Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Projections of U. S. GHG Reductions from Nuclear Power New Capacity Based on Historic Levels of Investment  

SciTech Connect

Historical rates of capital investment in nuclear plant construction was used as a guide to estimate the rate of future capacity introduction. The magnitude of nuclear capacity was then used to determine the effect on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electrical production in the U.S. to 2050. Total capital investment in nuclear power plant construction for every U.S. nuclear unit from 1964 to 1990 were obtained and the total investment and divided by their construction period to provide a value for possible rate of investment. The total linear rate of capital expenditure over the entire period was determined as well as that for the period of peak construction from 1973 to 1985, $11.5 billion/y and $17.9 billion/y, respectively in 2004$. These were used with a variety of capital cost estimates for nuclear construction to obtain several scenarios for nuclear capacity additions. Total nuclear generation out to 2050 was calculated assuming current plants would be constrained by 60-year operating licenses (i.e., a single 20-year life extension). The effect on nuclear generating capacity was projected and the resultant impact on GHG emissions determined assuming nuclear would directly replace coal-fired generation. It was concluded that actually reductions in emissions would not be experienced until 2038, yet growth in emissions from electrical production would be slowed up through that point. Nuclear energy, therefore cannot have a dramatic short-term effect on emissions, as likely cannot any energy producing technology due to the significant time to introduce large-scale changes. Nuclear power, however, can have a major longer term impact on emissions, particularly under more favorable cost and investment conditions.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, ... Quad Cities Generating Station River Bend San Onofre Seabrook Sequoyah South Texas Project St Lucie ...

3

The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Project  

SciTech Connect

The SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop technology for military and civil applications. Starting in 1986, NASA has funded a technology program to maintain the momentum of promising aerospace technology advancement started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the changes for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for a wide range of future space applications. The elements of the CSTI High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. Technology advancement in all elements is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall project with develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements will be presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Titran, R. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Schmitz, P. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center Group; Vandersande, J. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993  

SciTech Connect

This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Y-12 builds capacity to meet nuclear testing schedule - Or: ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

builds capacity to meet nuclear testing schedule - Or: Increasing capacity to meet nuclear testing schedule (title as it appeared in The Oak Ridger) The continuing high volume...

6

PROJECT REPORT HVAC EQUIPMENT DEMOGRAPHICS AND CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROJECT REPORT HVAC EQUIPMENT DEMOGRAPHICS AND CAPACITY ANALYSIS TOOLS APPLICABLE TO MULTI Commercial HVAC Design Process 12 5.0 Conclusion 18 6.0 References 19 TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTIONS #12;MULTI performance by collectively improving the enve- lope, lighting and HVAC systems. The primary goals of the UC

California at Davis, University of

7

Property:Project Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Installed Capacity (MW) Installed Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Installed Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Project Installed Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 + MHK Projects/ADM 5 + 1 + MHK Projects/AWS II + 1 + MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project + 22 + MHK Projects/Agucadoura + 2 + MHK Projects/Alaska 18 + 10 + MHK Projects/Alaska 36 + 10 + MHK Projects/Algiers Cutoff Project + 16 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + 300 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 0 +

8

EIA - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel (2003-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Data Tables...

9

Global nuclear generation capacity totaled more than 370 gigawatts ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China—where plans for large increases in nuclear capacity had been announced—instituted a temporary moratorium on new approvals for nuclear power ...

10

EIA - Appendix H - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2005-2030) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2005-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2005-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table H1 World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country Table H1. World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

11

Capacity Building Project with Howard University | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capacity Building Project with Howard University Capacity Building Project with Howard University Capacity Building Project with Howard University The purpose of this initiative is to build community capacity for public participation in environmental and energy decision making. The target communities are those impacted by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and in Washington, DC, the DOE Headquarters host community. The primary focus is on environmental justice communities-low-income and minority communities. Capacity Building Project with Howard University More Documents & Publications National Conference of Black Mayors, Inc. Capacity Building Project with Howard University The State of Environmental Justice in America 2010 Conference Environmental Justice at the U.S. Department of Energy - A Decade of

12

EIA - Appendix H - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2006-2030) for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2006-2030) International Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2006-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 18 complete) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table H1 World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country Table H1. World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

13

EIA - Appendix H - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2007-2035) for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2007-2035) International Energy Outlook 2010 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2007-2035) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 18 complete) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Appendix H. Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table H1 World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country Table H1. World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

14

Capacity Factor Risk At Nuclear Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior ...

Du, Yangbo

15

Texas Nuclear Profile - South Texas Project  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Texas Project" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

16

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown...

17

PROJECTIZING AN OPERATING NUCLEAR FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss the evolution of an operations-based organization to a project-based organization to facilitate successful deactivation of a major nuclear facility. It will describe the plan used for scope definition, staff reorganization, method estimation, baseline schedule development, project management training, and results of this transformation. It is a story of leadership and teamwork, pride and success. Workers at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) F Canyon Complex (FCC) started with a challenge--take all the hazardous byproducts from nearly 50 years of operations in a major, first-of-its-kind nuclear complex and safely get rid of them, leaving the facility cold, dark, dry and ready for whatever end state is ultimately determined by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). And do it in four years, with a constantly changing workforce and steadily declining funding. The goal was to reduce the overall operating staff by 93% and budget by 94%. The facilities, F Canyon and its adjoined sister, FB Line, are located at SRS, a 310-square-mile nuclear reservation near Aiken, S.C., owned by DOE and managed by Washington Group International subsidiary Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC). These facilities were supported by more than 50 surrounding buildings, whose purpose was to provide support services during operations. The radiological, chemical and industrial hazards inventory in the old buildings was significant. The historical mission at F Canyon was to extract plutonium-239 and uranium-238 from irradiated spent nuclear fuel through chemical processing. FB Line's mission included conversion of plutonium solutions into metal, characterization, stabilization and packaging, and storage of both metal and oxide forms. The plutonium metal was sent to another DOE site for use in weapons. Deactivation in F Canyon began when chemical separations activities were completed in 2002, and a cross-functional project team concept was implemented to successfully accomplish deactivation. This concept had to allow for continued operations in FB Line until 2005, while providing distinct task-oriented teams for deactivation of the FCC. Facility workers, always the most knowledgeable about any facility, were integral parts of the project team. The team defined the scope, developed a bottoms-up estimate, reorganized personnel to designated project teams, and developed a baseline schedule with about 12,000 activities. Training was implemented to prepare the facility workers to use project management tools and concepts, which were to execute the project, coordinate activities and track progress. The project budget was estimated at $579 million. The team completed F Canyon and FB Line deactivation in August 2006, four months ahead of schedule and under budget.

Adams, N

2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

18

Iraq nuclear facility dismantlement and disposal project (NDs Project).  

SciTech Connect

The Al Tuwaitha nuclear complex near Baghdad contains a number of facilities from Saddam Hussan's nuclear weapons program. Past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting have created an enormous radioactive waste problem at the Al Tuwaitha complex, which contains various, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq has never had a radioactive waste disposal facility and the lack of a disposal facility means that ever increasing quantities of radioactive material must be held in guarded storage. The Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) has been initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials, while building human capacities so that the GOI can manage other environmental cleanups in their country. The DOS is funding the IAEA to provide technical assistance via Technical Cooperation projects. Program coordination will be provided by the DOS, consistent with GOI policies, and Sandia National Laboratories will be responsible for coordination of participants and waste management support. Texas Tech University will continue to provide in-country assistance, including radioactive waste characterization and the stand-up of the Iraq Nuclear Services Company. The GOI owns the problems in Iraq and will be responsible for implementation of the NDs Program.

Cochran, John Russell

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

President Roosevelt Establishes Manhattan Project | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Establishes Manhattan Project | National Nuclear Establishes Manhattan Project | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > President Roosevelt Establishes Manhattan Project President Roosevelt Establishes Manhattan Project June 17, 1942 Washington, DC President Roosevelt Establishes Manhattan Project

20

Project Prioritization for Nuclear Plant Investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating investments, sometimes called project prioritization, is a central business process in a plant's or fleet's management of their nuclear assets. To date, a variety of project prioritization approaches have been used in the nuclear industry. Many nuclear utilities use an approach that can be characterized as an engineering work grading process. Project prioritization is related closely to long-range planning. Long-range plans help to avoid surprises from increased expenditures and reduced levels...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

November 2010CAPACITY FACTOR RISK AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior to the end of its anticipated useful life. We then fit the parameters of the model to the IAEA’s PRIS dataset of historical capacity factors on reactors across the globe. The estimated capacity factor risk is greatest in the first year of operation. It then quickly declines over the next couple of years, after which it is approximately constant. Whether risk is constant or increasing in later years depends significantly on the probability of a premature permanent shutdown of the reactor. Because these should be very rare events, the probability is difficult to estimate reliably from the small historical sample of observations. Our base case is parameterized with a conservatively low probability of a premature permanent shutdown which yields the approximately constant variance. Our model, combined with the global historical dataset, also yields relatively low estimates for the expected level of the capacity factor through the life of the plant. Our base case estimate is approximately 74%. Focusing on alternative subsets of the data raises the estimated mean capacity factor marginally, but not significantly, unless the sample chosen is restricted to selected countries over select years. This emphasizes the need for judgment in exploiting the historical data to project future probabilities.

Yangbo Du; John E. Parsons; Yangbo Du; John E. Parsons

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Current projects - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Projects Current Projects Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program Current Projects Bookmark and Share Compilation and evaluation of nuclear structure and decay data for the IAEA coordinated International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network. Argonne Nuclear Data Program has the responsibility for evaluations of A=176-179 & 199-209 mass chains. These evaluations are included in the world most completed and comprehensive nuclear structure

23

Nuclear carrier business volume projections, 1980-2000  

SciTech Connect

The expected number of shipments of commodities in the nuclear fuel cycle are projected for the years 1980 thru 2000. Projections are made for: yellowcake (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/); natural, enriched and reprocessed uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/); uranium dioxide powder (UO/sub 2/); plutonium dioxide powder (PuO/sub 2/); fresh UO/sub 2/ and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel; spent UO/sub 2/ fuel; low-level waste (LLW); transuranic (TRU) waste; high-activity TRU waste; high-level waste (HLW), and cladding hulls. Projections are also made for non-fuel cycle commodities such as defense TRU wastes and institutional wastes, since they also are shipped by the commercial transportation industry. Projections of waste shipments from LWRs are based on the continuation of current volume reduction and solidification techniques now used by the utility industry. Projections are also made based on a 5% per year reduction in LWR waste volume shipped which is assumed to occur as a result of increased implementation of currently available volume reduction systems. This assumption results in a net 64% decrease in the total waste shipped by the year 2000. LWR waste shipment projections, and essentially all other projections for fuel cycle commodities covered in this report, are normalized to BWR and PWR generating capacity projections set forth by the Department of Energy (DOE) in their low-growth projection of April, 1979. Therefore these commodity shipment projections may be altered to comply with future changes in generating capacity projections. Projected shipments of waste from the reprocessing of spent UO/sub 2/ fuel are based on waste generation rates proposed by Nuclear Fuels Services, Allied-General Nuclear Services, Exxon Nuclear, and the DOE. Reprocessing is assumed to begin again in 1990, with mixed oxide fresh fuel available for shipment by 1991.

Lebo, R.G.; McKeown, M.S.; Rhyne, W.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nuclear power. Volume 2: nuclear power project management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following topics are discussed: review of nuclear power plants; licensing procedures; safety analysis; project professional services; quality assurance and project organization; construction, scheduling and operation; construction, scheduling and operation; nuclear fuel handling and fuel management; and plant cost management. 116 references, 115 figures, 33 tables.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

DEMO Project Goals | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

DEMO Project Goals | National Nuclear Security Administration DEMO Project Goals | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog DEMO Project Goals Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Human Resources > Pay-banding > DEMO Project Goals DEMO Project Goals The goals of this demonstration project are to Improve hiring by allowing NNSA to compete more effectively for high

26

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CHANGE OF PROJECT...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CHANGE OF PROJECT NUMBER UPDATE PROJECT Project Number: Title: Date Valid: Date Deactivated: Classification Codes: Project Number:...

27

EIA - Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In three  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Data Tables (1990-2030) Formats Table Data Titles (1 to 6 complete) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E1 World Oil Production Capacity by Region and Country, Reference Case Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

28

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities.

LEROY, P.G.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

29

Nuclear Power Plant Design Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................. 22 5.1.16 Decommissioning: AP600, HTGR, ALWR ............................................................................................................... 35 7.3.4 Decommissioning Cost #12;9 decommissioning. The long delayed nuclear waste disposal facility at Yucca Mountain is becoming

30

Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator Index (NERI): A benchmarking tool for assessing nuclear capacity in developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Declining natural resources, rising oil prices, looming climate change and the introduction of nuclear energy partnerships, such as GNEP, have reinvigorated global interest in nuclear energy. The convergence of such issues has prompted countries to move ahead quickly to deal with the challenges that lie ahead. However, developing countries, in particular, often lack the domestic infrastructure and public support needed to implement a nuclear energy program in a safe, secure, and nonproliferation-conscious environment. How might countries become ready for nuclear energy? What is needed is a framework for assessing a country's readiness for nuclear energy. This paper suggests that a Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator (NERI) Index might serve as a meaningful basis for assessing a country's status in terms of progress toward nuclear energy utilization under appropriate conditions. The NERI Index is a benchmarking tool that measures a country's level of 'readiness' for nonproliferation-conscious nuclear energy development. NERI first identifies 8 key indicators that have been recognized by the International Atomic Energy Agency as key nonproliferation and security milestones to achieve prior to establishing a nuclear energy program. It then measures a country's progress in each of these areas on a 1-5 point scale. In doing so NERI illuminates gaps or underdeveloped areas in a country's nuclear infrastructure with a view to enable stakeholders to prioritize the allocation of resources toward programs and policies supporting international nonproliferation goals through responsible nuclear energy development. On a preliminary basis, the indicators selected include: (1) demonstrated need; (2) expressed political support; (3) participation in nonproliferation and nuclear security treaties, international terrorism conventions, and export and border control arrangements; (4) national nuclear-related legal and regulatory mechanisms; (5) nuclear infrastructure; (6) the utilization of IAEA technical assistance; (7) participation in regional arrangements; and (8) public support for nuclear power. In this paper, the Index aggregates the indicators and evaluates and compares the level of readiness in seven countries that have recently expressed various degrees of interest in establishing a nuclear energy program. The NERI Index could be a valuable tool to be utilized by: (1) country officials who are considering nuclear power; (2) the international community, desiring reassurance of a country's capacity for the peaceful, safe, and secure use of nuclear energy; (3) foreign governments/NGO's, seeking to prioritize and direct resources toward developing countries; and (4) private stakeholders interested in nuclear infrastructure investment opportunities.

Saum-Manning,L.

2008-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

Global generation capacity for nuclear power has grown to over 346 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... nuclear capacity in North America and Europe are relatively small in comparison to those in such countries as China, Korea, and India.

32

EA-1044: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

44: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak 44: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1044: Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 25, 1995 EA-1044: Finding of No Significant Impact Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee May 25, 1995 EA-1044: Final Environmental Assessment

33

International Safety Projects - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

34

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency...

35

Project Hanford nuclear facilities list and authorization basis information  

SciTech Connect

Rev. 4 documents and updates the Nuclear Facilities list and associated Authorization Basis (AB) information for applicable Project Hanford facilities.

EVANS, C.B.

1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

36

Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project  

SciTech Connect

This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

Benson, B.

1991-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

Uprates can increase U.S. nuclear capacity substantially without ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The electrical output of the nuclear power plant fleet can be increased either by constructing new plants or by 'uprating' operating plants.

38

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project operational staffing plan  

SciTech Connect

Using the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project`s current process flow concepts and knowledge from cognizant engineering and operational personnel, an initial assessment of the SNF Project radiological exposure and resource requirements was completed. A small project team completed a step by step analysis of fuel movement in the K Basins to the new interim storage location, the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This analysis looked at fuel retrieval, conditioning of the fuel, and transportation of the fuel. This plan describes the staffing structure for fuel processing, fuel movement, and the maintenance and operation (M&O) staffing requirements of the facilities. This initial draft does not identify the support function resources required for M&O, i.e., administrative and engineering (technical support). These will be included in future revisions to the plan. This plan looks at the resource requirements for the SNF subprojects, specifically, the operations of the facilities, balances resources where applicable, rotates crews where applicable, and attempts to use individuals in multi-task assignments. This plan does not apply to the construction phase of planned projects that affect staffing levels of K Basins.

Debban, B.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Project Management and Systems Support | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Management and Systems Support | National Nuclear Security Project Management and Systems Support | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Project Management and Systems Support Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Project Management and Systems Support Project Management and Systems Support Goal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Project Management and Systems Support | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Project Management and Systems Support | National Nuclear Security Project Management and Systems Support | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Project Management and Systems Support Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Project Management and Systems Support Project Management and Systems Support Goal

42

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Joe 1, the first Soviet atomic test, August 29, 1949. NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION Joe 1, the first Soviet atomic test, August 29, 1949. NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION (1949-Present) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Even before the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, many of the scientists of the Manhattan Project were arguing that international control of atomic energy was essential. Any modern, industrialized state, they reasoned, could eventually build its own atomic bomb if it so chose. There was no "secret" scientific theory or principle concerning the bomb. Its possibility was fundamental to modern physics. Then as now, the primary difficulties were engineering related: separating uranium-235 or producing plutonium and designing and building the actual weapon.

43

Nuclear & Uranium - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Most Requested Most Requested Change category... Most Requested Nuclear Plants and Reactors Projections Uranium All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Reports Today in Energy - Nuclear Short, timely articles with graphs about recent nuclear energy issues and trends Monthly Reports Monthly Energy Review - Nuclear Section Released: November 25, 2013 Recent statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors. Electricity Monthly Update Released: November 22, 2013 Provides analysis and of the highlights of the data included in the Electric Power Monthly publication and presents tables of electricity generation, fuel consumption for generation, fossil fuel stocks, and average retail sales and prices of electricity. The EMU is published at the

44

Construction Projects | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

45

DEMO Project Goals | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

46

Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project (NFST...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project (NFST) Program Status More Documents & Publications DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Transportation Planning, Route Selection, and Rail Issues Update on Blue Ribbon Commission...

47

Spent Nuclear Fuel project integrated safety management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is being revised in its entirety and the document title is being revised to ``Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Integrated Safety Management Plan.

Daschke, K.D.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

48

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin, Yalta, Russia, February 9, 1945 FIRST STEPS TOWARD INTERNATIONAL CONTROL Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin, Yalta, Russia, February 9, 1945 FIRST STEPS TOWARD INTERNATIONAL CONTROL (1941-July 1945) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Throughout most of the Second World War, officials gave little consideration to the postwar atom. Even at the top echelons of government, few knew of the Manhattan Project, and among those who did the primary concern was the ultimate success of the bomb development and not possible impact of the bomb on postwar international relations. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Vannevar Bush, director of the Office of Science and Research and Development and perhaps the President’s closest adviser on the bomb, discussed "after-war control" on October 9, 1941, "at some length" but there was no follow-up.

49

SRNL Project Supports Nuclear Energy Research  

will provide necessary data and analyses to further U.S. nuclear fuel cycle technology development, meet the need for advanced nuclear energy

50

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOE’s project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 November 2012 Protocol for High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight The purpose of this protocol is to establish the requirements and responsibilities for managing and conducting Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) independent oversight of high-hazard nuclear facility projects. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) self regulatory framework for safety and security, DOE Order 227.1, Independent Oversight Program, assigns HSS the responsibility for implementing an independent oversight program. It also requires the HSS Office of Enforcement and Oversight to conduct independent evaluations of safety and security. This

52

Replacement energy, capacity, and reliability costs for permanent nuclear reactor shutdowns  

SciTech Connect

Average replacement power costs are estimated for potential permanent shutdowns of nuclear electricity-generating units. Replacement power costs are considered to include replacement energy, capacity, and reliability cost components. These estimates were developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in evaluating regulatory issues that potentially affect changes in serious reactor accident frequencies. Cost estimates were derived from long-term production-cost and capacity expansion simulations of pooled utility-system operations. Factors that affect replacement power cost, such as load growth, replacement sources of generation, and capital costs for replacement capacity, were treated in the analysis. Costs are presented for a representative reactor and for selected subcategories of reactors, based on estimates for 112 individual reactors.

VanKuiken, J.C., Buehring, W.A.; Hamilton, S.; Kavicky, J.A.; Cavallo, J.D.; Veselka, T.D.; Willing, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Technologies » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Fuel Cycle Technologies » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents September 30, 2013 Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites In January 2013, the Department of Energy issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste. Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. February 22, 2013 Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste Management Facilities for Storage and Disposal This report provides findings from a set of social science studies

54

Facilities & Projects | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

55

Computational nuclear quantum many-body problem: The UNEDF project  

SciTech Connect

The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. The primary focus of the project was on constructing, validating, and applying an optimized nuclear energy density functional, which entailed a wide range of pioneering developments in microscopic nuclear structure and reactions, algorithms, high-performance computing, and uncertainty quantification. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

Fann, George I [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratory Stimulus Project | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratory Stimulus Project | National Nuclear Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratory Stimulus Project | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Carolyn Zerkle Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratory Stimulus Project Carolyn Zerkle Carolyn Zerkle Role: Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratory Stimulus Project

57

Pantex breaks ground on renewable energy project | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

breaks ground on renewable energy project | National Nuclear breaks ground on renewable energy project | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex breaks ground on renewable energy project Pantex breaks ground on renewable energy project Posted By Office of Public Affairs Today was a rare windless day on the plains of the Texas Panhandle, but

58

Pantex breaks ground on renewable energy project | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

breaks ground on renewable energy project | National Nuclear breaks ground on renewable energy project | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex breaks ground on renewable energy project Pantex breaks ground on renewable energy project Posted By Office of Public Affairs Today was a rare windless day on the plains of the Texas Panhandle, but

59

Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratory Stimulus Project | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratory Stimulus Project | National Nuclear Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratory Stimulus Project | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Carolyn Zerkle Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratory Stimulus Project Carolyn Zerkle Carolyn Zerkle Role: Leader, Los Alamos National Laboratory Stimulus Project

60

Cesium uptake capacity of simulated ferrocyanide tank waste. Interim report FY 1994, Ferrocyanide Safety Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to determine the capacity for {sup 137}CS uptake by mixed metal ferrocyanides present in Hanford waste tanks, and to assess the potential for aggregation of these {sup 137}CS exchanged materials to form tank ``hot-spots.`` This research, performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), stems from concerns of possible localized radiolytic heating within the tanks. If radioactive cesium is exchanged and concentrated by the remaining nickel ferrocyanide present in the tanks, this heating could cause temperatures to rise above the safety limits specified for the ferrocyanide tanks. For the purposes of this study, two simulants, In-Farm-2 and U-Plant-2, were chosen to represent the wastes generated by the scavenging processes. These simulants were formulated using protocols from the original cesium scavenging campaign. Later additions of cesium-rich wastes from various processes also were considered. The simulants were prepared and centrifuged to obtain a moist ferrocyanide sludge. The centrifuged sludges were treated with the original supernate spiked with a known amount of cesium nitrate. After analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) were calculated. The capacity of solid waste simulants to exchange radioactive cesium from solution was examined. Initial results showed that the greater the molar ratio of cesium to cesium nickel ferrocyanide, the less effective the exchange of cesium from solution. The theoretical capacity of 2 mol cesium per mol of nickel ferrocyanide was not observed. The maximum capacity under experimental conditions was 0.35 mol cesium per mol nickel ferrocyanide. Future work on this project will examine the layering tendency of the cesium nickel ferrocyanide species.

Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.; Burger, L.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Present status and future development of Qinshan Nuclear Power Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Qinshan 300 MWe Nuclear Power Project is the first domestically designed and constructed nuclear power plant in China. Given is a brief description of its progress in design work, equipment manufacture and site construction since the first structural concrete in March 1985. In Qinshan area four units of 600 MWe each are planned to be built with collaboration of proper foreign partners.

Yu, O.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Computational Nuclear Quantum Many-Body Problem: The UNEDF Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

Scott Bogner; Aurel Bulgac; Joseph A. Carlson; Jonathan Engel; George Fann; Richard J. Furnstahl; Stefano Gandolfi; Gaute Hagen; Mihai Horoi; Calvin W. Johnson; Markus Kortelainen; Ewing Lusk; Pieter Maris; Hai Ah Nam; Petr Navratil; Witold Nazarewicz; Esmond G. Ng; Gustavo P. A. Nobre; Erich Ormand; Thomas Papenbrock; Junchen Pei; Steven C. Pieper; Sofia Quaglioni; Kenneth J. Roche; Jason Sarich; Nicolas Schunck; Masha Sosonkina; Jun Terasaki; Ian J. Thompson; James P. Vary; Stefan M. Wild

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

63

Identifying and Characterizing Candidate Areas for Siting New Nuclear Capacity in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff recently completed an internal 'Energy Assurance' study examining the key issues associated with the country's energy needs for the future focusing on generation sources, baseload options, transmission and distribution, reduction of greenhouse gases, and overall energy security issues. In examining the various generation sources including nuclear power and renewables, one principal finding was that 300 GW(e) of new nuclear electrical generating capacity would be needed by 2050. With that need, the initial, obvious question is can 300 GW(e) of nuclear capacity be sited in the United States? In an attempt to address that question as well as others, ORNL initiated a 'National Electric Generation Siting Study,' which is to be a multiphase study to address several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. The initial phase of this study is to examine the nuclear option. This paper summarizes the approach developed for screening sites, the methodology employed that includes spatial modeling, and preliminary results using the southeast United States to demonstrate the usefulness of the overall approach as a test case.

Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Other Projects [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Projects Other Projects Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Other projects Bookmark and Share HIGH POWER LASER BEAM DELIVERY High-power laser-beam delivery with conventional and fiber optics DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING Laser processing technology for decontamination of surfaces

65

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Knowledge Transfer Improvement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Maintenance Application Center has begun a project a project to explore ways to improve how our products can be more easily used by our members and, in particular, the benefit that can be derived by the worker in the field. The project focuses on developing methods for improving the delivery of information that is specifically directed at maintenance tasks that are performed as part of preventive or corrective maintenance on plant equipment. The results are intended to benefit the maintenance...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown Connecticut Yankee site. The ISFSI includes 40 multi-purpose canisters, within vertical concrete storage casks, containing 1019 used nuclear fuel assemblies [412.3 metric ton heavy metal (MTHM)] and 3 canisters of greater-than-class-C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. Photo courtesy of Connecticut Yankee (http://www.connyankee.com/html/fuel_storage.html). Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown Connecticut Yankee site. The ISFSI includes 40 multi-purpose canisters, within vertical concrete storage casks, containing 1019 used nuclear fuel

67

Agile Machining and Inspection Non-Nuclear Report (NNR) Project  

SciTech Connect

This report is a high level summary of the eight major projects funded by the Agile Machining and Inspection Non-Nuclear Readiness (NNR) project (FY06.0422.3.04.R1). The largest project of the group is the Rapid Response project in which the six major sub categories are summarized. This project focused on the operations of the machining departments that will comprise Special Applications Machining (SAM) in the Kansas City Responsive Infrastructure Manufacturing & Sourcing (KCRIMS) project. This project was aimed at upgrading older machine tools, developing new inspection tools, eliminating Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM) in the handling of classified Numerical Control (NC) programs by installing the CRONOS network, and developing methods to automatically load Coordinated-Measuring Machine (CMM) inspection data into bomb books and product score cards. Finally, the project personnel leaned perations of some of the machine tool cells, and now have the model to continue this activity.

Lazarus, Lloyd

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

Industry Related Projects [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Related Projects Industry Related Projects Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Industry related projects Bookmark and Share LASER OIL & GAS WELL DRILLING Using high-power lasers to drill and complete gas & oil wells LASER HEAT TREATMENT Optimization of laser beam heat treatment (Caterpillar and USCAR)

69

Spent nuclear fuel project integrated schedule plan  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrated Schedule Plan establishes the organizational responsibilities, rules for developing, maintain and status of the SNF integrated schedule, and an implementation plan for the integrated schedule. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner which stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel.

Squires, K.G.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

Interdicting a Nuclear-Weapons Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A “proliferator” seeks to complete a first small batch of fission weapons as quickly as possible, whereas an “interdictor” wishes to delay that completion for as long as possible. We develop and solve a max-min model that identifies ... Keywords: CPM, defense, foreign policy, government, integer, linear, military, programming, project management, targeting

Gerald G. Brown; W. Matthew Carlyle; Robert C. Harney; Eric M. Skroch; R. Kevin Wood

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Texas Nuclear Profile - South Texas Project  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3tx6251 1,280 11,304 100.8 PWR 9,823 87.6 2,560 21,127 94.2 South Texas Project Unit Type Data for 2010 PWR = Pressurized Light Water Reactor. Note: Totals may ...

72

Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project parameter study database  

SciTech Connect

A computerized, knowledge-screened, comprehensive database of the nuclear criticality safety documentation has been assembled as part of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety (NCTS) Project. The database is focused on nuclear criticality parameter studies. The database has been computerized using dBASE III Plus and can be used on a personal computer or a workstation. More than 1300 documents have been reviewed by nuclear criticality specialists over the last 5 years to produce over 800 database entries. Nuclear criticality specialists will be able to access the database and retrieve information about topical parameter studies, authors, and chronology. The database places the accumulated knowledge in the nuclear criticality area over the last 50 years at the fingertips of a criticality analyst.

Toffer, H.; Erickson, D.G.; Samuel, T.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pearson, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Report of the State of Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects  

SciTech Connect

This third biennial Report of the Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects has been prepared in fulfillment of the requirements of NRS 459.0092, which stipulates that the Commission shall report to the Governor and Legislature on any matter relating to radioactive waste disposal the Commission deems appropriate and advise and make recommendations on the policy of the State concerning nuclear waste disposal projects. Chapter One of the Report presents a brief overview of the Commission`s functions and statutory charges. It also contains a summary of developments which have affected the overall nuclear waste disposl issue since the last Commission Report was published in November, 1988. Chapter Two contains a synthesis of Commission activities and reports on the findings of the Commission relative to the geotechnical, environmental, socioeconomic, transportation, intergovernmental and legal aspects of federal and State nuclear waste program efforts.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

State of Nevada, Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office narrative report, July 1--September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) is the State of Nevada agency designated by State law to monitor and oversee US Department of Energy (DOE) activities relative to the possible siting, construction, operation and closure of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and to carry out the State of Nevada`s responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During the reporting period the NWPO continued to work toward the five objectives designed to implement the Agency`s oversight responsibilities. (1) Assure that the health and safety of Nevada`s citizens are adequately protected with regard to any federal high-level radioactive waste program within the State. (2) Take the responsibilities and perform the duties of the State of Nevada as described in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. (3) Advise the Governor, the State Commission on Nuclear Projects and the Nevada State Legislature on matters concerning the potential disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the State. (4) Work closely and consult with affected local governments and State agencies. (5) Monitor and evaluate federal planning and activities regarding high-level radioactive waste disposal. Plan and conduct independent State studies regarding the proposed repository.

NONE

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Joint nuclear safety research projects between the US and Russian Federation International Nuclear Safety Centers  

SciTech Connect

The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) formed international Nuclear Safety Centers in October 1995 and July 1996, respectively, to collaborate on nuclear safety research. Since January 1997, the two centers have initiated the following nine joint research projects: (1) INSC web servers and databases; (2) Material properties measurement and assessment; (3) Coupled codes: Neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, mechanical and other; (4) Severe accident management for Soviet-designed reactors; (5) Transient management and advanced control; (6) Survey of relevant nuclear safety research facilities in the Russian Federation; (8) Advanced structural analysis; and (9) Development of a nuclear safety research and development plan for MINATOM. The joint projects were selected on the basis of recommendations from two groups of experts convened by NEA and from evaluations of safety impact, cost, and deployment potential. The paper summarizes the projects, including the long-term goals, the implementing strategy and some recent accomplishments for each project.

Bougaenko, S.E.; Kraev, A.E. [International Nuclear Safety Center of the Russian MINATOM, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hill, D.L.; Braun, J.C.; Klickman, A.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). International Nuclear Safety Center

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Nuclear Science--A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart 2003 Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Science--A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart ©2003 Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) 7-1 Chapter 7 Nuclear Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used, protons, alphas, or "heavy ions"), creates these reactions when they strike a target nucleus. Nuclear

77

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bernard Baruch presents the United States plan for international control of atomic energy to the United Nations, June 14, 1946. NEGOTIATING INTERNATIONAL CONTROL Bernard Baruch presents the United States plan for international control of atomic energy to the United Nations, June 14, 1946. NEGOTIATING INTERNATIONAL CONTROL (December 1945-1946) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present After American, British, and Canadian officials agreed at the November 1945 Washington meeting to a negotiating approach on international control, Secretary of State James F. Byrnes quickly arranged for the Big Three foreign ministers to meet in Moscow in mid-December. Atomic energy, which the Soviets placed last on a long list of agenda items, was discussed only in terms of the United Nations proposal. Surprising Byrnes with their willingness to cooperate, the Soviets acquiesced to the American proposal, which was based on the Washington joint declaration, but with one exception. They agreed that the commission should be set up by the United Nations General Assembly, but, counter to the American plan, they insisted that the commission report to the Security Council and be accountable to it "in matters affecting security." This was no mere procedural difference. Most of the members in the General Assembly, where decisions were made by majority rule, were more closely aligned to the United States than to the Soviet Union. In the Security Council, the Soviet Union possessed the veto and could effectively halt any commission actions that it found objectionable.

78

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson and Secretary of State James F. Byrnes arrive at the Gatow Airport in Berlin for the Potsdam Conference, July 15, 1945. SEARCH FOR A POLICY ON INTERNATIONAL CONTROL Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson and Secretary of State James F. Byrnes arrive at the Gatow Airport in Berlin for the Potsdam Conference, July 15, 1945. SEARCH FOR A POLICY ON INTERNATIONAL CONTROL (August to November 1945) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present In the immediate aftermath of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, President Harry S. Truman and his top officials viewed the Soviet Union as the primary stumbling block in the move toward international control of the atomic bomb. Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson and Secretary of State James F. Byrnes represented the two poles of an uncertain and divided policy. Despite his ongoing misgivings concerning the Soviets, Stimson determined that unless the United States offered full partnership in the development of atomic energy the Soviet Union would begin "a secret armament race of a rather desperate character." Byrnes, on the eve of the first postwar foreign ministers conference to be held in London, remained adamant in opposition to any attempt to cooperate with the Soviets on atomic energy and viewed the bomb as a diplomatic asset that would make the Soviets more amenable. As Stimson observed in his diary, Byrnes went to London fully set on having "the implied threat of the bomb in his pocket during the conference."

79

Nuclear Asset Management (NAM) Model - Update for Project Prioritization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of the Nuclear Asset Management (NAM) Process Model developed in 2007 and published in EPRI report 1015091. It incorporates results from modeling project prioritization guidance developed as part of EPRI's participation in the Equipment Reliability Working Group (ERWG). This update presents additional detail on the model described in report 1015091 and provides a reflection of current industry best practices for project prioritization.

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

80

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the proceedings of the annual Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCTSP) Workshop held in Monterey, California, on April 16--28, 1993. The NCTSP was sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The report is divided into six sections reflecting the sessions outlined on the workshop agenda.

Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, a major change in the technical strategy for managing Multi Canister Overpacks (MCO) while stored within the Canister Storage Building (CSB) occurred. The technical strategy is documented in Baseline Change Request (BCR) No. SNF-98-006, Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing) (FDH 1998). This BCR deleted the hot conditioning process initially adopted for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) as documented in WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (WHC 199.5). In summary, MCOs containing Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from K Basins would be placed in interim storage following processing through the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility. With this change, the needs for the Hot Conditioning System (HCS) and inerting/pressure retaining capabilities of the CSB storage tubes and the MCO Handling Machine (MHM) were eliminated. Mechanical seals will be used on the MCOs prior to transport to the CSB. Covers will be welded on the MCOs for the final seal at the CSB. Approval of BCR No. SNF-98-006, imposed the need to review and update the CSB functions and requirements baseline documented herein including changing the document title to ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements.'' This revision aligns the functions and requirements baseline with the CSB Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing). This document represents the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Subproject technical baseline. It establishes the functions and requirements baseline for the implementation of the CSB Subproject. The document is organized in eight sections. Sections 1.0 Introduction and 2.0 Overview provide brief introductions to the document and the CSB Subproject. Sections 3.0 Functions, 4.0 Requirements, 5.0 Architecture, and 6.0 Interfaces provide the data described by their titles. Section 7.0 Glossary lists the acronyms and defines the terms used in this document. Section 8.0 References lists the references used for this document.

KLEM, M.J.

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

83

An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable success of future nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Project Rover: Main Series of Nuclear-Rocket Engines - NUCLEAR ROCKETS: To  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Rover: Main Series of Nuclear-Rocket Engines Project Rover: Main Series of Nuclear-Rocket Engines Kiwi-A Named after the large, flightless bird, Kiwi was the first phase of Project Rover. Kiwi consisted of eight reactors that scientists tested between 1959 and 1964. The first reactor, dubbed Kiwi-A, was fired for the first (and only) time on July 1, 1959, at Jackass Flats in the Nevada Test Site (now the Nevada National Security Site). Kiwi-B The Kiwi-B series increased power by ten-fold while maintaining the same size of the Kiwi-A series. The Kiwi-B reactors experienced a problem similar to Kiwi-A: Internal vibrations caused by dynamic flow instability fractured portions of the fuel elements. Scientists resolved this problem when they developed Kiwi-B4. Phoebus-1 During the 1960s, scientists developed the Phoebus series of nuclear

85

Overview of the spent nuclear fuel project at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project`s mission at Hanford is to {open_quotes}Provide safe, economic and environmentally sound management of Hanford spent nuclear fuel in a manner which stages it to final disposition.{close_quotes} The inventory of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site covers a wide variety of fuel types (production reactor to space reactor) in many facilities (reactor fuel basins to hot cells) at locations all over the Site. The 2,129 metric tons of Hanford SNF represents about 80% of the total US Department of Energy (DOE) inventory. About 98.5% of the Hanford SNF is 2,100 metric tons of metallic uranium production reactor fuel currently stored in the 1950s vintage K Basins in the 100 Area. This fuel has been slowly corroding, generating sludge and contaminating the basin water. This condition, coupled with aging facilities with seismic vulnerabilities, has been identified by several groups, including stakeholders, as being one of the most urgent safety and environmental concerns at the Hanford Site. As a direct result of these concerns, the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project was recently formed to address spent fuel issues at Hanford. The Project has developed the K Basins Path Forward to remove fuel from the basins and place it in dry interim storage. Alternatives that addressed the requirements were developed and analyzed. The result is a two-phased approach allowing the early removal of fuel from the K Basins followed by its stabilization and interim storage consistent with the national program.

Daily, J.L. [Dept. of Energy, Richland, WA (United States). Richland Operations Office; Fulton, J.C.; Gerber, E.W.; Culley, G.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Radiation Protection Program Resource Optimization Project; Brunswick Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation protection (RP) managers face challenges in providing a necessary service that complies with stringent regulations, while simultaneously reducing operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. The results of this pilot project, hosted by Brunswick Nuclear Plant (BNP), will assist utilities in targeting resource commitments and cost effectiveness while optimizing overall performance. This report identifies specific program cost reduction and process performance enhancements for the host plant, and esta...

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

87

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Energy and the Public's Right to Know  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The Smyth Report, August 1945. NUCLEAR ENERGY AND THE The Smyth Report, August 1945. NUCLEAR ENERGY AND THE PUBLIC'S RIGHT TO KNOW Resources > Openness Given ongoing concerns with terrorism and nuclear proliferation, a word about secrecy, the information presented on this web site, and the public's right to know is in order. The information on this web site is currently available, and has long been available, in any major university library. The basic story of the Manhattan Project was first released to the public in August 1945 in the "Smyth Report" (right), a book-length study of the Manhattan Project. It was personally reviewed by Leslie Groves, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Ernest O. Lawrence, and others, to ensure that it contained no information that would be of assistance to anyone who might try to build a nuclear weapon. The information from the Smyth Report and other contemporary MED press releases has been supplemented in subsequent years by numerous other histories of the Manhattan Project, including a comprehensive official history produced by the Atomic Energy Henry D. Smyth confers with Ernest O. Lawrence about the Smyth Report, Berkeley, fall 1944. Commission (AEC) historians Richard G. Hewlett and Oscar E. Anderson, Jr. As for the most potentially-sensitive category of entries on this web site, "Science," most of the text for these entries was taken directly from an unclassified 1963 AEC publication, The Atomic Energy Deskbook. Created under the personal supervision of AEC Chairman Glenn T. Seaborg, the Deskbook was intended from the start to be a reference work for the public. The intent of all of these publications was to reveal what could be revealed and to keep secret what needed to be kept secret. Accordingly, this web site has been reviewed by the Department of Energy's Office of Classification and confirmed to be unclassified. (For more information on Manhattan Project-related publications, see the list of "Suggested Readings.")

88

Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

Benson, B.

1991-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Supplier Quality Management for New Nuclear Plant Construction Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for new nuclear power plant construction projects on supplier quality-related risks associated with the procurement of materials, equipment, and services intended for use in a safety-related plant application. This guidance takes an in-depth look into the procurement-related challenges that new construction projects face and at measures for overcoming these challenges. A methodology is provided for identifying, managing, evaluating, and mitigating quality-related risks ...

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

90

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Project Plan. The Project Plan is intended to provide the high-level direction that documents the required software activities to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Carl Wharton; Kent Norris

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an evaluation of the Project Plan. The Project Plan is intended to provide the high-level direction that documents the required software activities to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Carl Wharton; Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Project Plan. The Project Plan is intended to provide the high-level direction that documents the required software activities to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Carl Wharton

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Commercial nuclear power 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Spent nuclear fuels project characterization data quality objectives strategy  

SciTech Connect

A strategy is presented for implementation of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process to the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) characterization activities. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are teaming in the characterization of the SNF on the Hanford Site and are committed to the DQO process outlined in this strategy. The SNFP characterization activities will collect and evaluate the required data to support project initiatives and decisions related to interim safe storage and the path forward for disposal. The DQO process is the basis for the activity specific SNF characterization requirements, termed the SNF Characterization DQO for that specific activity, which will be issued by the WHC or PNL organization responsible for the specific activity. The Characterization Plan prepared by PNL defines safety, remediation, and disposal issues. The ongoing Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) requirement and plans and the fuel storage and disposition options studies provide the need and direction for the activity specific DQO process. The hierarchy of characterization and DQO related documentation requirements is presented in this strategy. The management of the DQO process and the means of documenting the DQO process are described as well as the tailoring of the DQO process to the specific need of the SNFP characterization activities. This strategy will assure stakeholder and project management that the proper data was collected and evaluated to support programmatic decisions.

Lawrence, L.A.; Thornton, T.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Redus, K.S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Negative heat capacity in the critical region of nuclear fragmentation: an experimental evidence of the liquid-gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental indication of negative heat capacity in excited nuclear systems is inferred from the event by event study of energy fluctuations in $Au$ quasi-projectile sources formed in $Au+Au$ collisions at 35 A.MeV. The excited source configuration is reconstructed through a calorimetric analysis of its de-excitation products. Fragment partitions show signs of a critical behavior at about 5 A.MeV excitation energy. In the same energy range the heat capacity shows a negative branch providing a direct evidence of a first order liquid gas phase transition.

M. D'Agostino; F. Gulminelli; Ph. Chomaz; M. Bruno; F. Cannata; R. Bougault; N. Colonna; F. Gramegna; I. Iori; N. Le Neindre; G. V. Margagliotti; P. F. Mastinu; P. M. Milazzo; A. Moroni; G. Vannini

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project, November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Cleanup Project Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2

97

Nuclear criticality project plan for the Hanford Site tank farms  

SciTech Connect

The mission of this project is to provide a defensible technical basis report in support of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This technical basis report will also be used to resolve technical issues associated with the nuclear criticality safety issue. The strategy presented in this project plan includes an integrated programmatic and organizational approach. The scope of this project plan includes the provision of a criticality technical basis supporting document (CTBSD) to support the FSAR as well as for resolution of the nuclear criticality safety issue. Specifically, the CTBSD provides the requisite technical analysis to support the FSAR hazard and accident analysis as well as for the determination of the required FSAR limits and controls. The scope of The CTBSD will provide a baseline for understanding waste partitioning and distribution phenomena and mechanistics for current operational activities inclusive of single-shell tanks, double-shell tanks, double-contained receiver tanks, and miscellaneous underground storage tanks.. Although the FSAR does not include future operational activities, the waste partitioning and distribution phenomena and mechanistics work scope identified in this project plan provide a sound technical basis as a point of departure to support independent safety analyses for future activities. The CTBSD also provides the technical basis for resolution of the technical issues associated with the nuclear criticality safety issue. In addition to the CTBSD, additional documentation will be required to fully resolve U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters administrative and programmatic issues. The strategy and activities defined in this project plan provide a CTBSD for the FSAR and for accelerated resolution of the safety issue in FY 1996. On April 30, 1992, a plant review committee reviewed the Final Safety Analysis Reports for the single-shell, double-shell, and aging waste tanks in light of the conclusions of the inadequate waste characterization with respect to fissile material. The review indicated that the conclusion in the FSARS, that a criticality is not credible, cannot be supported for a full range of potential tank constituents. Therefore, a USQ was declared. Development of a credible scenario leading to a criticality proved to be extremely difficult, given the paucity of data on the quantity and distribution of fissile material in the tanks. The objective of this project plan is to develop a strategy and technical approach to provide a CTBSD for the FSAR and for resolution of the nuclear criticality safety issue pertaining to tank farm waste storage and transfer operations. The strategy and technical approach identified in this project plan include definition of administrative and technical tasks. Technical analyses will include mechanistic studies, historical data review, and additional limited neutronics analysis. Completion of these studies will be documented in a CTBSD to support the existing criticality technical basis. The CTBSD will be incorporated in the criticality portion of the FSAR.

Bratzel, D.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nuclear & Uranium - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy - Nuclear. Short, timely articles with graphs about recent nuclear energy issues and trends . Monthly Energy Review - Nuclear Section

99

EU warns of breakaway plans on nuclear project 24 September 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. He argued the project could be launched with Russia paying 10 percent of the costs and ChinaEU warns of breakaway plans on nuclear project 24 September 2004 The European Union is pushing increasingly hard for an accord on the site for a landmark nuclear energy project, while treading carefully

100

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Design Verification and Validation Process  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a description of design verification and validation activities implemented by the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. During the execution of early design verification, a management assessment (Bergman, 1999) and external assessments on configuration management (Augustenburg, 1999) and testing (Loscoe, 2000) were conducted and identified potential uncertainties in the verification process. This led the SNF Chief Engineer to implement corrective actions to improve process and design products. This included Design Verification Reports (DVRs) for each subproject, validation assessments for testing, and verification of the safety function of systems and components identified in the Safety Equipment List to ensure that the design outputs were compliant with the SNF Technical Requirements. Although some activities are still in progress, the results of the DVR and associated validation assessments indicate that Project requirements for design verification are being effectively implemented. These results have been documented in subproject-specific technical documents (Table 2). Identified punch-list items are being dispositioned by the Project. As these remaining items are closed, the technical reports (Table 2) will be revised and reissued to document the results of this work.

OLGUIN, L.J.

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Achieving a Higher Capacity National Airspace System: An Analysis of the Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, 2007. Capacity Needs of the NationalSipe, A. L. , et al. , 2005. Capacity enhancing air trafficAll-weather Maximum Capacity by 2020 (MW) Metron Surface,

Smirti, Megan; Hansen, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Proceedings of the nuclear criticality technology safety project  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summaries of the most of the papers presented at the 1994 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 10 and 11 at Williamsburg, Va. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Validation and Application of Calculations; (2) Relevant Experiments for Criticality Safety; (3) Experimental Facilities and Capabilities; (4) Rad-Waste and Weapons Disassembly; (5) Criticality Safety Software and Development; (6) Criticality Safety Studies at Universities; and (7) Training. The minutes and list of participants of the Critical Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup meeting, which was held on May 9 at the same venue, has been included as an appendix. A second appendix contains the names and addresses of all NCTSP meeting participants. Separate abstracts have been indexed to the database for contributions to this proceedings.

Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects 00516 North Dakota Refining Capacity Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Dakota Refining Capacity Study North Dakota Refining Capacity Study DE-FE0000516 Goal The objective of the North Dakota Refining Capacity study is to assess the feasibility of increasing the oil refinery capacity in North Dakota, and, if possible, determine the scale of such an expansion, the slate of refined product(s) that would produce the most economic benefit, and the preferred ownership model, i.e., private, public or private-public. Performer North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives (NDAREC) Corval Group, partnered with Purvin & Gertz and Mustang Engineering Background The genesis of this study came from an April 2008 report issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) asserting that North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. This assessment shows a 25-fold increase in the amount of recoverable oil compared to the USGS 1995 estimate of 151 million barrels of oil. The Bakken Formation estimate is larger than all other current USGS oil assessments of the lower 48 states and is the largest "continuous" oil accumulation ever assessed by the USGS. The new report points out that the new geologic models applied to the Bakken Formation, advances in drilling and production technologies, and recent oil discoveries have resulted in these substantially larger technically recoverable oil volumes. About 105 million barrels of oil were produced from the Bakken Formation by the end of 2007. In 2008, the formation produced another 27.2 million barrels of oil, which represented 43% of the state’s annual oil production of some 62.3 million barrels. Even though oil prices have dropped significantly in recent months, it appears that oil production from this formation will continue strong for decades to come. Most recently, a major production find has occurred in the Three Forks formation underlying the Bakken. This find is still undergoing significant testing, but early evidence suggests it represents another significant recoverable pool of oil in western North Dakota.

104

PRELIMINARY NUCLEAR CRITICALITY NUCLEAR SAFETY EVLAUATION FOR THE CONTAINER SURVEILLANCE AND STORAGE CAPABILITY PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Washington Safety Management Solutions (WSMS) provides criticality safety services to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) at the Savannah River Site. One activity at SRS is the Container Surveillance and Storage Capability (CSSC) Project, which will perform surveillances on 3013 containers (hereafter referred to as 3013s) to verify that they meet the Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) 3013 for plutonium storage. The project will handle quantities of material that are greater than ANS/ANSI-8.1 single parameter mass limits, and thus required a Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation (NCSE). The WSMS methodology for conducting an NCSE is outlined in the WSMS methods manual. The WSMS methods manual currently follows the requirements of DOE-O-420.1B, DOE-STD-3007-2007, and the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) SCD-3 manual. DOE-STD-3007-2007 describes how a NCSE should be performed, while DOE-O-420.1B outlines the requirements for a Criticality Safety Program (CSP). The WSRC SCD-3 manual implements DOE requirements and ANS standards. NCSEs do not address the Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) of non-reactor nuclear facilities that may be affected by overt or covert activities of sabotage, espionage, terrorism or other security malevolence. Events which are beyond the Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) are outside the scope of a double contingency analysis.

Low, M; Matthew02 Miller, M; Thomas Reilly, T

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Above-normal outages of U.S. nuclear capacity persist at the start ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Southern California Edison's San Onofre Nuclear Generating ... Progress's handling of Crystal River repairs became an issue in the company's recent merger with Duke ...

106

Above-normal outages of U.S. nuclear capacity persist at the start ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... Privacy/Security Copyright & Reuse Accessibility. Related Sites U.S. Department of Energy

107

Nuclear & Uranium - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, ...

108

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

109

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

110

-News Home Help EU presses Japan to compromise on nuclear project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-News Home Help EU presses Japan to compromise on nuclear project 2 hours, 23 minutes ago BRUSSELS to resolve a standoff over who will host a revolutionary nuclear reactor project, a key EU official said Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which has been billed as a test bed for a safe and inexhaustible

111

Nuclear Science and Physics Data from the Isotopes Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Isotopes Project pages at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been a source of nuclear data and reference information since the mid-nineties. Almost all of the data, the results of analyses, the specialized charts and interfaces, and the extensive bibiographic references are fed to the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory and maintained there. The Isotope Project pages at LBNL provide a glimpse of early versions for many of the nuclear data resources.

None

112

Nuclear criticality safety program for environmental restoration projects  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), formerly known as the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), is located on a 1050 acre site approximately twenty miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. The production area of the site covers approximately 136 acres in the central portion of the site. Surrounding the core production area is a buffer consisting of leased grazing land, reforested land, and unused areas. The uranium processing facility was designed and constructed in the early 1950s. During the period from 1952 to 1989 the site produced uranium feed material and uranium products used in the United States weapons complex. Production at the site ended in 1989, when the site was shut down for what was expected to be a short period of time. However, the FUTC was permanently shut down in 1991, and the site`s mission was changed from production to environmental restoration. The objective of this paper is to give an update on activities at the Fernald Site and to describe the Nuclear Criticality Safety issues that are currently being addressed.

Marble, R.C.; Brown, T.D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nuclear & Uranium - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Analysis & Projections. Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, financial analysis, Congressional reports. Markets & ...

114

Research of IPE Solution Applied to EPR Nuclear Power Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear power company is currently in the process of constructing the advanced 3rd generation of EPR Nuclear Power Plant, and its corresponding information system is an overall integrated information management system based on the new concept design. ... Keywords: digital nuclear power plant, IPE solutions, comprehensive application

Daqiao Wang; Fangneng Hu; Yi Luo; Yi Ma

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Overview of Nuclear Energy: Present and Projected Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several factors will influence the contribution of nuclear energy to the future energy mix. Among them, the most important are the degree of global commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, continued vigilance in safety and safeguards, technological advances, economic competitiveness and innovative financing arrangements for new nuclear power plant constructions, the implementation of nuclear waste disposal, and, last but not least, public perception, information and education. The paper presents an overview of the current nuclear energy situation, possible development scenarios, of reactor technology, and of non-electric applications of nuclear energy.

Alexander Stanculescu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

France gets nuclear fusion plant France will get to host the project to build a 10bn-euro (6.6bn) nuclear fusion reactor, in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the construction costs will be shouldered by the EU. "We believe that the Iter project should start as soon energy programme in 1959. ITER - NUCLEAR FUSION PROJECT Project estimated to cost 10bn euros and will runFrance gets nuclear fusion plant France will get to host the project to build a 10bn-euro (£6.6bn

117

16 years of successful projects in16 years of successful projects in Nuclear Science & TechnologyNuclear Science & Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of operating NPP; · NPP decommissioning and waste treatment; · Novel reactor concepts and Nuclear Fuel Cycle

118

Seismic structural fragility investigation for the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (Project I); SONGS-1 AFWS Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the seismic capacities of several of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS-1) structures was conducted to determine input to the overall probabilistic methodology developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Seismic structural fragilities to be used as input consist of median seismic capacities and their variabilities due to randomness and uncertainty. Potential failure modes were identified for each of the SONGS-1 structures included in this study by establishing the seismic load-paths and comparing expected load distributions to available capacities for the elements of each load-path. Particular attention was given to possible weak links and details. The more likely failure modes were screened for more detailed investigation.

Wesley, D.A.; Hashimoto, P.S.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Nuclear electric propulsion : assessing the design of Project Prometheus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high fuel efficiency of electric propulsion makes it a viable alternative for long-distance space travel. Project Prometheus was a NASA-led project that sought to demonstrate that distant electric propulsion missions ...

Goycoolea, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nuclear & Uranium - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... Privacy/Security Copyright & Reuse Accessibility. Related Sites U.S. Department of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nation’s verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

Klingensmith, A. L.

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

Preoperational Environmental Survey for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document represents the report for environmental sampling of soil, vegetation, litter, cryptograms, and small mammals at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities located in 100 K and 200 East Areas in support of the preoperational environmental survey.

MITCHELL, R.M.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

Spent Nuclear Fuel project systems engineering management plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the WHC Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is to describe the systems engineering approach and methods that will be integrated with established WHC engineering practices to enhance the WHC engineering management of the SNF Project. The scope of the SEMP encompasses the efforts needed to manage the WHC implementation of systems engineering on the SNF Project. This implementation applies to, and is tailored to the needs of the SNF project and all its subprojects, including all current and future subprojects

Womack, J.C.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

France to win huge nuclear fusion project 10:42 24 June 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edwards A long and bitter dispute about where to site the world's largest nuclear fusion reactor looks allFrance to win huge nuclear fusion project 10:42 24 June 2005 NewScientist.com news service Rob the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) at Rokkashomura in Japan or at Cadarache in France

125

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Retention capacity of bio-films formed on the surface of nuclear and basaltic glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The role of the bacteria in the various compartments of a repository site was still not extensively studied. It is likely that most known bacteria cannot develop on the surface of radioactive materials but one must consider that 10% only of the bacteria species are known. As an example, a research group has recently discovered an isolated community of bacteria nearly two miles underground that derives all of its energy from the decay of radioactive rocks (LIN et al., 2006). It is generally accepted that alterations of rocks and anthropogenic products are not exclusively driven by the interaction with water or mineral aqueous solutions. Organic compounds as well as microorganisms are important in mineral degradation processes, and secondary mineralization. However, the exact role of bio-films in these processes remains unclear. The study of (AOUAD, 2006) will be presented as an example. Two materials were tested: the reference French nuclear glass SON68 17 LIDC2A2Z1 and a tholeiitic basaltic glass (natural analogue). Experiments were carried out for 19 weeks at 25 deg. C. A specific growth medium were developed which allows both the growth of Pseudomonas bacterium and a precise measurement, using ICP-MS, of trace elements solubilized from both glasses (AOUAD et al., 2005) The thickness of bio-films, analyzed by confocal laser microscopy was 40 {mu}m for both materials. These bio-films are able to efficiently trap most of the glass constituents. They also form a protective barrier at the solid/solution interface. (authors)

Crovisier, Jean Louis [EOST-CGS, 1, rue Blessig, Strasbourg, 67000 (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Manhattan Project: Postscript--The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Government-suggested fallout shelter design, 1950s POSTSCRIPT--THE NUCLEAR AGE Government-suggested fallout shelter design, 1950s POSTSCRIPT--THE NUCLEAR AGE (1945-Present) Events Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Joe 1, the first Soviet atomic test, August 29, 1949. The end of the Second World War brought with it a whole new set of issues and problems, not least of which was the dilemma of what to do with the nuclear genie now that he had been let out of the bottle. In the United States, and around the world, news of the atomic bomb created among the public a sense of shock and awe. Manhattan Engineer District officials took certain obvious steps such as slowing down the program from its wartime pace, but the assembly of additional nuclear weapons did quietly continue.

128

Project Plan: Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan outlines the Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities (CEUS SSC) Project, which will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI report NP-4726, July 1986. The objective of the CEUS SSC project is to develop an up-to-date assessment of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) SSC for CEUS. Input to a PSHA consists of both seismic source and ground motion characterization. These two components ...

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

129

Project Plan Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove SNM Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev.0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baseline to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviation to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process. The Remove SNM Materials project provides the necessary support and controls required for DOE-HQ, DOE-RL, BWHC, and other DOE Complex Contractors the path forward to negotiate shipped/receiver agreements, schedule shipments, and transfer material out of PFP to enable final deactivation.

BARTLETT, W.D.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

Can New Nuclear Power Plants be Project Financed?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manufacturing companies with sites in France contracted in 2010 for 24 year power contracts from EDF through a special purpose vehicle company called Exeltium.4 The Olkiluoto NPP under construction in Finland is backed by several long term power contracts... independent project company financed with equity from one or more sponsoring firms and non-recourse debt for the purpose of investing in a capital asset”. The key feature of project financing is that a new company (known as a special purpose vehicle (SPV...

Taylor, Simon

131

Project Ranking Method for Nuclear Power Plants: Prioritizing Proposed Capital and O&M Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, it becomes ever more important to invest limited budgets only in projects that increase or protect a plant's value and profitability over its remaining operating term. This report describes a robust method that plants can customize to evaluate, rank, and select their operating and maintenance (O&M) and capital projects.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

132

Summary for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project in Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the major progress that the NGNP Project has made toward developing and commercializing the HTGR technology. Significant R&D progress has been made in addressing key technical issues for qualification of the HTGR fuel and graphite, codification of high temperature materials and verification and validation of design codes. Work is also progressing in heat transfer/transport design and testing and in development of the high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production process. A viable licensing strategy has been formulated in coordination with the NRC and DOE. White papers covering key licensing issues have been and will continue to be submitted and necessary discussions of these key issues have begun with the NRC. Continued government support is needed to complete the Project objectives as established in the 2005 Energy Policy Act.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Spent nuclear fuel project multi-canister overpack, additional NRC requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), established in the K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Regulatory Policy, dated August 4, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the Policy), the requirement for new Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities to achieve nuclear safety equivalency to comparable US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. For activities other than during transport, when the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) is used and resides in the Canister Storage Building (CSB), Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility or Hot Conditioning System, additional NRC requirements will also apply to the MCO based on the safety functions it performs and its interfaces with the SNF Project facilities. An evaluation was performed in consideration of the MCO safety functions to identify any additional NRC requirements needed, in combination with the existing and applicable DOE requirements, to establish nuclear safety equivalency for the MCO. The background, basic safety issues and general comparison of NRC and DOE requirements for the SNF Project are presented in WHC-SD-SNF-DB-002.

Garvin, L.J.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI APPLICATIONS PROJECT WUL 1 SON  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI APPLICATIONS PROJECT WUL 1 SON F I N A L OPERATIONAL WAB$OACTIVI TY REPORT PRODUCT1 ON TESTS FEBRUARY 1972 PEACEFUL APPLICATIONS DIVISION NEVADA OPER4TIONS OFFICE This page intentionally left blank TABLE OF CONTENTS Subject Page N o . Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acknowledgements i i i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . Introduction 1 I1 . F i r s t Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I11 . Second Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 IV . Third Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 V . Data Tables A . First Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 B . Second Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 C . Third Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Figures I . Road Map of Northwest Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . I1 . Total 3~ and 8

136

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Safety Basis Implementation Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Safety Basis Implementation is to ensure that implementation of activities is accomplished in order to support readiness to move spent fuel from K West Basin. Activities may be performed directly by the Safety Basis Implementation Team or they may be performed by other organizations and tracked by the Team. This strategy will focus on five key elements, (1) Administration of Safety Basis Implementation (general items), (2) Implementing documents, (3) Implementing equipment (including verification of operability), (4) Training, (5) SNF Project Technical Requirements (STRS) database system.

TRAWINSKI, B.J.

2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fluor Hanford Nuclear Material Stabilization Project Welding Manual  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this section of the welding manual is to: (1) Provide a general description of the major responsibilities of the organizations involved with welding. (2) Provide general guidance concerning the application of codes related to welding. This manual contains requirements for welding for all Fluor Hanford (FH) welding operators working on the W460 Project, in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford facilities. These procedures and any additional requirements for these joining processes can be used by all FH welding operators that are qualified. The Welding Procedure Specifications (WPS) found in this document were established from Procedure Qualification Records (PQR) qualified by FH specifically for the W460 Project. PQRs are permanent records of the initial testing and qualification program and are used to backup, and support, the WPS. The identification numbers of the supporting PQR(s) are recorded on each WPS. All PQRs are permanently stored under the supervision of the Fluor Hanford Welding Engineer (FHWE). New PQRs and WPSs will continue to be developed as necessary. The qualification of welders, welding operators and welding procedures will be performed for FH under supervision and concurrent of the FHWE. All new welding procedures to be entered in this manual or welder personnel to be added to the welder qualification database, shall be approved by the FHWE.

BERKEY, J.R.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Design Verification Report Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

SciTech Connect

The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. Because this sub-project is still in the construction/start-up phase, all verification activities have not yet been performed (e.g., canister cover cap and welding fixture system verification, MCO Internal Gas Sampling equipment verification, and As-built verification.). The verification activities identified in this report that still are to be performed will be added to the start-up punchlist and tracked to closure.

PICKETT, W.W.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

Implementation of IAEA /1/INT/054 Project in Nuclear Analytical Techniques Group of Argentina: Current State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the implementation of the training received through the IAEA Project 'Preparation of Reference Materials and Organization of Proficiency Tests Rounds' in the Nuclear Analytical (NAT) Group of CNEA. Special emphasis is done on those activities related to the first Proficiency Test being carried out by the NAT Group.

Sara, Resnizky; Rita, Pla [Nuclear Analytical Techniques Group, Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Av. Del Libertador 8250 (1429) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alba, Zaretzky [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry Group(CRRD), Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), Av. Del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Safety Aspects of Nuclear Desalination with Innovative Systems; the EURODESAL Project  

SciTech Connect

The proposed paper reports the results of a preliminary investigation on safety impact deriving from the coupling of a desalination plant with a 600 MWe Passive Design PWR like the AP600 Nuclear Power Plant. This evaluation was performed in the frame of the EURODESAL Project of the 5. EURATOM Framework Programme. (authors)

Alessandroni, C.; Cinotti, L.; Mini, G. [Ansaldo Nucleare, C.so Perrone, 25 - Genova (Italy); Nisan, S. [CEA-CEN Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Print this article Close This Window EU OKs India joining ITER nuclear reactor project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delhi on the project was a separate issue from India's avoidance of the nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, she said. "There is the non-proliferation issue and we are pursuing that with the Indians as part despite its refusal to sign a global treaty barring the spread of atomic weapons. That move was seen

142

Project Hanford management contract quality assurance program implementation plan for nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

During transition from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Management and Operations (M and O) contract to the Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Management and Integration (M and I) contract, existing WHC policies, procedures, and manuals were reviewed to determine which to adopt on an interim basis. Both WHC-SP-1131,Hanford Quality Assurance Program and Implementation Plan, and WHC-CM-4-2, Quality Assurance Manual, were adopted; however, it was recognized that revisions were required to address the functions and responsibilities of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC). This Quality Assurance Program Implementation Plan for Nuclear Facilities (HNF-SP-1228) supersedes the implementation portion of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. The revised Quality Assurance (QA) Program is documented in the Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD), HNF-MP-599. That document replaces the QA Program in WHC-SP-1131, Rev. 1. The scope of this document is limited to documenting the nuclear facilities managed by FDH and its Major Subcontractors (MSCS) and the status of the implementation of 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, at those facilities. Since the QA Program for the nuclear facilities is now documented in the QAPD, future updates of the information provided in this plan will be by letter. The layout of this plan is similar to that of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide an overview of the Project Hanford QA Program. A list of Project Hanford nuclear facilities is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides the status of facility compliance to 10 CFR 830.120. Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 provide requested exemptions, status of open items, and references, respectively. The four appendices correspond to the four projects that comprise Project Hanford.

Bibb, E.K.

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Tests of Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors for Active1 Target Time Projection Chambers in nuclear physics2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests of Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors for Active1 Target Time Projection Chambers in nuclear the gas used as the detection medium10 is also a target for nuclear reactions, have been used for a wide variety of11 nuclear physics applications since the eighties. Improvements in MPGD (Mi-12 cro Pattern

Recanati, Catherine

144

Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

World nuclear outlook 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

NONE

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

World nuclear outlook 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Chemical thermodynamics of nuclear materials. IX. High temperature heat capacity of plutonium-3. 2 at. % gallium alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat capacity of delta-stabilized plutonium (Pu - 3.2 at. % Ga) has been determined from 330 to 700/sup 0/K by an adiabatic calorimeter. The heat capacity for this alloy may be expressed by: Cp (Pu-3.2 at. % Ga)/(J K/sup -1/ mol/sup -1/) = 39.249 - 0.0264 (T/K) + 3.595 x 10/sup 5/ (T/K)/sup 2/ - 2.506 x 10/sup 5/ (K/T)/sup 2/. It was found that a large contribution to the heat capacity is due to the electronic heat capacity. The thermal functions for this plutonium-gallium alloy are calculated to 700/sup 0/K.

Adams, R.O.; Oetting, F.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Integrated data base report--1995: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information in this report summarizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data base for inventories, projections, and characteristics of domestic spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. This report is updated annually to keep abreast of continual waste inventory and projection changes in both the government and commercial sectors. Baseline information is provided for DOE program planning purposes and to support DOE program decisions. Although the primary purpose of this document is to provide background information for program planning within the DOE community, it has also been found useful by state and local governments, the academic community, and some private citizens.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project technical baseline document. Fiscal year 1995: Volume 1, Baseline description  

SciTech Connect

This document is a revision to WHC-SD-SNF-SD-002, and is issued to support the individual projects that make up the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project in the lower-tier functions, requirements, interfaces, and technical baseline items. It presents results of engineering analyses since Sept. 1994. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safety, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner that stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel, although other SNF is involved also.

Womack, J.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cramond, R. [TRW (United States); Paedon, R.J. [SAIC (United States)] [and others

1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

Integrated data base report - 1994: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Except for transuranic wastes, inventories of these materials are reported as of December 31, 1994. Transuranic waste inventories are reported as of December 31, 1993. All spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Design Verification Report Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. The original version of this document was prepared by Vista Engineering for the SNF Project. The purpose of this revision is to document completion of verification actions that were pending at the time the initial report was prepared. Verification activities for the installed and operational SSCs have been completed. Verification of future additions to the CSB related to the canister cover cap and welding fixture system and MCO Internal Gas Sampling equipment will be completed as appropriate for those components. The open items related to verification of those requirements are noted in section 3.1.5 and will be tracked as part of the CSB Facility action tracking system.

BAZINET, G.D.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fermilab Project X nuclear energy application: Accelerator, spallation target and transmutation technology demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The recent paper 'Accelerator and Target Technology for Accelerator Driven Transmutation and Energy Production' and report 'Accelerators for America's Future' have endorsed the idea that the next generation particle accelerators would enable technological breakthrough needed for nuclear energy applications, including transmutation of waste. In the Fall of 2009 Fermilab sponsored a workshop on Application of High Intensity Proton Accelerators to explore in detail the use of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator technology for Nuclear Energy Applications. High intensity Continuous Wave (CW) beam from the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Linac (Project-X) at beam energy between 1-2 GeV will provide an unprecedented experimental and demonstration facility in the United States for much needed nuclear energy Research and Development. We propose to carry out an experimental program to demonstrate the reliability of the accelerator technology, Lead-Bismuth spallation target technology and a transmutation experiment of spent nuclear fuel. We also suggest that this facility could be used for other Nuclear Energy applications.

Gohar, Yousry; /Argonne; Johnson, David; Johnson, Todd; Mishra, Shekhar; /Fermilab

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

1992 Annual Capacity Report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (10 CFR Part 961) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to issue an Annual Capacity Report (ACR) for planning purposes. This report is the fifth in the series published by DOE. In May 1993, DOE published the 1992 Acceptance Priority Ranking (APR) that established the order in which DOE will allocate projected acceptance capacity. As required by the Standard Contract, the acceptance priority ranking is based on the date the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) was permanently discharged, with the owners of the oldest SNF, on an industry-wide basis, given the highest priority. The 1992 ACR applies the projected waste acceptance rates in Table 2.1 to the 1992 APR, resulting in individual allocations for the owners and generators of the SNF. These allocations are listed in detail in the Appendix, and summarized in Table 3.1. The projected waste acceptance rates for SNF presented in Table 2.1 are nominal and assume a site for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility will be obtained; the facility will initiate operations in 1998; and the statutory linkages between the MRS facility and the repository set forth in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), will be modified. During the first ten years following projected commencement of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operation, the total quantity of SNF that could be accepted is projected to be 8,200 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This is consistent with the storage capacity licensing conditions imposed on an MRS facility by the NWPA. The annual acceptance rates provide an approximation of the system throughput and are subject to change as the program progresses.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Scotts Valley Energy Office and Human Capacity Building that will provide energy-efficiency services and develop sustainable renewable energy projects.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project is to develop a Scotts Valley Energy Development Office (SVEDO). This office will further support the mission of the Tribe's existing leadership position as the DOE Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program (TMCWEP) in creating jobs and providing tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance to increase energy efficiency, occupant comfort and improved indoor air quality. This office will also spearhead efforts to move the Tribe towards its further strategic energy goals of implementing renewable energy systems through specific training, resource evaluation, feasibility planning, and implementation. Human capacity building and continuing operations are two key elements of the SVEDO objectives. Therefore, the project will 1) train and employ additional Tribal members in energy efficiency, conservation and renewable resource analyses and implementation; 2) purchase materials and equipment required to implement the strategic priorities as developed by the Scotts Valley Tribe which specifically include implementing energy conservation measures and alternative energy strategies to reduce energy costs for the Tribe and its members; and 3) obtain a dedicated office and storage space for ongoing SVEDO operations.

Anderson, Temashio [Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

Scotts Valley Energy Office and Human Capacity Building that will provide energy-efficiency services and develop sustainable renewable energy projects.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project is to develop a Scotts Valley Energy Development Office (SVEDO). This office will further support the mission of the Tribe's existing leadership position as the DOE Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program (TMCWEP) in creating jobs and providing tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance to increase energy efficiency, occupant comfort and improved indoor air quality. This office will also spearhead efforts to move the Tribe towards its further strategic energy goals of implementing renewable energy systems through specific training, resource evaluation, feasibility planning, and implementation. Human capacity building and continuing operations are two key elements of the SVEDO objectives. Therefore, the project will 1) train and employ additional Tribal members in energy efficiency, conservation and renewable resource analyses and implementation; 2) purchase materials and equipment required to implement the strategic priorities as developed by the Scotts Valley Tribe which specifically include implementing energy conservation measures and alternative energy strategies to reduce energy costs for the Tribe and its members; and 3) obtain a dedicated office and storage space for ongoing SVEDO operations.

Anderson, Temashio [Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

158

Integrated data base report--1996: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Inventories of most of these materials are reported as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1996, which is September 30, 1996. Commercial SNF and commercial uranium mill tailings inventories are reported on an end-of-calendar year (CY) basis. All SNF and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are SNF, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through FY 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

Ian McKirdy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Development of Nuclear Reactor remote Monitoring software (NRM) for the Star project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a response to the needs of developing countries to meet their rapidly growing energy requirements, the Safe, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor (STAR) program originated. This concept relies on small, passively safe, and highly autonomous nuclear power stations to make nuclear energy available to countries not containing the infrastructure to support a conventional reactor. Nuclear Reactor remote Monitoring software (NRM), a part of this project, has been developed to centralize and coordinate operations support for multiple plants, guarantee safety and nonproliferation, and improve cost-effectiveness. NRM allows soft real time monitoring of the reactor power, primary and secondary coolant temperatures, control rod movement, and secondary coolant zones in the steam generator (subcooled, saturated, and superheated). The coherence of the data sets is checked with QUASIMODO, a thermohydraulics computational code. NRM receives the measurement of physical variables from a data acquisition system. This data is then encrypted and transferred to the monitoring center using Secure SHell (SSH). The main program, written in C and Java embedded with Java Native Interface (JNI) processes the data, which is displayed in a graphic user interface along with calculated results.

Gautier, Vincent Charles

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cask and MCO Helium Purge System Design Review Completion Report Project A.5 and A.6  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the design verification performed on the Cask and Multiple Canister Over-pack (MCO) Helium Purge System. The helium purge system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cask Loadout System (CLS) at 100K area. The design verification employed the ''Independent Review Method'' in accordance with Administrative Procedure (AP) EN-6-027-01.

ARD, K.E.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diablo Canyon 2 nuclear reactors. Data were taken fromCapacity Operation of nuclear reactors for power generationby the operation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, ap-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electric Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords Electric Capacity Electricity Generation New Zealand projections

165

Department of Energy Issues Call for Proposals to U.S. Universities for Nuclear Energy-Related Integrated Research Project Proposals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy University Programs is now accepting applications from universities interested in conducting nuclear energy-related Integrated Research Projects.

166

Forward capacity market CONEfusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In ISO New England and PJM it was assumed that sponsors of new capacity projects would offer them into the newly established forward centralized capacity markets at prices based on their levelized net cost of new entry, or ''Net CONE.'' But the FCCMs have not operated in the way their proponents had expected. To clear up the CONEfusion, FCCM designs should be reconsidered to adapt them to the changing circumstances and to be grounded in realistic expectations of market conduct. (author)

Wilson, James F.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Refinery Capacity Report 2007  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

Refinery Capacity Report 2009  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Refinery Capacity Report 2008  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Equipment Reliability for New Nuclear Plant Projects: Industry Recommendations for Storage, Construction, and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial and continued good operating performance of the current build of new nuclear plants is critical to the rebirth of the nuclear option in many countries and vital to the companies making the large investments required for new nuclear plants. One of the foundations of good performance is a sound process for establishing and sustaining plant equipment reliability (ER).

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

Cooperative Project on Burnup Credit -- Data and Analysis for Spent Nuclear Fuel Transport and Storage in Burnup Credit Casks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past two years, the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE/RW), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (NRC/RES) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have pursued a coordinated project having as its objective to develop and/or obtain the scientific and technical information necessary to support preparation and review of a safety evaluation for cask designs that use full (actinide and fission product) burnup credit...

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

172

Project: Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere  

SciTech Connect

We present a summary of the FY12 activities for DTRA-funded project 'Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere'. We briefly review the outstanding scientific questions and discuss the work done in the last year to try to answer these questions. We then discuss the agenda for this Technical Meeting with the DTRA sponsors. In the last year, we have continued our efforts to understand artificial radiation belts from several different perspectives: (1) Continued development of Electron Source Model (ESM) and comparison to HANE test data; (2) Continued studies of relativistic electron scattering by waves in the natural radiation belts; (3) Began study of self-generated waves from the HANE electrons; and (4) Began modeling for the UCLA laser experiment.

Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Kaijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

173

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of the Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the spent nuclear fuel project (SNFP) Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

174

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan WBS No. 1.4.1, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project portion of the Hanford Strategic Plan for the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The SNF Project was established to evaluate and integrate the urgent risks associated with N-reactor fuel currently stored at the Hanford site in the K Basins, and to manage the transfer and disposition of other spent nuclear fuels currently stored on the Hanford site. An evaluation of alternatives for the expedited removal of spent fuels from the K Basin area was performed. Based on this study, a Recommended Path Forward for the K Basins was developed and proposed to the U.S. DOE.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Sampling and analysis plan for the preoperational environmental survey of the spent nuclear fuel project facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sampling and analysis plan will support the preoperational environmental monitoring for construction, development, and operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities, which have been designed for the conditioning and storage of spent nuclear fuels; particularly the fuel elements associated with the operation of N-Reactor. The SNF consists principally of irradiated metallic uranium, and therefore includes plutonium and mixed fission products. The primary effort will consist of removing the SNF from the storage basins in K East and K West Areas, placing in multicanister overpacks, vacuum drying, conditioning, and subsequent dry vault storage in the 200 East Area. The primary purpose and need for this action is to reduce the risks to public health and safety and to the environment. Specifically these include prevention of the release of radioactive materials into the air or to the soil surrounding the K Basins, prevention of the potential migration of radionuclides through the soil column to the nearby Columbia River, reduction of occupational radiation exposure, and elimination of the risks to the public and to workers from the deterioration of SNF in the K Basins.

MITCHELL, R.M.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Project, April 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Project May 2011 April 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Project Table of Contents 1. Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2. Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2

179

Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation  

SciTech Connect

Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

Fulton, J.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant.

Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1990-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

182

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Risk Management Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an evaluation of the risk management. Risk management is intended to ensure a methodology for conducting risk management planning, identification, analysis, responses, and monitoring and control activities associated with the SAPHIRE project work, and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kent Norris

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Spent nuclear fuel project multi-year work plan WBS {number_sign}1.4.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) is a controlled living document that contains the current SNF Project Technical, Schedule and Cost Baselines. These baselines reflect the current Project execution strategies and are controlled via the change control process. Other changes to the MYWP document will be controlled using the document control process. These changes will be processed as they are approved to keep the MYWP a living document. The MYWP will be maintained continuously as the project baseline through the life of the project and not revised annually. The MYWP is the one document which summarizes and links these three baselines in one place. Supporting documentation for each baseline referred to herein may be impacted by changes to the MYWP, and must also be revised through change control to maintain consistency.

Wells, J.L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

185

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

186

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

187

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

188

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

189

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

190

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

191

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

192

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

193

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

194

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

195

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

196

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

197

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

198

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

199

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

200

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

202

GENERATING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating capacity consistent with mandatory reliability criteria. A large part of the problem can be associated with the failure of wholesale spot market prices for energy and operating reserves to rise to high enough levels during periods when generating capacity is fully utilized. Reforms to wholesale energy markets, the introduction of well-design forward capacity markets, and symmetrical treatment of demand response and generating capacity resources to respond to market and institutional imperfections are discussed. This policy reform program is compatible with improving the efficiency of spot wholesale electricity markets, the continued evolution of competitive retail markets, and restores incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity consistent with operating reliability criteria applied by system operators. It also responds to investment disincentives that have been associated with volatility in wholesale energy prices, limited hedging opportunities and to concerns about regulatory opportunism. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest – i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources...

205

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) Nuclear electricity generation remains flat in the IEO99 reference case, representing a declining share of the world’s total electricity consumption. Net reductions in nuclear capacity are projected for most industrialized nations. In 1997, a total of 2,276 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated from nuclear power worldwide, providing 17 percent of the world’s electricity generation. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear power for electricity varies greatly (Figure 53). Ten countries met at least 40 percent of their total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of worldwide electricity generation are uncertain, despite projected growth of

206

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

207

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

208

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

209

Can we talk? Communications management for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a complex nuclear waste management project  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Nuclear Waste Management Program is pursuing for DOE an option for permanently disposing radioactive waste in deep geologic repositories. Included in the Program are the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project for US defense program mixed waste the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) for spent power reactor fuel and vitrified high-level waste, projects for other waste types, and development efforts in environmental decision support technologies. WIPP and YMP are in the public arena, of a controversial nature, and provide significant management challenges. Both projects have large project teams, multiple organization participants, large budgets, long durations, are very complex, have a high degree of programmatic risk, and operate in an extremely regulated environment requiring legal defensibility. For environmental projects like these to succeed, SNL`s Program is utilizing nearly all areas in PMI`s Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) to manage along multiple project dimensions such as the physical sciences (e.g., geophysics and geochemistry; performance assessment; decision analysis) management sciences (controlling the triple constraint of performance, cost and schedule), and social sciences (belief systems; public participation; institutional politics). This discussion focuses primarily on communication challenges active on WIPP. How is the WIPP team meeting the challenges of managing communications?`` and ``How are you approaching similar challenges?`` will be questions for a dialog with the audience.

Goldstein, S.A.; Pullen, G.M.; Brewer, D.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Indonesia-ECN Capacity building for energy policy formulation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECN Capacity building for energy policy formulation and implementation of sustainable energy projects Jump to: navigation, search Name CASINDO: Capacity development and...

211

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Nuclear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear Power Nuclear Power picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Nuclear power is projected to represent a growing share of the developing world’s electricity consumption from 1999 through 2020. New plant construction and license extensions for existing plants are expected to produce a net increase in world nuclear capacity. Nuclear power plants generated electricity in 29 countries in 1999. A total of 433 nuclear power reactors were in operation (Figure 61), including 104 in the United States, 59 in France, and 53 in Japan. The largest national share of electricity from nuclear power was in France, at 75 percent (Figure 62). Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Lithuania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Sweden, Ukraine, and South Korea depended on nuclear power for at least 40

212

Project Management Guidance when Upgrading Steam Turbines at Nuclear and Fossil Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power producers upgrade steam turbines to gain megawatts (MW) instead of installing new capacity for a variety of reasons. The engineering challenges encounteredwhen managing procurement and adequately analyzing plant support systems affected by this upgradeare becoming more pronounced.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Monthly generator capacity factor data now available by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

weather; gasoline; capacity; exports; nuclear; forecast; ... Solar generators—particularly solar thermal—operate at a minimum during winter months, ...

214

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report With Data as of January 1, 2013 | Release Date: June 21, 2013 | Next Release Date: June 20, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1997 1995 1994 Go Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

215

NNSAs Management of the $245 million Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrades Project Phase II at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA's Management of the $245 NNSA's Management of the $245 Million Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrades Project Phase II DOE/IG-0901 January 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Special Report on "NNSA's Management of the $245 million Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrades Project Phase II at Los Alamos National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for the protection and control of a significant portion of the Nation's special nuclear

216

Japanese set to direct `sun-power' nuclear reactor in France September 16, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japanese set to direct `sun-power' nuclear reactor in France September 16, 2005 Japan has been develop three generations of nuclear reactors and includes six low-capacity experimental reactors and a 17 asked to nominate the chief of an international project to build a multi- billion-dollar nuclear fusion

217

EEI/DOE Transmission Capacity Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRANSMISSION CAPACITY: TRANSMISSION CAPACITY: PRESENT STATUS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS Eric Hirst Consulting in Electric-Industry Restructuring Bellingham, Washington June 2004 Prepared for Energy Delivery Group Edison Electric Institute Washington, DC Russell Tucker, Project Manager and Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC Larry Mansueti, Project Manager ii iii CONTENTS Page SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v LIST OF ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. TRANSMISSION CAPACITY: DATA AND PROJECTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HISTORICAL DATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CURRENT CONDITIONS . . . . . . .

218

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reducedpurposes. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts ofFigure 2: Comparison of capacity projections from AEO2011

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Committee 135  Capacity Bidding Program  Client and REPORT AUTOMATION OF CAPACITY BIDDING WITH AN AGGREGATORDevelopment and Testing of the Capacity Bidding Program for 

Kiliccote, Sila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Property:Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nameplate Capacity (MW) Nameplate Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Device Nameplate Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 8MW 1MW Farms of multiple machines will be deployed with installed capacity of circa 20MW + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 40 kW + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + 250kW pilot 1MW commercial scale + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 40 kW +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Philadelphia Navy Yard: UESC Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Navy Yard Navy Yard UESC project with PGW ESCO Perspective Presented by Christopher Abbuehl Constellation Energy Integrated Energy Company * Generation - 12,000+ megawatts of owned generating capacity (fossil, nuclear &renewable ) * Electric Commodity - 62 million MWH peak load served to retail power customers (2010) Trusted supplier to 2/3 of the Fortune 100 * Gas Commodity - 334 million mmBTUs of natural gas delivered in open retail markets (2010) * Owns Baltimore Gas and Electric ESCO Services * More than 25 years of comprehensive energy projects through performance contracting. * Over 4,000 Energy Savings Projects implemented for large governmental, institutional, and private sector customers Constellation Energy Key Facts 2 * Established: 1816 *

222

Integrated Data Base report--1993: U.S. spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel; also, commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1993. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 256 refs., 38 figs., 141 tabs.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Koizumi stands firm to Chirac on Japan hosting nuclear project Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi said Sunday that Japan stood firm in its attempt to host a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Koizumi said Sunday that Japan stood firm in its attempt to host a revolutionary nuclear reactor, amid EUKoizumi stands firm to Chirac on Japan hosting nuclear project 27/03/2005 Prime Minister Junichiro Jacques Chirac discussed the deadlock over the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER

224

The management of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Classified Enterprise Secure Network project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Original publisher: Washington, DC : U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Inspector General, Office of Audit Services, [2009] OCLC Number: (OCoLC)712149327 Subject: Nuclear weapons information -- Security measures -- Evaluation. Excerpt: ... support of ESN. ...

United States. Dept. of Energy. Office

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

John Collins

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Planned Geothermal Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planned Geothermal Capacity Planned Geothermal Capacity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Planned Geothermal Capacity This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. General List of Development Projects Map of Development Projects Planned Geothermal Capacity in the U.S. is reported by the Geothermal Energy Association via their Annual U.S. Geothermal Power Production and Development Report (April 2011). Related Pages: GEA Development Phases Geothermal Development Projects Add.png Add a new Geothermal Project Please be sure the project does not already exist in the list below before adding - perhaps under a different name. Technique Developer Phase Project Type Capacity Estimate (MW) Location Geothermal Area Geothermal Region GEA Report

227

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

228

A reduction theorem for capacity of positive maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove a reduction theorem for capacity of positive maps of finite dimensional C*-algebras, thus reducing the computation of capacity to the case when the image of a nonscalar projection is never a projection.

Erling Stormer

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Loads, capacity, and failure rate modeling  

SciTech Connect

Both failure rate and load capacity (stress-strength) interferenece methodologies are employed in the reliability analysis at nuclear facilities. Both of the above have been utilized in a heuristic failure rate model in terms of load capacity inference. Analytical solutions are used to demonstrate that infant mortality and random aging failures may be expressed implicity in terms of capacity variability, load variability, and capacity deterioration, and that mode interactions play a role in the formation of the bathtub curve for failure rates.

Lewis, E.E.; Chen, Hsin-Chieh

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test conducted at the project Gnome Underground Nuclear Test Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A radionuclide tracer test was conducted in 1963 by the U.S. Geological Survey at the Project Gnome underground nuclear test site, approximately 40 km southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The tracer study was carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to study the transport behavior of radionuclides in fractured rock aquifers. The Culebra Dolomite was chosen for the test because it was considered to be a reasonable analogue of the fractured carbonate aquifer at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the principal location of U.S. underground nuclear tests. Project Gnome was one of a small number of underground nuclear tests conducted by the AEC at sites distant from the NTS. The Gnome device was detonated on December 10, 1961 in an evaporate unit at a depth of 360 m below ground surface. Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close these offsite nuclear test areas. An early step in this process is performance of a preliminary risk analysis of the hazard posed by each site. The Desert Research Institute has performed preliminary hydrologic risk evaluations for the groundwater transport pathway at Gnome. That evaluation included the radioactive tracer test as a possible source because the test introduced radionuclides directly into the Culebra Dolomite, which is the only aquifer at the site. This report presents a preliminary evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test as a source for radionuclide migration in the Culebra Dolomite. The results of this study will assist in planning site characterization activities and refining estimates of the radionuclide source for comprehensive models of groundwater transport st the Gnome site.

Pohll, G.; Pohlmann, K.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

"1. W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",3664 "2. South Texas Project","Nuclear","STP Nuclear Operating Co",2560  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas" Texas" "1. W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",3664 "2. South Texas Project","Nuclear","STP Nuclear Operating Co",2560 "3. Martin Lake","Coal","TXU Generation Co LP",2425 "4. Comanche Peak","Nuclear","TXU Generation Co LP",2406 "5. Monticello","Coal","TXU Generation Co LP",1890 "6. Sabine","Gas","Entergy Texas Inc.",1814 "7. Limestone","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",1689 "8. Fayette Power Project","Coal","Lower Colorado River Authority",1641 "9. Forney Energy Center","Gas","FPLE Forney LP",1640

232

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

233

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

234

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

235

3D design tools improve efficiency and accuracy of a Hanford site nuclear waste storage project  

SciTech Connect

The complex effort of cleaning up the Hanford K Basins is separated into several individual projects. Fluor Hanford and Fluor Federal Services modeled key elements using a 3D parametric modeling program for mechanical design with training animations.

NIELSEN, B.L.

2003-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

C.2 analysis of the environmental effects of the Nuclear Facilities Modernization project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis indicates that the potential impacts associated with the current/projected Mound tritium operations are adequately bounded by the existing environmental impacts analyzed in the FEIS. It also indicates that the incremental impacts of the NFM project will make a positive contribution to the overall impact of current/projected tritium operations. Except for minor and normal temporary conditions during the construction and demolition phases, the NFM project would measurably reduce the likelihood of adverse consequences to the environment. Relocation of the PE/PD laboratory operations from the SW/R Tritium Complex to the T Building will place these operations in a safer, state-of-the-art glovebox systems. Through the utilization of modern laboratory equipment and enhanced containment, the project will reduce the quantity of routine airborne tritium releases and volume of solid tritiated wastes resulting from routine PE/PD laboratory operations. The increased reliance placed on engineered safety aspects and stronger mitigative measures by the project will also reduce the risk associated with these operations by reducing both the probability and consequences of unusual occurrences involving uncontrolled tritium releases.

NONE

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Comparative analysis of structural concrete Quality Assurance practices on nine nuclear and three fossil fuel power plant construction projects. Final summary report  

SciTech Connect

A summary of two reports, COO/4120-1 and COO/4120-2, is given. A comparative analysis was made of the Quality Assurance practices related to the structural concrete phase on nine nuclear and three fossil fuel power plant projects which are (or have been) under construction in the United States in the past ten years. For the nuclear projects the analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to the applicable criteria of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B as well as to the pertinent regulatory requirements and industry standards. For the fossil projects the analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to criteria similar to those which were applicable in the nuclear situation. The major emphasis was placed on the construction aspects of the structural concrete phase of each project. The engineering and design aspects were examined whenever they interfaced with the construction aspects.

Willenbrock, J.H.; Thomas, H.R. Jr.; Burati, J.J. Jr.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets”, Papers andand Steven Stoft, “Installed Capacity and Price Caps: Oil onElectricity Markets Have a Capacity requirement? If So, How

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

240

Spent Nuclear Fuel project photon heat deposition calculation for hygrogen generation within MCO  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three types of water conditions are analyzed for nuclear heat deposition in a MCO: fully flooded, thick film, and thin film. These heat deposition rates within water can be used to determine gas generation during the different phases of Spent Fuel removal and processing for storage.

Lan, J.S.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Spent nuclear fuels project: FY 1995 multi-year program plan, WBS {number_sign}1.4  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) program is to safely, reliably, and efficiently manage, condition, transport, and store Department of Energy (DOE)-owned SNF, so that it meets acceptance criteria for disposal in a permanent repository. The Hanford Site Spent Nuclear Fuel strategic plan for accomplishing the project mission is: Establish near-term safe storage in the 105-K Basins; Complete national Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process to obtain a decision on how and where spent nuclear fuel will be managed on the site; Define and establish alternative interim storage on site or transport off site to support implementation of the NEPA decision; and Define and establish a waste package qualified for final disposition. This report contains descriptions of the following: Work Breakdown Structure; WBS Dictionary; Responsibility Assignment Matrix; Program Logic Diagrams; Program Master Baseline Schedule; Program Performance Baseline Schedule; Milestone List; Milestone Description Sheets; Cost Baseline Summary by Year; Basis of Estimate; Waste Type Data; Planned Staffing; and Fiscal Year Work Plan.

Denning, J.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nuclear Fabrication Consortium  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

Levesque, Stephen

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

Evolution of Safeguards over Time: Past, Present, and Projected Facilities, Material, and Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the past trends and evolution of safeguards over time and projects growth through 2030. The report documents the amount of nuclear material and facilities under safeguards from 1970 until present, along with the corresponding budget. Estimates for the future amount of facilities and material under safeguards are made according to non-nuclear-weapons states’ (NNWS) plans to build more nuclear capacity and sustain current nuclear infrastructure. Since nuclear energy is seen as a clean and economic option for base load electric power, many countries are seeking to either expand their current nuclear infrastructure, or introduce nuclear power. In order to feed new nuclear power plants and sustain existing ones, more nuclear facilities will need to be built, and thus more nuclear material will be introduced into the safeguards system. The projections in this study conclude that a zero real growth scenario for the IAEA safeguards budget will result in large resource gaps in the near future.

Kollar, Lenka; Mathews, Caroline E.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

The report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel discusses the technical, regulatory, and economic aspects of spent-fuel storage at nuclear reactors. The report is intended to provide legislators state officials and citizens in the Midwest with information on spent-fuel inventories, current and projected additional storage requirements, licensing, storage technologies, and actions taken by various utilities in the Midwest to augment their capacity to store spent nuclear fuel on site.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Conceptual design report for the ICPP spent nuclear fuel dry storage project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual design is presented for a facility to transfer spent nuclear fuel from shipping casks to dry storage containers, and to safely store those containers at ICPP at INEL. The spent fuels to be handled at the new facility are identified and overall design and operating criteria established. Physical configuration of the facility and the systems used to handle the SNF are described. Detailed cost estimate for design and construction of the facility is presented.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Need for Deployment of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research, development, design, construction, and operation of a prototype nuclear reactor to produce electricity and hydrogen. The NGNP is intended to be a collaborative effort among the U.S. Department of Energy, the Idaho National Laboratory, and appropriate industrial partners. It is also intended to include international technology exchanges. The NGNP will utilize what is commonly referred to as a Generation IV design. Generation III designs are the latest reactor designs licensed or certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Generation III+ includes the new designs currently under review by the NRC and anticipated to begin operation during the next 10 to 20 years. Generation IV designs are more advanced and are expected to be ready for commercial construction after 2020. The Generation IV designs may include new or additional features such as the following: • capability for hydrogen production 2 • use of recycled fuel • use of plutonium and other fission by-products • a more efficient fuel cycle with lower generation of waste products • higher safety and physical protection levels • higher reliability • better economic performance. The ANS also supports the federal government efforts in support of a robust Generation IV development program in parallel with current Generation III+ efforts. 3 Sequential utilization of new or different designs and technologies will ensure ever-increasing safety levels and will help nuclear energy fulfill its vital role in worldwide electricity generation.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Comparative analysis of structural concrete quality assurance practices on nine nuclear power plant construction projects. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The basic objective of this research effort was to perform a comparative analysis of the Quality Assurance practices related to the structural concrete phase on nine nuclear power plant projects which are (or have been) under construction in the United States in the past ten years. This analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to the applicable criteria of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B as well as to the pertinent regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major emphasis was placed on the construction aspects of the structural concrete phase of each project. The engineering and design aspects were examined whenever they interfaced with the construction aspects. For those aspects of the Quality Assurance system which can be considered managerial in nature (i.e., organizational relationships, types of Quality Assurance programs, corrective action procedures, etc.) an attempt has been made to present the alternative approaches that were identified. For those aspects of the Quality Assurance system which are technical in nature (i.e., the frequency of testing for slump, compressive strength, etc.) an attempt has been made to present a comparative analysis between projects and in relation to the recommended or mandated practices presented in the appropriate industry codes and standards.

Willenbrock, J.H.; Thomas, H.R. Jr.; Burati, J.L. Jr.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Success of the first nuclear power plant built on China`s self-reliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Having overcome a series of difficulties and hard points, the first Chinese indigenous nuclear power plant, Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant of PWR type with the capacity of 300MW(e) is now in steady operation. Through tremendous works done for this project great achievements and experience as well as lessons learned have been obtained for systematic acquisition of nuclear power technology. The sound fact has demonstrated that China has the ability to develop nuclear power mainly depending on self-reliance.

Yu, O.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Some Materials Degradation Issues in the U.S. High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Study (The Yucca Mountain Project)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safe disposal of radioactive waste requires that the waste be isolated from the environment until radioactive decay has reduced its toxicity to innocuous levels for plants, animals, and humans. All of the countries currently studying the options for disposing of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) have selected deep geologic formations to be the primary barrier for accomplishing this isolation. In U.S.A., the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) designated Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site to be characterized for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) disposal. Long-term containment of waste and subsequent slow release of radionuclides into the geosphere will rely on a system of natural and engineered barriers including a robust waste containment design. The waste package design consists of a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 cylindrical barrier surrounding a Type 316 stainless steel inner structural vessel. The waste package is covered by a mailbox-shaped drip shield composed primarily of Ti Grade 7 with Ti Grade 24 structural support members. The U.S. Yucca Mountain Project has been studying and modeling the degradation issues of the relevant materials for some 20 years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation processes based on the past 20 years studies on Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) materials degradation issues with focus on interaction between the in-drift environmental conditions and long-term materials degradation of waste packages and drip shields within the repository system during the 10,000 years regulatory period. This paper provides an overview of the current understanding of the likely degradation behavior of the waste package and drip shield in the repository after the permanent closure of the facility. The degradation scenario discussed in this paper include aging and phase instability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys. The effects of microbial activity and radiation on degradation of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys are also discussed. Further, for titanium alloys, the effects of fluorides, bromides, calcium ions, and galvanic coupling to less noble metals are further considered. It is concluded that, as far as materials degradation is concerned, the materials and design adopted in the U.S. Yucca Mountain Project will provide sufficient safety margins within the 10,000-years regulatory period.

F. Hua; P. Pasupathi; N. Brown; K. Mon

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

252

California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

253

New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

254

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

255

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

256

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Lessons Learned Report on the Combined Construction and Operating License/Design Certification Demonstration Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report August 30, 2012 Prepared by Longenecker and Associates DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not

257

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

259

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

260

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

262

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project- November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project

263

HOW MANY DID YOU SAY? HISTORICAL AND PROJECTED SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL SHIPMENTS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1964 - 2048  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

No comprehensive, up-to-date, official database exists for spent nuclear fuel shipments in the United States. The authors review the available data sources, and conclude that the absence of such a database can only be rectified by a major research effort, similar to that carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1990s. Based on a variety of published references, and unpublished data from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the authors estimate cumulative U.S. shipments of commercial spent fuel for the period 1964-2001. The cumulative estimates include quantity shipped, number of cask-shipments, and shipment-miles, by truck and by rail. The authors review previous estimates of future spent fuel shipments, including contractor reports prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NRC, and the State of Nevada. The DOE Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Yucca Mountain includes projections of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive was te shipments for two inventory disposal scenarios (24 years and 38 years) and two national transportation modal scenarios (''mostly legal-weight truck'' and ''mostly rail''). Commercial spent fuel would compromise about 90 percent of the wastes shipped to the repository. The authors estimate potential shipments to Yucca Mountain over 38 years (2010-2048) for the DOE ''mostly legal-weight truck'' and ''mostly rail'' scenarios, and for an alternative modal mix scenario based on current shipping capabilities of the 72 commercial reactor sites. The cumulative estimates of future spent fuel shipments include quantity shipped, number of cask-shipments, and shipment-miles, by legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, rail and barge.

Halstead, Robert J.; Dilger, Fred

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System Cold Demonstration Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) provides an interface between large and small casks and between storage-only and transportation casks. It permits decommissioning of reactor pools after shutdown and allows the use of large storage-only casks for temporary onsite storage of spent nuclear fuel irrespective of reactor or fuel handling limitations at a reactor site. A cold demonstration of the DTS prototype was initiated in August 1996 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The major components demonstrated included the fuel assembly handling subsystem, the shield plug/lid handling subsystem, the cask interface subsystem, the demonstration control subsystem, a support frame, and a closed circuit television and lighting system. The demonstration included a complete series of DTS operations from source cask receipt and opening through fuel transfer and closure of the receiving cask. The demonstration included both normal operations and recovery from off-normal events. It was designed to challenge the system to determine whether there were any activities that could be made to jeopardize the activities of another function or its safety. All known interlocks were challenged. The equipment ran smoothly and functioned as designed. A few "bugs" were corrected. Prior to completion of the demonstration testing, a number of DTS prototype systems were modified to apply lessons learned to date. Additional testing was performed to validate the modifications. In general, all the equipment worked exceptionally well. The demonstration also helped confirm cost estimates that had been made at several points in the development of the system.

Christensen, Max R; McKinnon, M. A.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Dominion Virginia Power Cooperative Project U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-05ID14635 Construction and Operating License Demonstration Project Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves to summarize the major activities completed as part of Virginia Electric and Power Company's North Anna construction and operating license demonstration project with DOE. Project successes, lessons learned, and suggestions for improvement are discussed. Objectives of the North Anna COL project included preparation and submittal of a COLA to the USNRC incorporating ESBWR technology for a third unit a the North Anna Power Station site, support for the NRC review process and mandatory hearing, obtaining NRC approval of the COLA and issuance of a COL, and development of a business case necessary to support a decision on building a new nuclear power plant at the North Anna site.

Eugene S. Grecheck David P. Batalo

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

267

Efficient Method for Quantum Number Projection and Its Application to Tetrahedral Nuclear States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed an efficient method for quantum number projection from most general HFB type mean-field states, where all the symmetries like axial symmetry, number conservation, parity and time-reversal invariance are broken. Applying the method, we have microscopically calculated, for the first time, the energy spectra based on the exotic tetrahedral deformation in $^{108,110}$Zr. The nice low-lying rotational spectra, which have all characteristic features of the molecular tetrahedral rotor, are obtained for large tetrahedral deformation, $\\alpha_{32} \\gtsim 0.25$, while the spectra are of transitional nature between vibrational and rotational with rather high excitation energies for $\\alpha_{32}\\approx 0.1-0.2$

S. Tagami; Y. R. Shimizu; J. Dudek

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Budget projections 1990, 1991, and 1992 for research in high energy nuclear physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research programs in experimental high energy physics are carried out at Harvard under the general supervision of a departmental faculty committee on high energy physics. The committee members are: G.W. Brandenburg, M. Franklin, S. Geer, R. J. Glauber, K. Kinoshita, F. M. Pipkin, R. F. Schwitters, K. Strauch, M. E. Law, and R. Wilson. Of these individuals, Professors R.J. Glauber, F.M. Pipkin, R.F.Schwitters, K. Strauch, and R. Wilson are the principal investigators with whom a number of junior faculty members and post-doctoral research fellows are associated. Dr. Brandenburg is the Director of the High Energy Physics Laboratory and administers the DOE high energy physics contract. Professor Schwitters is currently on leave of absence as Director of the Superconducting Super Collider project. In the fall of 1990 Professor G. Feldman, who is currently at SLAC, will join the Harvard faculty and become a principal investigator. Harvard is planning to make one or two additional senior faculty appointments in experimental high energy physics over the next two years. The principal goals of the work described here are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. Harvard`s educational efforts are concentrated in graduate education. These budget projections cover all of the Harvard based high energy physics experimental activities. The {open_quotes}umbrella{close_quotes} nature of this contract greatly simplifies support of essential central technical and computer services and helps the group to take advantage of new physics opportunities and to respond to unexpected needs. The funding for the operation of the HEPL facility is shared equally by the experimental groups.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Budget projections 1989, 1990, and 1991 for research in high energy nuclear physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research programs in experimental high energy physics are carried out at Harvard under the general supervision of a departmental faculty committee on high energy physics. The committee members are: G.W. Brandenburg, S. Geer, R.J. Glauber, K. Kinoshita, R. Nickerson, F.M. Pipkin, R.F. Schwitters, M. Shapiro, K. Strauch, R. Vanelli, and R. Wilson. Of these individuals, Professors R.J. Glauber, F.M. Pipkin, R.F. Schwitters, K. Strauch, and R. Wilson are the principal investigators with whom a number of junior faculty members and post-doctoral research fellows are associated. Dr. Brandenburg is the Director of the High Energy Physics Laboratory and administers the DOE high energy physics contract. Professor Schwitters is currently on leave of absence as Director of the Superconducting Super Collider project. In the fall of 1990 Professor G. Feldman, who is currently at SLAC, will join the Harvard faculty and become a principal investigator. Harvard is planning to make one or two additional senior faculty appointments in experimental high energy physics over the next two years. The principal goals of the work described here are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world. Harvard`s educational efforts are concentrated in graduate education, where they are currently supporting 15 research students. These budget projections cover all of the Harvard based high energy physics experimental activities. The {open_quotes}umbrella{close_quotes} nature of this contract greatly simplifies support of essential central technical and computer services and helps the group to take advantage of new physics opportunities and to respond to unexpected needs. The funding for the operation of the HEPL facility is shared equally by the experimental groups.

Not Available

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

GIZ-Developing Climate Policy Capacity within the South African Department  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Capacity within the South African Department Policy Capacity within the South African Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Developing Climate Policy Capacity within DEA Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Partner South African Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA), Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/weltweit/ Program Start 2009 Program End 2011 Country South Africa UN Region Eastern Africa References Championing Action against Climate Change in South Africa[1] "This project will support DEA in its climate policy capacity building, in

271

NUCLEAR MERCHANT SHIP REACTOR PROJECT QUARTERLY TECHNICAL REPORT FOR JULY- SEPTEMBER 1958  

SciTech Connect

Studies of the completed one-tweifth scale model of the power plant resulted in some auxiliary system arrangement changes. The large margin of safety inherent in the NMSR design is further emphasized by continued thermal and hydraulic studies. Core nuclear studies resulted in the elimination of burnable poison, since a probable core life of 822 days at 63.5 Mw can be achieved without burnable poison. Experiments by the Critical Experment Laboratory are described. The fuel enrichment was set at 4.20 wt.% U/sup 235/ for the 16 inner pass fuel elements and 4.60 wt.% U/sup 235/ for the 16 outer pass elements. The change from tube sheet fuel element design to the brazed ferrule design reduced the bundle length from 72 to 69 in. The basic reactor internals designs were established. Modlfications were made to the pressurizer, primary coolant pumps, steam generators, primary gate valves, and thermal insulation in the primary system. An 8 in. maximum lead thickness of secondary shield is required to reduce dose rate in passenger spaces to 0.5 rem/year. An 8 in. required minimum polyethylene thickness of secondary shield was calculated to ensure effective removal of the inelastically scattered fast flux. (For preceding period see BAW- 1118.) (W.D.M.)

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

273

Comparison of Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Comparison of Productive Capacity Comparisons of base case productive capacities for this and all previous studies were made (Figure B1).

274

Tables - Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tables: 1: Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2009: PDF: 2: Production Capacity of Operable ...

275

Budget projections 1988, 1989, and 1990 for research in high energy nuclear physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research programs in experimental high energy physics are carried out at Harvard under the general supervision of a departmental faculty committee on high energy physics. Professor R.F. Schwitters is currently chairman of this committee. The committee members are: G.W. Brandenburg, S. Geer, R.J. Glauber, K. Kinoshita, R. Nickerson, F.M. Pipkin, J. Rohlf, C. Rubbia, R.F. Schwitters, M. Shapiro, K. Strauch, R. Vanelli, and R. Wilson. Of these individuals, Professors R.J. Glauber, F.M. Pipkin, C. Rubbia, R.F. Schwitters, K. Strauch, and R. Wilson are the principal investigators with whom a number of junior faculty members and post-doctoral research fellows are associated. Dr. Brandenburg (Associate Director, High Energy Physics Laboratory) administers the High Energy Physics Laboratory and is in charge of the Computer Facility. Professor Rubbia is currently on leave of absence and will leave Harvard on December 31, 1988 to become the Director General of CERN. A reduced UA1 effort will remain at Harvard after Professor Rubbia`s departure. Harvard is planning to make one or two senior faculty appointments in experimental high energy physics sometime in 1988-89. The principal goals of the work described here are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. Harvard`s educational efforts are concentrated in graduate education, where they are currently supporting 15 research students. In addition, undergraduate students work in projects at HEPL during the academic year and over summers. Many of these students have gone on to graduate school studying physics at Harvard and elsewhere.

Not Available

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Critical analysis of the Hanford spent nuclear fuel project activity based cost estimate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, the SNFP developed a baseline change request (BCR) and submitted it to DOE-RL for approval. The schedule was formally evaluated to have a 19% probability of success [Williams, 1998]. In December 1997, DOE-RL Manager John Wagoner approved the BCR contingent upon a subsequent independent review of the new baseline. The SNFP took several actions during the first quarter of 1998 to prepare for the independent review. The project developed the Estimating Requirements and Implementation Guide [DESH, 1998] and trained cost account managers (CAMS) and other personnel involved in the estimating process in activity-based cost (ABC) estimating techniques. The SNFP then applied ABC estimating techniques to develop the basis for the December Baseline (DB) and documented that basis in Basis of Estimate (BOE) books. These BOEs were provided to DOE in April 1998. DOE commissioned Professional Analysis, Inc. (PAI) to perform a critical analysis (CA) of the DB. PAI`s review formally began on April 13. PAI performed the CA, provided three sets of findings to the SNFP contractor, and initiated reconciliation meetings. During the course of PAI`s review, DOE directed the SNFP to develop a new baseline with a higher probability of success. The contractor transmitted the new baseline, which is referred to as the High Probability Baseline (HPB), to DOE on April 15, 1998 [Williams, 1998]. The HPB was estimated to approach a 90% confidence level on the start of fuel movement [Williams, 1998]. This high probability resulted in an increased cost and a schedule extension. To implement the new baseline, the contractor initiated 26 BCRs with supporting BOES. PAI`s scope was revised on April 28 to add reviewing the HPB and the associated BCRs and BOES.

Warren, R.N.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nuclear & Uranium - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear & Uranium Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Uranium & Nuclear Fuel Nuclear Power Plants Radioactive Waste International All Nuclear Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Nuclear Plants and Reactors Projections Uranium All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for electricity › chart showing U.S. electricity generation by fuel, all sectors Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. Quarterly uranium production data › image chart of Quarterly uranium production as described in linked report Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly, 3rd Quarter 2013, October 31, 2013. Uprates can increase U.S. nuclear capacity substantially without building

278

Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement for Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center A Summary and Guide for Stakeholders DOE/EIS-0226-D (Revised) November 2008 The West Valley Site Availability of the Revised Draft EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center For further information on this Draft EIS, or to request a copy please contact: Cathern Bohan, EIS Document Manager West Valley Demonstration Project U.S. Department of Energy Ashford Office Complex 9030 Route 219 West Valley, NY 14171 Telephone: 716-942-4159 Fax: 716-942-4703 E-mail: catherine.m.bohan@wv.doe.gov Printed with soy ink on recycled paper

279

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

280

1 hour, 25 minutes ago Japan will ask the European Union to declare it a "joint host" of a revolutionary nuclear energy project even if the reactor is located in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" of a revolutionary nuclear energy project even if the reactor is located in France, a newspaper said. The Nihon to 'joint host' revolutionary nuclear reactor 6/6/05 8:23 AMPrint Story: Japan to ask EU to 'joint host' revolutionary nuclear reactor on Yahoo! News Page 1 of 1http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20050606/sc

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

282

Capacity planning in a transitional economy: What issues? Which models?  

SciTech Connect

This paper is devoted to an exploration of the important issues facing the Russian power generation system and its evolution in the foreseeable future and the kinds of modeling approaches that capture those issues. These issues include, for example, (1) trade-offs between investments in upgrading and refurbishment of existing thermal (fossil-fired) capacity and safety enhancements in existing nuclear capacity versus investment in new capacity, (2) trade-offs between investment in completing unfinished (under construction) projects based on their original design versus investment in new capacity with improved design, (3) incorporation of demand-side management options (investments in enhancing end-use efficiency, for example) within the planning framework, (4) consideration of the spatial dimensions of system planning including investments in upgrading electric transmission networks or fuel shipment networks and incorporating hydroelectric generation, (5) incorporation of environmental constraints and (6) assessment of uncertainty and evaluation of downside risk. Models for exploring these issues include low power shutdown (LPS) which are computationally very efficient, though approximate, and can be used to perform extensive sensitivity analyses to more complex models which can provide more detailed answers but are computationally cumbersome and can only deal with limited issues. The paper discusses which models can usefully treat a wide range of issues within the priorities facing decision makers in the Russian power sector and integrate the results with investment decisions in the wider economy.

Mubayi, V.; Leigh, R.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bright, R.N. [Anylec Research, Inc., Bayport, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

AEO2012 has energy projections and analyses of legislation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary › All Reports ... weather; gasoline; capacity; nuclear; exports; forecast; View All Tags ...

284

OpenEI - Electric Capacity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Zealand Energy New Zealand Energy Outlook (2010): Electricity and Generation Capacity http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/357 The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included.

License

285

RM Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in 1990. The projects serve Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska and Wyoming with 830 MW of installed capacity and 3,360 miles of transmission line. About Power Marketing...

286

Network Routing Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define the routing capacity of a network to be the supremum of all possible fractional message throughputs achievable by routing. We prove that the routing capacity of every network is achievable and rational, we present an algorithm for its computation, and we prove that every non-negative rational number is the routing capacity of some network. We also determine the routing capacity for various example networks. Finally, we discuss the extension of routing capacity to fractional coding solutions and show that the coding capacity of a network is independent of the alphabet used.

Jillian Cannons; Randall Dougherty; Christopher Freiling; Kenneth Zeger

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Table F9. World installed geothermal generating capacity by region ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2011 259 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel

288

North American LNG Project Sourcebook  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a status of the development of LNG Import Terminal projects in North America, and includes 1-2 page profiles of 63 LNG projects in North America which are either in operation, under construction, or under development. For each project, the sourcebook provides information on the following elements: project description, project ownership, project status, projected operation date, storage capacity, sendout capacity, and pipeline interconnection.

NONE

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

GAO-04-611 Nuclear Waste: Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Committee on Government Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives June 2004 NUCLEAR WASTE Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals GAO-04-611 www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-04-611. To view the full product, including the scope and methodology, click on the link above. For more information, contact Robin M. Nazzaro at (202) 512-3841 or nazzaror@gao.gov. Highlights of GAO-04-611, a report to the Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives June 2004 NUCLEAR WASTE Absence of Key Management Reforms on Hanford's Cleanup Project Adds to Challenges of Achieving Cost and Schedule Goals DOE's initial approach called for treating 10 percent of the site's high-level waste by 2018 and for operating the plant until treatment was completed in

290

Publications 2000 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Publications 2011 Publications 2010 Publications 2009...

291

Seversk Plutonium Production Elimination Project (SPPEP) | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seversk Plutonium Production Elimination Project (SPPEP) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

292

Instrumentation and Control, Human System Interface, and Information Technology Requirements Project Plan for Nuclear Power Plant Lo ng-Term Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plant owners are looking to extend the operating life of their plants to 80 years and potentially longer. Instrumentation and control, human system interface, and information technologies have changed drastically since the plants were built and will change even more drastically before the plants reach the end of their operating life. A project plan to develop requirements for these technologies is defined here. These requirements will enable plants to better identify future solutions that w...

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

293

Custom Renewable Energy Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Trust of Oregon offers cash incentives and project development assistance for renewable energy projects that are 20 megawatts (MW) or less in capacity. These custom incentives are part of...

294

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL's Consolidated Sequestration Research Program (CSRP) Project Number FWP ESD09-056 Barry Freifeld Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits and Goals of GEO-SEQ * Technical Status - Otway Project (CO2CRC) - In Salah (BP, Sonatrach and Statoil) - Ketzin Project (GFZ, Potsdam) - Aquistore (PTRC) * Accomplishments and Summary * Future Plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed: - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage capacity estimation - Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence.

295

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline I. Benefits II. Project Overview III. Technical Status A. Background B. Results IV. Accomplishments V. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals. - Prediction of CO 2 storage capacity. * Project benefits. - Workforce/Student Training: Support of 3 student GAs in use of multiphase flow and geochemical models simulating CO 2 injection. - Support of Missouri DGLS Sequestration Program. 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Project Goals and Objectives. 1. Training graduate students in use of multi-phase flow models related to CO 2 sequestration. 2. Training graduate students in use of geochemical models to assess interaction of CO

296

Installed Geothermal Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Capacity Geothermal Capacity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Installed Geothermal Capacity International Market Map of U.S. Geothermal Power Plants List of U.S. Geothermal Power Plants Throughout the world geothermal energy is looked at as a potential source of renewable base-load power. As of 2005 there was 8,933 MW of installed power capacity within 24 countries. The International Geothermal Association (IGA) reported 55,709 GWh per year of geothermal electricity. The generation from 2005 to 2010 increased to 67,246 GWh, representing a 20% increase in the 5 year period. The IGA has projected that by 2015 the new installed capacity will reach 18,500 MW, nearly 10,000 MW greater than 2005. [1] Countries with the greatest increase in installed capacity (MW) between

297

Property:PlannedCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PlannedCapacity PlannedCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PlannedCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The total planned capacity for a given area, region or project. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

298

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management's Yucca Mountain Project and the Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) programs. Efforts...

302

Cooperative Project on Burnup Credit--Data and Analysis for Spent Nuclear Fuel Transport and Storage in Burnup Credit Casks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key part of EPRI's research is directed towards assuring efficient and effective management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from commercial nuclear power plants. A summary of the 2005 burnup-credit-related activities jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of National Transportation, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is presented. A simple, but straightforward, approach for quantifying the benefits of PWR fission product burnup credit...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation,...

304

ORISE: Capacity Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps government agencies and organizations develop a solid infrastructure through capacity building. Capacity building refers to activities that improve an organization's ability to achieve its mission or a person's ability do his or her job more effectively. For organizations, capacity building may relate to almost any aspect of its work-from leadership and administration to program development and implementation. Strengthening an organizational infrastructure can help agencies and community-based organizations more quickly identify targeted audiences for

305

Development of a process for high capacity arc heater production of silicon for solar arrays. Low-cost solar array project, silicon materials task. Quarterly technical report, January--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program has been established at Westinghouse to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost. The program consists of a four-phase effort directed to the development and implementation of this technology. The initial phase of the program, Phase I, was an eleven-month study funded by JPL which was completed in September, 1977. Phase I was defined as a comprehensive feasibility and engineering review of the reaction process, and a formulation of the design for a test system to experimentally verify the high temperature reaction. Phase II, currently underway, involves a multi-task approach including (1) a detailed engineering analysis of the entire process; (2) design, fabrication, and assembly of the experimental system; (3) experimental testing of the reduction reaction to produce silicon and (4) complementary research programs to augment the experimental system design. The Phase II effort was initiated in October, 1977, and work is described in detail on the various stages of this effort.

Reed, W.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Modeling Capacity Reservation Contract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we model a scenario where a chip designer (buyer) buys capacity from chip manufacturers (suppliers) in the presence of demand uncertainty faced by the buyer. We assume that the buyer knows the probability distribution of his demand. The supplier offers the buyer to reserve capacity in advance at a price that is lower than the historical average of the spot price. The supplier’s price (if the buyer reserves capacity in advance) is function of her capacity, demand for her capacity, unit production cost, the average spot market price and the amount of capacity reserved by the buyer. Based on these parameters we derive the price the suppliers will charge. We formulate the problem from the buyer’s perspective. The buyer’s decisions are how much capacity to reserve and from how many suppliers. The optimal solution is obtained numerically. Our model addresses the following issues that are not covered in the current literature on capacity reservation models. In the existing literature the supplier’s price is an exogenous parameter. We model the supplier’s price from relevant parameters mentioned above. This makes our model richer. For example, if the expected capacity utilization for the supplier is likely to be low then the supplier will charge a lower price for capacity reservation. In reality, the buyer sources from multiple suppliers. Most mathematical models on capacity reservation, we are aware of, assumes a single buyer and a single supplier. We generalize this to a single buyer and multiple suppliers.

Jishnu Hazra; B. Mahadevan; Sudhi Seshadri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states 1985 through 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication presents information on wellhead productive capacity and a projection of gas production requirements. A history of natural gas production and productive capacity at the wellhead, along with a projection of the same, is illustrated.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project No. 02 103 Innovative Low Cost Approaches to Automating QA/QC of Fuel Particle Production Using On Line Nondestructive Methods for Higher Reliability Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

This Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project was tasked with exploring, adapting, developing and demonstrating innovative nondestructive test methods to automate nuclear coated particle fuel inspection so as to provide the United States (US) with necessary improved and economical Quality Assurance and Control (QA/QC) that is needed for the fuels for several reactor concepts being proposed for both near term deployment [DOE NE & NERAC, 2001] and Generation IV nuclear systems. Replacing present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, with higher speed automated nondestructive methods will make fuel production for advanced reactors economically feasible. For successful deployment of next generation reactors that employ particle fuels, or fuels in the form of pebbles based on particles, extremely large numbers of fuel particles will require inspection at throughput rates that do not significantly impact the proposed manufacturing processes. The focus of the project is nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies that can be automated for production speeds and make either: (I) On Process Measurements or (II) In Line Measurements. The inspection technologies selected will enable particle “quality” qualification as a particle or group of particles passes a sensor. A multiple attribute dependent signature will be measured and used for qualification or process control decisions. A primary task for achieving this objective is to establish standard signatures for both good/acceptable particles and the most problematic types of defects using several nondestructive methods.

Ahmed, Salahuddin; Batishko, Charles R.; Flake, Matthew; Good, Morris S.; Mathews, Royce; Morra, Marino; Panetta, Paul D.; Pardini, Allan F.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Tucker, Brian J.; Weier, Dennis R.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lowden, Richard A.; Miller, James H.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

309

Extended nuclear plant outages raise Southern California wholesale ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary › All Reports ... weather; gasoline; capacity; exports; nuclear; forecast; View All Tags ...

310

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * This research project develops a reservoir scale CO 2 plume migration model at the Sleipner project, Norway. The Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea is the world's first commercial scale geological carbon storage project. 4D seismic data have delineated the CO 2 plume migration history. The relatively long history and high fidelity data make

311

Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects: report for January-March 1985. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geochemical information relevant to the retention of radionuclides by the Hanford Site (in basalt) and the Yucca Mountain site (in tuff), candidate high-level nuclear waste geologic repositories being developed by US Department of Energy (DOE) projects, is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Our evaluation of the sorption of technetium by basalt/groundwater systems was essentially completed this quarter and the results summarized; we conclude that the experimental methodology and results reported by the DOE for the Hanford Site have not conclusively established that significant retardation of technetium migration may be provided by phases present in the basalts of the Hanford Site. We have shown that sodium boltwoodite is the saturating uranium solid phase in two basalt/groundwater systems. Because thermodynamic data are not available for sodium boltwoodite, calculated solubilities for uranium are erroneous in these systems. Results of radionuclide solubility/speciation calculations, published by the DOE for the Yucca Mountain site, were evaluated this quarter under our geochemical modeling task. We express concerns relative to the inherent limitations of such calculations. Samples of Yucca Mountain tuff and J-13 well water were received for use in our planned radionuclide sorption/solubility experiments. These Yucca Mountain materials will be used to evaluate radionuclide sorption and apparent concentration limit values published by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project. 40 refs., 5 figs., 16 tabs.

Kelmers, A.D.; Seeley, F.G.; Arnold, W.D.; Blencoe, J.G.; Meyer, R.E.; Jacobs, G.K.; Whatley, S.K.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

EPRI Increased Transmission Capacity Workshop Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the proceedings of EPRI's Increased Overhead Transmission Capacity Workshop. The workshop was held on September 20, 2011 at the offices of the American Transmission Company in Waukesha, Wisconsin. Participants included members of the EPRI Increased Overhead Transmission Capacity Task Force. The workshop was a joint effort of two EPRI research projects: (1) Increased Power Flow Guidebook and Ratings for Overhead Lines, and (2) Impact of High Temperature Operation on Conductor Systems...

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Increasing State Capacity Through Clans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their role in increasing state capacity With the decline ofhere focus on state capacity and the associated discussionselements of state capacity during the transition from one

Doyle, Jr, Thomas Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

315

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power WorkingFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

ORISE: Capacity Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute...

317

Idaho Site Nuclear Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Nuclear Facilities Idaho Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Idaho Closure Project (ICP) This page was last updated on May 16...

318

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Increased control of reservoir pressure, reduced risk of CO2 migration, and expanded formation storage capacity. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints on CCS deployment and provide insight into

319

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Resources International, Inc. Advanced Resources International, Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Project benefits statement: - This research seeks to develop a set of robust mathematical modules to predict how coal and shale permeability and

320

Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

322

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale CO Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources International U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Program Goals * Benefits Statement * Project Overview - Goals - Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix USDOE/NETL Program Goals * Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence. * Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage

323

Project Plan: Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) for the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility, Piqua, Ohio, April 1998 (minor revisions November 1999).  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility Piqua, Ohio April 1998 (minor revisions November 1999) Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number LTS-111-0027-00-000 Document Number S0007600 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-06 This page intentionally blank Document Number S0007600 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office LTSP for Piqua Nuclear Power Facility April 1998 Page iii Contents Page 1.0 Introduction...........................................................................................................................1B1

324

State of Washington Department of Health Radioactive air emissions notice of construction phase 1 for spent nuclear fuel project - cold vacuum drying facility, project W-441  

SciTech Connect

This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the estimated annual possession quantity resulting from operation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). Additional details on emissions generated by the operation of the CVDF will be discussed again in the Phase 11 NOC. This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of WAC 246-247-060 for the completion of Phase I NOC, defined as the pouring of concrete for the foundation flooring, construction of external walls, and construction of the building excluding the installation of CVDF process equipment. A Phase 11 NOC will be submitted for approval prior to installing and is defined as the completion of the CVDF, which consisted installation of process equipment, air emissions control, and emission monitoring equipment. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters while the SNF in the K East Basin is in open canisters, which allow free release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water.

Turnbaugh, J.E.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

326

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Dresden Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Power Plant Data for Dresden Generating Station Author: DOE/EIA Keywords: Dresden Generating Station, Illinois, Nuclear, Plant, Reactor, Generation, Capacity

327

Partial energies fluctuations and negative heat capacities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We proceed to a critical examination of the method used in nuclear fragmentation to exhibit signals of negative heat capacity. We show that this method leads to unsatisfactory results when applied to a simple and well controlled model. Discrepancies are due to incomplete evaluation of potential energies.

Xavier Campi; H. Krivine; E. Plagnol; N. Sator

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

328

Partial energies fluctuations and negative heat capacities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We proceed to a critical examination of the method used in nuclear fragmentation to exhibit signals of negative heat capacity. We show that this method leads to unsatisfactory results when applied to a simple and well controlled model. Discrepancies are due to incomplete evaluation of potential energies.

Campi, X; Plagnol, E; Campi, Xavier; ccsd-00002099, ccsd

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Capacity on Finsler Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here, the concept of electric capacity on Finsler spaces is introduced and the fundamental conformal invariant property is proved, i.e. the capacity of a compact set on a connected non-compact Finsler manifold is conformal invariant. This work enables mathematicians and theoretical physicists to become more familiar with the global Finsler geometry and one of its new applications.

Bidabad, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance Plan. The Software Quality Assurance Plan is intended to ensure all actions necessary for the software life cycle; verification and validation activities; documentation and deliverables; project management; configuration management, nonconformance reporting and corrective action; and quality assessment and improvement have been planned and a systematic pattern of all actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that a software product conforms to established technical requirements; and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kent Norris

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance Plan. The Software Quality Assurance Plan is intended to ensure all actions necessary for the software life cycle; verification and validation activities; documentation and deliverables; project management; configuration management, nonconformance reporting and corrective action; and quality assessment and improvement have been planned and a systematic pattern of all actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that a software product conforms to established technical requirements; and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

capacity capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

334

Battery capacity indicator  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery capacity indicator for providing a continuous indication of battery capacity for a battery powered device. It comprises means for periodically effecting a first and a second positive discharge rate of the battery; voltage measurement means, for measuring the battery terminal voltage at the first and second positive discharge rates during the operation of the device, and for generating a differential battery voltage value in response thereto; memory means for storing a set of predetermined differential battery voltage values and a set of predetermined battery capacity values, each of the set of predetermined differential battery voltage values defining one of the set of predetermined battery capacity values; comparison means, coupled to the memory means and to the voltage measurement means, for comparing the measured differential battery voltage values with the set of predetermined differential battery voltage values, and for selecting the predetermined battery capacity value corresponding thereto.

Kunznicki, W.J.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 DE-FE0001159 Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations Gary Mavko Rock Physics Project/Stanford University 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Motivating technical challenge * Approach * Technical Status - Laboratory results - Theoretical modeling * Summary Mavko: Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99% of injected CO 2 remains in injection zones. * Project benefits statement.

336

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Clear Air Act notice of construction for the spent nuclear fuel project - Cold Vaccum Drying Facility, project W-441  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information regarding the source and the estimated quantity of potential airborne radionuclide emissions resulting from the operation of the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility. The construction of the CVD Facility is scheduled to commence on or about December 1996, and will be completed when the process begins operation. This document serves as a Notice of Construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61 for the CVD Facility. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters, while the SNF in the K East Basin is in open canisters, which allow release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water. Storage of the current inventory in the K Basins was originally intended to be on an as-needed basis to sustain operation of the N Reactor while the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant was refurbished and restarted. The decision in December 1992 to deactivate the PURF-X Plant left approximately 2,100 MT (2,300 tons) of uranium as part of the N Reactor SNF in the K Basins with no means for near-term removal and processing. The CVD Facility will be constructed in the 100 Area northwest of the 190 K West Building, which is in close proximity to the K East and K West Basins (Figures 1 and 08572). The CVD Facility will consist of five processing bays, with four of the bays fully equipped with processing equipment and the fifth bay configured as an open spare bay. The CVD Facility will have a support area consisting of a control room, change rooms, and other functions required to support operations.

Turnbaugh, J.E.

1996-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors Influencing Factors Influencing CO 2 Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales Contract No. DE-FE0004633 Michael Godec, Vice President Advanced Resources International mgodec@adv-res.com U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefits to the Program * Program Goals Addressed - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.

338

EIS-0350-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Supplemental EIS evaluates the completion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement (CMRR) Project, which consists of constructing the nuclear facility portion (CMRR-NF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The CMRR Project provides the analytical chemistry and materials characterization capabilities currently or previously performed in the existing Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. Because of recent detailed site geotechnical investigations, certain aspects of the CMRR-NR project have changed resulting in change to the environmental impacts.

339

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

340

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microsoft Word - GasCapacityReport3-17.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the Lower-48 States Executive Summary This analysis examines the availability of effective productive capacity to meet the projected wellhead demand for natural gas through 2003. Effective productive capacity is defined as the maximum production available from natural gas wells considering limitations of the production, gathering, and transportation systems. Surplus or unutilized capacity is the difference between the effective productive capacity and the actual production. This report contains projections of natural gas effective productive capacity in the Lower-48 States for 2003 and is based on prices and production forecasts in EIA's February 2003 Short Term Energy Outlook (STEO). The analysis projects an average surplus capacity of 5.6 Bcf/d in 2003 under STEO Base

342

State of Washington Department of Health radioactive air emission notice of construction phase 1 for spent nuclear fuel project - hot conditioning system annex, project W-484  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the estimated annual possession quantity resulting from the operation of the Hot Conditioning System Annex (HCSA). This information will be discussed again in the Phase II NOC, providing additional details on emissions generated by the operation of the HCSA. This Phase I NOC is defined as construct in the substructure, including but limited to, pouring the concrete for the floor; construction of the process pits and exterior walls; making necessary interface connections to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) ventilation and utility systems for personnel comfort; and extending the multi-canister over-pack (MCO) handling machine rails into the HCSA. A Phase II NOC will be submitted for approval prior to installation and is defined as the completion of the HCSA, which will consist of installation of Hot Conditioning System Equipment (HCSA), air emissions control equipment, and emission monitoring equipment. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters, while the SNF in the K East Basin is contained in open canisters, which allow free release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water. Storage in the K Basins was originally intended to be on an as-needed basis to sustain operation of the N Reactor while the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant was refurbished and restarted. The decision in December 1992 to deactivate the PUREX Plant left approximately 2,300 MT (2,530 tons) of N Reactor SNF in the K Basins with no means for near-term removal and processing. The HCSA will be constructed as an addition to the CSB and will contain the HCSA. The hot conditioning system (HCS) will remove chemically-bound water and will passivate the exposed uranium surfaces associated,with the SNF. The HCSA will house seven hot conditioning process stations, six operational and one auxiliary pit, which could be used as a welding area for final sealing of the vessel containing the SNF, or for neutron interrogation of the vessel containing the SNF to determine residual water content. Figures 1 and 2 contain map locations of the Hanford Site and the HCSA. `Response to Requirement` subtitle under each of the following sections identifies the corresponding Appendix A NOC application requirement listed under WAC 246-247-1 10.

Turnbaugh, J.E.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Act notice of construction for spent nuclear fuel project - hot conditioning system annex, project W-484  

SciTech Connect

This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the estimated quantity of potential airborne radionuclide emissions resulting from the operation of the Hot Conditioning System (HCS) Annex. The construction of the HCS Annex is scheduled to conunence on or about December 1996, and will be completed when the process equipment begins operations. This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61 for the HCS Annex. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters, while the SNF in the K East Basin is contained in open canisters, which allows release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water. Storage of the current inventory in the K Basins was originally intended to be on an as-needed basis to sustain operation of the N Reactor while the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant was refurbished and restarted. The decision in December 1992 to deactivate the PUREX Plant left approximately 2, 1 00 MT (2,300 tons) of uranium, as part of 1133 N Reactor SNF in the K Basins with no means for near-term removal and processing. The HCS Annex will be constructed as an annex to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) and will contain the hot conditioning equipment. The hot conditioning system (HCS) will release chemically-bound water and will condition (process of using a controlled amount of oxygen to destroy uranium hydride) the exposed uranium surfaces associated with the SNF through oxidation. The HCS Annex will house seven hot conditioning process stations, six operational and one auxiliary, which could be used as a welding area for final closure of the vessel containing the SNF. The auxiliary pit is being evaluated at this time for its usefulness to support other operations that may be needed to ensure proper conditioning of the SNF and proper storage of the vessel containing the SNF. Figures I and 2 contain map locations of the Hanford Site and the HCS Annex.

Baker, S.K., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

344

Coupled Site Characterization and Foundation Analysis Research Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis Research Project: Rational Selection of for Drained-Strength Bearing Capacity Analysis Manhattan Research Project: Rational Selection of for Drained-Strength Bearing Capacity Analysis Manhattan CollegeCoupled Site Characterization and Foundation Analysis Research Project: Rational Selection

Horvath, John S.

345

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

347

Decommissioning Project Remnant Considerations  

- P-Reactor 2013 - R-Reactor 2014 - F-Canyon 2015 (pending Global Nuclear Energy Partnership decision by 2011) 5 Project Drivers

348

Projected Alaska North Slope oil production at risk beyond 2025 if ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary › All Reports ... weather; gasoline; capacity; exports; nuclear; forecast; View All Tags ...

349

Guide for Increasing the Capacity of Induction Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2002, as a result of re-licensing, nearly 700 MW of U.S. nuclear power capacity was added in 13 uprate programs. Over the past two years, similar re-licensing efforts have resulted in 33 uprates, which have increased nuclear capacity by over 1,700 MW. With this re-licensing and uprating of nuclear power plants, there is seen an accompanying need to increase the output of some of the major auxiliary motors. With the special motors used in nuclear power plants, some of which have flywheels and some of w...

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

350

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3ny6122 581 4,948 97.2 PWR R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit Summer Capacity (MW) Net Generation (Thousand MWh) Summer Capacity Factor (Percent) Type

351

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Agenda, August 15. [6] FERC, Docket No. EL01-63-003,at http://www.pjm.com. [7] FERC, Docket No. ER01-1440-capacity of the others” (FERC, 2001). Therefore, if an LSE

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Lateral Capacity Exchange and Its Impact on Capacity Investment Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of capacity exchange between two …rms in anticipation of the mismatch between demand and capacity and its impact on …rm’s capacity investment decisions. For given capacity investment levels of the two …rms, we demonstrate how capacity price may be determined and how much capacity should be exchanged when either manufacturer acts as a Stackelberg leader in the capacity exchange game. By benchmarking against the centralized system, we show that a side payment may be used to coordinate the capacity exchange decisions. We then study the …rms’capacity investment decisions using a biform game framework in which capacity investment decisions are made individually and exchange decisions are made as in a centralized system. We demonstrate the existence and uniqueness of the Nash equilibrium capacity investment levels and study the impact of …rms’share of the capacity exchange surplus on their capacity investment levels.

Amiya K. Chakravartyz; Jun Zhangy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The Development, Content, Design, and Conduct of the 2011 Piloted US DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Criticality Safety Engineering Training and Education Project  

SciTech Connect

In May 1973 the University of New Mexico conducted the first nationwide criticality safety training and education week-long short course for nuclear criticality safety engineers. Subsequent to that course, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) developed very successful 'hands-on' subcritical and critical training programs for operators, supervisors, and engineering staff. Since the inception of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCT&SP) in 1983, the DOE has stimulated contractor facilities and laboratories to collaborate in the furthering of nuclear criticality as a discipline. That effort included the education and training of nuclear criticality safety engineers (NCSEs). In 1985 a textbook was written that established a path toward formalizing education and training for NCSEs. Though the NCT&SP went through a brief hiatus from 1990 to 1992, other DOE-supported programs were evolving to the benefit of NCSE training and education. In 1993 the DOE established a Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) and undertook a comprehensive development effort to expand the extant LACEF 'hands-on' course specifically for the education and training of NCSEs. That successful education and training was interrupted in 2006 for the closing of the LACEF and the accompanying movement of materials and critical experiment machines to the Nevada Test Site. Prior to that closing, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was commissioned by the US DOE NCSP to establish an independent hands-on NCSE subcritical education and training course. The course provided an interim transition for the establishment of a reinvigorated and expanded two-week NCSE education and training program in 2011. The 2011 piloted two-week course was coordinated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and jointly conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) classroom education and facility training, the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) hands-on criticality experiments training, and the US DOE National Criticality Experiment Research Center (NCERC) hands-on criticality experiments training that is jointly supported by LLNL and LANL and located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) This paper provides the description of the bases, content, and conduct of the piloted, and future US DOE NCSP Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Education Project.

Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Development, Content, Design, and Conduct of the 2011 Piloted US DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Criticality Safety Engineering Training and Education Project  

SciTech Connect

In May 1973 the University of New Mexico conducted the first nationwide criticality safety training and education week-long short course for nuclear criticality safety engineers. Subsequent to that course, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) developed very successful 'hands-on' subcritical and critical training programs for operators, supervisors, and engineering staff. Since the inception of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCT&SP) in 1983, the DOE has stimulated contractor facilities and laboratories to collaborate in the furthering of nuclear criticality as a discipline. That effort included the education and training of nuclear criticality safety engineers (NCSEs). In 1985 a textbook was written that established a path toward formalizing education and training for NCSEs. Though the NCT&SP went through a brief hiatus from 1990 to 1992, other DOE-supported programs were evolving to the benefit of NCSE training and education. In 1993 the DOE established a Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) and undertook a comprehensive development effort to expand the extant LACEF 'hands-on' course specifically for the education and training of NCSEs. That successful education and training was interrupted in 2006 for the closing of the LACEF and the accompanying movement of materials and critical experiment machines to the Nevada Test Site. Prior to that closing, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was commissioned by the US DOE NCSP to establish an independent hands-on NCSE subcritical education and training course. The course provided an interim transition for the establishment of a reinvigorated and expanded two-week NCSE education and training program in 2011. The 2011 piloted two-week course was coordinated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and jointly conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) classroom education and facility training, the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) hands-on criticality experiments training, and the US DOE National Criticality Experiment Research Center (NCERC) hands-on criticality experiments training that is jointly supported by LLNL and LANL and located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) This paper provides the description of the bases, content, and conduct of the piloted, and future US DOE NCSP Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Education Project.

Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop  

SciTech Connect

This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Project Brief: General Motors, LLC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This project will also apply neutron detectors to study lithium transport in batteries to assess mechanisms for degradation of battery capacity and ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

357

Collaborating Organizations - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborating Organizations Collaborating Organizations Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program Collaborating Organizations Bookmark and Share National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network, coordinated by IAEA, Vienna, Austria Heavy-Ion Nuclear Physics Group, Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. Nuclear Spectroscopy Group, Department of Nuclear Physics,

358

Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Program Data Program Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program We contribute to the development of comprehensive nuclear reactions and nuclear structure databases, including nuclear data measurement, analysis, modeling and evaluation methodologies, that are implemented in basic science research and advanced nuclear technologies. Bookmark and Share Recent Events Nuclear Structure 2012 Conference Argonne National Laboratory hosted the

359

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

behavior of shales as behavior of shales as seals and storage reservoirs for CO2 Project Number: Car Stor_FY131415 Daniel J. Soeder USDOE/NETL/ORD U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Program Goals - Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness * Project Objectives - Assess how shales behave as caprocks in contact with CO 2 under a variety of conditions - Assess the viability of depleted gas shales to serve as storage reservoirs for sequestered CO

360

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co-Sequestration Co-Sequestration Studies Project Number 58159 Task 2 B. Peter McGrail Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 and mixed gas storage capacity in various geologic settings - Demonstrate fate of injected mixed gases * Project benefits statement:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 Collaborators Zhengrong Wang, Yale University Kevin Johnson, University of Hawaii 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 storage capacity - Demonstrate fate of injected CO 2 and most common contaminants * Project benefits statement: This research project conducts modeling, laboratory studies, and pilot-scale research aimed at developing new technologies and new systems for utilization of basalt formations for long term subsurface storage of CO 2 . Findings from this project

362

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of capacity projections from AEO2011 and AEO2012.presents a reference case projection of U.S. energy supply,to produce a modified projection. 3. The difference between

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Pushing Capacity Payments Forward: Agent-Based Simulation of Available Capacity Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study demonstrates that agent-based simulation is a useful tool for analyzing existing and proposed design features of electricity markets. The study documents not only how this technology functions, but how it can be used. Experiments using computer-based agents were used to simulate the effects of capacity markets on energy markets, and the project takes a particularly close look at the proposed Available Capacity (ACAP) market of the California independent system operator (CA-ISO). These agents p...

2003-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750–800°C Reactor Outlet Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750–800°C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

John Collins

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report June 2013 With Data as of January 1, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table 1. Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2013

366

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

Wolfe, R.W.

1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

Wolfe, Robert W. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nuclear Safety and Global Cooperation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The thesis of is to strengthen the capacity building of nuclear safety and disaster prevention all over the world from a preventive perspective, and to… (more)

Chang, Yu-shan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 with Projections to 2025 4 with Projections to 2025 Report #: DOE/EIA-0383(2004) Release date: January 2004 Next release date: January 2005 Errata August 25, 2004 The Annual Energy Outlook presents a midterm forecast and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 Table of Contents Summary Tables Adobe Acrobat Logo Yearly Tables MS Excel Viewer Regional and other detailed tables (Supplemental) MS Excel Viewer Overview Market Drivers Trends in Economic Activity Economic Growth Cases International Oil Markets Energy Demand Projections Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Alternative Technology Cases Electricity Forecast Electricity Sales Electricity Generating Capacity Electricity Fuel Costs and Prices Electricity from Nuclear Power

370

Can Bounded Rationality Explain Excess Capacity? ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excess capacity is observed in many markets especially those where a substantial initial investment is required. The theoretical literature often explains this feature by strategic attempts to deter entry or to limit new entrants ’ market shares but the empirical evidence for such a rationale is mixed. Moreover, excess capacity has also been observed in experimental studies on capacityconstrained games where there is no entry (and therefore no entry-deterrence motive). This paper explores experimentally another rationale for excess capacity: rather than (in addition to) being a threat to (potential) entrants, excess capacity held by incumbents may constitute a valuable option to reap extra gains from competition with an inexperienced entrant, if he turns out to makes a mistake. In our experimental design we used the level of experience (the number of periods played) as a proxy for the level of rationality and matched subjects with different levels of experience. We find evidence of excess capacity decreasing with opponent’s experience. ? This paper is a sustantially revised version of a chapter of Le Coq and Sturluson’s 2003 Stockholm School of Economics Ph.D. thesis. It was before circulated as "Does Opponent’s experience matter?". The authors would like to thank Tore Ellingsen for his insightful comments in the project’s infancy, Urs Fischbacher for allowig us tousethez-TreesoftwareandHans-TheoNorman for technical help. We thank also seminar participants at the IIOC 2004 (Chicago), EARIE 2003 (Lausanne), SAET 2003 (Rhodos) for helpful comments. We gratefully acknowledge financial

Chloélecoq Jon; Thor Sturluson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NV/13609-53 NV/13609-53 Development of a Groundwater Management Model for the Project Shoal Area prepared by Gregg Lamorey, Scott Bassett, Rina Schumer, Douglas P. Boyle, Greg Pohll, and Jenny Chapman submitted to Nevada Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy Las Vegas, Nevada September 2006 Publication No. 45223 Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof or its contractors or subcontractors. Available for sale to the public, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce

372

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

373

Real options approach to capacity planning under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis highlights the effectiveness of Real Options Analysis (ROA) in capacity planning decisions for engineering projects subject to uncertainty. This is in contrast to the irreversible decision-making proposed by ...

Mittal, Geetanjali, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: Summary status report: Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 through April 19, 1987. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

Doerge, D. H.; Haffner, D. R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

2012 Awards for Project Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Detector Project The Office of Environmental Management's Idaho Nuclear facility Decontamination & Decommissioning Project More Documents & Publications...

376

Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units Operable Units,1 1957-2011 Nuclear Net Summer Capacity Change, 1950-2011 Status of All Nuclear Generating Units, ...

377

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status o Experimentation: core-flooding and IFT/CA o Pore-scale modeling modeling * Accomplishments to Date * Summary University of Wyoming 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: o 'Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.' * Benefits statement: o The research project is focused on performing reservoir conditions experiments to measure steady-state relative permeabilities,

378

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECARB Anthropogenic Test: SECARB Anthropogenic Test: CO 2 Capture/Transportation/Storage Project # DE-FC26-05NT42590 Jerry Hill, Southern Sates Energy Board Richard A. Esposito, Southern Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - CO 2 Capture - CO 2 Transportation - CO 2 Storage * Accomplishments to Date * Organization Chart * Gantt Chart * Bibliography * Summary Benefit to the Program 1. Predict storage capacities within +/- 30% * Conducted high resolution reservoir characterization of the Paluxy saline formation key

379

Impact of 1980 scheduled capacity additions on electric-utility oil consumption  

SciTech Connect

The electric-utility sector currently consumes approximately 8% of the total oil used in the Nation. This oil represented about 15% of total fuel consumed by electric utilities in 1979. Two important factors that affect the level of utility oil consumption in 1980 are the substantial increase in coal-fired generating capacity and the uncertainty surrounding nuclear-plant licensing. With particular emphasis on these considerations, this report analyzes the potential for changes in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980 relative to the 1979 level. Plant conversions, oil to coal, for example, that may occur in 1980 are not considered in this analysis. Only the potential reduction in oil consumption resulting from new generating-capacity additions is analyzed. Changes in electric-utility oil consumption depend on, among other factors, regional-electricity-demand growth and generating-plant mix. Five cases are presented using various electricity-demand-growth rate assumptions, fuel-displacement strategies, and nuclear-plant-licensing assumptions. In general, it is likely that there will be a reduction in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980. Using the two reference cases of the report, this reduction is projected to amount to a 2 to 5% decrease from the 1979 oil-consumption level; 7% reduction is the largest reduction projected.

Gielecki, M.; Clark, G.; Roberts, B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Quantum Zero-error Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define here a new kind of quantum channel capacity by extending the concept of zero-error capacity for a noisy quantum channel. The necessary requirement for which a quantum channel has zero-error capacity greater than zero is given. Finally, we point out some directions on how to calculate the zero-error capacity of such channels.

Rex A. C. Medeiros; Francisco M. De Assis

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

Macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation -- Final project report by AST Environmental Services, LLC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a full-scale demonstration of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) package, manufactured by Arrow Construction, Inc. of Montgomery, Alabama. The HDPE package, called ARROW-PAK, was designed and patented by Arrow as both a method to macroencapsulation of radioactively contaminated lead and as an improved form of waste package for treatment and interim and final storage and/or disposal of drums of mixed waste. Mixed waste is waste that is radioactive, and meets the criteria established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for a hazardous material. Results from previous testing conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1994 found that the ARROW-PAK fabrication process produces an HDPE package that passes all helium leak tests and drop tests, and is fabricated with materials impervious to the types of environmental factors encountered during the lifetime of the ARROW-PAK, estimated to be from 100 to 300 years. Arrow Construction, Inc. has successfully completed full-scale demonstration of its ARROW-PAK mixed waste macroencapsulation treatment unit at the DOE Hanford Site. This testing was conducted in accordance with Radiological Work Permit No. T-860, applicable project plans and procedures, and in close consultation with Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc.`s project management, health and safety, and quality assurance representatives. The ARROW-PAK field demonstration successfully treated 880 drums of mixed waste debris feedstock which were compacted and placed in 149 70-gallon overpack drums prior to macroencapsulation in accordance with the US EPA Alternate Debris Treatment Standards, 40 CFR 268.45. Based on all of the results, the ARROW-PAK process provides an effective treatment, storage and/or disposal option that compares favorably with current mixed waste management practices.

Baker, T.L.

1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

383

Lab resumes work on NMSSUP security project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the weather. I expect a full restart in the late March timeframe." Facility, nuclear material remain secure The Nuclear Material Safeguards and Security Upgrade Project...

384

Active Project Justification Statements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Justification Statements Project Justification Statements Date Received PJS Number Title Owner / Author Status ORG Due Date 10/26/2012 PJS-2012-007 Cost Benefit Analysis for Nuclear Facility Accident Prevention or Mitigation Design Options, Project Justification 1/9/2013 PJS-2013-01 DOE HDBK of Optimizing Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment 6/24/2013 PJS-2013-03 Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility

385

Load Capacity of Bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the stress analysis in a plastic body $\\Omega$, we prove that there exists a maximal positive number $C$, the \\emph{load capacity ratio,} such that the body will not collapse under any external traction field $t$ bounded by $Y_{0}C$, where $Y_0$ is the elastic limit. The load capacity ratio depends only on the geometry of the body and is given by $$ \\frac{1}{C}=\\sup_{w\\in LD(\\Omega)_D} \\frac{\\int_{\\partial\\Omega}|w|dA} {\\int_{\\Omega}|\\epsilon(w)|dV}=\\left\\|\\gamma_D\\right\\|. $$ Here, $LD(\\Omega)_D$ is the space of isochoric vector fields $w$ for which the corresponding stretchings $\\epsilon(w)$ are assumed to be integrable and $\\gamma_D$ is the trace mapping assigning the boundary value $\\gamma_D(w)$ to any $w\\in LD(\\Omega)_D$.

Reuven Segev

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Capacity Value of Solar Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating the capacity value of renewable energy sources can pose significant challenges due to their variable and uncertain nature. In this paper the capacity value of solar power is investigated. Solar capacity value metrics and their associated calculation methodologies are reviewed and several solar capacity studies are summarized. The differences between wind and solar power are examined, the economic importance of solar capacity value is discussed and other assessments and recommendations are presented.

Duignan, Roisin; Dent, Chris; Mills, Andrew; Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Keane, Andrew; O'Malley, Mark

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

387

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 14 10 4 1,617,500 1,205,000 412,500 1,708,500 1,273,500 435,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 0 1 182,200 0 182,200 190,200 0 190,200 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

388

"1. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "2. Navajo","Coal","Salt River Project",2250  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "1. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "2. Navajo","Coal","Salt River Project",2250 "3. Gila River Power Station","Gas","Gila River Power Station LP",2060 "4. Springerville","Coal","Tucson Electric Power Co",1618 "5. Glen Canyon Dam","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",1312 "6. Santan","Gas","Salt River Project",1227 "7. Mesquite Generating Station","Gas","Mesquite Power LLC",1073 "8. Harquahala Generating Project","Gas","New Harquahala Generating Co, LLC",1054 "9. Hoover Dam","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",1040

389

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

390

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

391

Nuclear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Nuclear Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 82. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity Table 96. Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Table 97. Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, nuclear power capacity increases from 101.0 gigawatts in 2009 to 110.5 gigawatts in 2035 (Figure 82), including 3.8 gigawatts of expansion at existing plants and 6.3 gigawatts of new capacity. The new capacity includes completion of a second unit at the Watts Bar site, where construction on a partially completed plant has

392

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nt of n y nt of n y Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Project Title: (0471-1508) NAVITASMAX - Novel Tuning of Critical Fluctuations for Advanced Thermal Energy Storage Location: *- Multiple States - Arizona, Massachusetts, New York, Colorado Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: D Funding will support a proof-of-concept project that evaluates and optimizes simple and complex supercritical fluids for use as novel heat storage, transfer, and working fluids in solar and nuclear applications. Proposed work consists of indoor laboratory-based research and development (R&D), modeling, and analysis, including (1) developing theoretical models to explore inhomogeneities and heat capacity anomalies in supercritical fluids, and prove potential to increase heat capacity over ranges of

393

Property exempt from taxation: nuclear generation facility property...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

legislation would exempt from state property taxes any property purchased, constructed or installed to expand capacity at an existing nuclear plant or to build a new nuclear plant....

394

2012 Annual Planning Summary for National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration 2012 Annual Planning Summary for National Nuclear Security Administration The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and...

395

The ITER Project: International Collaboration to Demonstrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ITER Project: International Collaboration to Demonstrate Nuclear Fusion American Fusion News Category: U.S. ITER Link: The ITER Project: International Collaboration to Demonstrate...

396

Capacities associated with scalar signed Riesz kernels, and analytic capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The real and imaginari parts of the Cauchy kernel in the plane are scalar Riesz kernels of homogeneity -1. One can associate with each of them a natural notion of capacity related to bounded potentials. The main result of the paper asserts that these capacities are comparable to classical analytic capacity, thus stressing the real variables nature of analytic capacity. Higher dimensional versions of this result are also considered.

Mateu, Joan; Verdera, Joan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training and Research Peter M. Walsh University of Alabama at Birmingham U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CCUS Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania August 21-23, 2012 DE-FE0002224 * Evaluation of the sealing capacity of caprocks serving as barriers to upward migration of CO 2 sequestered in geologic formations. * Education and training of undergraduate and graduate students, through independent research on geologic sequestration. * Education, through an advanced undergraduate/graduate level course on coal combustion and gasification, climate change, and carbon sequestration. * Simulation of CO 2 migration and trapping in storage

398

YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT RECOMMENDATION BY THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY REGARDING THE SUITABILITY OF THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE FOR A REPOSITORY UNDER THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than half a century, since nuclear science helped us win World War II and ring in the Atomic Age, scientists have known that !he Nation would need a secure, permanent facility in which to dispose of radioactive wastes. Twenty years ago, when Congress adopted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA or ''the Act''), it recognized the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community that the best option for such a facility would be a deep underground repository. Fifteen years ago, Congress directed the Secretary of Energy to investigate and recommend to the President whether such a repository could be located safely at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since then, our country has spent billions of dollars and millions of hours of research endeavoring to answer this question. I have carefully reviewed the product of this study. In my judgment, it constitutes sound science and shows that a safe repository can be sited there. I also believe that compelling national interests counsel in favor of proceeding with this project. Accordingly, consistent with my responsibilities under the NWPA, today I am recommending that Yucca Mountain be developed as the site for an underground repository for spent fuel and other radioactive wastes. The first consideration in my decision was whether the Yucca Mountain site will safeguard the health and safety of the people, in Nevada and across the country, and will be effective in containing at minimum risk the material it is designed to hold. Substantial evidence shows that it will. Yucca Mountain is far and away the most thoroughly researched site of its kind in the world. It is a geologically stable site, in a closed groundwater basin, isolated on thousands of acres of Federal land, and farther from any metropolitan area than the great majority of less secure, temporary nuclear waste storage sites that exist in the country today. This point bears emphasis. We are not confronting a hypothetical problem. We have a staggering amount of radioactive waste in this country--nearly 100,000,000 gallons of high-level nuclear waste and more than 40,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel with more created every day. Our choice is not between, on the one hand, a disposal site with costs and risks held to a minimum, and, on the other, a magic disposal system with no costs or risks at all. Instead, the real choice is between a single secure site, deep under the ground at Yucca Mountain, or making do with what we have now or some variant of it--131 aging surface sites, scattered across 39 states. Every one of those sites was built on the assumption that it would be temporary. As time goes by. every one is closer to the limit of its safe life span. And every one is at least a potential security risk--safe for today, but a question mark in decades to come.

NA

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Multipath Channels of Unbounded Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The capacity of discrete-time, noncoherent, multipath fading channels is considered. It is shown that if the variances of the path gains decay faster than exponentially, then capacity is unbounded in the transmit power.

Koch, Tobias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Developer Industrial State/Provincial Govt Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Under the Forward Capacity Market (FCM), ISO New England projects the capacity needs of the region's power system three years in advance and then holds an annual auction to purchase the power resources that will satisfy those future regional requirements. Resources that clear in the auction are obligated to provide power or curtail demand when called upon by the ISO. The Forward Capacity Market was developed by ISO New England, the six New

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 1, Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Drart environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage Pathways and Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO 2 Project DE-FC26-0xNT4 FE0001786 James P. Evans Utah State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Goals and Objectives * Relationship to overall program goals * Overview of seal bypass * Technical status; bypass systems - Field based studies - Technological advances * Accomplishments and Summary * Appendices 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.

404

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michael G. Waddell Earth Sciences and Resources Institute University of South Carolina U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project goals and benefits * Overview of the geology of the South Georgia Rift basin in SC * Results of petrographic and core analysis from the Rizer #1 * Future investigations in the SGR * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program Program Goals: * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected

405

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beneficial Use of CO Beneficial Use of CO 2 in Precast Concrete Production DE-FE0004285 Yixin Shao, Yaodong Jia Liang Hu McGill University 3H Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation outline * Goals and objectives * Benefits to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishment to date * Summary 2 Objective Masonry blocks Fiber-cement panels Prefabricated buildings Concrete pipes To develop a carbonation process to replace steam curing in precast concrete production for energy reduction, and carbon storage and utilization. Goals * CO 2 sequestration capacity by cement:

406

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Kansas Center for Research University of Kansas Center for Research Kansas Geological Survey U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Benefits, objectives, overview * Methods * Background & setting * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary Benefit to the Program * Program goal addressed: Develop technologies that will support the industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ± 30 percent. * Program goal addressed: This project will confirm - via a horizontal test boring - whether fracture attributes derived from 3-D seismic PSDM Volumetric Curvature (VC) processing are real. If

407

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Advanced simulation tool for quantifying transport in porous and fractured geological formations during CO 2 sequestration that includes all mechanisms: convection, diffusion, dissolution and chemical reactions * A simulator that can fully model these processes does not currently exist * Simulator will contribute to our ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations, to within ±30 percent 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Comprehensive reservoir simulator for investigation of CO 2 non-isothermal, multiphase flow and long-term storage in

408

Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security Nuclear Security The Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) is responsible for the development and implementation of security programs for NNSA. In this capacity, DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for

409

Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security Nuclear Security The Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) is responsible for the development and implementation of security programs for NNSA. In this capacity, DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for

410

Heat capacities of elastic solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work function is embedded in the equation describing the relationship between the constant volume and constant pressure heat capacities. The modification of the work function results that the relationship between these quantities must be changed accordingly. Using the newly derived work functions of elastic solids the description of the heat capacities and the relationship between the heat capacities are given for solid phase.

Garai, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Symmetrical Symplectic Capacity with Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we first introduce the concept of symmetrical symplectic capacity for symmetrical symplectic manifolds, and by using this symmetrical symplectic capacity theory we prove that there exists at least one symmetric closed characteristic (brake orbit and $S$-invariant brake orbit are two examples) on prescribed symmetric energy surface which has a compact neighborhood with finite symmetrical symplectic capacity.

Liu, Chungen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Zheleznogorsk Plutonium Production Elimination Project (ZPPEP...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zheleznogorsk Plutonium Production Elimination Project (ZPPEP) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

413

NUCLEI: Nuclear Computational Low-Energy Initiative | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NUCLEI: Nuclear Computational Low-Energy Initiative NUCLEI: Nuclear Computational Low-Energy Initiative This project seeks to advance large-scale nuclear physics compoutations in...

414

Dynamic Long-Term Modelling of Generation Capacity Investment and Capacity Margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Total interest accumulated during construction is given by TIACx = ICx ? cxpx. Finally, DCx is the present worth of the decommissioning cost. Only nuclear projects have considerable decommissioning costs (estimated at 12% of px4); in the case of other... plant types the decommissioning liabilities are assumed to be offset by the salvage value of the assets [22]. Nuclear decommissioning is assumed to take 150 years and the equivalent incidence of capital outlay matrix contains 0.05 for the first 10...

Eager, Dan; Hobbs, Benjamin; Bialek, Janusz

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

415

An Assessment of Railway Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we review the main concepts and methods to perform capacity analyses, and we present an automated tool that is able to perform several capacity analyses. Capacity is extremely dependent on infrastructure, traffic, and operating parameters. Therefore, an in-depth study of the main factors that influence railway capacity is performed on several Spanish railway infrastructures. The results show how the capacity varies according to factors such as train speed, commercial stops, train heterogeneity, distance between railway signals, and timetable robustness.

M. Abril; F. Barber; A L. Ingolotti; A M. A. Salido; P. Tormos; B A. Lova

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Organization Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization Examples Organization Examples Example 8 4.0 PROJECT ORGANIZATION Chapter 4.0 describes the principle project organizations, including their responsibilities and relationships. Other organizations, that have an interest in the project, also are described. 4.1 Principal Project Organizations and Responsibilities The management organization for the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project represents a partnership between four principal project organizations responsible for the project. The four project organizations and their associated summary responsibilities are described in the following paragraphs. 4.1.1 U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters (HQ) The DOE-HQ Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) is primarily responsible for policy and budget decisions

417

Entangling capacity with local ancilla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the entangling capacity of a dynamical operation with access to local ancilla. A comparison is made between the entangling capacity with and without the assistance of prior entanglement. An analytic solution is found for the log-negativity entangling capacity of two-qubit gates, which equals the entanglement of the Choi matrix isomorphic to the unitary operator. Surprisingly, the availability of prior entanglement does not affect this result; a property we call resource independence of the entangling capacity. We prove several useful upper-bounds on the entangling capacity that hold for general qudit dynamical operations, and for a whole family of entanglement measures including log-negativity and log-robustness. The log-robustness entangling capacity is shown to be resource independent for general dynamics. We provide numerical results supporting a conjecture that the log-negativity entangling capacity is resource independence for all two-qudit unitaries.

Campbell, Earl T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

EIA - AEO2010 - U.S. nuclear power plants: Continued life or replacement  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. nuclear power plants: continued life or replacement after 60? U.S. nuclear power plants: continued life or replacement after 60? Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 U.S. nuclear power plants: Continued life or replacement after 60? Background Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of GHG regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating. The nuclear industry has expressed strong interest in continuing the operation of existing nuclear facilities, and no particular technical issues have been identified that would impede their continued operation. Recent AEOs had assumed that existing nuclear units would be retired after 60 years of operation (the initial 40-year license plus one 20-year license renewal). Maintaining the same assumption in AEO2010, with the projection horizon extended to 2035, would result in the retirement of more than one-third of existing U.S. nuclear capacity between 2029 and 2035. Given the uncertainty about when existing nuclear capacity actually will be retired, EIA revisited the assumption for the development of AEO2010 and modified it to allow the continued operation of all existing U.S. nuclear power plants through 2035 in the Reference case.

419

Construction project scheduling problem with uncertain resource ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which its maximal limited capacity is fixed throughout the project duration; second maximal limited resource ... However, in the market fierce competition and bad.

420

Project Payette  

SciTech Connect

This is the concept for Project Payette, a nuclear event in the Seismic Detection Research Program. For this experiment, a nuclear explosive in the range of 5 to 10 kt will be detonated at a depth of 2000 to 3000 ft in an underground cavity of sufficient size that the walls of the cavity experience only elastic motion. The site will be located in a salt dome. Project Payette has been divided into three phases. Phase I will include site evaluation and engineering design of the construction of the cavity. It is estimated to require about 1 year. Phase II will include construction of the cavity and emplacement hole. It is estimated to require about 2 years. Phase III will include emplacement of instruments and the device, the detonation and the post-shot program including cavity re-entry. This is estimated to require about 1 year. The scope of this concept is intended to define Project Payette sufficiently will that Phase I work may proceed.

Warner, D.

1966-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nuclear Goes Hollywood | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Tennessee (UT) nuclear engineering student; Ned Sauthoff, director for the US ITER project office; Lawrence Townsend, chancellor's professor of nuclear engineering at UT;...

422

Nuclear Chemistry at BNL 1947-66  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry in the Chemistry Department. The National Laboratories were spawned from the Manhattan Project. Not coincidentally, nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics burgeoned...

423

Table 3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Point Beach Nuclear Plant Quad Cities Generating Station R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant PSEG Salem Generating Station Harris South Texas Project PPL ...

424

Microsystems technologist workforce development capacity and challenges in Central New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has made major investments in microsystems-related infrastructure and research staff development over the past two decades, culminating most recently in the MESA project. These investment decisions have been made based in part upon the necessity for highly reliable, secure, and for some purposes, radiation-hardened devices and subsystems for safety and sustainability of the United States nuclear arsenal and other national security applications. SNL's microsystems development and fabrication capabilities are located almost entirely within its New Mexico site, rendering their effectiveness somewhat dependent on the depth and breadth of the local microsystems workforce. Consequently, the status and development capacity of this workforce has been seen as a key personnel readiness issue in relation to the maintenance of SNL's microsystems capabilities. For this reason SNL has supported the instantiation and development of the Southwest Center for Microsystems Education, an Advanced Technology Education center funded primarily by the National Science Foundation, in order to foster the development of local training capacity for microsystems technologists. Although the SCME and the associated Manufacturing Technology program at Central New Mexico Community College have developed an effective curriculum and graduated several highly capable microsystems technologists, the future of both the center and the degree program remain uncertain due to insufficient student enrollment. The central region of New Mexico has become home to many microsystems-oriented commercial firms. As the demands of those firms for technologists evolve, SNL may face staffing problems in the future, especially if local training capacity is lost.

Osborn, Thor D.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

426

Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, 1984 to 2020  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original spent fuel utility data base (SFDB) has been adjusted to produce agreement with the EIA nuclear energy generation forecast. The procedure developed allows the detail of the utility data base to remain intact, while the overall nuclear generation is changed to match any uniform nuclear generation forecast. This procedure adjusts the weight of the reactor discharges as reported on the SFDB and makes a minimal (less than 10%) change in the original discharge exposures in order to preserve discharges of an integral number of fuel assemblies. The procedure used in developing the reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, as well as the resulting data bases themselves, are described in detail in this report. Discussions of the procedure cover the following topics: a description of the data base; data base adjustment procedures; addition of generic power reactors; and accuracy of the data base adjustments. Reactor-specific discharge and storage requirements are presented. Annual and cumulative discharge projections are provided. Annual and cumulative requirements for additional storage are shown for the maximum at-reactor (AR) storage assumption, and for the maximum AR with transshipment assumption. These compare directly to the storage requirements from the utility-supplied data, as reported in the Spent Fuel Storage Requirements Report. The results presented in this report include: the disaggregated spent fuel discharge projections; and disaggregated projections of requirements for additional spent fuel storage capacity prior to 1998. Descriptions of the methodology and the results are included in this report. Details supporting the discussions in the main body of the report, including descriptions of the capacity and fuel discharge projections, are included. 3 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

Heeb, C.M.; Libby, R.A.; Holter, G.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Decentralized capacity management and internal pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press. Goex, R. (2002). Capacity planning and pricing undermanufacturing on innovation, capacity and pro?tability.Mieghem, V. J. (2003). Capacity management, investment and

Dutta, Sunil; Reichelstein, Stefan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Capacity consideration of wireless ad hoc networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capacity ProblemCurrent Research on Capacity of Wireless Ad HocChapter 3 Upper Bound on the Capacity of Wireless Ad Hoc

Tan, Yusong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Are there capacity limitations in symmetry perception?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1980). The demonstration of capacity limitation. Cognitive1972). Visual processing capacity and attentional control.J. (1996). Goodness of CAPACITY LIMIT OF SYMMETRY PERCEPTION

Huang, L Q; Pashler, Harold; Junge, J A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The Ergodic Capacity of Interference Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Jafar, “The ergodic capacity of interference networks,”Gupta and P. R. Kumar, “The capacity of wireless networks,”cooperation achieves optimal capacity scaling in ad hoc

Jafar, Syed A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Mapping Individual Variations in Learning Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in working memory capacity. Integrative Physiological andVariations in Learning Capacity Eduardo Mercado IIIdifferences in learning capacity are evident in humans and

Mercado III, Eduardo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Definition: Capacity Emergency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emergency Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Capacity Emergency A capacity emergency exists when a Balancing Authority Area's operating capacity, plus firm purchases from...

433

Report on Department of Homeland Security Sponsored Research Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on Preparation for an Improvised Nuclear Device Event  

SciTech Connect

Following the events of September 11th, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. My summer 2008 internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory afforded me the opportunity to look in depth at the preparedness process and the research that has been conducted on this issue. While at the laboratory I was tasked to collect, combine, and process research on how cities and the federal government can best prepare for the horrific prospect of an IND event. Specific projects that I was involved with were meeting reports, research reviews, and a full project report. Working directly with Brooke Buddemeier and his support team at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, I was able to witness first hand, preparation for meetings with response planners to inform them of the challenges that an IND event would pose to the affected communities. In addition, I supported the Homeland Security Institute team (HSI), which was looking at IND preparation and preparing a Congressional report. I participated in meetings at which local responders expressed their concerns and contributed valuable information to the response plan. I specialized in the psycho-social aspects of an IND event and served as a technical advisor to some of the research groups. Alongside attending and supporting these meetings, I worked on an independent research project which collected information from across disciplines to outline where the state of knowledge on IND response is. In addition, the report looked at meetings that were held over the summer in various cities. The meetings were attended by both federal responders and local responders. The meetings explored issues regarding IND preparation and how to mitigate the effects of an IND detonation. Looking at the research and current preparation activity the report found that the state of knowledge in responding and communicating is a mixed bag. Some aspects of an IND attack are well understood, some are not, but much is left to synthesize. The effects of an IND would be devastating, yet much can be done to mitigate those effects through education, preparation, and research. A major gap in current knowledge is how to effectively communicate with the public before an attack. Little research on the effectiveness of public education has been done, but it is likely that educating the public about the effects of an IND and how to best protect oneself could save many lives.

A., B

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6  

SciTech Connect

This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Adaptive capacity and its assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

Engle, Nathan L.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

436

Building MRV Standards and Capacity in Key Countries | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MRV Standards and Capacity in Key Countries MRV Standards and Capacity in Key Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name Building MRV Standards and Capacity in Key Countries Agency/Company /Organization World Resources Institute (WRI) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Implementation Website http://www.wri.org/topics/mrv Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country Brazil, Colombia, Ethiopia, India, South Africa, Thailand South America, South America, Eastern Africa, Southern Asia, Southern Africa, South-Eastern Asia References World Resources Institute (WRI)[1] Program Overview Developing countries will be required to measure, report, and verify (MRV) mitigation actions according to international guidelines, but few have the capacity to do so. The goal of this project is to build the capacity of a

437

North Dakota Refining Capacity Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

438

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Because Because analyses by EIA are required to be pol- icy-neutral, the projections in AEO2006 generally are based on Federal and State laws and regulations in effect on or before October 31, 2005. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations or appropri- ation of funds that are not provided or speci- fied in the legislation itself-are not reflected in the projections. Selected examples of Federal and State legislation incorporated in the projections include the following: * EPACT2005, which, among other actions, in- cludes mandatory energy conservation standards; creates numerous tax credits for businesses and individuals, covering energy-efficient appliances, hybrid vehicles, small biodiesel producers, and new nuclear power capacity; creates

439

EIA - Appendix F-Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Gruping Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Nuclear Generating Capacity Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. F1 Total World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector and Fuel Table F1. Total World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

440

Preliminary Evaluation of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program for Renewable Power Projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rules pertaining to what project costs should and should notless than total installed project costs, with the differenceof total installed project costs). Capacity factor is simply

Bolinger, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear capacity projections" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(LECBP) (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

442

Battery Capacity Measurement And Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we look at different battery capacity models that have been introduced in the literatures. These models describe the battery capacity utilization based on how the battery is discharged by the circuits that consume power. In an attempt to validate these models, we characterize a commercially available lithium coin cell battery through careful measurements of the current and the voltage output of the battery under different load profile applied by a micro sensor node. In the result, we show how the capacity of the battery is affected by the different load profile and provide analysis on whether the conventional battery models are applicable in the real world. One of the most significant finding of our work will show that DC/DC converter plays a significant role in determining the battery capacity, and that the true capacity of the battery may only be found by careful measurements.

Using Lithium Coin; Sung Park; Andreas Savvides; Mani B. Srivastava

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Project 143  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George Rizeq George Rizeq Principal Investigator GE Global Research 18A Mason Irvine, CA 92618 949-330-8973 rizeq@research.ge.com FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CARBON DIOXIDE Description Projections of increased demands for energy worldwide, coupled with increasing environmental concerns have given rise to the need for new and innovative technologies for coal-based energy plants. Incremental improvements in existing plants will likely fall short of meeting future capacity and environmental needs economically. Thus, the implementation of new technologies at large scale is vital. In order to prepare for this inevitable paradigm shift, it is necessary to have viable alternatives that have been proven both theoretically and experimentally

444

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluid-driven fracture fluid-driven fracture DE-FE0002020 Joseph F. Labuz Civil Engineering University of Minnesota U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits statement * Goal, objectives * Technical status: fracture code, experimental results (poro, AE) * Accomplishments * Summary 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 Lateral displacement [mm] Load [kN] 0 300 600 900 1200 1500 AE events inelastic deformation peak 3 Benefit to the Program * Goal: develop technologies to predict CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations. * Benefits statement: develop 3D boundary element code & experimental techniques

445

Measuring wind plant capacity value  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric utility planners and wind energy researchers pose a common question: What is the capacity value of a wind plant? Tentative answers, which can be phrased in a variety of ways, are based on widely varying definitions and methods of calculation. From the utility`s point of view, a resource that has no capacity value also has a reduced economic value. Utility planners must be able to quantify the capacity value of a wind plant so that investment in conventional generating capacity can be potentially offset by the capacity value of the wind plant. Utility operations personnel must schedule its conventional resources to ensure adequate generation to meet load. Given a choice between two resources, one that can be counted on and the other that can`t, the utility will avoid the risky resource. This choice will be reflected in the price that the utility will pay for the capacity: higher capacity credits result in higher payments. This issue is therefore also important to the other side of the power purchase transaction -- the wind plant developer. Both the utility and the developer must accurately assess the capacity value of wind. This article summarizes and evaluates some common methods of evaluating capacity credit. During the new era of utility deregulation in the United States, it is clear that many changes will occur in both utility planning and operations. However, it is my judgement that the evaluation of capacity credit for wind plants will continue to play an important part in renewable energy development in the future.

Milligan, M.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections integrated across all ...

447

STUDIES IN THE NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY OF PLUTONIUM, AMERICIUM, AND CURIUM AND MASSES OF THE HEAVIEST ELEMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy Series, Plutonium Project Record, Vol. 14B,Nuclear Energy Series, Plutonium Project Record, Vol. 9, p.Nuclear Energy Series, Plutonium Project Record, Vol. l4B,

Glass, Richard Alois

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

449

NUCLEAR PROPULSION--AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The use of nuclear energy in the space programs is discussed. Nuclear rocket development is reviewed, and the Nevada rocket development station, nuclear electric propulsion and power generation, and advanced research projects are discussed. (J.R.D.)

Finger, H.B.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CHANGE OF PROJECT NUMBER UPDATE PROJECT Project Number: Title: Date Valid: Date Deactivated: Classification Codes: Project Number: Project Title: Associated Materials: Programmatic RIS Previous Project Number(s) Status Code Allotment Code (S=Supplier, U=User) I authorize that the information listed above is for the NMMSS Program to use as part of the project number conversion process for this facility.

451

Long-term need for new generating capacity  

SciTech Connect

Electricity demand should continue to grow at about the same rate as GNP, creating a need for large amounts of new generating capacity by the year 2000. Only coal and nuclear at this time have the abundant domestic resources and assured technology to meet this need. However, large increase in both coal and nuclear usage will not be acceptable to society without solutions to many of the problems that now deter their increased usage. For coal, the problems center around the safety and environmental impacts of increased coal mining and coal combustion. For nuclear the problems center around reactor safety, radioactive waste disposal, financial risk, and nuclear materials safeguards. The fuel requirements and waste generation for coal plants are orders of magnitude greater than for nuclear. Technology improvements and waste management practices must be pursued to mitigate environmental and safety impacts from electricity generation. 26 refs., 14 figs., 23 tabs.

Bloomster, C.H.; Merrill, E.T.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Prepared by Melinda Downing, Environmental Justice Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy MAR 06 MARCH 2006 Since 1999, the Department of Energy has worked with the National Urban Internet and others to create community capacity through technology.  Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Table of Contents Message from the Environmental Justice Program Manager . . . . . . . . 3 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Partnerships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Process Chart: From Agency to Community. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Case Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

453

Current Projects for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis > Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis > Current Projects Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics...

454

Project X functional requirements specification  

SciTech Connect

Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support intensity frontier research in elementary particle physics, with possible applications to nuclear physics and nuclear energy research, at Fermilab. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions. This paper will describe the Functional Requirements for the Project X facility and the rationale for these requirements.

Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Yankee Nuclear Power Station - analysis of decommissioning costs  

SciTech Connect

The preparation of decommissioning cost estimates for nuclear power generating stations has received a great deal of interest in the last few years. Owners are required by regulation to ensure that adequate funds are collected for the timely decommissioning of their facilities. The unexpected premature shutdown of several facilities and uncertainties associated with radioactive waste disposal and long-term spent-fuel storage, when viewed in the light of a deregulated electric utility industry, has caused many companies to reevaluate their decommissioning cost estimates. The decommissioning of the Yankee Nuclear Power Station represents the first large-scale project involving the complete decontamination and dismantlement of a commercial light water nuclear power generation facility in the United States. Since this pressurized water reactor operated for 32 yr at a respectable 74% lifetime capacity factor, the actual costs and resources required to decommission the plant, when compared with decommissioning estimates, will yield valuable benchmarking data.

Lessard, L.P. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

DSW Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates DSW Power Projects Boulder Canyon: Straddling the Colorado River near the Arizona-Nevada border, Hoover Dam in Boulder Canyon creates Lake Mead. River waters turning turbines at Hoover Powerplant produce about 2,074 MW--enough electricity for nearly 8 million people. Western markets this power to public utilities in Arizona, California and Nevada over 53.30 circuit-miles of transmission line. Central Arizona: Authorized in 1968, the Central Arizona Project in Arizona and western New Mexico was built to improve water resources in the Colorado River Basin. Segments of the authorization allowed for Federal participation in the Navajo Generating Station. The Federal share of the powerplant's combined capacity is 547 MW.

457

GASCAP: Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model documentation, June 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model (GASCAP) has been developed by EIA to provide a historical analysis of the monthly productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead and a projection of monthly capacity for 2 years into the future. The impact of drilling, oil and gas price assumptions, and demand on gas productive capacity are examined. Both gas-well gas and oil-well gas are included. Oil-well gas productive capacity is estimated separately and then combined with the gas-well gas productive capacity. This documentation report provides a general overview of the GASCAP Model, describes the underlying data base, provides technical descriptions of the component models, diagrams the system and subsystem flow, describes the equations, and provides definitions and sources of all variables used in the system. This documentation report is provided to enable users of EIA projections generated by GASCAP to understand the underlying procedures used and to replicate the models and solutions. This report should be of particular interest to those in the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

generation capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation capacity generation capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

459

High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,288,136 entitled "High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a method that facilitates the production of low-cost carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbents for use in large-scale gas-solid processes. This method treats an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnates the amine in a porous solid s