall of 1981 in looseleaf format so that it can be updated as additional information becomes available. To ensure utmost reliability, all materials data appearing in the Handbook will be obtained by standard procedures defined in the Handbook and approved by an independent Materials Review Board (MRB) comprised of materials experts from Department of Energy laboratories and from universities and industry. In the interim before publication of the Handbook there is need for a report summarizing the existing materials data on nuclear waste forms. This review summarizes materials property data for the nuclear waste forms that are being developed for immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. It is intended to be a good representation of the knowledge concerning the properties of HLW forms as of March 1981. The table of contents lists the following topics: introduction which covers waste-form categories, and important waste-form materials properties; physical properties; mechanical properties; chemical durability; vaporization; radiation effects; and thermal phase stability.

Mendel, J. E.; Nelson, R. D.; Turcotte, R. P.; Gray, W. J.; Merz, M. D.; Roberts, F. P.; Weber, W. J.; Westsik, Jr., J. H.; Clark, D. E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Alpha-Cluster Model, Charge Symmetry of Nuclear Force and Single Particle Bound State Potential in Symmetrical Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenological alpha-cluster model based on the charge symmetry of nuclear force allows one to estimate the last proton position radius (LPPR) in a symmetrical nucleus. The values of LPPR obtained for the symmetrical nuclei with 5=15 it is inappropriate to represent a single particle bound state by the Woods-Saxon potential. For the nuclei with 5<=Z<=14 the error of the spectroscopic factor obtained with standard parameters in DWBA analysis of pure peripheral one nucleon transfer reactions is estimated. It is shown that for some nuclei using the standard parameters brings an error more than 20%.

G. K. Nie

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Sandia National Laboratories: Compact Linear Fesnel Reflector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMappingCombustionBiofuels OnWindCompact

270

Compact LINAC for deuterons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

Kurennoy, S S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, J F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, L J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS, AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT - 11052  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical Separation Facilities (canyons).

Bergren, C.; Flora, M.; Belencan, H.

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

272

ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

Bergren, C

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

HOW MANY DID YOU SAY? HISTORICAL AND PROJECTED SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL SHIPMENTS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1964 - 2048  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

No comprehensive, up-to-date, official database exists for spent nuclear fuel shipments in the United States. The authors review the available data sources, and conclude that the absence of such a database can only be rectified by a major research effort, similar to that carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1990s. Based on a variety of published references, and unpublished data from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the authors estimate cumulative U.S. shipments of commercial spent fuel for the period 1964-2001. The cumulative estimates include quantity shipped, number of cask-shipments, and shipment-miles, by truck and by rail. The authors review previous estimates of future spent fuel shipments, including contractor reports prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NRC, and the State of Nevada. The DOE Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Yucca Mountain includes projections of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive was te shipments for two inventory disposal scenarios (24 years and 38 years) and two national transportation modal scenarios (''mostly legal-weight truck'' and ''mostly rail''). Commercial spent fuel would compromise about 90 percent of the wastes shipped to the repository. The authors estimate potential shipments to Yucca Mountain over 38 years (2010-2048) for the DOE ''mostly legal-weight truck'' and ''mostly rail'' scenarios, and for an alternative modal mix scenario based on current shipping capabilities of the 72 commercial reactor sites. The cumulative estimates of future spent fuel shipments include quantity shipped, number of cask-shipments, and shipment-miles, by legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, rail and barge.

Halstead, Robert J.; Dilger, Fred

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

274

Accretion in Compact Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compact binaries have long been a paradigm for accretion theory. Much of our present view of how accretion occurs comes directly from the comparison of theory with observations of these sources. Since theory differs little for other objects such as active galaxies, increasing efforts have recently gone into searching for correspondences in observed behaviour. This chapter aims at giving a concise summary of the field, with particular emphasis on new developments since the previous edition of this book. These developments have been significant. Much of the earlier literature implicitly assumed that accreting binaries were fairly steady sources accreting most of the mass entering their vicinity, often with main-sequence companions, and radiating the resulting accretion luminosity in rough isotropy. We shall see that in reality these assumptions fail for the majority of systems. Most are transient; mass ejection in winds and jets is extremely common; a large (sometimes dominant) fraction of even short-period systems have evolved companions whose structure deviates significantly from the zero-age main sequence; and the radiation pattern of many objects is significantly anisotropic. It is now possible to give a complete characterization of the observed incidence of transient and persistent sources in terms of the disc instability model and formation constraints. X-ray populations in external galaxies, particularly the ultraluminous sources, are revealing important new insights into accretion processes and compact binary evolution.

Andrew R. King

2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Compact Stars in low-mass X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model for compact stars in low-mass X-ray binaries(LMXBs) namely KS 1731-260, EXO 1745-248 and 4U 1608-52. Here we investigate the physical phenomena of a compact star in the LMXBs. Using our model, we have calculated central density, surface density, mass(M) and red-shift for the above mentioned compact stars, which is very much consistent with the reported data. We also obtain the possible equation of state(EOS) of the stars which is physically acceptable.

Sk. Monowar Hossein; Sajahan Molla; Md. Abdul Kayum Jafry; Mehedi Kalam

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

276

Symmetry, Compact Closure and Dagger Compactness for Categories of Convex Operational Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the categorical approach to the foundations of quantum theory, one begins with a symmetric monoidal category, the objects of which represent physical systems, and the morphisms of which represent physical processes. Usually, this category is taken to be at least compact closed, and more often, dagger compact, enforcing a certain self-duality, whereby preparation processes (roughly, states) are inter-convertible with processes of registration (roughly, measurement outcomes). This is in contrast to the more concrete "operational" approach, in which the states and measurement outcomes associated with a physical system are represented in terms of what we here call a "convex operational model": a certain dual pair of ordered linear spaces -- generally, {\\em not} isomorphic to one another. On the other hand, state spaces for which there is such an isomorphism, which we term {\\em weakly self-dual}, play an important role in reconstructions of various quantum-information theoretic protocols, including teleportation and ensemble steering. In this paper, we characterize compact closure of symmetric monoidal categories of convex operational models in two ways: as a statement about the existence of teleportation protocols, and as the principle that every process allowed by that theory can be realized as an instance of a remote evaluation protocol --- hence, as a form of classical probabilistic conditioning. In a large class of cases, which includes both the classical and quantum cases, the relevant compact closed categories are degenerate, in the weak sense that every object is its own dual. We characterize the dagger-compactness of such a category (with respect to the natural adjoint) in terms of the existence, for each system, of a {\\em symmetric} bipartite state, the associated conditioning map of which is an isomorphism.

Howard Barnum; Ross Duncan; Alexander Wilce

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

277

Structure and dynamics studies by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The major goal of this work is the development of high resolution solid state 205T1 NMR techniques and their application to the elucidation of the mechanism and dynamics of ion exchange in biological solids. The thesis ...

Itin, Boris

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Disparities in nuclear power plant performance in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report presents data comparing the performance of light water reactors in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The comparisons are made for the years 1980-1983 and include 21 Westinghouse ...

Hansen, Kent F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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280

United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartment ofEnergy, Office ofNuclear Damage |Energy

282

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartment ofEnergy, Office ofNuclear DamageDepartment of

283

United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartment ofEnergy, Office ofNuclear DamageDepartment

284

United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartment ofEnergy, Office ofNuclearVision"Initiative

285

Solid-State NMR Examination of Alteration Layers on a Nuclear Waste  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment2) 1/8Advanced MaterialsHalogen

286

Symmetry, Compact Closure and Dagger Compactness for Categories of Convex Operational Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the categorical approach to the foundations of quantum theory, one begins with a symmetric monoidal category, the objects of which represent physical systems, and the morphisms of which represent physical processes. Usually, this category is taken to be at least compact closed, and more often, dagger compact, enforcing a certain self-duality, whereby preparation processes (roughly, states) are inter-convertible with processes of registration (roughly, measurement outcomes). This is in contrast to the more concrete "operational" approach, in which the states and measurement outcomes associated with a physical system are represented in terms of what we here call a "convex operational model": a certain dual pair of ordered linear spaces -- generally, {\\em not} isomorphic to one another. On the other hand, state spaces for which there is such an isomorphism, which we term {\\em weakly self-dual}, play an important role in reconstructions of various quantum-information theoretic protocols, including teleportatio...

Barnum, Howard; Wilce, Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Compact acoustic refrigerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

Bennett, G.A.

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

Compact acoustic refrigerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Compact vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Compact vacuum insulation embodiments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Compact vacuum insulation embodiments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Nuclear weapons modernizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

High-Sensitivity Delayed-Coincidence Spectrometer to Search for Short-Lived Nuclear States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-sensitivity four-dimensional triple-coincidence spectrometer with two detectors is developed on the basis of an autocorrelation single-crystal scintillation time 4{\\pi} spectrometer and a semiconductor HPGe detector. The delayed-coincidence spectrometer is designed for searching for isomeric nano- and microsecond states in short-lived nuclei and for their related gamma-rays. Half-lives of short-lived states are measured in the range from 4 ns to 4 {\\mu}s. The sufficient activity of the monoisotopic source for the investigations does not exceed 0.01 {\\mu}Ci.

Morozov, V A; Norseev, Yu V; Sereeter, Z; Zlokazov, V B

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A practical strategy for reducing the future security risk of United States spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depletion calculations show that advanced oxide (AOX) fuels can be used in existing light water reactors (LWRs) to achieve and maintain virtually any desired level of US (US) reactor-grade plutonium (R-Pu) inventory. AOX fuels are composed of a neutronically inert matrix loaded with R-Pu and erbium. A 1/2 core load of 100% nonfertile, 7w% R-Pu AOX and 3.9 w% UO{sub 2} has a net total plutonium ({sup TOT}Pu) destruction rate of 310 kg/yr. The 20% residual {sup TOT}Pu in discharged AOX contains > 55% {sup 242}Pu making it unattractive for nuclear explosive use. A three-phase fuel-cycle development program sequentially loading 60 LWRs with 100% mixed oxide, 50% AOX with a nonfertile component displacing only some of the {sup 238}U, and 50% AOX, which is 100% nonfertile, could reduce the US plutonium inventory to near zero by 2050.

Chodak, P. III; Buksa, J.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis Group

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Tests of the nuclear equation of state and superfluid and superconducting gaps using the Cassiopeia A neutron star  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observed rapid cooling of the Cassiopeia A neutron star can be interpreted as being caused by neutron and proton transitions from normal to superfluid and superconducting states in the stellar core. Here we present two new Chandra ACIS-S Graded observations of this neutron star and measurements of the neutron star mass M and radius R found from consistent fitting of both the X-ray spectra and cooling behavior. This comparison is only possible for individual nuclear equations of state. We test phenomenological superfluid and superconducting gap models which mimic many of the known theoretical models against the cooling behavior. Our best-fit solution to the Cassiopeia A data is one in which the (M,R) = (1.43 Msun,12.6 km) neutron star is built with the BSk21 equation of state, strong proton superconductor and moderate neutron triplet superfluid gap models, and a pure iron envelope or a thin carbon layer on top of an iron envelope, although there are still large observational and theoretical uncertainties.

Ho, Wynn C G; Heinke, Craig O; Potekhin, Alexander Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Collective enhancement of nuclear state densities by the shell model Monte Carlo approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shell model Monte Carlo (SMMC) approach allows for the microscopic calculation of statistical and collective properties of heavy nuclei using the framework of the configuration-interaction shell model in very large model spaces. We present recent applications of the SMMC method to the calculation of state densities and their collective enhancement factors in rare-earth nuclei.

Özen, C; Nakada, H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Neutron star-black hole mergers with a nuclear equation of state and neutrino cooling: Dependence in the binary parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a first exploration of the results of neutron star-black hole mergers using black hole masses in the most likely range of $7M_\\odot-10M_\\odot$, a neutrino leakage scheme, and a modeling of the neutron star material through a finite-temperature nuclear-theory based equation of state. In the range of black hole spins in which the neutron star is tidally disrupted ($\\chi_{\\rm BH}\\gtrsim 0.7$), we show that the merger consistently produces large amounts of cool ($T\\lesssim 1\\,{\\rm MeV}$), unbound, neutron-rich material ($M_{\\rm ej}\\sim 0.05M_\\odot-0.20M_\\odot$). A comparable amount of bound matter is initially divided between a hot disk ($T_{\\rm max}\\sim 15\\,{\\rm MeV}$) with typical neutrino luminosity $L_\

Francois Foucart; M. Brett Deaton; Matthew D. Duez; Evan O'Connor; Christian D. Ott; Roland Haas; Lawrence E. Kidder; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Mark A. Scheel; Bela Szilagyi

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

298

3He- and 4He-induced nuclear fission - a test of the transition state method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fission in 3He and 4He induced reactions at excitation energies between the fission barrier and 140 MeV has been investigated. Twentythree fission excitation functions of various compound nuclei in different mass regions are shown to scale exactly according to the transition state prediction once the shell effects are accounted for. New precise measurements of excitation functions in a mass region where shell effects are very strong, allow one to test the predictions with an even higher accuracy. The fact that no deviations from the transition state method have been observed within the experimentally investigated excitation energy regime allows one to assign limits for the fission transient time. The precise measurement of fission excitation functions of neighboring isotopes enables us to experimentally estimate the first chance fission probability. Even if only first chance fission is investigated, no evidence for fission transient times larger than 30 zs can be found.

Th. Rubehn; K. X. Jing; L. G. Moretto; L. Phair; K. Tso; G. J. Wozniak

1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

299

Theoretical direct WIMP detection rates for transitions to nuclear excited states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent WMAP and Planck data have confirmed that exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (cosmological constant) dominate in the flat Universe. Many extensions of the standard model provide dark matter candidates, in particular Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Thus the direct dark matter detection is central to particle physics and cosmology. Most of the research on this issue has hitherto focused on the detection of the recoiling nucleus. In this paper we study transitions to the excited states, possible in some nuclei, which have sufficiently low lying excited states. Examples considered previously were the first excited states of $^{127}$I and $^{129}$Xe. We examine here $^{83}$Kr, which offers some kinematical advantages and is currently considered as a possible target. We find appreciable branching ratios for the inelastic scattering mediated by the spin cross sections, with an inelastic event rate of $4.4\\times 10^{-4}$kg$^{-1}$d$^{-1}$. So, the extra signature of the gamma ra...

Vergados, J D; Pirinen, P; Srivastava, P C; Kortelainen, M; Suhonen, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Compact neutron generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Compact vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

Compact vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Metastable and stable equilibrium states of stellar electron-nuclear plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By minimizing free energy density, we show that the stellar core of a hydrogen burning star is not in a global thermodynamical equilibrium unless density, temperature, mass and composition assume given values. The core (as the solar interior) may be viewed more appropriately as a metastable state with very long lifetime. Slightly non-extensive distribution function could be the natural distribution for a weakly non-ideal plasma like a stellar core and represents a more appropriate approximation to this system than a Maxwellian distribution, without affecting bulk properties of stars.

F. Ferro; A. Lavagno; P. Quarati

2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

304

Metastable and stable equilibrium states of stellar electron-nuclear plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By minimizing free energy density, we show that the stellar core of a hydrogen burning star is not in a global thermodynamical equilibrium unless density, temperature, mass and composition assume given values. The core (as the solar interior) may be viewed more appropriately as a metastable state with very long lifetime. Slightly non-extensive distribution function could be the natural distribution for a weakly non-ideal plasma like a stellar core and represents a more appropriate approximation to this system than a Maxwellian distribution, without affecting bulk properties of stars.

Ferro, F; Quarati, P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment(October-DecemberBasedToward a MoreA Rising Star: Solid-StateVolume

306

Compaction managed mirror bend achromat  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

Douglas, David (Yorktown, VA)

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment of $^{173}$Yb from precise measurements of hyperfine structure in the ${^3P}_2$ state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure hyperfine structure in the metastable ${^3P}_2$ state of $^{173}$Yb and extract the nuclear magnetic octupole moment. We populate the state using dipole-allowed transitions through the ${^3P}_1$ and ${^3S}_1$ states. We measure frequencies of hyperfine transitions of the ${^3P}_2 \\rightarrow {^3S}_1$ line at 770 nm using a Rb-stabilized ring cavity resonator with a precision of 200 kHz. Second-order corrections due to perturbations from the nearby ${^3P}_1$ and ${^1P}_1$ states are below 30 kHz. We obtain the hyperfine coefficients as: $A=-742.11(2)$ MHz, $B=1339.2(2)$ MHz, which represent two orders-of-magnitude improvement in precision, and $C=0.54(2)$ MHz. From atomic structure calculations, we obtain the nuclear moments: quadrupole $Q=2.46(12)$ b and octupole $\\Omega=-34.4(21)$ b\\,$\\times \\mu_N$.

Singh, Alok K; Natarajan, Vasant

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

New considerations for compact cyclotrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A compact cyclotron built with superconducting magnets could be a transformative solution to many scientific problems facing the defense, medical, and energy industries today. This thesis discusses three potential applications ...

Marshall, Eric S. (Eric Scott)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

EU, U.S., Russia, Asian States Sign Nuclear-Fusion Reactor May 24 (Bloomberg) --The European Union, the U.S., Russia and Asian nations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Europe EU, U.S., Russia, Asian States Sign Nuclear-Fusion Reactor Pact May 24 (Bloomberg) -- The European Union, the U.S., Russia and Asian nations including China signed a treaty to build the first percent, China, India, South Korea and Russia 10 percent each and France 8 percent, #12;according

311

Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide to Lipid Distances Reveal the Intimate Contact of Strand Peptide with Membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide to Lipid Distances Reveal 23, 2007 ABSTRACT: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection begins with fusion between viral and host cell membranes and is catalyzed by the HIV gp41 fusion protein. The 20 N-terminal apolar residues

Weliky, David

312

Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for Parallel and Antiparallel Strand Arrangements in the Membrane-Associated HIV-1 Fusion Peptide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence for Parallel and Antiparallel Strand Arrangements in the Membrane-Associated HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Jun Yang and David P. Weliky* Department of Chemistry, Michigan 7, 2003 ABSTRACT: The HIV-1 fusion peptide serves as a useful model system for understanding viral

Weliky, David

313

Compact boson stars in K field theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a scalar field theory with a non-standard kinetic term minimally coupled to gravity. We establish the existence of compact boson stars, that is, static solutions with compact support of the full system with self-gravitation taken into account. Concretely, there exist two types of solutions, namely compact balls on the one hand, and compact shells on the other hand. The compact balls have a naked singularity at the center. The inner boundary of the compact shells is singular, as well, but it is, at the same time, a Killing horizon. These singular, compact shells therefore resemble black holes.

C. Adam; N. Grandi; P. Klimas; J. Sanchez-Guillen; A. Wereszczynski

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

314

Compact boson stars in K field theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a scalar field theory with a non-standard kinetic term minimally coupled to gravity. We establish the existence of compact boson stars, that is, static solutions with compact support of the full system with self-gravitation taken into account. Concretely, there exist two types of solutions, namely compact balls on the one hand, and compact shells on the other hand. The compact balls have a naked singularity at the center. The inner boundary of the compact shells is singular, as well, but it is, at the same time, a Killing horizon. These singular, compact shells therefore resemble black holes.

Adam, C; Klimas, P; Sánchez-Guillén, J; Wereszczynski, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Calcium silicate hydrates investigated by solid-state high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work focuses on phases formed during cement hydration under high pressure and temperature: portlandite Ca(OH){sub 2} (CH); hillebrandite Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} ({beta}-dicalcium silicate hydrate); calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H); jaffeite Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(OH){sub 6} (tricalcium silicate hydrate); {alpha}-C{sub 2}SH Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} ({alpha}-dicalcium silicate hydrate); xonotlite Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 6}O{sub 17})(OH){sub 2} and kilchoanite Ca{sub 6}(SiO{sub 4})(Si{sub 3}O{sub 10}). Portlandite and hillebrandite were synthesized and characterised by high resolution solid-state {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In addition, information from the literature concerning the last five phases was gathered. In certain cases, a schematic 3D-structure could be determined. These data allow identification of the other phases present in a mixture. Their morphology was also observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

Meducin, Fabienne [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Milieux Heterogenes, Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)]. E-mail: meducin@cnrs-orleans.fr; Bresson, Bruno [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, ESPCI (France); Lequeux, Nicolas [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des polymeres et des milieux disperses, ESPCI (France); Noirfontaine, Marie-Noelle de [Laboratoire CECM-CNRS, 15, rue Georges Urbain, 94407 Vitry sur Seine (France); Zanni, Helene [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Milieux Heterogenes, Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Characteristics of potential repository wastes: Volume 4, Appendix 4A, Nuclear reactors at educational institutions of the United States; Appendix 4B, Data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions; Appendix 4C, Supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; Appendix 4D, Supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; Appendix 4E, Supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 4 contains the following appendices: nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States; data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States(operational reactors and shut-down reactors); supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; and supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

318

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

319

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

320

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

322

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

323

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

324

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

325

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

326

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

327

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

328

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

329

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

330

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

331

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

332

DEFINITIONS OF COMPACTNESS AND THE AXIOM OF CHOICE ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 17, 2001 ... the United States and in France: using nets (Birkhoff, building on work by E. H. Moore and H. L. Smith), and ..... no countably infinite subset, and neither does its power set. It follows that (A, ...... [ho] P. Howard, Definitions of compactness, J. Symbolic Logic 55 (1990) 645–655. ... University of Northern Iowa.

1910-20-32T23:59:59.000Z

333

Recent progress on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work done on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), both at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and at other fusion laboratories in the United States. The goal of CIT is to reach ignition in a tokamak fusion device in the mid-1990's. Scientific and engineering features of the design are described, as well as projected cost and schedule.

Ignat, D.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evidence of the release Pu from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station to the local environment and surrounding communities and estimates on fraction of total fuel inventory released

Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

Compact accelerator for medical therapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

336

Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Vernon, George E. (Rio Rancho, NM); Hoke, Darren A. (Albuquerque, NM); De Marquis, Virginia K. (Tijeras, NM); Harris, Steven M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

337

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Sources: Form EIA-860, "Annual...

338

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual...

339

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual...

340

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source:Form EIA-860, "Annual...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile 2012WestWyomingAlabama

342

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile

343

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity ProfileArkansas

344

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity ProfileArkansasConnecticut

345

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity

346

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas ElectricityGeorgia

347

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas ElectricityGeorgiaMassachusetts

348

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas ElectricityGeorgiaMassachusettsMinnesota

349

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas

350

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar

351

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar

352

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar

353

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan Feb

354

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan Feb9

355

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan Feb91

356

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan Feb913

357

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan Feb9137

358

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan

359

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan20

360

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan2021

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan20215

362

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan202153

363

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan2021537

364

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year Jan20215379

365

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year

366

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year1 Missouri

367

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year1 Missouri7

368

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year1 Missouri79

369

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year1

370

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year13 New York

371

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year13 New

372

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year13 New6 Ohio

373

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year13 New6

374

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year13 New61

375

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year13 New614

376

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year13 New6146

377

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year13 New614660

378

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year13

379

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubic Feet)Year1363

380

Final Report for Monitoring of Reactor Antineutrinos with Compact Germanium Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 2008 NCMR project has pursued measurement of the antineutrino-nucleus coherent scattering interaction using a low-energy threshold germanium gamma-ray spectrometer of roughly one-half kilogram total mass. These efforts support development of a compact system for monitoring the antineutrino emission from nuclear reactor cores. Such a monitoring system is relevant to nuclear safeguards and nuclear non-proliferation in general by adding a strong method for assuring quantitative material balance of special nuclear material in the nuclear fuel cycle used in electricity generation.

Orrell, John L.; Collar, J. I.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

Thurber, Kent R., E-mail: thurberk@niddk.nih.gov; Tycko, Robert [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0520 (United States)] [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0520 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hyperbolic capture of compact binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hyperbolic encounters of compact objects are common interactions in dense environments. During this process a significant amount of gravitational radiation is emitted depending on the parameters of the system. Here we give a parametric description of the radial motion valid for general binary orbits and the radiative energy and angular momentum losses for binaries with spinning components.

Mátyás Vasúth

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

Lyons, Peter

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hegemony and nuclear proliferation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contrary to longstanding of predictions of nuclear tipping points, the number of states interested in nuclear weapons has sharply declined in recent decades. In contrast to existing explanations, this dissertation argues ...

Miller, Nicholas L. (Nicholas LeSuer)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Compact neutron generator development at LBNL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generator Development at LBNL J. Reijonen, G. English, R.Technology Group in LBNL. The compact axial extraction

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Comparative analysis of United States and French nuclear power plant siting and construction regulatory policies and their economic consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the substantial commitments of time and money which are devoted to the nuclear power plant siting process, the effectiveness of the system in providing a balanced evaluation of the technical, environmental and ...

Golay, Michael Warren.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Compact magnetic energy storage module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Compact magnetic energy storage module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

Prueitt, M.L.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. Cross-statement of the United States Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE cross-statement in the matter of proposed rulemaking in the storage and disposal of nuclear wastes is presented. It is concluded from evidence contained in the document that: (1) spent fuel can be disposed of in a manner that is safe and environmentally acceptable; (2) present plans for establishing geological repositories are an effective and reasonable means of disposal; (3) spent nuclear fuel from licensed facilities can be stored in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner on-site or off-site until disposal facilities are ready; (4) sufficient additional storage capacity for spent fuel will be established; and (5) the disposal and interim storage systems for spent nuclear fuel will be integrated into an acceptable operating system. It was recommended that the commission should promulgate a rule providing that the safety and environmental implications of spent nuclear fuel remaining on site after the anticipated expiration of the facility licenses involved need not be considered in individual facility licensing proceedings. A prompt finding of confidence in the nuclear waste disposal and storage area by the commission is also recommeded. (DMC)

None

1980-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

390

Isospin asymmetric nuclear matter and properties of axisymmetric neutron stars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pure hadronic compact stars that are above a limiting value (approx =1.6M{sub c}entre dot) of their gravitational masses, to which predictions of most of other equations of state are restricted, can be reached from the equation of state (EOS) obtained using the density-dependent M3Y (DDM3Y) effective interaction. This effective interaction is found to be quite successful in providing a unified description of elastic and inelastic scattering, various radioactivities, and nuclear matter properties. We present a systematic study of the properties of pure hadronic compact stars. The beta-equilibrated neutron star matter using this EOS with a thin crust is able to describe highly massive compact stars, such as PSR B1516+02B with a mass M=1.94{sub -0.19}{sup +0.17}M{sub c}entre dot and PSR J0751+1807 with a mass M=2.1+-0.2M{sub c}entre dot to a 1sigma confidence level.

Chowdhury, Partha Roy; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Basu, D. N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier than iron, and neutron stars. Big-bang nucleosynthesis is concerned with the formation of elements with A nuclear physics inputs required are few-nucleon reaction cross sections. The nucleosynthesis of heavier elements involves a variety of proton-, alpha-, neutron-, and photon-induced reactions, coupled with radioactive decay. The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities has opened an important new avenue for studying these processes, as many involve radioactive species. Nuclear physics also plays an important role in neutron stars: both the nuclear equation of state and cooling processes involving neutrino emission play a very important role. Recent developments and also the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be highlighted.

Carl R. Brune

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

Nuclear Spectra from Skyrmions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structures of Skyrmions, especially for baryon numbers 4, 8 and 12, are reviewed. The quantized Skyrmion states are compared with nuclear spectra.

Manton, N. S. [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

393

Expectations on Documented Safety Analysis for Deactivated Inactive Nuclear Facilities in a State of Long Term Surveillance & Maintenance or Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE promulgated 10 CFR 830 ''Nuclear Safety Management'' on October 10, 2000. Section 204 of the Rule requires that contractors at DOE hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities develop a ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (DSA) that summarizes the work to be performed, the associated hazards, and hazard controls necessary to protect workers, the public, and the environment. Table 2 of Appendix A to the rule has been provided to ensure that DSAs are prepared in accordance with one of the available predetermined ''safe harbor'' approaches. The table presents various acceptable safe harbor DSAs for different nuclear facility operations ranging from nuclear reactors to decommissioning activities. The safe harbor permitted for decommissioning of a nuclear facility encompasses methods described in DOE-STD-1 120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Facility Disposition Activities,'' and provisions in 29 CFR 1910.120 or 29 CFR 1926.65 (HAZWOPER). Additionally, an evaluation of public safety impacts and development of necessary controls is required when the facility being decommissioned contains radiological inventory or contamination exceeding the Rule's definition for low-level residual fixed radioactivity. This document discusses a cost-effective DSA approach that is based on the concepts of DOE-STD-I 120 and meets the 10 CFR 830 safe harbor requirements for both transition surveillance and maintenance as well as decommissioning. This DSA approach provides continuity for inactive Hanford nuclear facilities that will eventually transition into decommissioning. It also uses a graded approach that meets the expectations of DOE-STD-3011 and addresses HAZWOPER requirements to provide a sound basis for worker protection, particularly where intrusive work is being conducted.

JACKSON, M.W.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Connection between the nuclear matter mean-field equation of state and the quark and gluon condensates at high density  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is known now that chiral symmetry restoration requires the meson-nucleon couplings to be density-dependent in nuclear-matter mean-field models. We further show that, quite generally, the quark and gluon condensates in medium are related to the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of nuclear matter and in these models the incompressibility K must be less than 3 times the chemical potential {mu}. In the critical density {rho}{sub c}, the gluon condensate is only reduced by 20{percent}, indicating a larger effective nucleon mass. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Malheiro, M.; Dey, M.; Delfino, A.; Dey, J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Maryland College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States); [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-340, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil; [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Calcutta 700073 (India); [Azad Physics Centre, Maulana Azad College, Calcutta 700013 (India)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese, and United States nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands: A bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A considerable literature exists on the Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap Marshallese and their atolls; however, this literature consists of a large number of governmental documents that are relatively unknown and difficult to locate. This is particularly true of the documents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and those related to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands. Because a comprehensive bibliography on the impact of nuclear weapons testing on the Marshallese and their atolls does not exist, the preparation of a bibliography that includes sufficient information to locate all types of reports seems justified. This document is the bibliography.

Schultz, V. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA)); Schultz, S.C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA)); Robison, W.L. (ed.) (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Application of fuzzy logic in nuclear reactor control Part I: An assessment of state-of-the-art  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the application of fuzzy logic to nuclear reactor control. The method has been suggested by many investigators in many control applications. Reviews of the application of fuzzy logic in process control are given by Tong and Sugeno. Because fuzzy logic control (FLC) provides a pathway for transforming human abstractions into the numerical domain, it has the potential to assist nuclear reactor operators in the control room. With this transformation, linguistically expressed control principles can be coded into the fuzzy controller rule base. Having acquired the skill of the operators, the FLC can assist an operator in controlling the complex system. The thrust of FLC is to derive a conceptual model of the control operation, without expressing the process as mathematical equations, to assist the human operator in interpreting incoming plant variables and arriving at a proper control action. To introduce the concept of FLC in nuclear reactor operation, an overview of the mythology and a review of its application in both nuclear and nonnuclear control application domains are presented along with subsequent discussion of fuzzy logic controllers, their structures, and their method of information processing. The article concludes with the application of a tunable FLC to a typical reactor control problem.

Herger, A.S.; Jamshidl, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alang-Rashid, N.K. [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research, Bangi (Malaysia)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Application of fuzzy logic in nuclear reactor control: Part 1: An assessment of state-of-the-art  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the application of fuzzy logic of nuclear reactor control. The method has been suggested by many investigators in many control applications. Reviews of the application of fuzzy logic in process control are given by Tong and Sugeno. Because fuzzy logic control (FLC) provides a pathway for transforming human abstractions into the numerical domain, it has the potential to assist nuclear reactor operators in the control room. With this transformation, linguistically expressed control principles can be coded into the fuzzy controller rule base. Having acquired the skill of he operators, the FLC can assist an operator in controlling the complex system. The thrust of FLC is to derive a conceptual model of the control operation, without expressing the process as mathematical equations, to assist the human operator in interpreting incoming plant variables and arriving at a proper control action. To introduce the concept of FLC in nuclear reactor operation, an overview of the mythology and a review of its application in both nuclear and nonnuclear control application domains are presented along with subsequent discussion of fuzzy logic controllers, their structures, and their method of information processing. The article concludes with the application of a tunable FLC to a typical reactor control problem. 49 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Heger, A.S.; Alang-Rashid, N.K.; Jamshidi, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Compact bilinear operators and commutators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) For all bounded B1 ? X,B2 ? Y , T (B1 ×B2) is precompact. (c7) For all bounded sequences {(xn, yn)} ? X × Y , the sequence {T (xn, yn)} has a convergent subsequence. Furthermore, if Z is Banach, then (c1) is also equivalent to: (c8) For all bounded B ? X...(X ×Y, Z) ? B(X ×Y, Z), assume that the compact bilinear operator T is not bounded. Then, for some r > 0, there exists a sequence (xn, yn) ? Br,X×Y , and ?T (xn, yn)? ? ?. Thus, {T (xn, yn)} could not have a convergent subsequence, so T (Br,X×Y ) would...

Bé nyi, Á rpá d; Torres, Rodolfo H.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the...

400

Solid-state Marx based two-switch voltage modulator for the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new circuit topology is proposed to replace the actual pulse transformer and thyratron based resonant modulator that supplies the 60 kV target potential for the ion acceleration of the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator, the stability of which is critical for the mass resolution downstream separator, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The improved modulator uses two solid-state switches working together, each one based on the Marx generator concept, operating as series and parallel switches, reducing the stress on the series stacked semiconductors, and also as auxiliary pulse generator in order to fulfill the target requirements. Preliminary results of a 10 kV prototype, using 1200 V insulated gate bipolar transistors and capacitors in the solid-state Marx circuits, ten stages each, with an electrical equivalent circuit of the target, are presented, demonstrating both the improved voltage stability and pulse flexibility potential wanted for this new modulator.

Redondo, L. M.; Canacsinh, H.; Ferrao, N.; Mendes, C. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa (ISEL), R. Conselheiro Emidio Navarro 1, Lisbon 1959-007 (Portugal); Nuclear Physics Center-Lisbon University (CFNUL), Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, Lisbon 1649-003 (Portugal); Silva, J. Fernando [Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, Lisbon 1049-001 (Portugal); Center for Innovation in Electrical and Energy Engineering-TU Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, Lisbon 1049-001 (Portugal); Soares, R. [Nuclear Physics Center--Lisbon University (CFNUL), Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, Lisbon 1649-003 (Portugal); ABT Group, TE Department, Site de Prevessin, FR-01631 CERN (Switzerland); Schipper, J.; Fowler, A. [ABT Group, TE Department, Site de Prevessin, FR-01631 CERN (Switzerland)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hydrostatic compaction of Microtherm HT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two samples of jacketed Microtherm{reg_sign}HT were hydrostatically pressurized to maximum pressures of 29,000 psi to evaluate both pressure-volume response and change in bulk modulus as a function of density. During testing, each of the two samples exhibited large irreversible compactive volumetric strains with only small increases in pressure; however at volumetric strains of approximately 50%, the Microtherm{reg_sign}HT stiffened noticeably at ever increasing rates. At the maximum pressure of 29,000 psi, the volumetric strains for both samples were approximately 70%. Bulk modulus, as determined from hydrostatic unload/reload loops, increased by more than two-orders of magnitude (from about 4500 psi to over 500,000 psi) from an initial material density of {approx}0.3 g/cc to a final density of {approx}1.1 g/cc. An empirical fit to the density vs. bulk modulus data is K = 492769{rho}{sup 4.6548}, where K is the bulk modulus in psi, and {rho} is the material density in g/cm{sup 3}. The porosity decreased from 88% to {approx}20% indicating that much higher pressures would be required to compact the material fully.

Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Screening evaluation of radionuclide groundwater concentrations for the end state basement fill model Zion Nuclear Power Station decommissioning project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled with clean material. The final selection of fill material has not been made.

Sullivan T.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

404

Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

On compact generation of deformed schemes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain a theorem which allows to prove compact generation of derived categories of Grothendieck categories, based upon certain coverings by localizations. This theorem follows from an application of Rouquier's cocovering theorem in the triangulated context, and it implies Neeman's result on compact generation of quasi-compact separated schemes. We prove an application of our theorem to non-commutative deformations of such schemes, based upon a change from Koszul complexes to Chevalley-Eilenberg complexes.

Wendy Lowen; Michel Van den Bergh

407

Constitutional Restrictions on Regulation by American States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

statute prohibiting nuclear plant operation until theor economic benefits of a nuclear plant to the state throughreleases from nuclear power plants did not fall within any

Farber, Daniel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Compact star constraints on the high-density EoS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new scheme for testing the nuclear matter (NM) equation of state (EoS) at high densities using constraints from compact star (CS) phenomenology is applied to neutron stars with a core of deconfined quark matter (QM). An acceptable EoS shall not to be in conflict with the mass measurement of 2.1 +/- 0.2 M_sun (1 sigma level) for PSR J0751+1807 and the mass-radius relation deduced from the thermal emission of RX J1856-3754. Further constraints for the state of matter in CS interiors come from temperature-age data for young, nearby objects. The CS cooling theory shall agree not only with these data, but also with the mass distribution inferred via population synthesis models as well as with LogN-LogS data. The scheme is applied to a set of hybrid EsoS with a phase transition to stiff, color superconducting QM which fulfills all above constraints and is constrained otherwise from NM saturation properties and flow data of heavy-ion collisions. We extrapolate our description to low temperatures and draw conclusions for the QCD phase diagram to be explored in heavy-ion collision experiments.

H. Grigorian; D. Blaschke; T. Klahn

2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

409

Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category.

410

Convolution type operators on locally compact groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shtein--~erg, Convolution Type Operators on Locally Compact Groups [in Russian],. Manuscript Deposited in the All-Union Institute of Scientific and Technical ...

411

Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute/United States Integral Neutronics Experiments and Analyses for tritium breeding, nuclear heating, and induced radioactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large member of integral experiments for fusion blanket neutronics were performed using deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutrons at the Fusion Neutronics Source facility as part of a 10-yr collaborative program between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the United States. A number of measurement techniques were developed for tritium production, induced radioactivity, and nuclear heating. Transport calculations were performed using three-dimensional Monte Carlo and two-dimensional discrete ordinates codes and the latest nuclear data libraries in Japan and the United States. Significant differences among measurement techniques and calculation methods were found. To assure a 90% confidence level for tritium breeding calculations not to exceed measurements, designers should use a safety factor > 1.1 to 1.2, depending on the calculation method. Such a safety factor may not be affordable with most candidate blanket designs. Therefore, demonstration of tritium self-sufficiency is recommended as a high priority for testing in near-term fusion facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The radioactivity measurements were performed for > 20 materials with the focus on gamma emitters with half-lives < 5 yr. Most discrepancies were attributed directly to deficiencies in the activation libraries, particularly errors in cross sections for certain reactions. 71 refs., 30 figs., 5 tabs.

Abdou, M.A.; Youssef, M.; Kumar, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

COMPACT, TUNABLE COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

413

Electronic quantum effects mapped onto non-Born-Oppenheimer nuclear paths: Nonclassical surmounting over potential barriers and trapping above the transition states due to nonadiabatic path-branching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop the path-branching representation for nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics [T. Yonehara and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 244102 (2010)] so as to treat dynamics in an energy range comparable to the barrier height of adiabatic potential energy curves. With this representation two characteristic chemical reaction dynamics are studied, in which an incident nuclear wavepacket encounters a potential barrier, on top of which lies another nonadiabatically coupled adiabatic potential curve: (1) Dynamics of initial paths coming into the nonadiabatic interaction region with energy lower than the barrier height. They branch into two pieces (and repeat branching subsequently), the upper counterparts of which can penetrate into a classically inaccessible high energy region and eventually branch back to the product region on the ground state curve. This is so to say surmounting the potential barrier via nonadiabatically coupled excited state, and phenomenologically looks like the so-called deep tunneling. (2) Dynamics of classical paths whose initial energies are a little higher than the barrier but may be lower than the bottom of the excited state. They can undergo branching and some of those components are trapped on top of the potential barrier, being followed by the population decay down to the lower state flowing both to product and reactant sites. Such expectations arising from the path-branching representation are numerically confirmed with full quantum mechanical wavepacket dynamics. This phenomenon may be experimentally observed as time-delayed pulses of wavepacket trains.

Yamamoto, Kentaro, E-mail: kyamamoto@mns2.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Takatsuka, Kazuo, E-mail: kaztak@mns2.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Basic Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Basic Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

414

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

415

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

416

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

417

EOSDB: The Database for Nuclear EoS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear equation of state (EoS) plays an important role in understanding the formation of compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes. The true nature of the EoS has been a matter of debate at any density range not only in the nuclear physics but also in the astronomy and astrophysics. We have constructed a database of EoSs by compiling data from the literature. Our database contains the basic properties of the nuclear EoS of symmetric nuclear matter and of pure neutron matter. It also includes the detailed information about the theoretical models, for example the adopted methods and assumptions in individual models. The novelty of the database is to consider new experimental probes such as the symmetry energy, its slope relative to the baryon density, and the incompressibility, which enables the users to check their model dependences. We demonstrate the performance of the EOSDB through the examinations of the model dependence among different nuclear EoSs. It is reveled that some theoretical EoSs, which is commonly used in astrophysics, do not satisfactorily agree with the experimental constraints.

Chikako Ishizuka; Takuma Suda; Hideyuki Suzuki; Akira Ohnishi; Kohsuke Sumiyoshi; Hiroshi Toki

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

418

Walk the Line: The Development of Route Selection Standards for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-level Radioactive Waste in the United States - 13519  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) are widely dispersed throughout the United States, these materials are also relatively concentrated in terms of geographic area. That is, the impacts of storage occur in a very small geographic space. Once shipments begin to a national repository or centralized interim storage facility, the impacts of SNF and HLRW will become more geographically distributed, more publicly visible, and almost certainly more contentious. The selection of shipping routes will likely be a major source of controversy. This paper describes the development of procedures, regulations, and standards for the selection of routes used to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. The paper begins by reviewing the circumstances around the development of HM-164 routing guidelines. The paper discusses the significance of New York City versus the Department of Transportation and application of HM-164. The paper describes the methods used to implement those regulations. The paper will also describe the current HM-164 designated routes and will provide a summary data analysis of their characteristics. This analysis will reveal the relatively small spatial scale of the effects of HM 164. The paper will then describe subsequent developments that have affected route selection for these materials. These developments include the use of 'representative routes' found in the Department of Energy (DOE) 2008 Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the formerly proposed Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The paper will describe recommendations related to route selection found in the National Academy of Sciences 2006 report Going the Distance, as well as recommendations found in the 2012 Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. The paper will examine recently promulgated federal regulations (HM-232) for selection of rail routes for hazardous materials transport. The paper concludes that while the HM 164 regime is sufficient for certain applications, it does not provide an adequate basis for a national plan to ship spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to centralized storage and disposal facilities over a period of 30 to 50 years. (authors)

Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States)] [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States)] [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)] [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Equation of state in the pion condensation phase in the asymmetric nuclear matter using a holographic QCD model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the asymmetric nuclear matter using a holographic QCD model by introducing a baryonic charge in the infrared boundary. We first show that, in the normal hadron phase, the predicted values of the symmetry energy and it's slope parameter are comparable with the empirical values. We find that the phase transition from the normal phase to the pion condensation phase is delayed compared with the pure mesonic matter: The critical chemical potential is larger than the pion mass which is obtained for the pure mesonic matter. We also show that, in the pion condensation phase, the pion contribution to the isospin number density increases with the chemical potential, while the baryonic contribution is almost constant. Furthermore, the value of chiral condensation implies that the enhancement of the chiral symmetry breaking occurs in the asymmetric nuclear matter as in the pure mesonic matter. We also give a discussion on how to understand the delay in terms of the 4-dimensional chiral Lagrangian including the rho and omega mesons based on the hidden local symmetry.

Hiroki Nishihara; Masayasu Harada

2014-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soil­soil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. © 2012 American

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Non-compact versions of Edwards' Theorem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edwards' Theorem establishes duality between a convex cone in the space of continuous functions on a compact space and the set of representing or Jensen measures for this cone. In this paper we prove non-compact versions of this theorem.

Gogus, Nihat G; Poletsky, Evgeny A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

3D N = 4 Gauge Theory Compactication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outline 3D N = 4 Gauge Theory Compactication Twistors 3D N = 4 Supersymmetric Gauge Theories and Hyperk¨ahler Metrics Richard Eager UCSB Friday, October 17th, 2008, 4:00 p.m. Richard Eager UCSB 3D N = 4 Supersymmetric Gauge Theories and Hyperk¨ahler M #12;Outline 3D N = 4 Gauge Theory Compactication Twistors

Bigelow, Stephen

423

Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line: the lowest energy states in $^9$He via their T=5/2 isobaric analogs in $^9$Li  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound $^9$He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy $^9$He states exist with spins $J^\\pi=1/2^+$ and $J^\\pi=1/2^-$ and widths on the order of hundreds of keV. These findings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. The present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the $^8$He$+n$ system, performed via a search for the T=5/2 isobaric analog states in $^9$Li populated through $^8$He+p elastic scattering. The present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad $J^{\\pi}=1/2^+$ state in $^9$He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.

Uberseder, E; Goldberg, V Z; Koshchiy, E; Roeder, B T; Alcorta, M; Chubarian, G; Davids, B; Fu, C; Hooker, J; Jayatissa, H; Melconian, D; Tribble, R E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy.

Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Color superconducting quark matter in compact stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent indications for high neutron star masses (M \\sim 2 M_sun) and large radii (R > 12 km) could rule out soft equations of state and have provoked a debate whether the occurence of quark matter in compact stars can be excluded as well. We show that modern quantum field theoretical approaches to quark matter including color superconductivity and a vector meanfield allow a microscopic description of hybrid stars which fulfill the new, strong constraints. For these objects color superconductivity turns out to be an essential ingredient for a successful description of the cooling phenomenology in accordance with recently developed tests. We discuss the energy release in the neutrino untrapping transition as a new aspect of the problem that hybrid stars masquerade themselves as neutron stars. Quark matter searches in future generations of low-temperature/high-density nucleus-nucleus collision experiments such as low-energy RHIC and CBM @ FAIR might face the same problem of an almost crossover behavior of the deconfinement transition. Therefore, diagnostic tools shall be derived from effects of color superconductivity.

D. B. Blaschke; T. Klahn; F. Sandin

2007-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

427

National Compact Stellarator Experiment Project Closeout Report PROJECT CLOSEOUT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Compact Stellarator Experiment Project Closeout Report i PROJECT CLOSEOUT REPORT NATIONAL of Science Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory #12;National Compact Stellarator Experiment Project Closeout Report PROJECT CLOSEOUT REPORT NATIONAL COMPACT STELLARATOR EXPERIMENT (NCSX

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

428

State-of-the-art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for application to nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inspection of nuclear power plant concrete structures presents challenges different from conventional civil engineering structures. Wall thicknesses can be in excess of one meter and the structures often have increased steel reinforcement density with more complex detailing. The accessibility for any testing method may be limited due to the presence of liners and other components and there can be a number of penetrations or cast-in-place items present. The objective of the report is to present the state-of-the art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for the inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced nuclear power plant concrete cross-sections with particular respect to: •locating steel reinforcement and identification of its cover depth •locating tendon ducts and identification of the condition of the grout materials •detection of cracking, voids, delamination, and honeycombing in concrete structures •detection of inclusions of different materials or voids adjacent to the concrete side of the containment liner •methods capable of identification of corrosion occurrence on the concrete side of the containment liner.

Wiggenhauser, Herbert [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin, D (Germany); Naus, Dan J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

State-of-the-Art of Non-Destructive Testing Methods and Technologies for Application to Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Concrete Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inspection of nuclear power plant concrete structures presents challenges different from conventional civil engineering structures. Wall thicknesses can be in excess of one meter and the structures often have increased steel reinforcement density with more complex detailing. The accessibility for any testing method may be limited due to the presence of liners and other components and there can be a number of penetrations or cast-in-place items present. The objective of the report is to present the state-of-the art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for the inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced nuclear power plant concrete cross-sections with particular respect to: locating steel reinforcement and identification of its cover depth locating tendon ducts and identification of the condition of the grout materials detection of cracking, voids, delamination, and honeycombing in concrete structures detection of inclusions of different materials or voids adjacent to the concrete side of the containment liner methods capable of identification of corrosion occurrence on the concrete side of the containment liner

Wiggenhauser, Dr. Herbert [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)] [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM); Naus, Dan J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Ultra Wide Band RFID Neutron Tags for Nuclear Materials Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advancements in the ultra-wide band Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and solid state pillar type neutron detectors have enabled us to move forward in combining both technologies for advanced neutron monitoring. The LLNL RFID tag is totally passive and will operate indefinitely without the need for batteries. The tag is compact, can be directly mounted on metal, and has high performance in dense and cluttered environments. The LLNL coin-sized pillar solid state neutron detector has achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 20% and neutron/gamma discrimination of 1E5. These performance values are comparable to a fieldable {sup 3}He based detector. In this paper we will discuss features about the two technologies and some potential applications for the advanced safeguarding of nuclear materials.

Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F; Wang, T

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nuclear disarmament verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification.

DeVolpi, A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

433

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

434

A compact tritium AMS system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium ({sup 3}H) is a radioisotope that is extensively utilized in biological and environmental research. For biological research, {sup 3}H is generally quantified by liquid scintillation counting requiring gram-sized samples and counting times of several hours. For environmental research, {sup 3}H is usually quantified by {sup 3}He in-growth which requires gram-sized samples and in-growth times of several months. In contrast, provisional studies at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry have demonstrated that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be used to quantify {sup 3}H in milligram-sized biological samples with a 100 to 1000-fold improvement in detection limits when compared to scintillation counting. This increased sensitivity is expected to have great impact in the biological and environmental research community. However in order to make the {sup 3}H AMS technique more broadly accessible, smaller, simpler, and less expensive AMS instrumentation must be developed. To meet this need, a compact, relatively low cost prototype {sup 3}H AMS system has been designed and built based on a LLNL ion source/sample changer and an AccSys Technology, Inc. Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac. With the prototype system, {sup 3}/{sup 1}H ratios ranging from 1 x 10{sup -10} to 1 x 10{sup -13} have to be measured from milligram sized samples. With improvements in system operation and sample preparation methodology, the sensitivity limit of the system is expected to increase to approximately 1 x 10{sup -15}.

Chiarappa, M L; Dingley, K H; Hamm, R W; Love, A H; Roberts, M L

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

435

Compact, electro-hydraulic, variable valve actuation system providing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Compact, electro-hydraulic, variable valve actuation system providing variable lift, timing and duration to enable high efficiency engine combustion control Compact,...

436

Development of Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference for Monitoring O2 and NOx in Combustion Environments Development of Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference for Monitoring...

437

Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling More Compact, Lightweight...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling More Compact, Lightweight Thermoelectric Power Generation & Cooling Systems Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling More Compact, Lightweight...

438

Ultra-Compact High-Efficiency Luminaire for General Illumination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cree has developed a new ultra-compact light emitting diode (LED) luminaire capable of providing high efficacy with excellent color quality that can lead to significant energy savings in todayâ??s commercial and retail applications. This success was based on an integrated development effort tailoring the LED component characteristics, optics, thermal management and driver design for the small footprint to achieve an overall system efficiency of â?¥ 70%. A new LED component was designed to provide high brightness and efficacy in a form factor that allowed for a small directional beam with a luminaire housing design able to dissipate the heat effectively using a small physical envelope. A very compact, 90% efficient driver was developed to meet the system performance while not taking away any thermal mass from the heat sink. A 91% efficient secondary optics was designed to maximize efficiency while providing a smooth beam. The reliability of the new LED component was robust under accelerated testing conditions. Luminaires were assembled integrating the novel LED component, secondary optics, heat sink and driver technology to demonstrate the system improvement. Cree has successfully completed this project by developing an ultra-compact LED luminaire that provided 380 lumens at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2822 K and color rendering index (CRI) of 94 with an efficacy of 94 lumens per watt (LPW) when operating at 4 W input power (steady state) with an overall system efficiency of 81%. At a higher input power of 9 Watts, the lamp provided 658 lumens at 71 LPW.

Ted Lowes

2012-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

439

Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

440

NONEXISTENCE OF ARITHMETIC FAKE COMPACT HERMITIAN ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? of G is a fake compact hermitian symmetric space, or a fake Xu, if its Betti ...... Letting A = (2?)16/4320 and using the bounds (13) and (22), we conclude that.

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Gravitational waves from merging compact binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Largely motivated by the development of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors, our understanding of merging compact binaries and the gravitational waves they generate has improved dramatically in recent years. ...

Hughes, Scott A.

442

Stuck-at-fault test set compaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Test set size under pattern score based dynamic compaction . . . 13 . . . 17 Figure 7. Pattern Score distribution v:ith pattern metric dynamic compaction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . I g LIST OF TABLES Page Table l. l. nuit Target Sclcction Methods.... Fault Target Selection Methods Random Minimum Detection Count Circuit Name c432 c499 c880 c1355 c1908 G2670 Excitation Balance 0. 136296 0. 191652 0. 170293 0. 173310 0. 187486 0. 190484 Pattern Count 1152 873 2693 1394 1708 5148...

Vanfickell, Jason Michael

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

443

Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of several radionuclides within environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Company website following the recent tsunami-initiated catastrophe were evaluated for the purpose of identifying the source term, reconstructing the release mechanisms, and estimating the extent of the release. 136Cs/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs ratios identified Units 1-3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil close to the facility. A trend was observed between the fraction of the total core inventory released for a number of fission product isotopes and their corresponding Gibbs Free Energy of formation for the primary oxide form of the isotope, suggesting that release was dictated primarily by chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the primary containment vessels of the vented reactors. The absence of any major fractionation beyond volatilization suggested all coolant had evaporated by the time of venting. High estimates for the fraction of the total inventory released of more volatile species (Te, Cs, I) indicated the damage to fuel bundles was likely extensive, minimizing any potential containment due to physical migration of these species through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall. 238Pu/239,240Pu ratios close-in and at 30 km from the facility indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of Pu to surface soil at the source but that this contribution likely decreased rapidly with distance from the facility. The fraction of the total Pu inventory released to the environment from venting units 1 and 3 was estimated to be ~0.003% based upon Pu/Cs isotope ratios relative to the within-reactor modeled inventory prior to venting and was consistent with an independent model evaluation that considered chemical volatility based upon measured fission product release trends. Significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel at the time of venting but not as yet observed and reported within environmental samples are suggested as potential analytes of concern for future environmental surveys around the site.

Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 4 What is compaction? Soil compaction occurs when moist or wet soil aggregates are pressed together and the pore space between them is reduced. Compaction changes

445

Compact Proof Certificates For Linear Logic Kaustuv Chaudhuri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compact Proof Certificates For Linear Logic Kaustuv Chaudhuri INRIA, France http://kaustuv.chaudhuri

Chaudhuri, Kaustuv

446

Nuclear-atomic state degeneracy in neutrinoless double-electron capture: A unique test for a Majorana-neutrino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a general consensus that detection of a double-beta decay without any neutrino involved would mark physics beyond the Standard Model. This is because in such decay modes lepton number conservation would be violated and the neutrino would reveal itself as being its own antiparticle, thereby of Majorana type. So far, the experimental focus has mostly been on the double beta minus decay variant, where one attempts to measure the spectrum of the two emitted electrons. A discrete line at the endpoint energy marks the unique signature for a Majorana neutrino. Little attention has been given to alternative decay modes in double-beta decay. In this note we show that there is at least one case in the periodic table, where the parent in the neutrinoless double-electron capture process is nearly degenerate with an excited state in the daughter, leading to a possible enhancement of the decay rate by several orders of magnitude. It is the nucleus 74-Se, which has this unique property. Furthermore, there is an easy to detect 2 gamma-ray decay cascade in 74-Ge, which follows the zero-neutrino double electron capture, and which by its mere detection provides unique signature of the Majorana neutrino.

D. Frekers

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

448

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

449

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Columbia Generating Station Unit...

450

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

451

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Duane Arnold Energy Center Unit...

452

DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

453

Compact Gamma-ray Source Technology Development Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on the applicability of current accelerator and laser technologies to the construction of compact, narrow bandwidth, gamma-ray sources for DHS missions in illicit materials detection. It also identifies research and development areas in which advancement will directly benefit these light sources. In particular, we review the physics of Compton scattering based light sources and emphasize the source properties most important to Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) applications of interest. The influences of laser and electron beam properties on the light source are examined in order to evaluate the utility of different technologies for this application. Applicable bulk and fiber-based laser systems and laser recirculation technologies are discussed and Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerator (linac) technologies are examined to determine the optimal frequency and pulse formats achievable.

Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Rusnak, B

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

454

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

455

FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE PROGRAM & SUPPORTING FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY (FNSF)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE PROGRAM & SUPPORTING FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY (FNSF): UPDATE · It was well recognized there were also critical materials and technology issues that needed to be addressed in order to apply the knowledge we gained about burning plasma state #12;FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE PROGRAM

456

Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Strategy Guideline: Compact Air Distribution Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Strategy Guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. Traditional systems sized by 'rule of thumb' (i.e., 1 ton of cooling per 400 ft2 of floor space) that 'wash' the exterior walls with conditioned air from floor registers cannot provide appropriate air mixing and moisture removal in low-load homes. A compact air distribution system locates the HVAC equipment centrally with shorter ducts run to interior walls, and ceiling supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls along the ceiling plane; alternatively, high sidewall supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls. Potential drawbacks include resistance from installing contractors or code officials who are unfamiliar with compact air distribution systems, as well as a lack of availability of low-cost high sidewall or ceiling supply outlets to meet the low air volumes with good throw characteristics. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

Burdick, A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Implications of an Improvised Nuclear Device Detonation on Command and Control for Surrounding Regions at the Local, State and Federal Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses command and control issues relating to the operation of Incident Command Posts (ICPs) and Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs) in the surrounding area jurisdictions following the detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). Although many aspects of command and control will be similar to what is considered to be normal operations using the Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS), the IND response will require many new procedures and associations in order to design and implement a successful response. The scope of this white paper is to address the following questions: • Would the current command and control framework change in the face of an IND incident? • What would the management of operations look like as the event unfolded? • How do neighboring and/or affected jurisdictions coordinate with the state? • If the target area’s command and control infrastructure is destroyed or disabled, how could neighboring jurisdictions assist with command and control of the targeted jurisdiction? • How would public health and medical services fit into the command and control structure? • How can pre-planning and common policies improve coordination and response effectiveness? • Where can public health officials get federal guidance on radiation, contamination and other health and safety issues for IND response planning and operations?

Pasquale, David A.; Hansen, Richard G.

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

459

Mechanized fuel treatment effects on soil compaction in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer stands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanized fuel treatment effects on soil compaction in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer stands Emily E need to treat forest fuels is often justified as a need to reduce potential fire behavior as well in the United States, and fuel treatments are being prescribed at unprecedented scales. In many cases

Stephens, Scott L.

460

INFLUENCE OF CORIOLIS FORCE ON DNA MOLECULE MIGRATION AND HYBRIDIZATION IN COMPACT DISK (CD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) MICROFLUIDICS PLATFORMS _______________ A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of San Diego State University in Compact Disk (CD) Microfluidics Platforms by Nithesh Paramesh Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering and hybridization of DNA molecules in CD microfluidics platform where centrifugal force is used as the driving force

Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Cylindrically Symmetric Models of Anisotropic Compact Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we have discussed the possibility of forming anisotropic compact stars from cosmological constant as one of the competent candidates of dark energy with cylindrical symmetry. For this purpose, we have applied the analytical solution of Krori and Barua metric to a particular cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The unknown constants in Krori and Barua metric have been determined by using masses and radii of class of compact stars like 4$U$1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658. The properties of these stars have been analyzed in detail. In this setting the cosmological constant has been taken as a variable which depends on the radial coordinates. We have checked all the regularity conditions, stability and surface redshift of the compact stars 4$U$1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658.

G. Abbas; Sumara Nazeer; M. A. Meraj

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

462

The Daya Bay Nuclear Plant Project in the Light of International Environmental Law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ministry of Nuclear Industry; PACIFIC BASIN LAW JOURNAL [international law prohibits a state from building a nuclearNUCLEAR PLANT PROJECT IN THE LIGHT OF INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

Mushkat, Roda

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of smuggling. Today, nuclear security is significantly morecritical importance of nuclear security, stating that thereJ. Doyle. Nuclear Safeguards, Security and Nonproliferation:

Dreyer, Jonathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Italy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

United States and Italy on the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit See a fact sheet here.The White HouseOffice of the Press SecretaryItaly and the United States of America are pleased...

465

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

468

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation As more countries embrace nuclear power as a cost-effective and clean alternative to fossil fuels, the need exists to ensure that the nuclear fuel cycle is...

469

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO: FILE FROM:DEC.lpx--.,'WASHINGTON,

470

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear, and neutron spectra. The NE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) capabilities are based on a staff with decades

Kemner, Ken

471

Closing the circle on the splitting of the atom: The environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production in the United States and what the Department of Energy is doing about it  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the grand scheme of things we are a little more than halfway through the cycle of splitting the atom for weapons purposes. If we visualize this historic cycle as the full sweep of a clockface, at zero hour we would find the first nuclear chain reaction by Enrico Fermi, followed immediately by the Manhattan Project and the explosion of the first atomic bombs. From two o`clock until five, the United States built and ran a massive industrial complex that produced tens of thousands of nuclear weapons. At half past, the Cold War ended, and the United States shut down most of its nuclear weapons factories. The second half of this cycle involves dealing with the waste and contamination from nuclear weapons production - a task that had, for the most part, been postponed into the indefinite future. That future is now upon us. Dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War is in many ways as big a challenge for us today as the building of the atomic bomb was for the Manhattan Project pioneers in the 1940s. Our challenges are political and social as well as technical, and we are meeting those challenges. We are reducing risks, treating wastes, developing new technologies, and building democratic institutions for a constructive debate on our future course.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Compact range for variable-zone measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A Global Compact to End Poverty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Global Compact to End Poverty Jeffrey Sachs on stabilisation, transition and weapons of mass progress. We can realistically envision a world without extreme poverty by the year 2025 because. Sachs, The End of Poverty, 2005. WORLD ECONOMICS · Vol. 6 · No. 4 · October­December 2005 11 Jeffrey D

474

Physics of compact stellarators* S. P. Hirshman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics of compact stellarators* S. P. Hirshman, D. A. Spong, J. C. Whitson, B. Nelson, D. B. Redi, W. Reiersen, A. H. Reiman, J. Schmidt, R. White, and M. C. Zarnstorff Princeton Plasma Physics, Austin, Texas 78712-1081 A. Boozer Department of Applied Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York

475

Retreating from the Nuclear Path Testing the theory of Prudential Realism to explain Nuclear Forbearance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Conventional explanations for a state’s nuclear policy (acquisition or forbearance) may be found in traditional International Relations (IR) theories such as neorealism, neoliberal institutionalism… (more)

Pillai, Anil, Ph.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A key factor to the spin parameter of uniformly rotating compact stars: crust structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the key factor to determine the dimensionless spin parameter $j\\equiv cJ/(GM^2)$ of different kinds of uniformly rotating compact stars, including the traditional neutron stars, hyperonic neutron stars, and hybrid stars, and check the reliability of the results on various types of equations of state of dense matter. The equations of state from the relativistic mean field theory and the MIT bag model are adopted to simulate compact stars. Numerical calculations of rigidly rotating neutron stars are performed using the RNS code in the framework of general relativity by solving the Einstein equations for stationary axis-symmetric spacetime. The crust structure of compact stars is found to be a key factor to determine the maximum value of the spin parameter $j_{\\rm max}$. For the stars with inclusion of the crust, $j_{\\rm max}\\sim 0.7$ is sustained for various kinds of compact stars with $M>0.5 M_{\\odot}$, and is found to be insensitive to the mass of star and selected equations of state. For the traditi...

Qi, B; Sun, B Y; Wang, S Y; Gao, J H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamentals of nuclear physics for engineering students. Basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations. Elementary quantum mechanical calculations of bound-state energies and barrier transmission probability. ...

Yip, Sidney

478

SRS upgrades helium recovery system | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

detectors employed by the United States Department of Homeland Security to detect neutron activity from nuclear material. Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, the management...

479

Nuclear Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

480

Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy Idaho National Laboratory is the Department of Energy's lead nuclear energy research and development facility. Building upon its legacy responsibilities,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear compact state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Compact Accelerated Life Testing with Expanded Measurement Suite John Raguse, Russell Geisthardt, Jennifer Drayton, James R. Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compact Accelerated Life Testing with Expanded Measurement Suite John Raguse, Russell Geisthardt -- An accelerated-life-testing (ALT) system has been built at the Colorado State University Photovoltaics Laboratory, electroluminescence, current measurement. I. INTRODUCTION A state-of-the-art accelerated-life-testing (ALT) system

Sites, James R.

482

Engineering properties of miniature cement - fly ash compacts prepared by high pressure compaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MINIATURE CEMENT - FLY ASH COMPACTS PREPARED BY HIGH PRESSURE COMPACTION E NGIRPR OT SFMMAFU AEU C-ALEYY HDOBPvvIi va vGI ge(iD(vI oannItI au NId(R E)L xrP1IeRPvT 9(evP(n uDnuPnnBIrv au vGI eI0DPeIBIrvR uae vGI i...IteII au LEHNFA -M Ho2FYoF EDtDRv 3456 L(7ae HDO7I8v? oP1Pn FrtPrIIePrt ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MINIATURE CEMENT - FLY ASH COMPACTS PREPARED BY HIGH PRESSURE COMPACTION E NGIRPR OT SFMMAFU AEU C-ALEYY E99ea1Ii (R va RvTnI (ri 8arvIrv OT? LP...

Bormann, Jeffrey Ray

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Fundamental building blocks for a compact optoelectronic neural network processor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The focus of this thesis is interconnects within the Compact Optoelectronic Neural Network Processor. The goal of the Compact Optoelectronic Neural Network Processor Project (CONNPP) is to build a small, rugged neural ...

Ruedlinger, Benjamin Franklin, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

December 2002 Issue #11 2002 IDENTIFYING AND MANAGING COMPACTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of compaction The need to conduct field operations in a timely and efficient manner has given rise to concerns

Balser, Teri C.

485

A study of compaction methods for lunar soil simulants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, compaction by vibration, compaction under vacuum pressure under the simultaneous effect of vibration are examined. Duc to the increasing confining pressure, the air voids decrease and the particles will be more closely packed, thus increasing the relative... density. The research will be used to identify a convenient method for compacting samples for laboratory digging experiments. The results of the research conclude that compaction by using vacuum and vibration produce results which can be used to predict...

Ekkad, Rama Varadarajan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

487

Print this Page Close The nuclear deal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Entity List', which was drawn up outside the non-proliferation laws after our nuclear weapon tests league. B At least in the eyes of the United States, India is now a nuclear weapons state. The gamblePrint this Page Close The nuclear deal July 20, 2005 | 19:05 ISTT P Sreenivasan | y assuming

488

FABRICATION OF URANIUM OXYCARBIDE KERNELS AND COMPACTS FOR HTR FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the program to demonstrate tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel is being irradiation tested in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This testing has led to improved kernel fabrication techniques, the formation of TRISO fuel particles, and upgrades to the overcoating, compaction, and heat treatment processes. Combined, these improvements provide a fuel manufacturing process that meets the stringent requirements associated with testing in the AGR experimentation program. Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are working in conjunction with a team from Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to (a) improve the quality of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) fuel kernels, (b) deposit TRISO layers to produce a fuel that meets or exceeds the standard developed by German researches in the 1980s, and (c) develop a process to overcoat TRISO particles with the same matrix material, but applies it with water using equipment previously and successfully employed in the pharmaceutical industry. A primary goal of this work is to simplify the process, making it more robust and repeatable while relying less on operator technique than prior overcoating efforts. A secondary goal is to improve first-pass yields to greater than 95% through the use of established technology and equipment. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 to November 2009. The AGR-1 fuel was designed to closely replicate many of the properties of German TRISO-coated particles, thought to be important for good fuel performance. No release of gaseous fission product, indicative of particle coating failure, was detected in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a peak burn up of 19.6% at a time-average temperature of 1038–1121°C. Before fabricating AGR-2 fuel, each fabrication process was improved and changed. Changes to the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a 6-inch diameter coater using a charge size about 21-times that of the 2-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. The compacting process was changed to increase matrix density and throughput by increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. AGR-2 fuel began irradiation in the ATR in late spring 2010.

Dr. Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott G. Nagley

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

3-DIMENSIONAL COMPACT DISC (CD) MICROFLUIDIC PLATFORM Presented to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-DIMENSIONAL COMPACT DISC (CD) MICROFLUIDIC PLATFORM _______________ A Thesis Presented OF THE THESIS 3-Dimensional Compact Disc (CD) Microfluidic Platform by Nitin Edmund Harwood Master of Science in a compact disc (CD) microfluidics platform involving two or more layers. The traditional 2-Dimensional

Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

490

THE COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM AND GHZ PEAKED SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM AND GHZ PEAKED SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES Christopher P. O'Dea Space@stsci.edu ABSTRACT I review the radio to X­ray properties of GHz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum The GHz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources make up significant fractions

491

Cooperation between the Russian Federation and the United States to enhance the existing nuclear-material protection, control, and accounting systems at Mayak Production Association  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ministry of the Russian Federation for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) are engaged in joint, cooperative efforts to reduce the likelihood of nuclear proliferation by enhancing Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) systems in both countries. Mayak Production Association (MPA) is a major Russian nuclear enterprise within the nuclear complex that is operated by MINATOM. This paper describes the nature, scope, and status of the joint, cooperative efforts to enhance existing MPC&A systems at MPA. Current cooperative efforts are focused on enhancements to the existing MPC&A systems at four plants that are operated by MPA and that produce, process, handle and/or store proliferation-sensitive nuclear materials.

Starodubtsev, G.S.; Prishchepov, A.I.; Zatorsky, Y.M.; James, L.T. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Excitation of the Isomeric {sup 229m}Th Nuclear State via an Electronic Bridge Process in {sup 229}Th{sup +}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the excitation of the nuclear transition {sup 229g}Th-{sup 229m}Th near 7.6 eV in singly ionized thorium via an electronic bridge process. The process relies on the excitation of the electron shell by two laser photons whose sum frequency is equal to the nuclear transition frequency. This scheme allows us to determine the nuclear transition frequency with high accuracy. Based on calculations of the electronic level structure of Th{sup +} which combine the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory, we estimate that a nuclear excitation rate in the range of 10 s{sup -1} can be obtained using conventional laser sources.

Porsev, S. G. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad district, 188300 (Russian Federation); Flambaum, V. V. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Peik, E.; Tamm, Chr. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

493

Electric holding company regulation by multistate compact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is divided into five sections. The first section discusses the market and regulatory environment of bulk power sales. The second presents the legal framework for compacting and discusses the minimal constitutional barriers presented by the Compact Clause. The next section discusses the economic considerations inherent in attempting to regulate a national activity through regional authorities. The fourth section more fully develops the administrative and political problems that regional regulation must overcome to be successful. Using the legal, economic, and policy framework developed in the preceding sections, the final section analyzes the proposal encompassed in Senate Bill 2607, a proposal by the Arkansas Public Service Commission and Entergy Corporation to create regional organizations to provide integrated resource planning.

Darr, F.P.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Thermally efficient compact fluorescent fixture systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compact fluorescent lamps that can be inserted into conventional light fixtures are rapidly gaining acceptance as both a viable retrofit and new design approach to reducing lighting loads. Ideally, the compact fluorescent lamp should have the same light output as the incandescent lamp it replaces, but overheating inside typically small enclosed fixtures can reduce lumen output and hence lighting fixture efficiency by 15 to 20 percent. Fortunately, simple fixture modifications can erase this efficiency penalty, so that the full efficiency benefit of replacing incandescent lamps with fluorescent lamps can be realized. The paper describes such modifications and presents experimental data documenting the potential efficiency enhancement associated with thermal control systems. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Packer, M.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Orthonormal bases of compactly supported wavelets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. Several variations are given on the construction of orthonormal bases of wavelets with compact support. They have, respectively, more symmetry, more regularity, or more vanishing moments for the scaling function than the examples constructed in Daubechies [Comm. Pure Appl. Math., 41 (1988), pp. 909-996]. Key words, wavelets, orthonormal bases, regularity, symmetry AMS(MOS) subject classifications. 26A16, 26A18, 26A27, 39B12

Ingrid Daubechies

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Polymer Backbone Dynamics in Poly(Ethylene Oxide) Based Lithium and Sodium Polyether-ester-sulfonate Ionomers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymer backbone dynamics of single ion conducting poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based ionomer samples with low glass transition temperatures (Tg) have been investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Experiments detecting 13C with 1H decoupling under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions identified the different components of the polymer backbone (PEO spacer and isophthalate groups) and their relative mobilities for a suite of lithium- and sodium-containing ionomer samples with varying cation contents. Variable temperature (203-373 K) 1H-13C cross-polarization MAS (CP-MAS) experiments also provided qualitative assessment of the differences in the motions of the polymer backbone components as a function of cation content and identity. Each of the main backbone components exhibit distinct motions, following the trends expected for motional characteristics based on earlier Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering and 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements. Previous 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation measurements focused on both the polymer backbone and cation motion on the nanosecond timescale. The studies presented here assess the slower timescale motion of the polymer backbone allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of the polymer dynamics. The temperature dependences of 13C linewidths were used to both qualitatively and quantitatively examine the effects of cation content and identity on PEO spacer mobility. Variable contact time 1H-13C CP-MAS experiments were used to further assess the motions of the polymer backbone on the microsecond timescale. The motion of the PEO spacer, reported via the rate of magnetization transfer from 1H to 13C nuclei, becomes similar for T ? 1.1 Tg in all ionic samples, indicating that at similar elevated reduced temperatures the motions of the polymer backbones on the microsecond timescale become insensitive to ion interactions. These results present an improved picture, beyond those of previous findings, for the dependence of backbone dynamics on cation density (and here, cation identity as well) in these amorphous PEO-based ionomer systems.

Roach, David J. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dou, Shichen [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Colby, Ralph H. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

497

Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

Kallenbach, Gene A. (Bosque Farms, NM); Noda, Frank T. (Albuquerque, NM); Mitchell, Dean J. (Tijeras, NM); Etzkin, Joshua L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

498

Compact x-ray source and panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

499

The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs), neutron stars (NSs), and black holes (BHs). Mergings of compact binary stars are expected to be the most important sources for the forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binary stars with NS and/or black components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

Konstantin Postnov; Lev Yungelson

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

500

Nuclear Physics of Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of cold nuclear matter, namely, the relation between the pressure and energy density, is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova, all depend critically on the equation of state of hadronic matter. In this contribution I will concentrate on the special role that nuclear physics plays in constraining the EOS of cold baryonic matter and its impact on the properties of neutron stars.

J. Piekarewicz

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z