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1

Effects of inorganic turbidity and plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

a floating object. In the 2-h feeding experiments, the average feeding rate of perch at 0 NTU (nephelometric turbidity units) turbidity was 6.5 S. crystallina fish21,...

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

forestking@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw apfelpuff@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forestking@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw apfelpuff@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw / weichao.chen@gmail.com robin@ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT shot detection color histogram difference saliency region, deletion, and rearrange- ment while using the screen real-estate effectively. Second, we wish to reduce

Ouhyoung, Ming

3

Instructions of the NTU Health Exam for Incoming Exchange Students at NTU Hospital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instructions of the NTU Health Exam for Incoming Exchange Students at NTU Hospital (Health Exam Hospital (1 Chan-der Street, Taipei. Near MRT National Taiwan University Hospital Station) (Items at the Department of Family Medicine, examine room No.13, National Taiwan University Hospital. Tel: (02

Wu, Yih-Min

4

National Taiwan University NTU's institutional predecessor was Taihoku Imperial University,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

students there; this fact shows that NTU has effectively transformed into a research university, and has National Taiwan University 2008/2009 #12; NTU's institutional predecessor was Taihoku Imperial-diversity Research Center. #12;331715 The total number of students at NTU, including those enrolled at the School

Wu, Yih-Min

5

1 Journey to Lean 2 NTU community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of excellence 13 Diversified culture understanding 14 Sustainable development 15 Student Guidance Administration Committee :_ #12; 1 Student Safety Division 2 Military Training Affairs 3 Traffic Safety for Student Safety 8 Campus safety meetings 9 Campus safety affairs : #12; 1 NTU Career Activity

Wu, Yih-Min

6

Jenn-Nan Wang Professor of Mathematics, NTU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jenn-Nan Wang Position Professor of Mathematics, NTU Research Fields Inverse Problems, Partial estimates. Especially, the Carleman-type estimate is very effective in treating systems of partial

Huang, Su-Yun

7

Chin-Lung Wang Professor in Mathematics, NTU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chin-Lung Wang Position Professor in Mathematics, NTU Research Fields Algebraic Geometry to the non-vanishing conjecture for a pseudo-effective adjoint divisor. I am interested in studying the an

Huang, Su-Yun

8

Speaker: Prof. Fa-Hsuan Lin (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Dr. Yi-Cheng Hsu (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Speaker: Prof. Fa-Hsuan Lin (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Dr. Yi-Cheng Hsu (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Title: Magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain: progress, challenges

Wu, Yih-Min

9

Efficiency of several micro-fiber glass filters for recovery of poliovirus from tape water.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and virus concentration efficiency by using tap water at 2 nephelometric turbidity...and virus concentration efficiency by using tap water at 2 nephelometric turbidity...and virus concentration efficiency by using tap water at 2 nephelometric turbidity...

P Payment; M Trudel

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Learning with Augmented Features for Heterogeneous Domain Lixin Duan S080003@ntu.edu.sg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learning with Augmented Features for Heterogeneous Domain Adaptation Lixin Duan S080003@ntu.edu.sg Dong Xu DongXu@ntu.edu.sg Ivor W. Tsang IvorTsang@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang be readily incorporated with our newly proposed augmented feature representations to effectively utilize

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

11

An NTU Cooperative Game Theoretic View of Manipulating Elections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An NTU Cooperative Game Theoretic View of Manipulating Elections Michael Zuckerman1 , Piotr 27708, USA. conitzer@cs.duke.edu Abstract. Social choice theory and cooperative (coalitional) game, we use cooperative game theory tools in order to explore the coali- tion formation process

Rosenschein, Jeff

12

Prince House-NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Yuan Hall Halcyon House Bldg. No. 1 Agricultural Exhibition Hall New Moon Pavilion NTU Visitor Center Lesyue Classroom Bldg. Gymnasium Dept. of Physics Astronomy - Mathematics Bldg. Shih-Liang Hall Computer's Dorm 8th Women's Dorm Dept. of Psychology (North Hall) Foreign Language Teaching and Resource Center

Hung, Shih-Hao

13

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

Evans, Paul

14

SimpleNPKL : Simple Non-Parametric Kernel Learning Jinfeng Zhuang ZHUA0016@NTU.EDU.SG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SimpleNPKL : Simple Non-Parametric Kernel Learning Jinfeng Zhuang ZHUA0016@NTU.EDU.SG Ivor W. Tsang IVORTSANG@NTU.EDU.SG Steven C.H. Hoi CHHOI@NTU.EDU.SG School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological-of-the-art perfor- mance. The choice of an effective kernel plays a crucial role in many kernel based machine

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

15

Click4BuildingID@NTU: Click for Building Identification with GPS-enabled Camera Cell Phone.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Click4BuildingID@NTU: Click for Building Identification with GPS- enabled Camera Cell Phone. Chai, School of Computer Engineering Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 {asckyeo,asltchia,astjcham,asdrajan}@ntu meters or less [3] to improve the effectiveness and reliability of the 911 emergency call services

Chia, Liang-Tien

16

NTU Library User's Guide w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My L ve Affairwith Library NTU Library User's Guide #12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;C Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro How to find to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

Wu, Yih-Min

17

Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents flowing around bends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents is assumed to be Froude-subcritical, and in the case of a turbidity current a relatively sharp interface between turbid water and clear water above is assumed. The analysis focuses on the processes that maintain

Parker, Gary

18

Page 1 of 4 NTU EcoCampus Environnemental Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach over 3years ­ Jan 2012. Procurement Objective: To limit the environmental impact of NTU an action plan to reduce Estates & Resources vehicle fleet environmental impacts - Aug 2011. · Roll out projects e.g. wind turbines at Brackenhurst/ photovoltaic power generation 10 year plan­ Feb 2012

Evans, Paul

19

SponSored by http://www.ntu.edu.sg/ias/oCpA8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SponSored by http://www.ntu.edu.sg/ias/oCpA8 International Conference on physics education · Statistical and Nonlinear physics · Science Education · Women in Physics Sir Michael PEPPER Univ. College or poster presentations. All posters at the conference will be considered for the 2014 OCPA-APS Outstanding

Faraon, Andrei

20

Reviewed and updated March 2013 NTU Sustainable Construction and Refurbishment Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviewed and updated March 2013 NTU Sustainable Construction and Refurbishment Policy Environmental sustainability is a central principle of the University as demonstrated by our Environmental Policy. Our built environment contributes heavily towards our direct environmental performance. All stages of construction can

Evans, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

environment.team@ntu.ac.uk Reviewed and updated March 2014 NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and over 3,000 staff, NTU acknowledges its education and business activities will significantly impact environmental management systems and initiatives to promote environmental and sustainability awareness and education, in accordance with our strategic plan. These build on current policies and will be disseminated

Evans, Paul

22

w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro A wonderful place to stay I want to read books... I want to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

Wu, Yih-Min

23

The optimal treatment method of water turbidity purification in tap-water plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between the water turbidity purification result with raw water turbidity, raw water pH value (more)

Lin, Yi-Heng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

High-density turbidity currents: Are they sandy debris flows?  

SciTech Connect

Conventionally, turbidity currents are considered as fluidal flows in which sediment is supported by fluid turbulence, whereas debris flows are plastic flows in which sediment is supported by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The concept of high-density turbidity current refers to high-concentration, commonly non-turbulent, flows of fluids in which sediment is supported mainly by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The conventional wisdom that traction carpets with entrained turbulent clouds on top represent high-density turbidity currents is a misnomer because traction carpets are neither fluidal nor turbulent. Debris flows may also have entrained turbulent clouds on top. The traction carpet/debris flow and the overriding turbulent clouds are two separate entities in terms of flow rheology and sediment-support mechanism. In experimental and theoretical studies, which has linked massive sands and floating clasts to high-density turbidity currents, the term high-density turbidity current has actually been used for laminar flows. In alleviating this conceptual problem, sandy debris flow is suggested as a substitute for high-density turbidity current. Sandy debris flows represent a continuous spectrum of processes between cohesive and cohesionless debris flows. Commonly they are rheologically plastic. They may occur with or without entrained turbulent clouds on top. Their sediment-support mechanisms include matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. They are characterized by laminar flow conditions, a moderate to high grain concentration, and a low to moderate mud content. Although flows evolve and transform during the course of transport in density-stratified flows, the preserved features in a deposit are useful to decipher only the final stages of deposition. At present, there are no established criteria to decipher transport mechanism from the depositional record.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Effect of turbidity on chlorination efficiency and bacterial persistence in drinking water.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...turbidities and the efficiency of chlorination in drinking water, experiments were...turbidities and the efficiency of chlorination in drinking water, experiments were...impacts drinking water quality. Disinfection efficiency, hence, efficacy...

M W LeChevallier; T M Evans; R J Seidler

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Development of WTI and turbidity estimation model using SMA application to Kushiro Mire, eastern Hokkaido, Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new water-turbidity index (WTI) based on multispectral images was developed and tested at Kushiro Mire, eastern Hokkaido, Japan. An algorithm for turbidity estimation was developed and applied to Landsat TM images to monitor the turbid water on the mire surface during the snow-melting season. We used spectral mixture analysis (SMA) to produce a turbidity estimation model. The SMA unmixes a mixed pixel determining the fractions due to each spectral end member. In this study, we used four end members (1, alder; 2, reed; 3, high-concentration turbid water (485 ppm); 4, low-concentration turbid water (10 ppm) measured in the test site. The WTI was determined by the following equation: WTI=amax/(amax+amin), where amax is abundance of high-concentration turbid water and amin is abundance of low-concentration turbid water. The end-member spectra of alder and reed were measured in the laboratory using specimens collected at the test site. The spectrum of turbid water was measured at the test sites. The relative abundance of each end member was estimated based on this spectral information using SMA. The same formula was applied to Landsat TM images. Then we applied the WTI equation to the end-member images to obtain a WTI map. In the mire wetland region, turbid water spreads under alder trees and reed grasses. To verify our turbidity estimation method based on WTI under these conditions, we constructed a small experimental wetland consisting of mixed stands of alder and reed. WTI was calculated from the mixed spectrum of this artificial wetland and the regression curve for the relation between WTI and the actual turbidity was determined (R2=.91). Finally, this regression equation was used to derive a turbidity map from the WTI image.

Satoshi Kameyama; Yoshiki Yamagata; Futoshi Nakamura; Masami Kaneko

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Broadband absorption spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broadband absorption spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady. Tromberg A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption a and reduced scattering s derived from the FD data

Berger, Andrew J.

28

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-5-318 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

29

Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

Losleben, Tamar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Trapping of sustained turbidity currents by intraslope MICHAEL P. LAMB1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was separated from the sediment-free water above by a relatively sharp, horizontal settling interface indicating highly Froude- subcritical flow. The very slow moving flow within the ponded zone created conditions on the relative magnitudes of the input discharge of turbid water and the detrainment discharge of water across

31

Interactions between turbidity currents and topography in aggrading sinuous submarine channels: A laboratory study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and thickness of the currents as the channel-form evolved. Aerial video was collected throughout the duration of each current...1365-3091.2003.00551.x. Parker, G., Garcia, M.H., Fukushima, Y., and Yu, W., 1987, Experiments on turbidity currents...

Kyle M. Straub; David Mohrig; Brandon McElroy; James Buttles; Carlos Pirmez

32

Discrete-ordinates solution of short-pulsed laser transport in two-dimensional turbid media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the hyperbolic transient radiative-transport equation are not known. Ku- mar et al.4 considered the solution-pulsed laser transport is transient radiative-transfer theory. Complete an- alytical solutionsDiscrete-ordinates solution of short-pulsed laser transport in two-dimensional turbid media

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

33

Polarized light propagation in highly scattering turbid media with a distribution of the particle size: a Monte Carlo study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The light propagation in highly scattering turbid media composed of the particles with different size distribution is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation model implemented in Standard C. Monte Carlo method has been widely utilized to study...

Koh, Wonshill

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

34

File:06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 25 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:14, 1 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:14, 1 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (25 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file:

35

Multilayer-weighted transmittance functions for use in broadband irradiance and turbidity calculations  

SciTech Connect

A physically-modelled method is presented to obtain an accurate transmittance and optical depth for various extinction processes (Rayleigh scattering, aerosol extinction, and absorption by ozone, nitrogen dioxide, uniformly mixed gases, and water vapor) affecting the transfer of shortwave radiation in a cloudless atmosphere. The integration over the shortwave solar spectrum is performed with a more realistic weighting function than the conventional one. The calculation and properties of the aerosol optical depth are discussed in detail, as well as its proper use in atmospheric turbidity studies.

Gueymard, C. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Turbidity current flow over an obstacle and phases of sediment wave generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the flow of particle-laden turbidity currents down a slope and over an obstacle. A high-resolution 2D computer simulation model is used, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. It includes poly-disperse particle grain sizes in the current and substrate. Particular attention is paid to the erosion and deposition of the substrate particles, including application of an active layer model. Multiple flows are modeled from a lock release that can show the development of sediment waves (SW). These are stream-wise waves that are triggered by the increasing slope on the downstream side of the obstacle. The initial obstacle is completely erased by the resuspension after a few flows leading to self consistent and self generated SW that are weakly dependant on the initial obstacle. The growth of these waves is directly related to the turbidity current being self sustaining, that is, the net erosion is more than the net deposition. Four system parameters are found to influence the SW growth: (1) slope, (2) current ...

Strauss, Moshe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

NTU Incoming Exchange/Visiting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Biochemistry, Biology, Accounting, Organic, Chemistry, Engineering, Mathematics. · Group study/ Discussion #12 Hours: Mon-Sat. 8:00~22:30 Sun.~17:00 · 24hr Study room · Library Catalog (TULIPS) · Find a book / film Development · Library B1 · Individual counsel · Economics, Statistics, Calculus, Chemistry, Physics

Wu, Yih-Min

38

In 2006, the Alliance of Coastal Technology (ACT) evaluated the performance of five commercial-ready, in situ turbidity sensors at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial-ready, in situ turbidity sensors at eight test sites located throughout North America (Fig. 1, and a freshwater lake (Fig. 1) . The sensors used in this study consisted of: A backscatter Turbidity Probe ( =660 A transmissometer ( =660nm) ­ data denoted by cp Both scattering sensors were equipped with integrated copper wipers

Boss, Emmanuel S.

39

Prospects of coherent control in turbid media: Bounds on focusing broadband laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

We study the prospects of controlling transmission of broadband and bichromatic laser pulses through turbid samples. The ability to focus transmitted broadband light is limited via both the scattering properties of the medium and the technical characteristics of the experimental setup. There are two time scales given by pulse stretching in the near- and far-field regions which define the maximum bandwidth of a pulse amenable to focusing. In the geometric-optics regime of wave propagation in the medium, a single setup can be optimal for focusing light at frequencies {omega} and n{omega} simultaneously, providing the basis for the 1+n coherent quantum control. Beyond the regime of geometric optics, we discuss a simple solution for the shaping, which provides the figure of merit for one's ability to simultaneously focus several transmission modes.

Shapiro, Evgeny A.; Drane, Thomas M. [Department of Chemistry, The University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Milner, Valery [Department of Physics, The University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Evaluation Of A Turbidity Meter For Use At The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation's (SRR's) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a ''peanut'' vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 wt%. A ''go/no-go'' decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a ''go'' decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a ''no-go'' determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a ''go/no-go'' CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the ''go/no-go'' decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the ''go/no-go'' criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), the sludge batch currently being processed. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R. N.; Edwards, T. B.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediations (SRRs) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a peanut vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A go/no-go decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a go decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a no-go determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the issuance of the initial version of this report but under the scope of the original request for technical assistance, WSE asked for this report to be revised to include the go/no-go CU value corresponding to 0.28 wt% solids. It was this request that led to the preparation of Revision 1 of the report. The results for the 0.28 wt% solids value were developed following the same approach as that utilized for the 0.14 wt% solids value. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a go/no-go CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the go/no-go decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the go/no-go criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from the sludge batch, Sludge Batch 7b, being processed at the time of this testing. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

42

Quantitative broadband absorption and scattering spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady state methodologies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses a combination of frequency-domain and steady-state reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light steady-state measurement, whereas the frequency-domain data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption and reduced scattering derived from the frequency-domain data are used to calibrate the intensity of the steady-state measurements and to determine the reduced scattering coefficient at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. The absorption coefficient spectrum is determined by comparing the steady-state reflectance values with the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. Absorption spectra of a turbid phantom and of human breast tissue in vivo, derived with the combined frequency-domain and steady-state technique, agree well with expected reference values.

Tromberg, Bruce J. (Irvine, CA); Berger, Andrew J. (Rochester, NY); Cerussi, Albert E. (Lake Forest, CA); Bevilacqua, Frederic (Costa Mesa, CA); Jakubowski, Dorota (Irvine, CA)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

43

IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 2, NO. 4, DECEMBER 1996 965 Depth-Resolved Holography Through Turbid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Resolved Holography Through Turbid Media Using Photorefraction Sam C. W. Hyde, Richard Jones, Nick P. Barry, J. C. The relative merits of photorefractive holography are discussed, including its potential to provide a higher

Dainty, Chris

44

Diabat L., Remund J., Wald L., 2003. Linke turbidity factors for several sites in Africa. Solar Energy, 75, 2, 111-119. Copyright UFAE Meteotest -Ecole des Mines de Paris Armines 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the fields of renewable energies, climatology, agro-meteorology, and atmospheric pollution. These issues Energy, 75, 2, 111-119. Copyright UFAE ­ Meteotest - Ecole des Mines de Paris ­ Armines 1 LINKE TURBIDITY turbidity factor (TL) has been estimated at sixteen locations in Africa (9 stations in Egypt, 2

Boyer, Edmond

45

New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media  

SciTech Connect

A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers.

Bcklin, Christoph, E-mail: boecklic@ethz.ch; Baumann, Dirk; Frhlich, Jrg [Institute of Electromagnetic Fields, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

A comparison of biologically active filters for the removal of ozone by-products, turbidity, and particles  

SciTech Connect

Biofiltration tests were performed at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California`s 5.5-mgd (21,000 m{sup 3}d) demonstration plant using two 400 ft{sup 2} (37 m{sup 2}) anthracite/sand filters and a 6 ft{sup 2} (0.56 m{sup 2}) granular activated carbon (GAC)/sand filter operated in parallel. The empty-bed contact time (EBCT) within the GAC and anthracite ranged from 2.1-3.1 min. The filters were evaluated based on (1) conventional filtration performance (turbidity, particle removal, and headloss); (2) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products (assimilable organic carbon [AOC], aldehydes, and aldoketoacids) after startup; (3) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products at steady state; and (4) resistance to short-term process upsets such as intermittent chlorination or filter out-of-service time. Approximately 80 percent formaldehyde removal was achieved by the anthracite/sand filter operated at a 2.1-min EBCT (6 gpm/ft{sup 2} [15 m/h]) within 8 days of ozone operation. The GAC/sand filter operated at the same rate achieved 80 percent removal within 1 day, possibly as an additive effect of adsorption and biological removal. In-depth aldehyde monitoring at four depths (0.5-min EBCT intervals) provided additional insight into the removal kinetics. During periods of warmer water temperature, from 20 to 48 percent of the AOC was removed in the flocculation/sedimentation basins by 40-75 percent. This percentage removal typically resulted in AOC concentrations within 40 {mu}g C/L of the raw, unozonated water levels.

Coffey, B.M.; Krasner, S.W.; Sclimenti, M.J.; Hacker, P.A.; Gramith, J.T. [Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, La Verne, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Prairie iVai. 23(2): 53-60. 1991. Smallmouth Bass Size Structure and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the two gears and assess the potential effects of conductivity and turbidity on catch rates for both g, the effectiveness of both gears was not seriously impaired by conductivities ranging from 470 to 1250 ¢/cm or by turbidities ranging from 2.1 to IS.0 NTU. An a posteriori analysis delineated electrofL~hing catch rates

48

Angles J., Menard L., Bauer O., Rigollier C., Wald L., 1999. A climatological database of the Linke turbidity factor. In Proceedings of the ISES Solar World Congress 1999, Jerusalem, Israel, July 49, 1999, volume I, pp 432434.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Angles J., Menard L., Bauer O., Rigollier C., Wald L., 1999. A climatological database of the Linke, volume I, pp 432434. A CLIMATOLOGICAL DATABASE OF THE LINKE TURBIDITY FACTOR Joel Angles, Lionel Ménard the period 19811990. Using the abovementioned formula, these values are turned into climatological values

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste - 13532  

SciTech Connect

Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source. (authors)

Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job [EIC Laboratories, Inc., 111 Downey St., Norwood, MA, 02062 (United States)] [EIC Laboratories, Inc., 111 Downey St., Norwood, MA, 02062 (United States); Bryan, Samuel; Lines, Amanda; Levitskaia, Tatiana [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

This is Your Library! NTU Library User's Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&HCI ORC ID&ResearcherID ORCIDIResearcherID 2 1 1 2 3 3 4 5 26 33 37 41 27 28 29 30 #12; -- NTUR --ESI -- 4 5 6 46 50 52 54 59 71 #12; #12;2 100 30603 [][][] 1 100 60 3 30 30 Core TSSCI #12; Web of Science Core Collection (SCIE, SSCI, A&HCI) ORCID & Researcher ID Journal

Wu, Yih-Min

51

New Moon Pavilion / NTU Visitor Center Sports Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subjects Classroom Building Xiao-Fu Square Liberal Education Classroom Building Gymnasium Swimming Pool-Liang Hall Global Change Research Center Graduate Institute of Oceanography N43 N44 N51 N52 N53 N54 N55 N56 N of Mechanical Engineering Chih-Hung Hall College of Engineering Building 9th Women's Dorm Restaurant 9th Women

Hung, Shih-Hao

52

ICSICSICSICS http://cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw/~thlin/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(duplexer; RF passive device)· SWr GMD44 (duplexer; RF passive device) · Invensense MPU3050 MPU3050 Triple software ICS 15 #12;ICSICS IC d ig h IC design house Start-up company Design service company FoundryFoundry System house ... Pain is inevitable; suffering is optional. 16 #12;

Hung, Shih-Hao

53

Removal of Waterborne Particles by Electrofiltration: Pilot-Scale Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

researchers conducted bench-scale experiments to verify the effectiveness of electrofiltration, few studies plant. Presedimentation basin water was used as the influent with a turbidity ranging from 12 to 37 NTU to be more effective for removal of smaller particles (

Li, Ying

54

N e w E n g l a n d W a t e r T r e a t m e n t Technology Assistance Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extraction wells in New Hampshire. 2. Characterize the treatment effectiveness of the slow sand filter.8-1.97 log Aerobic spore Forming Bacteria (CFU/100mL) 48 >2.4 log 8 2.3 log NA Turbidity (NTU) 48 82.8% 8 82 filtration extraction well water, even after eliminating the dilution effects with groundwater. The male

55

*Corresponding author. Tel: (65) 6790-6235. Email: arbhatnagar@ntu.edu.sg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 3 Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute a simulation- based method to estimate this impact for iid normally distributed demand. We also study for efficient and responsive distribution systems by implementing innovative practices such as cross

Graves, Stephen C.

56

Chien-Cheng Chang Professor, Institute of Applied Mechanics and Department of Math., NTU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Solar Energy, Lithium Battery­vibration and fluid me- chanics of wind turbines, solar panel)­ mechanics, heat transfer of microstructures (theory, computation and experiments) · Energy Research in Wind and experiments) · Biomimetics Research Inspired by Locomotion of Birds, Fish and Microorganisms­ aerody- namics

Huang, Su-Yun

57

Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which is the Effectiveness-NTU Method as described byfor each problem. Effectiveness-NTU Method This solutionthe cold side. The Effectiveness-NTU method is employed in

Galvez, Cristhian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Commercial Application of Freeze Crystallization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effluent Composition Product Analysis Feed Water Conductivity Micro S 10,000 220 Turbidity NTU >500 20 Density g/l 1.002 1.000 Total Solids % 1.5 0.01 Ash % orTS 55.0 N/A Suspended Solids PPM 1,750 20 C.O.D. PPM 10,000 100 As a result... Figure 3 outlines the overall flowsheet of the Chetwynd installation. Because the freeze system was designed 10 handle all the liquid effluent from the mill, a clarification system was designed to remove any suspended solids which may be present...

Gorgol, R. G.

59

Contribution to the turbidity problem in Mexico City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors give a numerical solution of ngstrm's equation for the extinction of solar radiation, where the procedure involves as variables: the intensityI of direct solar radiation, the optical air massm, the ...

Dr. Ignacio G. Galindo; Mr. Agustn Muhlia

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The dynamics of phosphorus in turbid estuarine systems: Example ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Suspended particles and surface waters were collected in the Gironde estuary (southwestern France) along the salinity gradient. Dissolved...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rapid modeling of diffuse reflectance of light in turbid slabs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The first type starts from the radiative trans- fer equation, and the second uses the Monte Carlo tech- nique. The radiative transfer equation is usually too complex to solve analytically and is often goals in these studies is to un- derstand and simulate light transport in biological tis- sues, which

Wang, Lihong

62

RESEARCH ARTICLE Cichlid species diversity in naturally and anthropogenically turbid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 9750 AC Haren, The Netherlands M. A. Kishe-Machumu Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute, Dar es Salaam Center, P.O. Box 78850, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Aquat Sci DOI 10.1007/s00027-012-0265-4 Aquatic Sciences

63

Remote measurement of turbidity and chlorophyll through aerial photography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Readings Along Transects . . 55-59 A-1 A-2 A-3 A-5 A-6 'A- 7 A-8 A-9 A-10 Analysis of Variance for Film Density Readings Along Transect Line T-test Values for Transect Readings Film Density Readings for Repetitive Flights Airphoto Data, May 3... Data, July 4, 19 73 70-74 76 79-80 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 Table ~Pa e A-11 A-12 A-13 A-14 A-15 B-1 B-2 C-1 C-2 C-3 Airphoto Data, July 5, 1973 Airphoto Data, July 11, 1973 Airphoto Data, July 12, 1973 Airphoto Data...

Schwebel, Martin David

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lunt, Jessica, and Delbert L. Smee. Turbidity influences trophic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

rocky shores in New England, green crabs were found to be more abundant in sites with high ..... grass, oyster reef, mud flat). Conditions such as wind speed.

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

65

Emotion-based Music Visualization using Photos Chin-Han Chen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

90030@csie.ntu.edu.tw,mfueng@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw skjeng@ew.ee.ntu.edu.tw,cyy@csie.ntu.edu.tw Abstract patterns irrelevant to the music content while elaborate ones present visual effects with coordination

Ouhyoung, Ming

66

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (first quarter 1995 is the third of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in wells FAC 3 and 11C. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (second quarter 1995 is the fourth of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and radium-226 exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west at a rate of 1300 feet per year. Groundwater flow in the Barnwell/McBean was to the northeast at a rate of 50 feet per year.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance is due to combined effects of improvement in charge collection and higher optical transmittance, Singapore (e-mail: aung0069@ntu.edu.sg; exwsun@ ntu.edu.sg; zhao0075@ntu.edu.sg; dyoga@ntu.edu.sg). H. V and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore (e-mail: hvdemir@ntu

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

69

Low-dimensional Models for Compression, Compressed Sensing, and Prediction of Large-Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological University, Singapore, 639798; nikola001@e.ntu.edu.sg, muhammad89@e.ntu.edu.sg, jdauwels@ntu) is commonly deployed to compress large traffic data sets [2], [4]­[6]. PCA provides an effective low

Jaillet, Patrick

70

Efficient Obstacle-Avoiding Rectilinear Steiner Tree Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan enorm@eda.ee.ntu.edu.tw, ywchang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw, yangc@csie.ntu an effective and efficient algorithm for the OARSMT problem to facilitate the IC design flow. Previous methods

Chang, Yao-Wen

71

The Diet-Aware Dining Table: Observing Dietary Behaviors over a Tabletop Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Department of Electrical Engineeringe , National Taiwan University r93018@csie.ntu.edu.tw, b90701219@ntu.edu.tw, {hchu, yjhsu}@csie.ntu.edu.tw; cheryl.chen@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw, {r94944009, r94054}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu and obesity amounts to $117 billion in 2000. Proper dietary intake and related inter- ventions are effective

Chu, Hao-hua

72

NTU Health Exam Requirement for Incoming Exchange / Visiting Students In order to understand the general health condition of coming students, and to meet the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

History Food allergies Drug allergies ( Item name: ) Physical Examination Height: cm Weight: kg Waist circumference: cm Blood Pressure: mmHg Pulse Rate: /min Skin: Head & Neck: Chest: Lungs Corrected R L Color Differentiation: Normal Abnormal Hearing: Right Pass Fail / Left Pass Fail

Wu, Yih-Min

73

NTU Health Exam Requirement for Incoming Exchange / Visiting Students In order to understand the general health condition of coming students, and to meet the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Personal History Food allergies Drug allergies ( Item name: ) Photo Physical Examination Height: cm Weight: kg Waist circumference: cm Blood Pressure: mmHg Pulse Rate: /min Skin: Head & Neck: Chest Corrected R L Color Differentiation: Normal Abnormal Hearing: Right Pass Fail / Left Pass Fail

Wu, Yih-Min

74

Instructions of NTU Health Exam for Exchange Students from China In order to understand the general health condition of the new students, and to meet the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hypertension Cervical cancer Gout or hyperuricemia Psychiatric disorders None of the diseases described

Wu, Yih-Min

75

Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a Counter Flow Offset Strip Fin Intermediate Heat Exchanger using an Effective Porous Media Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state temperature distribution using the effectiveness-NTUanalyzed using the effectiveness-NTU (number of transferand the analytical effectiveness-NTU method verifies that

Urquiza, Eugenio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5 Common Ions Ca mg/L 266 214 206 207

77

Microsoft Word - Appendix B Bedrock GW Samples.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Results for Bedrock Groundwater Samples, Analytical Results for Bedrock Groundwater Samples, January 2000 through April 2011 This page intentionally left blank Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride μg/L 124 242

78

Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05&  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 This page intentionally left blank Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5 Common Ions Ca mg/L 266 214 206 207

79

Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06a,b  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 This page intentionally left blank Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride μg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81

80

Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

10 10 This page intentionally left blank Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5 Common Ions Ca mg/L 266 214 206 207

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride μg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81 Mg mg/L 10.5 9.99

82

Microsoft Word - S02459_2006Annual GW Rpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Page 1 Page 1 Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity b µmhos/cm 560 560 DO b mg/L 1.4 -- ORP b mV -51 -46 pH b s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature b C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity b NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride µg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81 Mg mg/L 10.5 9.99

83

Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

10 10 This page intentionally left blank Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride μg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81

84

Microsoft Word - Appendix A Alluvial GW Samples.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Groundwater Samples, Groundwater Samples, January 2000 through April 2011 This page intentionally left blank Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5

85

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard (50 NTU) are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Digital optical phase conjugation for delivering two-dimensional images through turbid media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical transmission through complex media such as biological tissue is fundamentally limited by multiple light scattering. Precise control of the optical wavefield potentially holds the key to advancing a broad range of ...

Yamauchi, Toyohiko

87

Analytica Chimica Acta 463 (2002) 283293 Determination of total phosphorus and nitrogen in turbid waters by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Bestrecoveriesofphosphorusandnitrogenby microwaveheatingwereobtainedwhensolutionsweredigestedat95 Cfor40 min.Quantitativerecoveriesofphosphorusfrom Chlorella suspensions up to 1000 mg/l were analysis; NEIS no. 3 Chlorella; NEIS no. 2 pond sediment Corresponding author. Tel.: +61-26201-2531; fax

Canberra, University of

88

Experiments on Hydraulic Jumps in Turbidity Currents Near a Canyon-Fan Transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...attention. Recently Parker, Fukushima, and Pantin (11) have...sediment by-passing put forward by Mutti (19). The...11. G. Parker, Y. Fukushima, H. Pantin, ibid. 171, 145 (1986). 12. Y. Fukushima, G. Parker, H. Pantin...

MARCELO GARCIA; GARY PARKER

1989-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

89

Anomalous Bottom Water South of the Grand Banks Suggests Turbidity Current Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...study in the North American basin, Biscaye and Eit-treim...the western North At-lantic basin can usually be seen in the water...margin of the North American basin should also be considered in...A. F. Amos, The New York Bight and Hudson Canyon in October...

ANTHONY F. AMOS; ROBERT D. GERARD

1979-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Modeling the diffuse reflectance due to a narrow beam incident on a turbid medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an asymptotic analysis of the radiative transport equation for strong scattering, weak absorption, and a narrow of the radiative transport equation, we show that this diffuse reflectance model gives results that are accurate for the diffuse reflectance from the solution of the radiative transport equation. However, using the solution

Kim, Arnold D.

91

Absorption distribution of an optical beam focused into a turbid medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the radiative transfer equation. The radiative trans- fer equation is usually too complex to solve analyt- ically and is often simplified by a diffusion approximation. The radiative transfer equation or comparable with the transport mean free path. Focusing could significantly increase the peak absorp- tion

Wang, Lihong

92

Analysis of single Monte Carlo methods for prediction of reflectance from turbid media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be derived from the radiative transport equation. While theStarting from the radiative transport equation we derive the

Martinelli, Michele; Gardner, Adam; Cuccia, David; Hayakawa, Carole; Spanier, Jerome; Venugopalan, Vasan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Using polarization to find a source in a turbid Julia Clark,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, fog, and rain, for example. The scalar approximation of the radiative transport equation is used often been some notable works done of inverse problems for the vector radiative transport equation. Siewert of partially polarized light using the theory of radiative transport. In particular, we study the light

Kim, Arnold D.

94

Green functions for diffuse light in a medium comprising two turbid half-spaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review of Green functions for diffuse light in two semi-infinite scattering and absorbing half-spaces separated by a plane interface is presented. The frequency-domain Green...

Shendeleva, Margarita L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - apple juice turbidity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 1 Slice Cornbread 165 12 oz Apple Juice 167 THURSDAY: Total Calorie Count 1446... Ranch Dressing 70 1 Apple 81 1 Chocolate Chip Cookie 200 12 oz Diet Soda 0 MONDAY: Total...

96

Large River Food Webs: Influence of Nutrients, Turbidity, and Flow, and Implications for Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans impact rivers in many ways that modify ecological processes yielding ecosystem services. In order to mitigate anthropogenic impacts, scientists are challenged to understand interactions among physicochemical factors affecting large river food...

Roach, Katherine

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Experiments on Hydraulic Jumps in Turbidity Currents Near a Canyon-Fan Transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cathodoluminescence ex-periments. Many useful comments on our manu-script were made by K. Kash, J. M. Worlock, and M. Saifi. We are especially gratefill to D. E. Aspnes for making concrete suggestions for the improvement ofour report. 8 May 1989...

MARCELO GARCIA; GARY PARKER

1989-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

High-speed scattering medium characterization with application to focusing light through turbid media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a phase-control holographic technique to characterize scattering media with the purpose of focusing light through it. The system generates computer-generated holograms...

Conkey, Donald B; Caravaca-Aguirre, Antonio M; Piestun, Rafael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS Anshul Singh*, Arindam Basu, Keck-Voon Ling, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore *NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics (ISAID), NTU, Singapore $School of Computer Engineering, NTU, Singapore §School of ECE, Georgia

Mooney, Vincent

100

Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effectiveness Research, Clinical Trial Center, NTU Hospital Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine system regulates directed cell migration Institute of Molecular Medicine, NTU College of Medicine Feng) and Gefitinib NTU Hospital and NTU College of Medicine , Yi-Hsien Shih, Pin-Chun Chen, Chia-Yu Chu IF10

Wu, Yih-Min

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101

Connected Vehicle Safety Science, System, and Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yi-Ping Hung Intel-NTU Connected Context Computing Center National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan 1 kuanwenchen@ntu.edu.tw, 2 hsinmu@csie.ntu.edu.tw, 3 hung@csie.ntu.edu.tw Abstract--In this paper, we propose be effectively prevented. In this paper, we present the challenges arise from realizing intelligent transports

Ouhyoung, Ming

102

Fast Bounded Online Gradient Descent Algorithms for Scalable Kernel-Based Online Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zhao zhao0106@ntu.edu.sg Jialei Wang jl.wang@ntu.edu.sg Pengcheng Wu wupe0003@ntu.edu.sg Rong Jin rongjin@cse.msu.edu Steven C.H. Hoi chhoi@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang, they are neither computa- tionally efficient due to their intensive budget maintenance strategy nor effective due

Jin, Rong

103

Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF5%Web of ScienceWoS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Hanna S. Graduate Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, NTU Structural Carbamazepine- Induced Toxic Effects and HLA-B*1502 Screening in Taiwan NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Volume Imaging, NTU Hospital and College of Medicine, NTU Department of Laboratory Medicine, NTU Hospital

Wu, Yih-Min

104

The pretreatment with enhanced coagulation and a UF membrane for seawater desalination with reverse osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The application of reverse osmosis (RO) for desalination process has increased rapidly with the construction of large RO plants. Although there have been considerable improvements in membrane materials and operation experience, the fouling of membranes is a significant problem up to the present. There have been many instances of fouling of RO membranes caused by the presence of iron and silica. Biomineralization is usually believed to be caused by microorganisms metabolizing at iron and silica present. Its formation process was studied and described first in the present work, then the enhanced coagulation with Fe(VI) and UF membrane treatment process for pretreatment of reverse osmosis for desalination has been investigated in a laboratory for 34 months. The main aim is to reduce the feed water pollution, such as turbidity, iron, silica and aglae, microbial contamination in order to control biofouling and mineralization on the membrane surface. The results showed that the biomineralization formation process is the adsorption of organism and the biosorption of inorganics onto the organic matrix. The pretreatment results show that turbidity is less than 0.5 NTU, iron concentration never exceeds 0.2 mg/l, silicon concentration must not exceed 0.1 mg/l; and the removal rate of aglae and microbial is more than 98%.

Wei Ma; Yaqian Zhao; Lu Wang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 61, NO. 14, JULY 15, 2013 3545 Dual-Mode Low-Complexity Codebook Searching  

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significant effect of reducing the number of multiplications by 56% compared with referenced works. Finally Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan, R.O.C (e-mail: yihsuan@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw; zero- bigtree@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw; yagaru@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw; chenjo@ac- cess.ee.ntu.edu.tw; andywu@cc.ee.ntu

Hung, Shih-Hao

106

National Taiwan University ADaptable VIsionary System for Earthquake Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flai@ntu.edu.tw Pei-Chin Wang b89091@csie.ntu.edu.tw Keng-Hao Chang b89029@csie.ntu.edu.tw Yuan-Chung Shen b89040@csie.ntu.edu.tw Che-Hsuan Shu b89058@csie.ntu.edu.tw #12;CSIDC 2004 1 1 Abstract Serious effective way to predict when the earthquake will happen. Here ADVISER, ADaptable VIsionary System

Ouhyoung, Ming

107

www.advhealthmat.de www.MaterialsViews.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mail: edwinyeow@ntu.edu.sg; Bengang@ntu.edu.sg Here, a set of novel and personalized nanocarriers are presented side effects. Recent advances in multifunctional nanomedicine have shown great potentials to address

Xing, Bengang

108

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

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Department of Mathematics, NTU PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Computer experiment due to the Maxwell equations, and (iii) effective surrogates (meta-models) based on Gaussian process

Wu, Yih-Min

109

ChBE 3210 Transport Phenomena II (required course) Credit: 3-0-3  

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coefficients b. LMTD c. NTU-effectiveness method 5. Diffusion a. Molecular diffusion b. Knudsen and restricted of number and height of transfer units (NTU & HTU). (Student Outcomes: a, c, k) Topics Covered 1

Sherrill, David

110

Multi-receiver Homomorphic Authentication Codes for Network Coding  

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University, Singapore TANG0209@e.ntu.edu.sg, hoonwei@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. We investigate a new class, the messages are now inevitably susceptible to data modification or corruption. This has a severe effect

111

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

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Engineering, NTU PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Three-dimensional rotational that aneurysm structures were effectively segmented and in good agreement with manual delineation outcomes. #12;

Wu, Yih-Min

112

AN EFFICIENT AUTHENTICATION METHOD for H.264/AVC J. Zhang, Student Member, IEEE, A.T.S. Ho, Fellow. lEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological University Singapore 639798 Email: Jingzhang@pmail.ntu.edu.sg;etsho@ntu.edu.sg Keywords: Hard detect the tampering by the sensitive mode change. And the experimental results prove the effectiveness

Doran, Simon J.

113

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering (CQSE) National Center of Theoretical Sciences (NCTS)  

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Engineering, NTU Place: Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Plasma processes have attracted temperature. The effect of the diffusion of the ambient air on the plasma characteristics is assessed

Wu, Yih-Min

114

May 14, 2007 10:6 WSPC/Trim Size: 11in x 8.5in for Proceedings CSB2007 LEARNING POSITION WEIGHT MATRICES FROM SEQUENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Email: chenxin@ntu.edu.sg, guol0005@ntu-AlignACE is an effective tool for discovering TF binding sites from gene expression or ChIP-chip data and, in particular

Chen, Xin

115

www.advmat.de www.MaterialsViews.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological University Singapore 637371, Singapore E-mail: qihua@ntu.edu.sg; hdsun@ntu.edu.sg Prof. Q. H in highly efficient light sources (nanola- sers), waveguides, field-effect transistors and photodetectors

Xiong, Qihua

116

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPEAKER Dr. Chyh-Hong Chern Department of Physics, NTU PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU of up to 0.42 $\\hbar$ can be generated. Based on this effect, a novel device consisting of a grating

Wu, Yih-Min

117

Crowdsourcing Multimedia QoE Evaluation: A Trusted Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed framework by a comparison with MOS. Moreover, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (e-mail: bipa@fractal.ee.ntu.edu.tw; congo@fractal.ee.ntu.

Chen, Sheng-Wei

118

Submitted to the Journal of Fluid Mechanics, January, 2005 Conditions under which a supercritical turbidity current traverses an abrupt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

slope can be expected to be subcritical. The transition from supercritical to subcritical flow a hydraulic jump to subcritical flow near the canyon-fan break, and then b) accelerate again to critical flow water across the Gibraltar Sill from the Mediterranean Sea into the Atlantic (e.g. Armi & Farmer, 1988

Parker, Gary

119

Seeing Through Turbid Liquids with Digital Holography and Related Applications for Coherent Imaging in Bio-microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fluids with suspended colloidal particles hinder imaging through microfluidic channels restricting lab-on-chip's technology for clear liquids. Sharp images and quantitative...

Ferraro, Pietro; Bianco, Vittorio; Paturzo, Melania; Finizio, Andrea; Memmolo, Pasquale

120

ELSEVIER Analytica Chimica Acta 315 (1995) 123-135 Determination of phosphorus in turbid waters using alkaline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Japan No. 3 Chlorella and No. 2 Pond Sediment. Suspensions were prepared by adding these materials/l Chlorella suspensions were obtained using both autoclave and microwave heating. For the Pond Sediment peroxodisulphate digestion; Autoclave heating; Microwave heating; NIES Chlorella; NIES Pond Sediment; Phosphonates

Canberra, University of

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121

Effects of Greater flamingo Phoenicopterus ruber on macrophytes, chironimds and turbidity in natural marshes in Doana, SW Spain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resuspension. #12;3 Introduction Submerged vegetation has a major functional role in shallow wetlands, because it provides refuge for invertebrates, changes the nutrient dynamics of the system, prevents resuspension sediment resuspension (SCHEFFER et al. 1993, SCHEFFER 1998). However, the potential effects of benthivorous

Green, Andy J.

122

December 15, 2000 / Vol. 25, No. 24 / OPTICS LETTERS 1777 Transport-based image reconstruction in turbid media with  

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- proximation to the radiative transport equation is then used to reconstruct an image of a 100-mm absorbing been used,4 and most are based on the diffusion approximation to the Boltzmann transport equationDecember 15, 2000 / Vol. 25, No. 24 / OPTICS LETTERS 1777 Transport-based image reconstruction

Boas, David

123

Amplitude and Phase of Tightly Focused Laser Beams in Turbid Media Carole K. Hayakawa and Vasan Venugopalan*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these important changes to the focal volume. Monte Carlo methods can be used to solve the radiative transport equation by simulating light propagation as the transport of photons that undergo scattering at discrete

Potma, Eric Olaf

124

Nonlinear Neural Network-Based Mixture Model for Estimating the Concentration of Nitrogen Salts in Turbid Inland Waters Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by agricultural and industrial sources. The proposed neural network architecture consists of a modified multi of oceans, rivers, lakes, snow and glaciers. As a result, water pollution represents a major enviromental

Plaza, Antonio J.

125

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-85 AN ATTEMPT TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTS OF AN ANTI-TURBIDITY SYSTEM ON  

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Institute for Pollution and Resources Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan Yoshikuni Okayama of such products for publicity or advertising purposes is not authorized. Contribution No. 1060 from NOAA of phytoplankton, adsorb and concentrate some pollutants such as toxic chemicals, promote the consumption of great

126

Approved Module Information for CE1009, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Introduction to Transfer Processes Module Code: CE1009  

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-mean temperature difference; co- and counter-current flow; effectiveness-NTU method. Part C: Fluid flow

Neirotti, Juan Pablo

127

ORIGINAL ARTICLE GETA sandals: a footstep location tracking system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not suffer from problems with obstacles, multi- path effects, signal noises, signal interferences, and dead Taiwan University, #1 Roosevelt Road, Section 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan e-mail: hchu@csie.ntu.edu.tw S.-y. Yeh e-mail: r93124@csie.ntu.edu.tw C.-i. Wu e-mail: r92079@csie.ntu.edu.tw J. Y.-j. Hsu e-mail: yjhsu@csie.ntu

Ouhyoung, Ming

128

CHARTS / GRAPHS / IMAGES Mining Social Images with Distance Metric Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tagging Pengcheng Wu wupe0003@ntu.edu.sg Fig. Average precision at top t annotated tags under 11 methods

Hoi, Steven Chu-Hong

129

Synthesis and optical properties of IIVI 1D nanostructures Muhammad Iqbal Bakti Utama,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

size- and structure-dependent material properties where the relevance of quantum confinement effects Technological University, Singapore 637371. E-mail: Qihua@ntu.edu.sg b National Key Laboratory of Photoelectric, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. Before he moved to NTU, he had been working

Xiong, Qihua

130

Subscriber access provided by Nanyang Technological Univ Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute @ NTU (ERI@N), Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 3 Singapore be addressed. Email address: Tzechien@ntu.edu.sg and Qihua@ntu.edu.sg. Page 1 of 21 ACS Paragon Plus to be effectively tackled. Here we demonstrate a new family of planar room-temperature NIR nanolasers based

Xiong, Qihua

131

Thememory: Experiencing Thematic Photos in Daily Practice Kai-Yin Cheng  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

keynes@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Ko-Yuan Chou National Taiwan University koyuan@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Bing-Yu Chen National Taiwan University robin@ntu.edu.tw Figure 1. Interaction with the Thememory. (a Effect (template dependent) Photos X Theme Templates Progressive Reminder Preprocessing Theme

Ouhyoung, Ming

132

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh* , Arindam Basu , Keck-Voon Ling* and Vincent J. Mooney III*$§ Email: anshul.singh@research.iiit.ac.in, {arindam.basu, ekvling}@ntu, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore * NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied

Mooney, Vincent

133

SoC Test Scheduling Using the B*-Tree Based Floorplanning Technique * Jen-Yi Wuu1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University, Taipei, Taiwan jywuu@eda.ee.ntu.edu.tw, tungchieh@ntu.edu.tw, ywchang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Abstract effective and efficient---our method obtains the best results ever reported for SoC test scheduling

Chang, Yao-Wen

134

A Measurement Study of Zigbee-based Indoor Localization Systems Under RF Interference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University, MA, USA c Computer Science Department, Stanford University, CA, USA sylau@ntu.edu.tw, thlin@eecs.harvard.edu, huangty@stanford.edu, b91901152@ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT With an expected market value testbed, we are able to ana- lyze the effect of background IEEE 802.11 traffic on local- ization error

Huang, Polly

135

Co-Labeling: A New Multi-view Learning Approach for Ambiguous Problems Wen Li1 Lixin Duan2 Ivor Wai-Hung Tsang1 Dong Xu1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAP Research, SAP AG, Singapore, 117440 wli1@e.ntu.edu.sg lxduan@gmail.com ivortsang@ntu.edu.sg dongxu@ntu classifier as well as find the optimal training labels from a finite label candidate set. To effectively the effectiveness of our proposed co-labeling for both MIL and SSL. Keywords-ambiguous learning; multi

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

136

On the Effects of Haptic Display in Brush and Ink Simulation for Chinese Painting and Calligraphy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Effects of Haptic Display in Brush and Ink Simulation for Chinese Painting and Calligraphy Jeng-sheng Yeh jsyeh@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Ting-yu Lien andie@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Ming Ouhyoung ming@csie.ntu

Ouhyoung, Ming

137

Journal of Machine Learning Research 12 (2011) 1313-1347 Submitted 3/10; Revised 10/10; Published 4/11 A Family of Simple Non-Parametric Kernel Learning Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/11 A Family of Simple Non-Parametric Kernel Learning Algorithms Jinfeng Zhuang ZHUA0016@NTU.EDU.SG Ivor W. Tsang IVORTSANG@NTU.EDU.SG Steven C.H. Hoi CHHOI@NTU.EDU.SG School of Computer Engineering Nanyang results. Therefore, the choice of an effective kernel plays a crucial role in many kernel based machine

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

138

CASIS: A System for Concept-Aware Social Image Search Ba Quan Truong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CASIS: A System for Concept-Aware Social Image Search Ba Quan Truong bqtruong@ntu.edu.sg Aixin Sun axsun@ntu.edu.sg Sourav S. Bhowmick assourav@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang the opportunity of building effective tag-based social image retrieval systems. In contrast to content-based image

Aixin, Sun

139

MEE 452: Example 3-2 ShellShell--andand--Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis:Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties (var. T) corrections UA, NTU & = #12;MathCAD S&T HX analysis 6 of 7 HX effectiveness = Qduty & Th minmaxminmax min ,;; ,min)()( C C NTU C UA NTU TC q q q CCCcmCcmC UA CHCpCHpH #12;Tube arrangement in shell

Kostic, Milivoje M.

140

978-1-4799-5230-4/14/$31.00 c2014 IEEE 1 High Performance Adaptive Routing for Network-on-Chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

99901100@ntu.edu.tw {enjui,yyjasmine,ckcraig}@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw andywu@ntu.edu.tw Abstract--The Network, to overcome the problem of Hotspot traffic, an effective network architecture and packet routing method channel based on network information. Therefore, in this paper, to effectively utilize the proposed

Hung, Shih-Hao

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141

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 33, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 113 Path-Congestion-Aware Adaptive Routing with a  

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problems become major performance bottlenecks. An effective adaptive routing algorithm can help minimize and improve the effectiveness of routing path selection. We propose a path- congestion-aware adaptive routing University, Taipei, Taiwan (e-mail: enjui@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw; ck- craig@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw; andywu@cc.ee.ntu

Hung, Shih-Hao

142

Will This #Hashtag Be Popular Tomorrow? Zongyang Ma  

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Will This #Hashtag Be Popular Tomorrow? Zongyang Ma zma4@e.ntu.edu.sg Aixin Sun axsun@ntu.edu.sg Gao Cong gaocong@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering Nanyang Technological University, Singapore this prediction problem as a classification problem and evaluate the effectiveness of the extracted features

Aixin, Sun

143

Affinity-Driven Prediction and Ranking of Products in Online Product Review Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Affinity-Driven Prediction and Ranking of Products in Online Product Review Sites Hui Li herolee@pmail.ntu.edu.sg Sourav S Bhowmick assourav@ntu.edu.sg Aixin Sun axsun@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering Nanyang applications. In this paper, we identify and ana- lyze an array of features that exert effect on product affin

Aixin, Sun

144

Multimedia Tools and Applications, 26, 191206, 2005 c 2005 Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. Manufactured in The Netherlands.  

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Descriptor in Sports Video HAORAN YI pg03763623@ntu.edu.sg DEEPU RAJAN asdrajan@ntu.edu.sg LIANG-TIEN CHIA asltchia@ntu.edu.sg Center for Multimedia and Network Technology, School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang and multimedia database management techniques. The vast amount of content information calls for effective

Chia, Liang-Tien

145

2008 10th Intl. Conf. on Control, Automation, Robotics and Vision Hanoi, Vietnam, 1720 December 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

639798 1 liru0001@ntu.edu.sg, 1 su0001in@ntu.edu.sg, 2 ecszhang@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Current medical filter, named as Nakagami multiplicative adaptive filter (NaMAF), based on these models for effective effect and largest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when tested on phantom and in vivo images and least mean

Gabrieli, John

146

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2009 1295 A Progressive-ILP-Based Routing Algorithm for the  

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of droplets at each time step. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and effective- ness of our University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (e-mail: r91089@csie.ntu.edu.tw; yangc@csie.ntu.edu.tw). S. S. Sapatnekar Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (e-mail: ywchang@cc.ee.ntu

Chang, Yao-Wen

147

Image Pre-conditioning for Out-of-Focus Projector Blur Michael S. Brown Peng Song Tat-Jen Cham  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Computer Engineering Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 msbrown@ntu.edu.sg psong@pmail.ntu.edu.sg astjcham@ntu.edu.sg Abstract We present a technique to reduce image blur caused. Results show that using this technique can help ameliorate the vi- sual effects from out

Cham, Tat Jen

148

Handling Ambiguity via Input-Output Kernel Learning Xinxing Xu Ivor W. Tsang Dong Xu  

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of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore xuxi0006@ntu.edu.sg IvorTsang@ntu.edu.sg dongxu@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Data ambiguities exist in many data mining and machine learning applications the effectiveness of our proposed IOKL framework. Keywords-Group Multiple Kernel Learning; Input-Output Kernel

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

149

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 27, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2008 2007 Multilayer Obstacle-Avoiding Rectilinear Steiner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an effective algorithm for the ML-OARSMT problem to facilitate the design flow. However, there is no existing, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (e-mail: enorm@eda.ee.ntu.edu.tw; aaron@eda.ee.ntu.edu.tw; bo27@ eda.ee.ntu.edu.tw). K.-C. Hsu was with the Department of Electrical Engineering, National

Chang, Yao-Wen

150

From Auditory and Visual to Immersive Neurofeedback: Application to Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea elgendi@ntu.edu.sg, jdauwels@ntu.edu.sg, fvialatte@brain.riken.jp, mconstable@ntu.edu.sg, cia@brain.riken.jp, Abstract. In neurofeedback, brain waves immersive activity is enjoyable, stimulating, and can have a healing effect. As an illustration

Cichocki, Andrzej

151

Effective Polynomial Families for Generating More Pairing-Friendly Elliptic Curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Effective Polynomial Families for Generating More Pairing-Friendly Elliptic Curves Pu Duan, Shi University Singapore dp@pmail.ntu.edu.sg cuishi@pmail.ntu.edu.sg ecwchan@ntu.edu.sg Abstract Finding suitable without restrictions on embedding degree k and cofactor h. We propose the idea of effective polynomial

152

PRISM: Concept-preserving Social Image Search Results Summarization  

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PRISM: Concept-preserving Social Image Search Results Summarization Boon-Siew Seah seah0097@ntu.edu.sg Sourav S Bhowmick assourav@ntu.edu.sg Aixin Sun axsun@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of prism against state-of- the-art image summarization

Aixin, Sun

153

iCare Project: Adopting Pervasive and Persuasive Computing for Assisted Cognition  

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University {hchu, yjhsu}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw 1 Introduction The iCare research aspects. In this white paper, we would like to share our experiences in the NTU iCare research projects be an effective means to assist behavior modification, especially for people with cognitive impairments. Not only

Ouhyoung, Ming

154

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL NETWORKS AND LEARNING SYSTEMS, VOL. 24, NO. 5, MAY 2013 749 Soft Margin Multiple Kernel Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to improve the effectiveness of MKL, this paper presents a novel soft margin perspective for MKL recognition demonstrate that our proposed algorithms can efficiently achieve an effective yet sparse solution University, 639798, Singapore (e-mail: xuxi0006@ntu.edu.sg; IvorTsang@ntu.edu.sg; dongxu@ntu.edu.sg). Color

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

155

Practical strategies and insights for expanding collaboration, attracting funding and driving research outcomes in a  

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University (NTU), Singapore Dr Kenji Shibuya Professor and Chair, Department of Global Health Policy.45 OPENING KEYNOTE Establishing an effective performance measurement for tertiary research · Measuring Technological University (NTU), Singapore Professor Khor was the Director of Research at NTU (2004- 2008

156

Special Polynomial Families for Generating More Suitable Elliptic Curves for Pairing-Based Cryptosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological University Singapore dp@pmail.ntu.edu.sg cuishi@pmail.ntu.edu.sg ecwchan@ntu.edu.sg Abstract of effective polynomial families of pairing-friendly elliptic curves. For larger values of k, Brezing and Weng enough to make 4q ­ t2 small as to produce effective values of D. Barreto and Naehrig [17] generated non

157

Content is Still King: The Effect of Neighbor Voting Schemes on Tag Relevance for Social Image Retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Content is Still King: The Effect of Neighbor Voting Schemes on Tag Relevance for Social Image Retrieval Ba Quan Truong bqtruong@ntu.edu.sg Aixin Sun axsun@ntu.edu.sg Sourav S. Bhowmick assourav@ntuIR) experiences. One of the key issues in TagIR is to learn the effectiveness of a tag in de- scribing the visual

Aixin, Sun

158

Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Results for Post-ROD Biomonitoring Analytical Results for Post-ROD Biomonitoring Baseline Surface Water and Sediment This page intentionally left blank Biomonitoring Data a Sediment Surface Water Surface Location Date Sampled Se (mg/kg) Se (µg/L) Se b (µg/L) Alkalinity b (mg/L) Conductivity (µmhos/cm) pH (s.u.) Temperature (C) Turbidity (NTU) 10/06/04 3.3 3.7 3 273 1481 8.1 14.5 -- 10/06/04 -- 3.6 2.9 -- -- -- -- -- 04/05/05 1.3 2.9 2.2 170 810 7.92 12.08 38.5 10/11/05 1.9 3 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.56 3.6EJ -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/04/06 0.58 4.1E -- -- -- -- -- -- P-S1 04/09/07 4.3 4.5 -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 3 1.6 1.2 292 1500 7.72 13.3 53.5 04/05/05 0.86 2.8 2.4 171 785 7.99 13.1 37.4 10/11/05 0.51 3.2E 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.55 3.4J -- -- -- -- -- --

159

Performance and fate of organics in a pilot MBRNF for treating antibiotic production wastewater with recycling NF concentrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A double membrane system comprising a membrane bioreactor (MBR) combined with a nanofiltration (NF) membrane was investigated on a pilot scale for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater over a three-month period at a pharmaceutical company in Wuxi, China. By recycling the NF concentrate, the combined MBRNF process was shown to be effective for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater, resulting in excellent water quality and a high water yield of 925.6%. The water quality of the pilot-scale MBRNF process was excellent; e.g., the concentrations of TOC, NH4+-N, TP were stable at 5.52, 0.68, 0.34mgL?1, respectively, and the values of turbidity and conductivity of the NF permeate were 0.15 NTU and 2.5mScm?1, respectively; these values meet Chinas water quality standard requirements for industrial use (GB21903-2008). Not only were the antibiotic removal rates of spiramycin (SPM) and new spiramycin (NSPM) over 95%, the acute toxicity was also drastically reduced by the MBRNF pilot system. The main organics in the MBR effluent were proteins, polysaccharides, and humic-like substances; they were almost completely retained by the NF membrane and further biodegraded in the MBR because the NF concentrate was recycled. The microbial community of the MBR did not significantly change with the recycling of the NF concentrate.

Jianxing Wang; Kun Li; Yuansong Wei; Yutao Cheng; Dongbin Wei; Mingyue Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Prong Features Detection of a 3D Model Based on the Watershed Algorithm Bing-Yu Chen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection, the water level decreases iteratively from the maximum value. The decreas- ing level effects is not in the traversed set, it is a new prong feature. The pseudo code is as follows: e-mail:{joyce, liang}@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw e-mail:robin@ntu.edu.tw e-mail:ming@csie.ntu.edu.tw Function watershed algorithm V =sort (S); //if

Ouhyoung, Ming

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161

IEICE TRANS. COMMUN., VOL.E91B, NO.5 MAY 2008 INVITED PAPER Special Section on Communication Quality  

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, such as the level of distortion of voice signals, the effects of other factors like loudness and sidetone, can also) E-mail: r95921037@ntu.edu.tw b) E-mail: ktchen@iis.sinica.edu.tw c) E-mail: phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw d) E-mail: lei@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw This work was supported in part by Taiwan Informa- tion Security

Huang, Polly

162

Augmented Lagrangian method for generalized TV-Stokes model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reducing stair-case effect. Keyword: TV-Stokes model, Augmented Lagrangian method, Image inpainting, Image and stair-case effect [6­10]. The authors [9] showed that the TV-L2 model never recover the same contrast-010 and MOE (Ministry of Education) Tier II project T207N2202. jyhahn@ntu.edu.sg CLWU@ntu.edu.sg §xctai@ntu

Soatto, Stefano

163

Optimization Online - The Inexact Spectral Bundle Method for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 2, 2010 ... e.ntu.edu.sg) ... with matrices of order up to 3000 are performed and the computational results establish the effectiveness of this method.

Lin Huiling

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

164

International Scholar's Handbook NTUInternational Scholar's Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Scholar's Handbook NTUInternational Scholar's Handbook NTU #12;Cover: The General-ranked universi- ties in such areas as nanotechnology, physics, electrical engineering, and biomedicine. We as

Wu, Yih-Min

165

Appendix H biomonitoring data table H-1.xls  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baseline Surface Baseline Surface Water, Sediment, and Benthic Macroinvertebrate Samples This page intentionally left blank Table H-1: Biomonitoring Sediment and Surface Water Data a Sediment Surface Location Date Sampled Se (mg/kg) Se (µg/L) Se b (µg/L) Alkalinity b (mg/L) Conductivity (µmhos/cm) ORP (mV) pH (s.u.) Temperature (C) Turbidity (NTU) 10/06/04 3.3 3.7 3 273 1481 -- 8.1 14.5 -- 10/06/04 -- 3.6 2.9 -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/05/05 1.3 2.9 2.2 170 810 -- 7.92 12.08 38.5 10/11/05 1.9 3 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.56 3.6EJ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/04/06 0.58 4.1E -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/09/07 4.3 4.5 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/08/08 1.1 4 -- -- 858 82 7.32 8.6 -- 04/08/08 -- 3.9 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 06/23/10 -- 9.3 -- 260 2024 156.1 7.1 20.76 20.6 06/23/10 -- 9.3 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 3 1.6 1.2 292 1500 -- 7.72 13.3 53.5 04/05/05 0.86 2.8 2.4 171 785 -- 7.99 13.1 37.4 10/11/05 0.51 3.2E 2.8 --

166

Towards Practical Probabilistic Location Inference for Indoor Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Taiwan {b92901134, r97942100}@ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Abstract In this work, we highlight the truncation effect in Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) distributions. The effect is often overlooked of the approach is that the RSSI fingerprint captures not only the shadowing but also the multipath effect

Huang, Polly

167

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MULTIMEDIA 1 Scalable Face Image Retrieval using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effectiveness of different attributes and vital factors essential for face retrieval. Experimenting on two University (e-mail: sirius42@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw). Y.-Y. Chen is with the Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Taiwan University (e-mail: yanying@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw). Y.-H. Kuo

Hsu, Winston H.

168

School of Science and Technology PhD Scholarship in Investigating Dietary/Nutritional Interventions for Bone Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health at Nottingham Trent University. The proposed programme of work will examine the effects of dietary). Applying For informal enquiries about the studentship, please contact Dr Craig Sale ­ craig.sale@ntu.ac.uk or Dr Kevin Currell - kevin.currell@eis2win.co.uk For an application form, please email the NTU Graduate

Evans, Paul

169

410 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 36, NO. 1, JANUARY 2000 Erratum_______________________________________________________________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, mutual impedance effect which is important in phased ar- ray coils [2] design and other coil meshes Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (e-mail: chen@me.ee.ntu.edu.tw; skjeng@ew.ee.ntu.edu.tw). W.-P. Kuan

170

Curvature Minimization for Surface Reconstruction with Features  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371. {shij0004,wanm0003}@e.ntu.edu.sg, {xctai,desheng}@ntu indicate the robustness and effectiveness of the method. 1 Introduction Reconstructing a surface from in [35] and its variants prove the effectiveness of this methodology. The most popular regularization #12

Soatto, Stefano

171

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS FOR VIDEO TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 20, NO. 3, MARCH 2010 431 Face and Human Gait Recognition Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrate the effectiveness of our image-to-class distance. Index Terms--Face recognition, human gait are with the School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (e-mail: hu0005yi@ntu.edu.sg, dongxu@ntu.edu.sg). T.-J. Cham is with the Center for Multimedia and Network Technol- ogy, School

Xu, Dong

172

A Microscopic Examination of an RSSI-Signature-Based Indoor Localization System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taiwan University {b90901046, b91901152, sylau, r96944042} @ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT-based localization system, and conduct a detailed measurement study on the effect of antenna orientation, obstacle, and beacon density to RSSI signatures instability. We find that (1) the effect of antenna orientation

Huang, Polly

173

Text detection: Effect of size and eccentricity Chien-Hui Kao and Chien-Chung Chen*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Text detection: Effect of size and eccentricity Chien-Hui Kao and Chien-Chung Chen* Psychology. The spatial summation paradigm has been used to * c3chen@ntu.edu.tw; phone 886 2 33664462; fax 886 2 23639909; http://vnl.psy.ntu.edu.tw Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XVI, edited by Bernice E. Rogowitz

Chen, Chein Chung

174

Vice Chancellor's PhD Scholarships School of Science and Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leading to oxidative damage. The main aim is to study the effects of MPTP and other mitochondria contact Dr Alan Hargreaves ­ alan.hargreaves@ntu.ac.uk Please return completed application forms, with copies of academic certificates, to: gradschool@ntu.ac.uk The closing date for receipt of completed

Evans, Paul

175

Exploring Aggregate Effect with Weighted Transcoding Graphs for Efficient Cache Replacement in Transcoding Proxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring Aggregate Effect with Weighted Transcoding Graphs for Efficient Cache Replacement University Taipei, Taiwan, ROC E-mail: {cychang@arbor.ee.ntu.edu.tw; mschen@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw} Abstract This paper explores the aggregate effect when caching multiple versions of the same Web object

Chen, Ming-Syan

176

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY -INVESTING IN EXCELLENCE VICE-CHANCELLOR'S PHD SCHOLARSHIP SCHEME 2014 & SCHOOL PHD SCHOLARSHIPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interest in establishing effective ways of managing floods that work with, rather than against, natural: Dr Jillian Labadz, tel. 01636 817017 or email jillian.labadz@ntu.ac.uk This project has been selected and the competition are available at: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/research/graduate_school/studentships/index.html #12;For

Evans, Paul

177

A TEST OF EARTHQUAKE EARLY WARNING SYSTEM USING LOW COST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mail: drymwu@ntu.edu.tw 2 Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 70101 Tainan, Taiwan Abstract The earthquake early warning (EEW) research group at the National Taiwan University (NTU) and one is available, a cost-effective seismic network dedicated to EEW or rapid re- porting is highly favored

Wu, Yih-Min

178

902 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL NETWORKS AND LEARNING SYSTEMS, VOL. 23, NO. 6, JUNE 2012 Laplacian Embedded Regression for Scalable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and effectively cope with large scale SSL problems. Extensive experiments on both toy and real world data sets show the effectiveness and scalability of the proposed framework. Index Terms--Laplacian embedding Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798, Singapore (e-mail: chen0631@ntu.edu.sg; ivortsang@ntu

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

179

Nottingham Business School A study of senior practitioners' everyday work of appraising `risk' and making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services sector, senior management teams and their capability to steer the `organization' effectively has enquiries about the studentship, please contact Professor Dalvir Samra-Fredericks ­ dalvir.samra- fredericks@ntu.ac.uk or the Postgraduate Research Tutor Dr Néstor Valero-Silva ­ nestor.valero.silva@ntu.ac.uk. Application packs can

Evans, Paul

180

This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (http://www.hvac.okstate.edu).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.A. Weber, P. Bansal, and D.E. Fisher. 2007. Applying the effectiveness-NTU method to elemental heat performance due to the proposed algorithm. The proposed algorithm is specifically applied to the -NTU heat effect in the single-phase zones is ignored. The zone-by-zone method is computationally efficient

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181

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPEAKER Dr. Derek Larson Postdoctoral researcher, Department of Physics, NTU PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract The study of structural glasses remains a difficult problem in condensed, I show how the phase structure depends on the effective system dimension. We use one

Wu, Yih-Min

182

2006200620062006 Taiwan-Korea Plasma Conference 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/16-1/18 Place: NTU (1/16) NCHC(1/17 -18) 1/16 PSROC@NTU 10:00-13:00 Registration and Lunch 13:00-19:00 Plasma/NTHU, HsinChu, Taiwan Optical tunneling effect of localized surface plasmon: A simulation study using

Hsu, Jang-Yu

183

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 17, 14:30 ~ 15:30 TITLE Effective Medium Model for Dielectric Metamaterials SPEAKER Dr. Ruey-Lin Chern Institute of Applied Mechanics, NTU PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract to characterize the properties of metamateials is through the effective parameters. The effective medium model

Wu, Yih-Min

184

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY CODE OF PRACTICE ON FREEDOM OF SPEECH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1/3 NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY CODE OF PRACTICE ON FREEDOM OF SPEECH Effective from 18 June 2013 1.2. In common with other Higher Education Institutions, Nottingham Trent University (NTU) has certain legal and regulatory obligations to protect freedom of lawful speech and expression. 1.3. NTU is also committed (as

Evans, Paul

185

NEW AND GROWING INEQUALITIES: A CHALLENGE FOR THE SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the question of NTU serves to make more explicit and operational the managerial concern with the effectiveness and effects in terms of non-take-up 1. Socio-economic criteria 2. Behavioural criteria III. Institutional the reasons for no demand. IV. Discussion: How to combat NTU to reduce social inequalities in Europe

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

186

Vice Chancellor's PhD Scholarships School of Science and Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, over time their effectiveness decreases. There is therefore urgent need to develop strategies that work ­ mark.turner@ntu.ac.uk Please return completed application forms, with copies of academic certificates, to: gradschool@ntu.ac.uk The closing date for receipt of completed application forms is 9 am, Friday

Evans, Paul

187

School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment The Influence of Economic Forces, Finance, and Government Policy on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to an increase in asset wealth. The market has also been subject to the effects of policy change and financial «Professor Michael White_» (email michael.white@ntu.ac.uk» or telephone «0115 8482069»). To download, with copies of academic certificates, to: gradschool@ntu.ac.uk The closing date for receipt of completed

Evans, Paul

188

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL TITLE: Teacher training for postgraduate research students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTIVE DATE: 1 October 2013 1. INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT 1.1. It is widely recognised that the basis to be considered for participation in teaching activities at NTU. 2.2. Teaching: For the purpose of this policy Framework (D) and access to the Higher Education Academy. 7. POLICY STATEMENTS 7.1. NTU therefore seeks

Evans, Paul

189

School of Science & Technology Protecting pancreatic b-cell function in Type 2 diabetes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The resulting chronic hyperglycaemia can have damaging effects on a number of organs and tissues, including enquiries about the studentship, please contact Dr. Luigi De Girolamo ­ luigi.de-girolamo@ntu completed application forms, with copies of academic certificates to: gradschool@ntu.ac.uk The closing date

Evans, Paul

190

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY -INVESTING IN EXCELLENCE VICE-CHANCELLOR'S PHD SCHOLARSHIP SCHEME 2014 & SCHOOL PHD SCHOLARSHIPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& SCHOOL PHD SCHOLARSHIPS (entry in 2015/16) SCHOOL: ARES PROJECT TITLE: The effect of restoration: Dr Ben Clutterbuck; ben.clutterbuck@ntu.ac.uk This project has been selected for consideration: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/research/graduate_school/studentships/index.html For information on entry

Evans, Paul

191

A Semi-Empirical Model for Porous Media Heat Exchanger Design Richard A. Wirtz1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the effectiveness of the porous wall are always maximum when it is operated with the number of transfer units of the porous matrix greater than two (ntu 2). Furthermore, if the porous matrix is composed of a packed bed matrix is minimum when ntu 2. This suggest that for many design requirements, the porous media exchanger

Wirtz, Richard A.

192

Boost Your CV! Training, Volunteering, Careers and Further Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Team at NTU run a number of workshops to support maths and study skills. For example: Time Management: Building Your CV, Managing Projects, Application Forms, Effective Communication, Perfect Presentations and many more ILM accredited modules. NTU Career Development Centre A range of activities are provided

Evans, Paul

193

Surface Reconstruction with Feature Preservation based on Graph-cuts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

features. The effectiveness of the weighted minimal surface model E(S) is examined in the tetrahedral mesh is a very close approximation to the global minimum of EC (S). Various examples show the effectiveness Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371. E-mail: wanm0003@e.ntu.edu.sg, {desheng,xctai}@ntu

Soatto, Stefano

194

Survival Tips On-Campus Post Office and Bank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Sports Field Tennis Courts Outdoor Swimming Pool Basketball Courts 18 #12;NTU Sports center 19 NTU Campus Information 17 Swimming Gym /use 50 NT 50 NT /year 1,800 NT 1,350 NT / month 250 NT 200 NT

Wu, Yih-Min

195

HeatProbe: a Thermal-based Power Meter System for Tracking Per-user Power Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HeatProbe: a Thermal-based Power Meter System for Tracking Per-user Power Consumption Nan-Chen Chen Technology Innovation, Academic Sinica2 {b97006, b96118, b95701241}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, cwyou@citi.sinica.edu.tw, hchu@csie.ntu.edu.tw, mschen@citi.sinica.edu.tw Abstract. This paper proposes HeatProbe, a per

Chu, Hao-hua

196

Microsoft Word - S02459_2006Annual GW Rpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baseline Surface Water and Sediment This page intentionally left blank Biomonitoring Data a Sediment Surface Location Date Sampled Se (mg/kg) Se (µg/L) Se b (µg/L) Alkalinity b (mg/L) Conductivity (µmhos/cm) pH (s.u.) Temperature (C) Turbidity (NTU) 10/06/04 3.3 3.7 3 273 1481 8.1 14.5 -- 10/06/04 -- 3.6 2.9 -- -- -- -- -- 04/05/05 1.3 2.9 2.2 170 810 7.92 12.08 38.5 10/11/05 1.9 3 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.56 3.6EJ -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 3 1.6 1.2 292 1500 7.72 13.3 53.5 04/05/05 0.86 2.8 2.4 171 785 7.99 13.1 37.4 10/11/05 0.51 3.2E 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.55 3.4J -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 2.2 2 1.6 306 1523 7.72 12.2 50.7 04/05/05 3.4 3 2.5 176 803 8.04 13.92 33.6 10/11/05 4.1 3.1 2.6 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 1.4 3.4J -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 0.18 2.8 2.3 328 1830 6.6 9.9 1.91 04/05/05 0.14J 4.1 3.8 323 1606 6.84 10.89 1.57 10/11/05 0.033U 0.67 0.75 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.13 0.56J

197

Heterologous expression of Thermobifida fusca thermostable alpha-amylase in Yarrowia lipolytica and its application in boiling stable resistant sago starch preparation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A gene encoding the thermostable ?-amylase in Thermobifida fusca NTU22 was amplified by PCR, sequenced, and cloned into Yarrowia lipolytica P01g host strain using the vector pYLSC1 allowing constitutive expressio...

Chao-Hsun Yang; Yu-Chun Huang; Cheng-Yu Chen

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Factors Influencing Numbers of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Other Mycobacteria in Drinking Water Distribution Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ground), assimilable organic carbon (AOC) levels (high, moderate, and low...Source water Disinfectant type (pre/post) AOC Raw water NTU Level mug/liter (mean SD...and total organic carbon levels (). AOC () and biodegradable organic carbon (BDOC...

Joseph O. Falkinham III; Cheryl D. Norton; Mark W. LeChevallier

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cheng University PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract We have developed a series of Multi-Coefficient Density Functional Theory (MC-DFT) that effectively extrapolates the basis set

Wu, Yih-Min

200

TR-IIS-07-004 Point-of-Care Support for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and support environment needed to increase the effectiveness of such devices in prevention of medication91004, xx}@csie.ntu.edu.tw. P. H. Tsai and C. Y. Yu are affiliated with Department of Computer Science

Chen, Sheng-Wei

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201

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, National Taiwan Normal University PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract We study the effect of chemical modifications on electron transport of CNT-based nano-electronics. In the first part

Wu, Yih-Min

202

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2011.09.23.02(T) * Corresponding author  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2011.09.23.02(T) * Corresponding author E-mail: cchan@ntu.edu.tw Terr. Atmos, directivity, high fault strength, a slapdown phase, and hanging wall effect. The Darfield sequence case

Wu, Yih-Min

203

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 14:30 ~ 15:30 TITLE Computational Study of the Substitution Effect on the Mechanism for the Aza Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract The aza-, phospha- and arsa-Wittig reactions HM=PH3

Wu, Yih-Min

204

ORIGINAL PAPER A new procedure to best-fit earthquake magnitude  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

probability, and its effectiveness is demonstrated in this paper. The result shows that the optimal b value, Taipei, Taiwan e-mail: drymwu@ntu.edu.tw S.-C. Chang Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong

Wu, Yih-Min

205

2004 8th International Conference on Control, Automation, Robotics and Vision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avenue, Singapore 639798. Email: etsho@ntu.edu.sg Abstract In this paper, a fragile watermarking method. Simulation results arc presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed scheme. 1

Doran, Simon J.

206

Differential Privacy via Wavelet Transforms Xiaokui Xiao, Guozhang Wang, and Johannes Gehrke,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

show the effectiveness and efficiency of our solution. Index Terms--Privacy Preserving Data Publishing of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798. E-mail: xkxiao@ntu

Keinan, Alon

207

HIGH-FREQUENCY MAGNETOCAPACITANCE EFFECT IN ORGANIC SPIN VALVE WITH A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HIGH-FREQUENCY MAGNETOCAPACITANCE EFFECT IN ORGANIC SPIN VALVE WITH A 3,4,9,10-PERYLENE Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan *mtlin@phys.ntu

Lin, Minn-Tsong

208

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.05.30.01(T) * Corresponding author  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.05.30.01(T) * Corresponding author E-mail: drymwu@ntu.edu.tw Terr. Atmos City. The earthquakes occur- ring in southern Taiwan, due to considerable site effects along

Wu, Yih-Min

209

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Ming Lu National Center for High Performance Computing PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU and buckling strains of a single- and multi-walled carbon nanotube and the effect from fixed boundary layers

Wu, Yih-Min

210

A Scenario-Based Distributed Stochastic MPC for Building Temperature Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

show the effectiveness of our results. I. INTRODUCTION From the United Nations environment programme Technological University, Singapore 639798 {ylong002, lius0025, elhxie}@ntu.edu.sg 2K. H. Johansson

Johansson, Karl Henrik

211

r Human Brain Mapping 30:18771886 (2009) r Dynamic GrangerGeweke Causality Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requires a measure of effective connectivity. Previ- ously, structural equation modeling (SEM) has been, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan. E-mail: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw or fhlin@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu Received

212

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Previous ammonia oxidation studies reported ca. 100 a maximum of 65% at the highest temperature (773 K) and effective oxygen-to-ammonia ratio of 140, whereas

Wu, Yih-Min

213

iReduct: Differential Privacy with Reduced Relative Errors Xiaokui Xiao  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xkxiao@ntu.edu.sg Department of Computer Science Cornell University Ithaca, NY, USA {gbender. Experiments on real data demonstrate the effectiveness of our solution. Categories and Subject Descriptors H.2

Keinan, Alon

214

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building, NTU Abstract We develop the quantum theory for the electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT of the Fermi sea can destroy the EIT effect even at zero temperature. This quantum EIT property is mostly

Wu, Yih-Min

215

Large-Scale Video Summarization Using Web-Image Priors Aditya Khosla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

}@ebay.com, cjlin@csie.ntu.edu.tw Abstract Given the enormous growth in user-generated videos, it is becoming crowdsourcing. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our evaluation framework by comparing its performance

Oliva, Aude

216

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics Building, NTU Abstract We report on theoretical studies of point mutations effects on charge the tumour-suppressor gene p53. On the basis of effective single-strand or double strand tight-binding models

Wu, Yih-Min

217

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract fields. We have circumvented this limitation by generating an effective vector gauge potential

Wu, Yih-Min

218

856 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 51, NO. 3, MARCH 2003 A Generalized Higher Order Finite-Difference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and effectiveness of proposed scheme. Index Terms--Discrete singular convolution (DSC), finite difference time of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798; (e-mail: ezhshao@ntu

Wei, Guo-Wei

219

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.01.22.01(T) * Corresponding author  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.01.22.01(T) * Corresponding author E-mail: cchan@ntu.edu.tw Terr. Atmos the path and site effect using ground motion prediction equations, a proba- bilistic seismic hazard

Wu, Yih-Min

220

Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SQUID sensors demonstrate the effectiveness of this data consistency constraint and sparsity prior-mail: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw Introduction MRI has become an indispensible resource in clinical medicine because

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building, NTU Abstract The local-density approximation (LDA) to the ground-state density functional theory being important to reproduce the excitonic effect. We also present illustrative calculations

Wu, Yih-Min

222

Copyright (c) 2013 IEEE. Personal use is permitted. For any other purposes, permission must be obtained from the IEEE by emailing pubs-permissions@ieee.org. This article has been accepted for publication in a future issue of this journal, but has not been  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed SND scheme in conjunction with the RDMA protocol Technological University, 639798, Singapore. Email:rxlu@ntu.edu.sg. · J. Qiao and X. Shen

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

223

Differential Privacy via Wavelet Transforms Xiaokui Xiao Guozhang Wang, Johannes Gehrke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological University Cornell University Singapore Ithaca, USA xkxiao@ntu.edu.sg {guoz, johannes show the effectiveness and efficiency of our solution. I. INTRODUCTION The boisterous sea of liberty

Keinan, Alon

224

Increasing fMRI Sampling Rate Improves Granger Causality Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

' adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials. * Email: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw Introduction measures of effective connectivity [1­3]. Previously, effective connectivity analyses of human PET [4

225

national innovation financial report 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

governance 8 Responsibilities of the Board of Governors 9 Report of the auditors to the Board of Governors Charitable Trust is an unincorporated body and provides library buildings for academic use; NTU Energy

Evans, Paul

226

November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Carbon Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided. The carbon emissions are calculated using Carbon Trust conversion factors, as used in NTU's EMS statistics, to convert energy consumption data. The totals are calculated using electricity, gas and district

Evans, Paul

227

Page 1 of 5 Ngai Yin Yip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hillhouse Ave 306 ­ New Haven, CT, US 06511 Phone: +1 203 432 8110 / +1 203 435 0120 Email: ngaiyin: Professor Darren Sun Delai, NTU Thesis: Removal of indium from semiconductor industrial wastewater using

Elimelech, Menachem

228

The effects of selected environmental variables on filtration rate of Mytilopsis leucophaeata and evaluation of its potential role in the purification of mariculture effluent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by turbidity reduction of suspensions over three hours. Sepia ink (0.15 + 0.034 []m) was the primary indicator for turbidity reduction. Mussels were exposed to four types of suspended particles (Sepia ink, colloidal carbon, Nannochloropsis and shrimp...

Rice, Patrick Hays

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

TESTING AND EVALUATION OF THE MODIFIED DESIGN OF THE 25-DISK ROTARY MICROFILTER  

SciTech Connect

This report details redesign of a commercially available rotary microfilter to meet the operational and maintenance requirements for radioactive service. Personnel developed the design and coordinated procurement of two filters followed by testing of one unit. System testing examined the ability to rinse soluble material from the system, filtration performance using several insoluble solids loadings, effectiveness in washing sludge, amount of wear to parts and maintenance of the system including the insertion and removal of the filter stack, and the ability to flush solids from the system. The test program examined flushing the filter for soluble material by filling the system with a Rhodamine WT dye solution. Results showed that draining the system and rinsing with 50 gallons of water resulted in grater than 100X reduction of the dye concentration. Personnel determined filter performance using various amounts of insoluble sludge solids ranging from 0.06 to 15 weight percent (wt%) insoluble solids in a 3 molar (M) sodium simulated supernate. Through approximately 120 hours of start-and-stop (i.e., day shift) operation and various insoluble solids loadings, the filter produced filtration rates between 3 and 7 gallons per minute (gpm) (0.12-0.29 gpm/ft{sup 2}) for a 25-disk filter. Personnel washed approximately 80 gallons of simulated sludge using 207 gallons of inhibited water. Washing occurred at constant volume with wash water fed to a well mixed tank at the same rate as filtrate removal. Performance measurement involved collecting and analyzing samples throughout the washing for density and sodium content. Results showed an effective washing, mimicking a predicted dilution calculation for a well mixed tank and reducing the sodium concentration from 3.2 M to less than 0.3 M. Filtration rates during the washing process ranged between 3 and 4.3 gpm for one filter unit. The filter system then concentrated the washed 15 wt% insoluble solids slurry to approximately 20 wt% insoluble solids with no operational problems with the exception of the entrainment of air due to leaking packing in the feed pump. Prior to the air entrainment, the filtration rate was approximately 4.2 gpm for one filter assembly with the process fluid temperature adjusted to 35 C. Personnel measured the turbidity of filtrate samples from all phases of testing. All samples measured were less than 3 NTU, with the majority of samples less than 1 NTU. Thus, all measurements fell below the process acceptance criterion of less than 5 NTU. After slurry operations, personnel rinsed the filter with the equivalent of 250 gallons of water by re-circulating 50 gallons of water. The residual sludge solids remaining on the filter stack weighed approximately 685 grams. This amount of solids corresponds to an equivalent activity of 15.1 curies (Ci) beta and 0.38 Ci gamma radiation dose for Sludge Batch 4. Workers completely disassembled the filter system and examined it for signs of wear and component operation. An evaluation by a John Crane Inc. representative concluded that the wear observed on the mechanical seal resulted primarily from the numerous stops and starts, the abrasive nature of the process fluid and the possibility that the seal faces did not receive enough lubrication from the process fluid. No measurable slurry bypassed the mechanical seal. While it is extremely difficult to predict the life of the seal, the vendor representative indicates a minimum of one year in present service is reasonable. Changing the seal face material from silicon-carbide to a graphite-impregnated silicon-carbide is expected to double the life of the seal. Replacement with an air seal might be expected to increase lifetime to five years. The bottom bushing showed wear due to a misalignment during the manufacture of the filter tank. Minor adjustments to the alignment with shims and replacement of the graphite bushing with a superior material will greatly reduce this wear pattern.

Herman, D; Michael Poirier, M; Samuel Fink, S

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

230

Experimental determination of the boundary condition for diffuse photons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a turbid medium, the light transport is described by the diffusion approxima- tion of the radiative of a turbid medium within a few transport mean free paths, the diffusion equation is no longer satisfied light transport through a turbid (i.e., highly scatter- ing) medium and in imaging objects

Zhu, Xiangdong

231

Complotype affects the extent of down-regulation by Factor I of the C3b feedback cycle in-vitro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

numerator and denominator) have to be analysed using non-parametric methods and the appropriate test, the Kruskal-Wallis test, was performed using the Graph Pad Prism programs. Because of the influence of acute phase reactions the level of the individual... using the Kruskal-Wallis test is shown in the Figure. Figures 1b, c and d. Antigenic concentrations of C3, Factor H and Factor B were measured nephelometrically in the Clinical Immunology Laboratory at the Cambridge University NHS Trust by Dr...

Lay, Elizabeth; Nutland, Sarah; Smith, Julia E.; Hiles, Ian; Smith, RIchard A. G.; Seilly, David J.; Buchberger, Anna; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Lachmann, Peter J.

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

232

Water purification: a sustainable technology for rural development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study deals with the preliminary investigation on combined treatment with the coagulative ability of Moringa oleifera seeds to reduce turbidity and to determine the effectiveness of solar disinfection for the inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and coliforms on various turbid waters. Turbid water samples showed drastic reduction in microbial load and turbidity at time interval of 60 min settling with Moringa oleifera seeds at optimum dose of 0.12 gms where as solar disinfection showed drastic reduction in microbial counts (E. coli and coliforms) from too many to count to nil.

Syeda Azeem Unnisa; P. Deepthi; K. Mukkanti

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

An investigation into rinse bowl efficiency in continuous woolscouring.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This investigation into rinse bowl efficiency in continuous wool scouring involved experiments to determine the effect on scoured (as-is) colour and entanglement of: turbidity, point (more)

Whall, K. W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Light-scattering-induced artifacts in a complex polymer gel dosimetry phantom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Certain polymer gels become turbid on exposure to ionizing radiation, a property exploited in medical dosimetry to produce three-dimensional dose maps for radiotherapy. These maps...

Bosi, Stephen G; Naseri, Pourandokht; Baldock, Clive

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The effect of resuspension on algal production in a shallow lake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waves cause erosion and resuspension of bottom sediments. In shallow lakes resuspension can take place over most of the ... would have been without increased turbidity due to resuspension.

Thomas Hellstrm

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Management Sites (LMSPLNS04351, continually updated) and Program Directive SHP 2013-01. Field Variance: Turbidity stability requirements could not be met for the following...

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive physicochemical structure Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bigmouth Shiner-Notropis dorsalis HABITAT Class:Warm water Structure Riverine Substrate: Gradient... in small streams. Physicochemical conditions Temperature: Turbidity:...

238

Computing light statistics in heterogeneous media based on a mass weighted probability density function method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the transport theory, we present a modeling approach to light scattering in turbid material. It uses an efficient and general statistical description of the material's...

Jenny, Patrick; Mourad, Safer; Stamm, Tobias; Vge, Markus; Simon, Klaus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic charge transport Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. This acoustic turbidity is caused by a layer of subsurface gas, which prohibits the identification of geological... structures below that gas layer. Sound speeds were...

240

alara center experience: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

were dissolved oxygen, turbidity, nitrate-N, phosphateArkansas Water Resources Center Kings River Quality Assurance Project Final Report Marc Nelson, Ph Soerens, Thomas 193...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#99942-v1-4_5_Acre_Quarterly_October...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Turbidity Units RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPC total contaminants of...

242

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#345141-v1-4_5_Quarterly_Oct_Dec_2005...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Turbidity Units RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPC total contaminants of...

243

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#101993-v1-4_5_Acre_Quarterly_Jan...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Turbidity Units RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPC total contaminants of...

244

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#103356-v1-4_5_Acre_Quarterly_Apr...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Turbidity Units RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPC total contaminants of...

245

Download Full-text PDF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

concentration, as well as turbidity and light environment, which, in turn, have a ...... (for the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station). Vicksburg, MS.

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Coherence-Controlled Holographic Microscopy for Coherence-Gated Quantitative Phase Imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the use of incoherent illumination in coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM) enables coherence-gated quantitative phase imaging of objects through turbid...

Slaby, Tomas; Kolman, Pavel; Dostal, Zbynek; Antos, Martin; Lostak, Martin; Krizova, Aneta; Collakova, Jana; Kollarova, Vera; Slaba, Michala; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

247

Doppler effect's contribution to ultrasonic modulation of multiply scattered coherent light: Monte Carlo modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modulation of light by ultrasound in turbid media is investigated by modified public domain software based on the Monte Carlo algorithm. Apart from the recognized modulation...

Elazar, Jovan M; Steshenko, Oleg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - angular resolution multiplicity Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

targets placed in various positions in 5 cm optical... Angular domain optical projection tomography in turbid media Fartash ... Source: Chapman, Glenn H. - School of...

249

Feature Weighting via Optimal Thresholding for Video Analysis Zhongwen Xu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the de- tection tasks. Fusion mechanisms can be grouped into two types which are feature-level fusion.edu.au {yiyang,alex}@cs.cmu.edu IvorTsang@ntu.edu.sg sebe@disi.unitn.it Abstract Fusion of multiple features can Event Detection (MED) competi- tion [1]. In this paper, we propose a novel feature fusion approach

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

250

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 14101414 Symmetry Analysis in Spikes (Bursts) Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1410­1414 Symmetry and Igor TETKO Institute of Applied System Analysis, National Technical University of Ukraine (KPI), 37 Peremogy Ave., Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: makalex@mmsa.ntu-kpi.kiev.ua, apolixus@yahoo.com Institute

Popovych, Roman

251

Welcome to Cotton Mills At Cotton Mills, we believe your accommodation should help you make the most of your  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Welcome to Cotton Mills At Cotton Mills, we believe your accommodation should help you make to an amazing £1,200 per annum. Cotton Mills is fully certificated by: Cotton Mills is fully certificated. Cotton Mills is conveniently located on Radford Boulevard, right next to Norton Court (NTU accommodation

Evans, Paul

252

Vice Chancellor's PhD Scholarships School of Science and Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through a complex interplay of effects. This proposal investigates replacing coffee with "active, category 1, room temperature and bioluminescent. We will experimentally investigate the effect of bacterial enquiries about the scholarship, please contact Dr David Fairhurst ­ david.fairhurst@ntu.ac.uk Please return

Evans, Paul

253

US-Taiwan Workshop on Smart Structural Technology for Seismic Hazard Mitigation Taipei, Taiwan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The experiments also successfully validate the effectiveness of the decentralized output feedback control-active hydraulic dampers. The simulation analysis investigates the effects of communication latencies and degrees Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 6 Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National

Lynch, Jerome P.

254

EUROGRAPHICS 2005 / M. Alexa and J. Marks (Guest Editors)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

features. We compare our algorithm with other marching cubes variants and demonstrate its effectiveness hardware, but it is not an effective representation for time-varying applications and for performing a convenient and efficient way to convert the volumetric data e-mail:{murphyho, joyce}@cmlab.csie.ntu

Ouhyoung, Ming

255

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng 2006; 65:734751  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEY WORDS: surface of Wales Swansea, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, U.K. E-mail: desheng.wang@swansea.ac.uk, desheng@ntu

Wang, Desheng

256

Bounded Randomness Paul Brodhead1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kmng@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. We introduce some new variations of the notions of being Martin-L¨of random effective betting, effective regularities or effective compression. Exactly what we mean here by "effective to calibrate no- tions of randomness by varying the notion of effectivity. For example, classical Martin

Ng, Keng Meng "Selwyn"

257

Impact of Operational Practices on Rail Line Capacity: A Simulation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@illinois.edu, yclai@ntu.edu.tw, cbarkan@illinois.edu ABSTRACT Long-term demand for freight and passenger is critical for cost-effective planning of new capacity. A key aspect of this is the effect of heterogeneous conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various operational changes to reduce delays. The trade

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

258

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 87, 013843 (2013) Noise properties of coherent perfect absorbers and critically coupled resonators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the above "CPA theorem" is rigorously true within classical electromagnetic theory, where the effects effectiveness in this role are determined by quantum and thermal noise, which are the subjects of the present temperature, and there is no direct * yidong@ntu.edu.sg analog of the ST linewidth in a CPA. At zero

Cao, Hui

259

Interaction Design Patterns For Multi-touch Tabletop Collaborative Games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effectiveness of the proposed interaction designs in trials involving two groups of children with contrasting to be effective in soliciting collaborative play on interactive tabletops. Author Keywords Multi Nanyang Technological University Singapore 639798 aswbgoh@ntu.edu.sg Wei Shou School of Computer

Goh, Wooi Boon

260

RANSAC Matching: Simultaneous Registration and Segmentation Shao-Wen Yang, Chieh-Chih Wang and Chun-Hua Chang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

segmentation errors. By explicitly taking into account the various noise sources degrading the effective- ness. The improved segmentation can also be used as the basis for higher level scene understanding. The effectiveness, 10617 Taiwan any@pal.csie.ntu.edu.tw Chieh-Chih Wang is with Faculty of the Department of Computer

Wang, Chieh-Chih "Bob"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Measurement of flow maldistribution in parallel channels and its application to ex-situ and in-situ experiments in PEMFC water management studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to sig- nificant reduction in effectiveness for high NTU heat exchangers [1], about 7% for condensers in the effective operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Presently there are a few theoretically effects, two-phase separation and resultant flow non-uniformity. (b) Uneven flow resistances

Kandlikar, Satish

262

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng 2011; 85:206229  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be handled effectively as well. Furthermore, for the first time, multi-phase surface reconstruction and effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Received 3 December 2009; Revised Technological University, Singapore 637371, Singapore. E-mail: desheng@ntu.edu.sg Copyright 2010 John Wiley

Frey, Pascal

263

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MULTIMEDIA, VOL. 14, NO. 4, AUGUST 2012 1079 Unsupervised Semantic Feature Discovery for Image  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and visual image graphs in an unsupervised manner. We investigate the effectiveness of the framework when, and tag refinement. Experimental results confirm that the proposed framework effectively improves the per-mail: kuonini@cmlab.csie.ntu. edu.tw). W.-H. Cheng is with Research Center for Information Technology Innova

Hsu, Winston H.

264

Proceedingsof the American Control Conference Chicago, Illinois June 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hangzhou, 310027, P. R. China jwu@iipc .zju.edu.cn Gang Li The school of EEE Singapore egli@ntu are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the pro- posed strategy. Index Terms-Finite word length-point arith- metic. The FWL effects have been well studied in digital sig- nal processing, especially

Chen, Sheng

265

Recent developments in biological reporter technology 41 Recent Developments of Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to efficiently report the activation of particular messenger cascades and their effects on gene expression and Genetic Engineering Reviews - Vol. 25, 41-76 (2008) *To whom correspondence may be addressed (Bengang@ntu will make it possible to understand the molecular basis of diseases, track the effectiveness

Xing, Bengang

266

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY -INVESTING IN EXCELLENCE VICE-CHANCELLOR'S PHD SCHOLARSHIP SCHEME 2014 & SCHOOL PHD SCHOLARSHIPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

welfare and performance in the equestrian industry. Recent research carried out at NTU has identified-Harrison has studied personality and associated effects on survival, fitness and movement in a variety of species. Current studies include investigating the effect of personality on group cohesion in reintroduced

Evans, Paul

267

A Distributed MAC Scheme Supporting Voice Services in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Waterloo, Canada Email: hai.jiang@ece.ualberta.ca, wangping@ntu.edu.sg, poor results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. Index Terms ­ medium access control, code-time nature of voice traffic); and 4) adaptive to user mobility. In this paper, we propose an effective MAC

Zhuang, Weihua

268

Vice Chancellor's PhD Scholarships School of Science and Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduced metastasis development and mortality. There is evidence of similar effects in prostate cancer and malignant melanoma. This multidisciplinary project is directed at the discovery of therapeutically effective Wallis ­ john.wallis@ntu.ac.uk Please return completed application forms, with copies of academic

Evans, Paul

269

Effective Cerebral Connectivity during Silent Speech Reading Revealed by Functional Magnetic Resonance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective Cerebral Connectivity during Silent Speech Reading Revealed by Functional Magnetic Y-H, Lin F-H, Chou Y-J, Tsai KW-K, Kuo W-J, et al. (2013) Effective Cerebral Connectivity during that no competing interests exist. * E-mail: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw . These authors contributed equally to this work

270

Efficient Video Authentication for H.264/AVC School of Electrical and Electronic Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineer Nanyang Technology University 639798 Singapore jingzjang@pmail.ntu.edu.sg Anthony T. S. Ho School the tampering by the sensitive mode change. And the experimental results prove the effectiveness the algorithm the effectiveness the algorithm. The rest of this paper is organized as follows. Sec- tion 2 provides the reader

Doran, Simon J.

271

Complexity of Dependencies in Bounded Domains, Armstrong Codes, and Generalizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complexity of Dependencies in Bounded Domains, Armstrong Codes, and Generalizations Yeow Meng Chee University, Singapore email: {ymchee, huizhang, xiandezhang}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--The study of Armstrong systems, where attributes have bounded domains. A (q, k, n)-Armstrong code is a q-ary code of length n

Chee, Yeow Meng

272

Refactoring MATLAB Soroush Radpour1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refactoring MATLAB Soroush Radpour1,2 , Laurie Hendren2 , and Max Sch¨afer3 1 Google, Inc. soroush of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore schaefer@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. MATLAB and students world-wide. MATLAB programs are often developed incrementally using a mixture of MATLAB scripts

273

Engineering Optimization Vol. 37, No. 5, July 2005, 463477  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in radio-frequency (RF) plasma processing. *Corresponding author. Email: lars.nolle@ntu.ac.uk Engineering. In industrial plasmas, a RF generator is used as an external power-source, usually operating at 13.56 MHz investigation, a simulated annealing (SA) method was developed to optimize 14 Fourier terms in a radio-frequency

Hopgood, Adrian

274

Survival Tips On-Campus Post Office and Bank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student ID to apply for a pass #12;Sports Field Tennis Courts Outdoor Swimming Pool Basketball Courts 16; Sports Center NTU Campus Information 15 Swimming Gym /use 50 NT 50 NT /year 1,800 NT 1,350 NT / month 250

Wu, Yih-Min

275

Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 703-722, December 2006 Distribution of Gassy Sediments and Mud Volcanoes Offshore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediments and Mud Volcanoes Offshore Southwestern Taiwan Jui-Kun Chiu 1 , Wei-Hao Tseng 1 , and Char@ntu.edu.tw This study presents the results from recent intense marine geophysical surveys conducted offshore: offshore Kaohsiung, adjacent to the Kaoping Submarine Canyon, near the head of the Fangliao Submarine

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

276

Electrically switchable phase-type fractal zone plates and fractal photon sieves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@psu.edu (T. J. H.); exwsun@ntu.edu.sg (X. W. S.) Abstract: Electrically switchable phase-type fractal zoneElectrically switchable phase-type fractal zone plates and fractal photon sieves Yan Jun Liu,1 Hai­1323 (2004). 9. H. T. Dai, J. H. Liu, X. C. Sun, and D. J. Yin, "Programmable fractal zone plates (Fra

277

This article was published in an Elsevier journal. The attached copy is furnished to the author for non-commercial research and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

author. E-mail address: wenshan@ntu.edu.tw (W.-S. Chen). 0012-821X/$ - see front matter. Published , Yen-Chiu Liu c , Yen-Hui Lin c a Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan ROC b

Chen, Wen-Shan

278

30 MEET & GREET bring skills that we truly believe will change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to this project? It was the ability to create revolutionary computing technologies with deep roots in physics that are "nanometres" in size. Is size all that matters? No, the research is an NTU-funded $4 million project to find Asian core. I had many challenging activities at what is now A*STAR [Agency for Science, Technology

Mellor-Crummey, John

279

INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS AND BEYOND IN BRAIN IMAGING: EEG, MEG, FMRI, AND PET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS AND BEYOND IN BRAIN IMAGING: EEG, MEG, FMRI, AND PET Jagath C Technological University, Singapore ¾ Laboratory of Advanced Brain Signal Processing, Brain Science Institute@ntu.edu.sg, cia@bsp.brain.riken.go.jp, vdavidsanchez@earthlink.net Abstract There is an increasing interest

Vialatte, François

280

1 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim wileyonlinelibrary.com Intelligent and Ultrasensitive Analysis of Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

handling and analysis procedures, SERS obtained from the metama- terials is a direct measurement and can. Zhang, Prof. Q.-H. Xiong Division of Physics and Applied Physics School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences Nanyang Technological University Singapore 637371 E-mail: Qihua@ntu.edu.sg Prof. Q.-H. Xiong

Xiong, Qihua

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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281

Administration and Service Buildings Instructional Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Swimming Pool Mathematics Research Center Bldg. Dept. of Psychology (South Hall. B Incubation Center Bldg. C Bike Pound Si-Yuan Hall Halcyon House Bldg. No. 1 Agricultural Exhibition Hall New Moon Pavilion NTU Visitor Center Lesyue Bldg. Old Main Library College of Liberal Arts

Hung, Shih-Hao

282

Administration and Service Buildings Instructional Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Yuan Hall Halcyon House Bldg. No. 1 Agricultural Exhibition Hall New Moon Pavilion NTU Visitor Center Lesyue - Mathematics Bldg. Shih-Liang Hall Computer and Information Networking Center Dept. of Mathematics Dept. of Chemistry Freshman Classroom Bldg. 9th Women's Dorm 8th Women's Dorm Dept. of Psychology (North Hall

Hung, Shih-Hao

283

Green-Aware Workload Scheduling in Geographically Distributed Data Centers Changbing Chen, Bingsheng He, Xueyan Tang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: {chchangb, bshe, asxytang}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Renewable (or green) energy, such as solar or wind, has with renewable energy sources. While green energy supply for a single data center is intermittent due to daily/seasonal effects, our workload scheduling algorithm is aware of different amounts of green energy supply

Tang, Xueyan

284

Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Oldenburg (Core Provider) NTU Athens (Specialisation Provider: Wind Energy) #12; EUREC Module, Lectures, Labs and Seminars Core Oldenburg 1. Semester, Winter Term Module Title Term Titel Solar Energy Titel Wind Energy Winter Wind Energy I Tutorial Wind Energy Systems Wind Tunel (Lab

Habel, Annegret

285

OFC/NFOEC'11 Summary ---Access---  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systems · 10 GB/s PON Technology G. Kramer, Broadcom, US This paper discusses the current status of EPON Networks: NMD FTTX New Technologies NTuD 10 Gb/s PON Technology OWI Energy Efficient Networks NWD Worldwide FTTx Opportunities and Challenges OThB Energy Efficient Optical Access OThT High Speed PON OMP

California at Davis, University of

286

Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model...

Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Dynamic Processes of Abyssal Sedimentation: Erosion, Transportation, and Redeposition on the Deep-sea floor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......without anything to fret, chafe, or wear, save alone the tooth of time". That...superadjacent water was so small that a marine turbidity flow could leave the bottom and...shore they concluded : "If they exist, marine turbidity currents produced by wave agitations......

Bruce C. Heezen

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Grant Reference Lead / Sole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rank Overall Score Grant Reference Lead / Sole Grant Grant Holder Research Organisation Project sediment-concentration and velocity data for submarine turbidity currents Standard Grant DEC12 1 9 NE-concentration and velocity data for submarine turbidity currents Standard Grant DEC12 2 8 NE/K015184/1 Y Alistair Pike

289

Light traps are one of a number of different gears used to sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phases, current speed or water Effects of current speed and turbidity on stationary light-trap catches measurements of cur- rent speed and turbidity. Materials and methods Study sites Larval and juvenile fishes438 Light traps are one of a number of different gears used to sample pelagic larval and juvenile

290

Serpentine Thermal Coupling Between a Stream and a Conducting Body  

SciTech Connect

Here we document the effect of flow configuration on the heat transfer performance of a serpentine shaped stream embedded in a conducting solid. Several configurations with fixed volume of fluid are considered: U-shaped with varying spacing between the parallel portions of the U, serpentine shapes with three elbows, and conducting soil with several parallelepipedal shapes. We show that the spacing must be greater than a critical value in order for the heat transfer density of the stream-solid configuration to be the highest that it can be. Spacings larger than this critical value do not yield improvements in heat transfer density. We also show that even though the heat transfer is time dependent, the stream-solid configuration has an effective number of heat transfer units Ntu that is nearly constant in time. The larger Ntu values correspond to the configurations with greater heat transfer density.

Kobayashi, H.; Lorente, S.; Anderson, R.; Bejan, A.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the diameter and depth of the wheel, face flow velocity, rotational speed and other operating conditions. Bulk et al. [11] proposed NTU correlations for design calculation of latent and total effectiveness of enthalpy wheels coated with silica gel..., Wr Te1,We1 Space Fig.2. Passive desiccant system Enthalpy wheels normally use an aluminum substrate coated with a molecular sieve material or silica gel. The effectiveness of an enthalpy wheel depends on the load of desiccant materials...

Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Tectonophysics 320 (2000) 6982 www.elsevier.com/locate/tecto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Early Penglai Orogeny, Taiwan, as assessed by fission-track constraints T.-K. Liu a,*, Y.-G. Chen a, W.-S and the continental side.fax: +886-2-2365-7380. E-mail address: liutk@ccms.ntu.edu.tw (T.-K. Liu) The eastern Central reserved. PII: S0040-1951 ( 00 ) 00028-7 #12;70 T.-K. Liu et al. / Tectonophysics 320 (2000) 69­82 #12;71T

Chen, Wen-Shan

293

Impact of ANSI X9.24-1:2009 Key Check Value on ISO/IEC 9797-1:2011 MACs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of ANSI X9.24-1:2009 Key Check Value on ISO/IEC 9797-1:2011 MACs Tetsu Iwata1 and Lei Wang2, wang.lei@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. ANSI X9.24-1:2009 specifies the key check value, which is used to verify check value. As a result, we obtain a complete characterization of the impact of using ANSI X9.24-1 key

294

An Analysis of Efficiency Improvements in Room Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAECA NATIONAL APPLIANCE ENERGY CONSERVATION ACT NBS NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS NECPA NATIONAL ENERGY CONSERVATION POLICY ACT NTU NUMBER OF TRANSFER UNITS OEM ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURER ORNL OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RAC ROOM AIR CONDITIONER.... There are two public domain models that we have considered using for this analysis: the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) heat pump model [1] and the Arthur D. Little (ADL) room air conditioner model [2]. The ORNL model was completed in 1981. Although...

O'Neal, D. L.; Penson, S. B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Quantifying channelized submarine depositional systems from bed to basin scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The challenges of directly observing active turbidity currents necessitates the consideration of preserved deposits for deciphering the behavior of these systems. In this thesis, I take advantage 3-D subsurface seismic ...

Lyons, William J., 1965-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A study of biological contaminants in rainwater collected from rooftops in Bryan and College Station Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in optimizing the design of water treatment units for rainwater harvesting systems. It has been shown that a dry spell has an effect on turbidity levels indicating that the first flush would be more contaminated than other water flows....

Vasudevan, Lakshmi Narasimhan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

be installed on the common discharge lines from the turbidity meters on each sandfilter train. The check valves are to prevent the potential for contaminated water from the 10 inch...

298

Modulation of dissolved oxygen levels in a hypertidal estuary by sediment resuspension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hyperconcentrated benthic layers, which form during neap tides, recruit much of the fine sediment population of the turbidity maximum of a hypertidal estuary. Measurements of tidal amplitude and suspended solids ...

W. R. Parker; L. D. Marshall; A. J. Parfitt

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Resuspension created by bedload transport of macroalgae: implications for ecosystem functioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous studies suggest that current-driven plant transport in shallow lagoons and estuaries is associated with increased turbidity. Our hypothesis is therefore that macroalgae erode surface sediment while dr...

P. Canal-Vergs; M. Vedel; T. Valdemarsen; E. Kristensen; M. R. Flindt

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The influence of Corophium volutator abundance on resuspension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that Corophium volutator...affects the turbidity of water in estuaries through active resuspension of sediment. One experiment was done in...Corophium was add...

E. M. G. T. de Deckere; J. van de Koppel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The influence of Corophium volutator abundance on resuspension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that Corophium volutator...affects the turbidity of water in estuaries through active resuspension of sediment. One experiment was done in...Corophium was add...

E. M. G. T. de Deckere; J. van de Koppel; C. H. R. Heip

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Wave-forced resuspension of upper Chesapeake Bay muds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Moored instruments were used to make observations of near bottom currents, waves, temperature, salinity, and turbidity at shallow (3.5 m and 5.5 m depth) dredged sediment disposal sites in upper Chesapeake Bay du...

Lawrence P. Sanford

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Measuring Large Optical Transmission Matrices of Disordered Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a measurement of the large optical transmission matrix (TM) of a complex turbid medium. The TM is acquired using polarization-sensitive, full-field interferometric microscopy equipped with a rotating galvanometer ...

Yu, Hyeonseung

304

The effect of multiple stressors on the Florida Keys coral reef ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

demonstrate the presence of warm, hypersaline, and turbid water on coral reefs offshore from the Florida Keys ... and Blank 1987; Rowan and Powers 1991). ...... Study of the reef corals of the Tortugas. Car- negie Inst. Wash. Year Book 31: 290

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

Channel Catfish Farming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in commercial ferti- ning hook and skinning pliers. lifer. The use of organic fertilizer (barnyard ma- nure, cotton seed meal, etc.) increases the bacterial, rotifer ant1 crustacean population but does not increase the unicellular algae to where turbidity...

Klussmann, Wallace

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Characterization of the 3-D Properties of the Fine-Grained Turbidite 8 Sand Reservoir, Green Canyon 18, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-grained turbidity currents is composed of alternating sand and shale layers, whose extension is assumed to be large. They correspond to levee and overbank deposits that are usually associated to channel systems. The high porosity values, coming from unconsolidated...

Plantevin, Matthieu Francois

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Late Pleistocene to Recent sediment transport pathways of the Green Canyon OCS area, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remobilizes sediments which are then carried further downslope. These remobilized sediments may be transported as debris flows or other undifferentiated high-density flows, or may develop into turbidity currents which deposit graded sediments in response...

Swanson, John Patrick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

308

Near-Field Sediment Resuspension Measurement and Modeling for Cutter Suction Dredging Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sediment resuspension and turbidity created during dredging operations is both an economical and environmental issue. The movement of sediment plumes created from dredging operations has been predicted with numerical modeling, however, these far...

Henriksen, John Christopher

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - au xixe sicle Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Orsay Collection: Physics 13 Turbidity Measurements: 2 calciumpDNA and 2 phosphate PEG-PAA solutions (1 mL) preincubated at 25 C were directly Summary: tetrachloride (SiCl4)....

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic random medium Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

39 Discrete-ordinates solution of short-pulsed laser transport in two-dimensional turbid media Summary: of the medium is L W 10 mm. The medium is anisotropically scattering with...

311

Disinfection Devices: Field Experiences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Petrasek, et al., 1980). Total suspended solids and turbidity are two wastewater parameters that quantify the presence of particles in wastewater. Both disinfection methods require the removal of large particles that may contain or shield microorganisms...

Weaver, R. W.; Richter, A. Y.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Analysis of the empirical relations between visible solar radiation, the solar altitude and the transparency of the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of equations provide a practical method of evaluating the fluxes of solar origin incident on the sea surface provided that the turbidity parameters of the air mass are known. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Tbe author is particularly indebted to Professor Robert O. Raid... of equations provide a practical method of evaluating the fluxes of solar origin incident on the sea surface provided that the turbidity parameters of the air mass are known. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Tbe author is particularly indebted to Professor Robert O. Raid...

Garcia Occhipinti, Antonio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

Engineering faculty forum. Final report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project was to develop and broadcast monthly one-hour teleconferences to support the professional development of engineering faculty. The {open_quotes}Engineering Faculty Forum{close_quotes} was available nationwide over the NTU Satellite Network and was also available from a C-Band Satellite. There was no cost to participate in the live teleconferences for the two year period. The programs were developed in response to a questionnaire sent to engineering faculty members across the United States. Copies of the flyers and a print out of each course participation form has been included as a part of this report.

Baldwin, L.V.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), turbidity, flash point, conductivity, and pH. Undiluted sample is used for Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), turbidity, flash point, conductivity, and pH. Undiluted sample is used for all methods listed. Clean samples are analyzed on bench instruments, while radioactive samples are run on instruments located in radiological containment hoods. Instrumentation include clean and radiological use turbidimeters, balances, flash point devices, conductivity meters and probes, and titration systems. Standards and calibrants include the following: 1) turbidity - sealed glass vials purchased as a calibration kit; 2) conductivity - deionized water and purchased standards (KCl solutions); 3) Density - deionized water; 4) flash point - dodecane (2mL); 5) pH - 25 mL ACS Certified pH buffers - pH 4.0, pH 7.0, and pH 10.0.

315

CX-002991: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2991: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2991: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002991: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Turbidity Meter Discharge Check Valves CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 06/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Check Valves are to be installed on the common discharge lines from the turbidity meters on each sandfilter train. The check valves are to prevent the potential for contaminated water from the 10 inch drain header from discharging back through the turbidity meters. The work will be performed inside the diked area inside the 105-22L building. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002991.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002993: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000825: Categorical Exclusion Determination

316

Characterization of Turbiditic Oil Reservoirs Based on Geophysical Models of their Formation  

SciTech Connect

Models are developed and solved to describe the flow of and deposition from low and high concentration turbidity currents. The shallow water equations are amended to include particle transport to describe the low concentration turbidity currents. The suspension balance model is used to describe the high concentration turbidity currents. Numerical simulations are developed to solve the highly non-linear, free boundary problems associated with these models. Simpler, algebraic scaling relationships are also developed for these models. The models are successfully validated against field observations of turbidites. With these models, one can take seismic information on the shape of the turbiditic deposit and estimate the particle size, which can be used to determine the porosity and permeability.

Roger Bonnecaze

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Eustatic control of turbidites and winnowed turbidites  

SciTech Connect

Global changes in sea level, primarily the results of tectonism and glaciation, control deep-sea sedimentation. During periods of low sea level the frequency of turbidity currents is greatly increased. Episodes of low sea level also cause vigorous contour currents, which winnow away the fines of turbidites. In the rock record, the occurrence of most turbidites and winnowed turbidities closely corresponds to global lowstands of paleo-sea level. This observation may be useful in predicting the occurrence of deep-sea reservoir facies in the geologic record.

Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Culture of selected organisms in recirculating and flow-through systems using thermal effluent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&M University; Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Kirk Strawn Twenty species were cultured in tanks on flow-through and recirculating systems. Water source was the thermal effluent from the discharge can 1 of Houston Lighting a Power Company's Cedar Bayou..., pH and Turbidity Levels for Monitored Tanks Table Al Daily Temperature i Conductivity i Di s- solved Oxygen, pH and Turbidity Levels for Monitored Tanks Figures Al through A72 80 86 vu APPENDIX B ? Summary of Monthly Survival, L ngth...

Berry, Terri Layne

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

THE USE OF MSG DATA WITHIN A NEW TYPE OF SOLAR IRRADIANCE CALCULATION SCHEME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METEOSAT satellite and climatologies of atmospheric parameters e.g. turbidity (aerosols and water vapor Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. The expected quality represents a substantial improvement type will be based on radiative transfer models (RTM) using the information of atmospheric parameters

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

320

THE USE OF MSG DATA WITHIN A NEW TYPE OF SOLAR IRRADIANCE CALCULATION SCHEME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METEOSAT satellite and climatologies of atmospheric parameters e.g. turbidity (aerosols and water vapor of the atmospheric parameters retrieved from the MSG satellite (clouds, © , water vapor) and the GOME/ATSR-2 Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. The expected quality represents a substantial improvement

Heinemann, Detlev

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Proceedings of HT2009 2009 ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of HT2009 2009 ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference July 19-23, 2009, San Francisco, CA, USA HT2009-88261 SIMULATION OF FOCUSED RADIATION PROPAGATION AND TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER IN TURBID-dependent radiation and conduction bio-heat transfer model. Ultrashort pulsed radiation transport in the cylindrical

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

322

Modeling the Effects of Oyster Reefs and Breakwaters on Seagrass Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

like breakwaters by attenu- ating waves, thus decreasing sediment resuspension. We developed a quasi), a parameter controlled by resuspension-induced turbidity, was calculated in simulations in which wave height influencing SGP, with higher waves increasing sediment resuspension and decreasing SGP. Submerged breakwaters

North, Elizabeth W.

323

Solar with a Grain of Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...zone, and a bot-tom storage zone. The upper zone...electricity. Hot water is pumped out of the bottom zone...sequentially on the top of the storage zone. Howard C. Bryant...leached salts to the storage zone. One way to do...says French, but the seawater itself is turbid and...

THOMAS H. MAUGH II

1982-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Survey and Control of Synthetic Organics in Texas Water Supplies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was used as a surrogate for turbidity. Modification of conventional alum coagulation by addition of acid or base for pH control or by addition of secondary coagulants was studied. A medium molecular weight cationic polymer and activated silica were used...

Batchelor, B.; Shannon, J. D.; Yang, P.

325

Fusing ground measurements and satellite-derived products for the construction of climatological maps in atmosphere optics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusing ground measurements and satellite-derived products for the construction of climatological turbidity factor, remote sensing, resampling ABSTRACT: Climatological maps (gridded data) of optical). The problem is that such climatological maps only exist at low spatial resolution. A resampling of the maps

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

Environmental Biology of Fishes 70: 246, 2004. 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shiners occur in pools of low order prairie streams with cool, clear water, low gradients, low velocities-mail: charles berry@sdstate.edu) Common name: Topeka shiner (E). Conservation status: Federally endan- gered order streams with moderate turbidity and warm temperatures (Wall et al. 2004); and in floodplain pools

327

The Migration of Di use Photon Density Waves through Highly Scattering Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The radiative transport equation is a more accurate model for the migration of photons in general of Turbid Media: Theory and Applications assumptions that reduce the general transport equation to a di to the transport equation. 2.1 Di usion Approximation to the Transport Equation The linear transport equation

328

Data Analysis and Investigation of Self-Similarity in Oceanographic Sediment Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Analysis and Investigation of Self-Similarity in Oceanographic Sediment Data Lam Ling Shum Engineering, University College London Abstract: This paper aims to analyse the oceanographic sediment data are temperature, conductivity, and pressure. Turbidity, a measurement of sediment level is selected in this paper

Haddadi, Hamed

329

OVERVIEW OF SELECTED SURROGATE TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH-TEMPORAL RESOLUTION SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OVERVIEW OF SELECTED SURROGATE TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH- TEMPORAL RESOLUTION SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT for characterizing selected properties of suspended sediments in rivers are being augmented and in some cases of quantifiably accurate data for use primarily in sediment-flux computations. Turbidity is the most common

330

Bioluminescence in a complex coastal environment: 2. Prediction of bioluminescent source depth from spectral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water-leaving radiance signals are detectable, even in extremely turbid and dynamic coastal waters. Here.1029/2007JC004136. 1. Introduction [2] Bioluminescence in the marine environment is caused by a wide array appears to serve a wide variety of ecological functions in the marine environment, from pred- ator

Moline, Mark

331

Enteric Virus Survival during Household Laundering and Impact of Disinfection with Sodium Hypochlorite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MATERIALS AND METHODS Washing and drying procedures...temperature for 30 min before washing. Approximately 106 to...turbidity, and staining and soil which occur in average...heavy-duty vertical-axis washing machine was used. All...sulfate-an anionic surfactant) and, in some tests...

Charles P. Gerba; Denise Kennedy

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

332

Monitoring Stormwater: Do's, Don'ts, Why's and How's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facility TREE FILTER Watershed Boundary #12;9 #12;10 POROUS ASPHALT TREE FILTER #12;11 TREATMENT STRATEGIES Porous Asphalt Gravel Wetland Sand Filter Bioretention Cell Tree Filter Subsurface Infiltration Unit 13;17 Site Monitoring · Real Time Precipitation Flow pH Temperature Conductivity Dissolved Oxygen Turbidity

333

7932004 Estuarine Research Federation Estuaries Vol. 27, No. 5, p. 793806 October 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, to high turbidity that reduces the light reaching the plant surface. Because of this reduction assumptions, including that oysters were uniformly distributed rather than aggregated into offshore reefs as a consequence of the growth of epi- phytes on the plant leaves and phytoplankton in the water column (Twilley et

Newell, Roger

334

Oxidation of Glucose by a Cell-free Preparation of Aerobacter aerogenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in the cold for 15 min. at 3,000 g. The turbid yellowish supernatant (Slf 18 c.c.) was centrifuged for 20 min. at 15,000 g to ... and no classical cytochrome oxidase (a8)1. On addition of sodium dithionite to extract Slf the bands of reduced 6X and al could be seen with a microspectroscope, but ...

A. TISSIRES

1952-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

335

Structural and Functional Insights into Peptidoglycan Access for the Lytic Amidase LytA of Streptococcus pneumoniae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...substrate recognition interfaces (Fig. 2B and C...strands. The large glycan interface within the binding crevice...substrate-interacting interface at which multiple residues...activity was analyzed by measuring the decrease in turbidity...spotted directly onto a standard steel MALDI plate prior...

Peter Mellroth; Tatyana Sandalova; Alexey Kikhney; Francisco Vilaplana; Dusan Hesek; Mijoon Lee; Shahriar Mobashery; Staffan Normark; Dmitri Svergun; Birgitta Henriques-Normark; Adnane Achour

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation in p + 197 Au Reactions at 6.2-14.6 GeVc, S. Turbide, L. Beaulieu, P. Danielewicz, V.E. Viola, R. Roy, K. Kwiatkowski, W.-C. Hsi, G. Wang, T. Lefort, D.S. Bracken,...

337

PROGRESS IN RESEARCH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation in p + 197 Au Reactions at 6.2-14.6 GeVc, S. Turbide, L. Beaulieu, P. Danielewicz, V.E. Viola, R. Roy, K. Kwiatkowski, W.-C. Hsi, G. Wang, T. Lefort, D.S. Bracken,...

338

Level 2 Diagnosis and Project Inventory, Lower Snake Tributaries Prepared by: Mobrand Biometrics, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Level 2 Diagnosis and Project Inventory, Lower Snake Tributaries Prepared by: Mobrand Biometrics considerations to the contrary, a fish habitat manager developing a restoration plan based solely by EDT output turbidity, maximum temperature, woody debris and riparian function are the dominant limiting factors

339

Enduring legacy of a toxic fan via episodic redistribution of California gold mining debris  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Hg-laden sediment during individual floods, and (ii) systematic intrafan...during increasingly long, 10-y flood events. Each major flood apparently...Geological Society of America, Boulder, CO), Geological Society of America...concentration during turbid flood conditions on the Feather River...

Michael Bliss Singer; Rolf Aalto; L. Allan James; Nina E. Kilham; John L. Higson; Subhajit Ghoshal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Drinking Water as Route of Exposure to Microcystins in Great Lakes Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drinking Water as Route of Exposure to Microcystins in Great Lakes Communities Primary Investigator Erie is a source of drinking water for many communities and may also be a source of algal toxins drinking water. While there are state regulatory standards for factors like turbidity and fecal coliforms

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Vertical transport and dynamic size distribution of New Bedford Harbor sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superfund Site. Samples were analyzed on a Coulter Counter, AVC-80 Suspended Solids machine, and a HACH Model 2100A Turbidimeter. A vertical transport model, which included flocculation and flo breakup, was developed and calibrated with these laboratory... Column. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electronic Particle Counter. . . Suspended Solids and Turbidity . . . Density Meter Experimental Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Data Analysis. 28 31 32 34 35 35 36...

Sanders, Stephanie Carol

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Plant species as a significant factor in wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) in microcosms fed rural septic influent. The water parameters studied were water usage, ammonium-nitrogen, phosphorus, coliforms, suspended solids, BOD, pH, and turbidity. The BOD for all plants was reduced below the standard levels but none were significantly...

Varvel, Tracey W

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

343

Luminescence intensity in coral skeletons from Mona Island in the Caribbean Sea and its link to precipitation and wind speed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Precipitation and wind speed in combination may thus...well as turbidity and light availability. The negative...con- trolled by wind speed, precipitation and run-off...precipitation and wind speed may control some environmental...as freshwater supply, light availability and/or...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, adionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Chase, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Environmental applications of the particle analysis system  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates the applicability of particle counting technology for analysis of various water treatment systems at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Particle Analysis System described in this study determined the water quality of samples from environmental remediation, stormwater treatment, and drinking water treatment operations. Samples were measured in either discrete or on-line mode. This data showed filtration efficiencies, particle counts, particle size distributions, and real-time treatment system performance. Particle counting proved more sensitive than the turbidimetric measurement technique commonly used by the water treatment industry. Particle counting is a two-dimensional measurement of counts and sizes, whereas turbidity is a one-dimensional measurement of water clarity. Samples showing identical turbidities could be distinguished easily with the Particle Analysis System. The Particle Analysis System proved to be an efficient and reliable water quality measurement tool, and it is applicable to a variety of water treatment systems at the Rocky Flats Plant.

Moritz, E.J.; Hoffman, C.R.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Perception vs. reality in deep-water exploration  

SciTech Connect

The common perception in exploration is that deep-water sands are predominantly a product of low- and high-density turbidity currents, and that submarine-fan models with channel/levee and lobe elements are the norm. The reality, however, is that deep-water systems are extremely complex and variable in terms of depositional processes and sand-body geometries. For example, the Bourna Sequence, composed of T{sub a}, T{sub b}, T{sub c}, T{sub d}, and T{sub e} divisions, is believed to be the product of a turbidity current. However, recent core and outcrop studies show that the complete and partial Bouma sequences also can be explained by processes other than turbidity currents, such as sandy debris flows (i.e., {open_quotes}T{sub a}{close_quotes}) and bottom-current reworking (i.e., {open_quotes}T{sub b}, T{sub c} and T{sub d}{close_quotes}). Massive sands are interpreted routinely as high-density turbidites, but the reality is that the term {open_quotes}high-density turbidity current{close_quotes} commonly refers to sandy debris flow in terms of flow theology and sediment-support mechanism. Deep-water sequences in the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Offshore Gabon, Offshore Nigeria, Gulf of Mexico, and the Ouachita Mountains are generally considered to be turbidite-rich submarine fans. However, the reality is that these sequences are composed predominantly of sandy slumps and debris flows, not turbidites. Fan models are attractive to explorationists because of their predictable sheet-like geometries; however, these simplistic conceptual models are obsolete because they defy reality. Although the turbidite paradigm is alive and well for now in the minds of many sedimentologists and sequence stratigraphers, the turbidites themselves that form the foundation for fan models are becoming an endangered facies!

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration & Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Perception vs. reality in deep-water exploration  

SciTech Connect

The common perception in exploration is that deep-water sands are predominantly a product of low- and high-density turbidity currents, and that submarine-fan models with channel/levee and lobe elements are the norm. The reality, however, is that deep-water systems are extremely complex and variable in terms of depositional processes and sand-body geometries. For example, the Bourna Sequence, composed of T[sub a], T[sub b], T[sub c], T[sub d], and T[sub e] divisions, is believed to be the product of a turbidity current. However, recent core and outcrop studies show that the complete and partial Bouma sequences also can be explained by processes other than turbidity currents, such as sandy debris flows (i.e., [open quotes]T[sub a][close quotes]) and bottom-current reworking (i.e., [open quotes]T[sub b], T[sub c] and T[sub d][close quotes]). Massive sands are interpreted routinely as high-density turbidites, but the reality is that the term [open quotes]high-density turbidity current[close quotes] commonly refers to sandy debris flow in terms of flow theology and sediment-support mechanism. Deep-water sequences in the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Offshore Gabon, Offshore Nigeria, Gulf of Mexico, and the Ouachita Mountains are generally considered to be turbidite-rich submarine fans. However, the reality is that these sequences are composed predominantly of sandy slumps and debris flows, not turbidites. Fan models are attractive to explorationists because of their predictable sheet-like geometries; however, these simplistic conceptual models are obsolete because they defy reality. Although the turbidite paradigm is alive and well for now in the minds of many sedimentologists and sequence stratigraphers, the turbidites themselves that form the foundation for fan models are becoming an endangered facies

Shanmugam, G. (Mobil Exploration Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the lower Vicksburg sandstones, west McAllen Ranch Field, Hidalgo County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- quences of sedimentary structures accompanied by a fining upward in grain size which represent turbidity current deposition. Thick-bedded sandstones are dominated by massive sandstones overlain by laminated sandstones with individual bedsets averaging 4... ft in thickness. These sandstones also contain considerable amounts of interbedded shale. Thinner sandstones are probably of over- hank-levee origin. Average grain size is 0. 13 mm (fine-grained), and bedsets are commonly graded fram 0. 14 mm...

Marshall, William Dustin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

Coastal Microstructure: From Active Overturn to Fossil Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................... 33 Figure 10. Front view of the sensor package installed on MSS profiler including two shear probes, micro-temperature, micro-conductivity, accurate- temperature, accurate-conductivity, acceleration, turbidity, and depth sensors... frequently used in oceanography. A very important characteristic of turbulence is that it produces highly persistent, irreversible effects in a variety of hydro-physical fields. Linear waves come and go without leaving any trace, but turbulence...

Leung, Pak Tao

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

Low Grade Heat Recovery- A Unique Approach at Polysar Limited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The estimated annual savmgs IS In excess of $350,000. This paper describes the process optim!zation opportunities which resulted from Polysar's plant expansIOn and how this application of plate heat exchanger led to benefits that went much beyond energy... sensitive to the river condition. High feed water turbidity, resulting from yearly spring run off and turbulent river conditions from stonns, had led to reduced ion exchange train throughput capacity and increased frequency of sand filter backwash. (2...

Shyr, S.

351

Ion exchange as a tertiary treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that these treatment methods are capable of removing an appreciable amount of objection? able dissolved organic and inorganic materi aJ s from the final effluent. Color and turbidity were greatly reduced and an appreciable amount of the suspended solids were... Demand Re Resin A General Anion mg. /1. MLVSS psi gpm Milligrams per I. iter Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids Pounds per Square Inch Gallons per Minute. mm Mi llimeters kgr meq ml Kilogram Milliequilavent Millimeter S. S. BV...

Westervelt, Ronald David

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Distribution and preservation of pteropod tests in sediments of the Sigsbee Plain, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

terrigenous sedimentation, bu+ the same pat+em of pteropod occurrence in glacial episodes is cozzobozated by the change in the foraminiferal assemblage. In +he third core, Core 6n-1-9-33, carbonate-rich turbidity currents provide for preservation... vii LIST OF FIGUNES INT EODUCTION PEN VIOUS rlORK Ptetopods - Taxonomy, Biology, Composition, and Nictnstturtute Ptetooods ? Dis . . t' hution in +he Oceans and Deep-Sea Sedimen. ts Ptetopods - Nodes of Deposition and Ptesetvation G...

Pollard, Richard Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

Perception vs. reality in deepwater exploration  

SciTech Connect

The common perception in exploration is that deepwater sands are predominantly a product of turbidity currents, and that submarine-fan models with channel/levee and lobe elements are the norm. The reality, however, is that in many cases, deepwater sands are deposits of sandy debris flows and bottom currents, not turbidity currents. Submarine-fan models with channels and lobes are designed for turbidite-dominated deepwater systems, and therefore, fan models are obsolete for debris-flow deposits. The subject is described here in a discussion that covers: Deepwater processes. How sediments move downslope from the shelf, definitions, and misunderstood effects of high-density turbidity and bottom currents; Submarine fan models, and sequence stratigraphic implications. Limitations of widely used models, and seismic geometries and log motifs. Better calibrations are needed. In the conclusion, the author states a critical need for developing additional models for debris flows, and that research should also focus on developing reliable methods for using seismic geometry and wireline-log motifs to recognize depositional facies. A comprehensive bibliography of published literature on the subject is liberally referenced. In this paper, the term deep water refers to bathyal water depths, i.e., area seaward of the shelf edge, that existed at the time of deposition of reservoir sands; it does not necessarily refer to present-day water depths in offshore examples.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Reservoir compartmentalization of deep-water Intra Qua Iboe sand (Pliocene), Edop field, offshore Nigeria  

SciTech Connect

An integration of 3-D seismic and sedimentological information provides a basis for recognizing and mapping individual flow units within the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Core examination show the following depositional facies: A-Sandy slump/mass flow, B-Muddy slump/mass flow, C. Bottom current reworking. D-Non-channelized turbidity currents, E. Channelized (coalesced) turbidity currents. F-Channelized (isolated) turbidity currents, G-Pelagic/hemipelagic, H-Levee, I-Reworked slope, J-Wave dominated, and K-Tide dominated facies. With the exception of facies J and K, all these facies are of deep-water affinity. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope environment in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated scaward, deposition began with a channel dominated deep-water system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated deep-water system (IQI 3, the principle reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated shallow-water system (IQI 4). Compositional and textural similarities between the deep-water facies result in similar log motifs. Furthermore, these depositional facies are not readily apparent as distinct seismic facies. Deep-water facies A, D, E, and F are reservoir facies, whereas facies B, C, G, H, and I are non-reservoir facies. However, Facies G is useful as a seismically mappable event throughout the study area. Mapping of these non-reservoir events provides the framework for understanding gross reservoir architecture. This study has resulted in seven defined reservoir units within the IQI, which serves as the architectural framework for ongoing reservoir characterization.

Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobile Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria); Shanmugam, G. [Mobile Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Welcome to Analytical Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

METHODS OF INTEREST METHODS OF INTEREST Microwave/hot block digestion of solids Alpha spectroscopy Gamma spectroscopy (fixed and portable) Neutron and gamma ray measurements Gas proportional counting Gas chromatography Liquid scintillation counting Uranium and plutonium concentration and isotopic abundance by thermal ionization mass spectrometry Low mass, high resolution gas analysis by mass spectrometry Metallic impurities by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry Anion analysis by ion selective electrode and ion chromatography Wet chemistry analysis: pH, conductivity, density, turbidity, acid/base titrations Mercury analysis Carbon analysis Low-level uranium analysis by kinetic phosphorescence Volatile organics by gas chromatography with mass spectrometer detector/GC-MS

356

Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

Pauli, Adam T. (Cheyenne, WY); Robertson, Raymond E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Chatham, IL); Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

357

The effect of Corexit 7664 on the intoxication of larval Artemia salina by some selected poisons found in industrial effluents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

' cat. e ea 10 r"rpI rc tearr lrDDD ppa - 10 replica it sea 0 r pli . atone 10j000 ppm 10 teplic tooa 10 z cplicotcsa " Chch replicate consisted of 10 larvao tje 0 ? 10 replicates eachj sere tested and none i. n lat. er indicates that 10... trailing behind the shrimp larvae. The larvae were apparently feeding on the whitish turbidity-producing material in Instant Dcean 35$ (1-0-) I. 0. 100 ppa Coro" 't I. 0. ls000 ppa I. G. 1C, OOO ppa Ccrorlt I. 0. I. 0, 100 poa Coresit I, O. la...

Schofield, John Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

Probing nuclear matter with jet conversions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). [24] J. Adams et al. (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 152301 (2006). [25] X. N. Wang, Phys. Rev. C 58, 2321 (1998). [26] W. Liu, C. M. Ko, and B. W. Zhang (in preparation). [27] R. J. Fries, B. Muller, and D. K. Srivastava, Phys. Rev.... Lett. 90, 132301 (2003). [28] R. J. Fries, B. Muller, and D. K. Srivastava, Phys. Rev. C 72, 041902(R) (2005). [29] C. Gale, T. C. Awes, R. J. Fries, and D. K. Srivastava, J. Phys. G 30, S1013 (2004). [30] S. Turbide, C. Gale, S. Jeon, and G. D...

Liu, W.; Fries, Rainer J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Testing sand used in hydraulic fracturing operations  

SciTech Connect

Recommended practices for testing sand used in hydraulic fracturing operations are outlined as developed by the Task Group on Evaluation of Hydraulic Fracturing Sand under the API Subcommittee on Evaluation of Well Completion Materials. The tests recommended were developed to improve the quality of frac sand delivered to the well site, and are for use in evaluating certain physical properties of sand used in hydraulic fracturing operations. The tests suggested enable users to compare physical characteristics of various sands and to select materials most useful for such applications. Parameters to be tested include turbidity, clay and soft particle content, crush resistance, and mineralogic analysis.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Effects of Salinity Changes and the Formation of Dissolved Organic Matter Coatings on the Sorption of Phenanthrene:? Implications for Pollutant Trapping in Estuaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large horizontal concentration gradients led Bates et al. (2) to conclude that vertical transport dominated PAH distribution. ... The turbidity maximum is a location of high salinity gradient where alluvial particles are hypothesized to coagulate and settle; hence, it is likely to be a prime location for pollutant trapping within an estuary. ... For the sorption paradigm to explain pollutant trapping, large increases in pollutant binding in response to elevated salinities are needed; however, the aggregated experimental evidence obtained for extracellular polymer, alginic acid, and tannic acid sorption to kaolinite and bentonite indicate that increases in salinity do not cause a sufficient increase in DOM sorption. ...

Brett K. Brunk; Gerhard H. Jirka; Leonard W. Lion

1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K- Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A study of a dual polarization laser backscatter system for remote identification and measurement of water pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Experi- mental Data for the Depolarization Ratios from Gasoline and Kerosene on Turbid Water . . . . , . . . . . . . . . 101 XV ~Fi ure A-1 Lidar Polarimeter Electronic Control Unit ~Pa e 116 A-2 A-3 Lidar Polarimeter Electronic Connec- tions... for verti- cal transmit polarization is given by y?'?= F(TI)(l ? eXp(-2N p, L)) 2Pr (III- 10) Several observations can be made about (III-10) con- cerning the magnitude of the volume reflection coefficient relative to the mean depth L and the volume...

Sheives, Thomas Carlyle

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

363

A bovine model for evaluating efficacy of Pasteurella haemolytica biologics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and clinical score TABLE 2. Clinical scoring system for calf pneumonia TABLE 3. Pasteurella ~haemol tl a mouse thalleage Page 16 17 20 TABLE 4. Hean clinical score and mean antibody response of calves 23 TABLE 5. 'Serum turbidity test 25 LIST... OF FIGURES FIGURE 1. Temperature response of challenge calves FIGURE 2. Serum IgG antibody to Leukotoxin Protein as measured by an ELISA FIGURE 3. Serum IgG antibody to Supernatant Precipitate Antigen as measured by an ELISA Page 21 26 28...

Harris, James Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Water-Soluble Complexes from Random Copolymer and Oppositely Charged Surfactant. 1. Complexes of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Based Cationic Random Copolymer and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-Soluble Complexes from Random Copolymer and Oppositely Charged Surfactant. 1. Complexes of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Based Cationic Random Copolymer and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate ... Preliminary studies on the solubility of the complexes by turbidity measurements with one of the most studied anionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), demonstrate that complexes of the polymer with 68 mol % PEG content are insoluble in water. ... (angles are measured with respect to the direction of the laser beam) equipped with a 30 mW (GaAs, gallium arsenide) laser emitting vertically polarized light at wavelength ? = 690 nm. ...

C. K. Nisha; Pratyay Basak; Sunkara V. Manorama; Souvik Maiti; Kizhakkedathu N. Jayachandran

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

Energy conservation in high-rise buildings: Changes in air conditioning load induced by vertical temperature and humidity profile in Delhi  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperature and humidity profiles in the upper atmosphere are different from those observed by ground level meteorological stations and used to design HVAC systems for high-rise buildings. There exist correlations among solar energy, atmospheric turbidity and pollutants in urban areas, affecting the temperature and humidity profiles with variation in height. In the present study, a theoretical model is developed considering these parameters, and the HVAC load is calculated. The results are compared with the HVAC load calculated from data obtained from the meteorological station, and the comparison showed that the results differ significantly (20%) for a hypothetical 200 m high office building.

S. Sinha; Sanjay Kumar; N. Kumar

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Brine clarity maintenance in salinity-gradient solar ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brine transparency is an important part of the maintenance of a salinity-gradient solar pond as it affects the amount of solar radiation reaching the storage zone and hence has an influence on the thermal performance. There is a wide range of factors that can hinder the transmission of light in a solar pond. Algal and microbial growths are the most common problems encountered in working solar ponds and control of their densities is essential to maintain transparency. Two different chemical treatment methods for algae growth prevention are described in this paper: chlorine and a novel chemical product copper ethylamine complex. The latter method has never been implemented previously in a working pond. This paper discusses the theory of the algae control methods used and presents the experimental results of the chemical treatments. The results showed that Cupricide is more effective than chlorine and is therefore the recommended chemical for algae control in solar ponds; it improves the water transparency especially in the upper convective zone and lower convective zone with all measurement values less than 1 NTU. Chlorine was found to be more corrosive than Cupricide due to the acidic effect it has on the pH. The preliminary cost analysis showed that granular chlorine is the cheapest chemical. A more detailed financial analysis is nevertheless required to refine these costs.

Neus Gasulla; Yusli Yaakob; Jimmy Leblanc; Aliakbar Akbarzadeh; Jose Luis Cortina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Modeling the performance of small capacity lithium bromide-water absorption chiller operated by solar energy  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the performance of a solar operated small capacity (two-ton) Lithium Bromide-Water (LiBr-H{sub 2}O) absorption system is conducted. The analysis is based on the first law of thermodynamics with lithium bromide as the absorbent and water as the refrigerant. The effect of various parameters affecting the machine coefficient of performance under various operating conditions is reported. Coefficient of performance of up to 0.8 can be obtained using flat plate solar collectors with generator temperatures in the range of 80--95 C (176--203 F). Liquid heat exchangers with effectiveness based on an NTU of the order of one would be a good design choice. The chiller can save approximately 3,456 kWh/yr per a two-ton unit, and it will reduce emissions by 19 lb of NO{sub x}, 5,870 lb of CO{sub 2}, and 16 lb of SO{sub x} per year per machine.

Saman, N.F. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.; Sa`id, W.A.D.K. [Univ. of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq). Control and Systems Engineering Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), and pH to be accomplished in B-150. Other waste methods (turbidity, Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), and pH to be accomplished in B-150. Other waste methods (turbidity, flash point, and conductivity) are encompassed in EEC TC-A-2010-042. Undiluted sample is used for pH and specific gravity. Radiological samples will be analyzed in B-150. Instrumentation includes balances, probes, and a titration system.Standards and calibrants are as follows: for specific gravity, deionized water is the calibrant; for pH, 25 mL of ACS certified pH buffers are the probe calibrants (pH 4.0, pH 7.0, and pH 10.0). Waste Analysis Characterization Methods in the Analytical Development Wet Chemistry Lab Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC-A-2011-0009 , Rev.0 Mar 8, 2011 Andrew R. Grainger

369

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

SciTech Connect

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements demonstrated that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the first HAB genome (A. anophagefferens) and compared its gene complement to those of six competing phytoplankton species identified via metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on the gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 mbp) and more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen utilization, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

Gobler, C J; Grigoriev, I V; Berry, D L; Dyhrman, S T; Wilhelm, S W; Salamov, A; Lobanov, A V; Zhang, Y; Collier, J L; Wurch, L L; Kustka, A B; Dill, B D; Shah, M; VerBerkomes, N C; Kuo, A; Terry, A; Pangilinan, J; Lindquist, E A; Lucas, S; Paulsen, I; Hattenrath-Lehmann, T K; Talmage, S; Walker, E A; Koch, F; Burson, A M; Marcoval, M A; Tang, Y; LeCleir, G R; Coyne, K J; Berg, G M; Bertrand, E M; Saito, M A; Gladyshev, V N

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

370

Metal ions in water and sediments of the Pom-Atasta Lagoon, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Temperature, salinity, turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS), pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured in the surface water of the Pom-Atasta Lagoon at 15 stations during 5 sampling events from September 1996--May 1997. Concentrations of Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, Pb, Cr, Ag, Fe, Co, and Ba were also determined in the water and sediments at 15 stations during the study period. The values of salinity, turbidity, and TSS were related to the inputs of river water into the lagoon. Metals in the water and sediments showed no spatial variation. Seasonality in the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Ag, and Ba in the water was found and may be related to the resuspension of sediments in the lagoon. The concentrations of metals in sediments did not give significant seasonal variation. Metals in sediments were not correlated with the iron, suggesting an anthropogenic source of metals in the Pom-Atasta Lagoon. The concentrations of dissolved Pb were above the value recommended by the National Water Commission of Mexico.

Vazquez, G.F.; Enciso, G.; Morales, J.W. [UNAM, Distrito Federal (Mexico). Instituto de Ciencias Del Mar y Limnologia] [UNAM, Distrito Federal (Mexico). Instituto de Ciencias Del Mar y Limnologia; Sharma, V.K. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Nischt, S.L.; Domingo, G.L. [PEMEX, Campeche (Mexico)] [PEMEX, Campeche (Mexico)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Spatial and Temporal Variability in the Nearshore Distributions of Postlarval Farfantepenaeus aztecus along Galveston Island, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nearshore distributions of postlarval brown shrimp Farfantepenaeus aztecus (Ives, 1891) were investigated at four approximately equidistant sites along a section of Galveston Island, Texas. Simultaneous, replicate plankton samples were collected along with environmental measurements at each site during three consecutive days each week for a period of four weeks during April 1992. The data were modelled using analysis of variance and stepwise regression to evaluate the spatial, temporal and environmental factors contributing to changes in density. Postlarval densities differed significantly among the four weeks during the study, however, day was not a significant model effect. Changes in weekly distributions appeared correlated to the presence of winds favourable for onshore transport of water. The distributions of postlarvae were highly variable along the Island with significantly greater densities at sites located on sections of open beach and significantly lower densities in the vicinity of shoreline stabilization structures (groins and jetties). Turbidity, water and air temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen were all significantly related to postlarval density as were several interactions among environmental factors and turbidity and site. The variability observed in the study was used to estimate levels of sampling intensity required to achieve different levels of precision. Based on the high spatial and temporal variability in postlarval densities observed in this study, and our sampling effort calculations, we suggest that some of the difficulty in predicting landings of adult shrimp based on postlarval abundances may be due to insufficient sampling effort to accurately assess postlarval densities.

M.C. Benfield; R.G. Downer

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geological overview of the Angola-Congo Margin, the Congo deep-sea fan and its submarine valleys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Congo deep-sea fan is one of the largest fans in the world still affected by presently active turbidity currents. The present activity of deep-sea sedimentary processes is linked to the existence of a direct connection between the Congo River estuary and the Congo canyon head that allows relatively continuous sediment feeding of the deep-sea environment, in spite of a wide continental shelf (150 km). Because of this important activity in terms of sedimentary processes, the deep-sea environment of the Congo-Angola margin presents major interests concerning physical, chemical and biological studies near the sea floor. The main aim of this paper is to present the initial geological context of the BioZaire Program, showing a synthesis of the major results of the ZaAngo Project including (1) the brief geological setting of the Congo-Angola margin, (2) the structure of the modern Congo deep-sea fan, (3) the sedimentary architecture of the recent Congo turbidite system (from the canyon to the distal lobes), and (4) the recent and present turbidite sedimentation. In order to provide useful information and advice relevant to biological and geochemical studies across the Congo sedimentary system, this article focuses on the present sedimentary processes and the present activity of turbidity current along the Congo canyon and channel.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

U-shaped slope gully systems and sediment waves on the passive margin of Gabon (West Africa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract 3-D seismic reflection data has enabled the documentation of a system of remarkable modern and buried u-shaped gullies which intimately co-exist with upslope migrating sediment waves along 80km of the Gabon continental slope. The modern gullies occur on a silty mud-dominated slope in water depths of 1501500m on an ~50km wide slope with a gradient of 4.5 decreasing to 1.5. The gully sets persist laterally for distances of at least 40km and extend downslope for distances of up to 60km. The gullies are u-shaped in cross-section, with a relief of 530m, and widths of 50400m. Intriguingly, the gullies become narrower and shallower with distance down the slope, as well as increasing in number down slope. The majority of the gullies appear to be erosional but some appear to have resulted from simultaneous aggradation along inter-gully ridges and non-deposition along the adjacent gully floor. Hence, these gullies are interpreted to have formed mainly in response to spatially-variable deposition, rather than erosion. Upslope migrating sediment waves occur in close proximity to the gullies. Gullies cross fields of sediment waves and waves are observed to migrate up-slope locally within both the erosional and aggradational gullies. Evidence is lacking for any slumping or headward erosion in the headwall region of the gullies, which discounts formation by very local sediment gravity flows originating from shelf-edge collapse, as has been observed in other v-shaped gully systems. Based on our new data, and supported by theoretical studies on the mechanics of turbidity currents, we propose that the gullies and related sediment waves were formed by diffuse, sheet-like, mud-rich turbidity currents that presumably originated on the shelf. Instabilities in the turbidity currents generated a wave-shaped perturbation in a cross-flow direction leading to regularly spaced regions of faster and slower flow. For the non-aggradational and erosional gullies it is inferred that gully axes experienced flow velocities that mainly exceeded the settling velocity of the sediment in suspension, and thus no deposition occurred. In contrast, the aggradational gullies indicate lower flow velocities with sediment deposition both within the gully axes and on the gully flanks. Mixed mode gullies are also found which indicate that successive flows can experience variations in flow properties leading to interspersed erosional and depositional events.

Lidia Lonergan; Nur Huda Jamin; Christopher A.-L. Jackson; Howard D. Johnson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

CX-002993: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

993: Categorical Exclusion Determination 993: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Analysis Characterization Methods in the Analytical Development Wet Chemistry Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), turbidity, flash point, conductivity, and pH. Undiluted sample is used for all methods listed. Clean samples are analyzed on bench instruments, while radioactive samples are run on instruments located in radiological containment hoods. Instrumentation include clean and radiological use turbidimeters, balances, flash point devices, conductivity meters and probes, and titration systems. Standards and calibrants include

376

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B2.5 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 17, 2010 June 17, 2010 CX-002764: Categorical Exclusion Determination Arkansas-City-Fayetteville CX(s) Applied: B2.5, A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 06/17/2010 Location(s): Fayetteville, Arkansas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 16, 2010 CX-002991: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Turbidity Meter Discharge Check Valves CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 06/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office June 16, 2010 CX-002784: Categorical Exclusion Determination Utah-County-Washington CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/16/2010 Location(s): Washington County, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 15, 2010 CX-002776: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-City-Elk Grove

377

Three LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studies were studies were conducted by the Nutrients Dynamics teams of ND-07 at studies sites near Brasilia, Brazil. LBA-ECO ND-07 Hydrochemistry of Natural and Developed Land Cover, Brasilia, Brazil. Data set prepared by J.S.O. Silva and M. Bustamante. This data set reports on dissolved nutrient concentrations, as well as dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, conductivity, turbidity, and pH measured in water samples collected from nine streams, surface runoff, wells, lysimeters, and precipitation sites located in the state of Brasilia, Brazil, between September 2004 and December 2006. LBA-ECO ND-07 Microbial Biomass in Cerrado Soils, Brasilia, Brazil. Data set prepared by L.T. Viana, M. Molina, M. Bustamante, A.S. Pinto, K. Kisselle, R. Zepp, and R. Burke. This data set reports the microbial

378

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Temporal Characterization of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0010141 Goal The overall objective of the project is to investigate hydrate system dynamics beneath seafloor mounds—a structurally focused example of hydrate occurrence at the landward extreme of their stability field—in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Researchers will conduct observatory-based in situ measurements at Woolsey Mound, MC118 to: Characterize (geophysically) the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability and, Contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents, and seafloor

379

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) presented a novel reinterpretation of the Jackfork Group in the DeGray Spillway and Kiamichi Mountain sections, Arkansas and Oklahoma, suggesting that thick-bedded sandstones in these sections, previously interpreted as turbidites, are debris-flow deposits. Careful assessment of this reinterpretation is critical because the Jackfork serves as a classic North American sediment-gravity flow sequence and because the techniques of Shanmugam and Moiola (1995), if applied widely, would lead to reinterpretation, and in my view, misinterpretation, of virtually every sediment-gravity flow sequence in the geologic record. In this discussion, I focus on only three of the many issues raised by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995): (1) their rejection of the concept of high density turbidity currents; (2) their description of the Jackfork Group in DeGray Spillway; and (3) their criteria for distinguishing between turbidites and debris-flow deposits.

Lowe, D.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Metal Surface Decontamination by the PFC Solution  

SciTech Connect

PFC (per-fluorocarbon) spray decontamination equipment was fabricated and its decontamination behavior was investigated. Europium oxide powder was mixed with the isotope solution which contains Co-60 and Cs-137. The different shape of metal specimens artificially contaminated with europium oxide powder was used as the surrogate contaminants. Before and after the application of the PFC spray decontamination method, the radioactivity of the metal specimens was measured by MCA. The decontamination factors were in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. The spent PFC solution was recycled by distillation. Before and after distillation, the turbidity of PFC solution was also measured. From the test results, it was found that more than 98% of the PFC solution could be recycled by a distillation. (authors)

Hui-Jun Won; Gye-Nam Kim; Wang-Kyu Choi; Chong-Hun Jung; Won-Zin Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, P.O.Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, Korea, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Homogeneous condensation of gaseous mixtures of Si, Fe, O, N, and C in relative cosmic abundance and implications for astronomical condensation  

SciTech Connect

The pressure versus temperature curves for homogeneous nucleation and condensation of two gaseous mixtures with nearly relative solar abundance of Si, Fe, O, N, and C in an excess of H were determined experimentally. Mixtures of CO, Fe(CO)5, H2, SiH4, and N2O in Ar were heated behind reflected shocks in a shock tube. The nucleation and condensation, which took place in the subsequent gas-dynamic expansion (cooling phase), was monitored by light scattering and turbidity. Grain morphologies and crystalline phases present in the condensates were determined by electron microscopy. These data cast doubt on the validity of both equilibrium and classical nucleation theoretical approaches to predict homogeneous condensation in a solar nebula or stellar atmosphere.

Stephens, J.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Simple solar spectral model for direct and diffuse irradiance on horizontal and tilted planes at the earth's surface for cloudless atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

A new, simple model for calculating clear-sky direct and diffuse spectral irradiance on horizontal and tilted surfaces is presented. The model is based on previously reported simple algorithms and on comparisons with rigorous radiative transfer calculations and limited outdoor measurements. Equations for direct normal irradiance are outlined; and include: Raleigh scattering; aerosol scattering and absorption; water vapor absorption; and ozone and uniformly mixed gas absorption. Inputs to the model include solar zenith angle, collector tilt angle, atmospheric turbidity, amount of ozone and precipitable water vapor, surface pressure, and ground albedo. The model calculates terrestrial spectra from 0.3 to 4.0 ..mu..m with approximately 10 nm resolution. A major goal of this work is to provide researchers with the capability to calculate spectral irradiance for different atmospheric conditions and different collector geometries using microcomputers. A listing of the computer program is provided.

Bird, R.; Riordan, C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During third quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in four of the six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells (PAC 2, 5, and 6). Radium-228 exceeded Level 2 Flagging Criteria in one well (PAC 2); however this was an estimated value because quantitation in the sample did not meet specifications. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

High dose radiolysis of aqueous solutions of chloromethanes: Importance in the storage of radioactive organic wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiolysis of aqueous solutions of chloromethanes (dichloromethane, CH2Cl2; chloroform, CHCl3; and carbon tetrachloride, CCl4) was performed with ?-rays to doses sufficient to completely decompose the solute in order to estimate the effects of radiation on the long-term storage of mixed waste in enclosed containers. One of the main relevant products was the inorganic chloride anion, which increased in concentration with increasing radiation dose due to the reactions of radiolytic decomposition products of water with the chloromethane. The pH of the solutions was observed to decrease with irradiation due to the formation of H3O+ as the counter ion to Cl?, i.e. the main radiolytic decomposition product is hydrochloric acid. Polymer formation was observed in aerated solutions as a precipitate while deaerated solutions exhibited a slight turbidity.

P. Rajesh; J.A. LaVerne; S.M. Pimblott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Ambient water and sediment quality of Galveston Bay: Present status and historical trends. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

For many years, data relating to the quality of water and sediment have been collected in the Galveston Bay system by a variety of organizations and individuals. The purpose of the project was to compile these data, and to perform a quantitative assessment of water and sediment quality of Galveston Bay and its evolution over time. The study focused on the following categories of parameters: temperature, salinity and related parameters, suspended sediments and turbidity, pH, dissolved oxygen, nutrients as measured by nitrogen, phosphorous and organic carbon, organics as measured by oil and grease, volatile solids and biochemical oxygen demand, chlorophyll-a, coliforms, metals (total and dissolved), and trace organics, including pesticides, herbicides, PAH's, PCB's, and priority pollutants.

Ward, G.H.; Armstrong, N.E.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castao, Gabriel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Birefringence imaging in biological tissue using polarization sensitive optical coherent tomography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Employing a low coherence Michelson interferometer, two dimensional images of optical birefringence in turbid samples as a function of depth are measured. Polarization sensitive detection of the signal formed by interference of backscattered light from the sample and a mirror or reference plane in the reference arm which defines a reference optical path length, give the optical phase delay between light propagating along the fast and slow axes of the birefringence sample. Images showing the change in birefringence in response to irradiation of the sample are produced as an example of the detection apparatus and methodology. The technique allow rapid, noncontact investigation of tissue or sample diagnostic imaging for various medical or materials procedures.

De Boer, Johannes F. (Irvine, CA); Milner, Thomas E. (Austin, TX); Nelson, J. Stuart (Laguna Niguel, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation  

SciTech Connect

A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, ngstrm's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana [Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, V Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Pop, Nicolina [Department of Physical Foundations of Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara, V Parvan 2, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Calinoiu, Delia [Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University of Timisoara, Mihai Viteazu 1, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

Shelf and deep-sea sedimentary environments and physical benthic disturbance regimes: A review and synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Physical disturbances of the seafloor play a key role in ecosystem function and are postulated to exert control over spatial patterns of biodiversity. This review investigates the role of natural physical sedimentological processes that occur in shelf, slope and abyssal environments that also act as disturbances to benthic ecosystems and which, under certain circumstances, give rise to benthic disturbance regimes. Physical sedimentological processes can cause both press (process that causes a disturbance by acting over a timespan that is intolerable to benthos) and pulse (process that causes a disturbance by exceeding a threshold above which benthos are unable to remain attached to the seabed or are buried under rapidly deposited sediment) types of disturbance. On the continental shelf, pulse-type disturbances are due to temperate and tropical storm events, and press-type of disturbances identified here are due to the migration of bedforms and other sand bodies, and sustained periods of elevated turbidity caused by seasonally reversing wind patterns. On the continental slope and at abyssal depths, pulse-type disturbances are due to slumps, turbidity currents; benthic storms may cause either press or pulse type disturbances. A possible press-type of disturbance identified here is inter-annual changes in abyssal bottom current speed and/or direction. It is concluded that: 1) physical sedimentary disturbance regimes may characterize as much as 10% of the global ocean floor; 2) multidisciplinary research programs that integrate oceanography, sedimentology and benthic ecology to collect time series observational data sets are needed to study disturbance regimes; and 3) predictive habitat suitability modeling must include disturbance regime concepts, along with other biophysical variables that define the fundamental niches of marine species, in order to advance.

Peter T. Harris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Basin-floor fans in the North Sea: Sequence stratigraphic models vs. sedimentary facies  

SciTech Connect

Examination of nearly 12,000 feet (3658m) of conventional core from Paleogene and Cretaceous deep-water sandstone reservoirs cored in 50 wells in 10 different areas or fields in the North Sea and adjacent regions reveals that these reservoirs are predominantly composed of mass-transport deposits, mainly sandy slumps and sandy debris flows. Sedimentary features indicating slump and debris-flow origin include sand units with sharp upper contacts; slump folds; discordant, steeply dipping layers (up to 60{degrees}); glide planes; shear zones; brecciated clasts; clastic injections; floating mudstone clasts; planar clast fabric; inverse grading of clasts; and moderate-to-high matrix content (5-30%). This model predicts that basin-floor fans are predominantly composed of sand-rich turbidites with laterally extensive, sheetlike geometries. However, calibration of sedimentary facies in our long (400-700 feet) cores with seismic and wire-line-log signatures through several of these basin-floor fans (including the Gryphon-Forth, Frigg, and Faeroe areas) shows that these features are actually composed almost exclusively of mass-transport deposits consisting mainly of slumps and debris flows. Distinguishing deposits of mass-transport processes, such as debris flows, from those of turbidity currents has important implications for predicting reservoir geometry. Debris flows, which have plastic flow rheology, can form discontinuous, disconnected sand bodies that are harder to delineate and less economical to develop than deposits of fluidal turbidity currents, which potentially produce more laterally continuous, interconnected sand bodies. Process sedimentological interpretation of conventional core is commonly critical for determining the true origin and distribution of reservoir sands.

Shanmugam, G.; Bloch, R.B. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Mitchell, S.M. [Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Beamish, G.W.J.; Shields, K.E. [Mobil North Sea Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Hodgkinson, R.J.; Straume, T.; Syvertsen, S.E. [Mobil Exploration Norway, Inc., Stavanger (Norway); Damuth, J.E. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Core-based evidence for sandy slump and sandy debris flow facies in the Pliocene and Pleistocene of the Gulf of Mexico: Implications for submarine fan models  

SciTech Connect

Examination of nearly 3,500 feet of conventional core from Pliocene and Pleistocene deep-water reservoirs cored in 25 wells in 8 different areas covering the eastern, central and western Gulf of Mexico reveals that the reservoirs are predominantly composed of mass-transport deposits, mainly sandy slumps and sandy debris flows (60-100% of cored intervals). Bottom-current reworked sands are common (10-50%). Of importance to existing submarine fan models is that turbidities are extremely rare (<1 % of all cores). Sedimentary features indicative of slump and debris-flow origin include sand units with sharp upper contacts, slump folds, discordant, steeply dipping layers (up to 60[degrees]), glide planes, shear zones, brecciated clasts, rafted mudstone clasts, planar clast fabric, inverse grading of clasts, and moderate-to-high matrix content (5-20 %). These reservoirs have been interpreted by others to represent turbidite-dominated basin-floor fans and slope fans of the often used sequence stratigraphic model. However, our core data do not show a dominance of turbidities. Sandy debris flows exhibit a variety of log motifs (e.g., blocky, fining-up, and coarsening-up) due to changes in concentration of midstone clasts, and a variety of internal seismic facies (e.g., parallel-continuous, irregular-discontinuous, chaotic -discontinuous, and lateral pinch out) perhaps due to changes in stacking patterns of debris flows and slumps. Classic submarine-fan models, commonly advocated for these reservoirs, may not be appropriate. We propose a slump and debris-flow, dominated slope model in which sea-floor topography and depositional freezing (i.e., plastic flows) control sand distribution and geometry. Contrary to popular belief, sandy debris flows can be thick, areally extensive, and excellent reservoirs.

Shanmugam, G. (Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)); Zimbrick, G. (Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S., Dallas, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Core-based evidence for sandy slump and sandy debris flow facies in the Pliocene and Pleistocene of the Gulf of Mexico: Implications for submarine fan models  

SciTech Connect

Examination of nearly 3,500 feet of conventional core from Pliocene and Pleistocene deep-water reservoirs cored in 25 wells in 8 different areas covering the eastern, central and western Gulf of Mexico reveals that the reservoirs are predominantly composed of mass-transport deposits, mainly sandy slumps and sandy debris flows (60-100% of cored intervals). Bottom-current reworked sands are common (10-50%). Of importance to existing submarine fan models is that turbidities are extremely rare (<1 % of all cores). Sedimentary features indicative of slump and debris-flow origin include sand units with sharp upper contacts, slump folds, discordant, steeply dipping layers (up to 60{degrees}), glide planes, shear zones, brecciated clasts, rafted mudstone clasts, planar clast fabric, inverse grading of clasts, and moderate-to-high matrix content (5-20 %). These reservoirs have been interpreted by others to represent turbidite-dominated basin-floor fans and slope fans of the often used sequence stratigraphic model. However, our core data do not show a dominance of turbidities. Sandy debris flows exhibit a variety of log motifs (e.g., blocky, fining-up, and coarsening-up) due to changes in concentration of midstone clasts, and a variety of internal seismic facies (e.g., parallel-continuous, irregular-discontinuous, chaotic -discontinuous, and lateral pinch out) perhaps due to changes in stacking patterns of debris flows and slumps. Classic submarine-fan models, commonly advocated for these reservoirs, may not be appropriate. We propose a slump and debris-flow, dominated slope model in which sea-floor topography and depositional freezing (i.e., plastic flows) control sand distribution and geometry. Contrary to popular belief, sandy debris flows can be thick, areally extensive, and excellent reservoirs.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Zimbrick, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Sludge Settling Rate Observations and Projections at the Savannah River Site - 13238  

SciTech Connect

Since 2004, sludge batches have included a high percentage of stored sludge generated from the H- modified (HM) process. The slow-settling nature of HM sludge means that the settling is often the major part of the washing tank quiescent period between required pump runs to maintain flammability control. Reasonable settling projections are needed to wash soluble salts from sludge in an efficient manner, to determine how much sludge can be washed in a batch within flammability limits, and to provide composition projections for batch qualification work done in parallel with field preparation. Challenges to providing reasonably accurate settling projections include (1) large variations in settling behavior from tank-to-tank, (2) accounting for changing initial concentrations, sludge masses, and combinations of different sludge types, (3) changing the settling behavior upon dissolving some sludge compounds, and (4) sludge preparation schedules that do not allow for much data collection for a particular sludge before washing begins. Scaling from laboratory settling tests has provided inconsistent results. Several techniques have been employed to improve settling projections and therefore the overall batch preparation efficiency. Before any observations can be made on a particular sludge mixture, projections can only be made based on historical experience with similar sludge types. However, scaling techniques can be applied to historical settling models to account for different sludge masses, concentrations, and even combinations of types of sludge. After sludge washing/settling cycles begin, the direct measurement of the sludge height, once generally limited to a single turbidity meter measurement per settle period, is now augmented by examining the temperature profile in the settling tank, to help determine the settled sludge height over time. Recently, a settling model examined at PNNL [1,2,3] has been applied to observed thermocouple and turbidity meter readings to quickly provide settling correlations to project settled heights for other conditions. These tools improve the accuracy and adaptability of short and mid-range planning for sludge batch preparation. (authors)

Gillam, Jeffrey M.; Shah, Hasmukh B.; Keefer, Mark T. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications  

SciTech Connect

In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements like plutonium and uranium; (2) a LIBS system that can be deployed in harsh environments such as gloveboxes and hot cells providing relative compositional analysis of process streams for example ratios like Cm/Pu and Cm/U; and (3) an inspector field deployable system that can be used to analyze the elemental composition of microscopic quantities of samples containing plutonium and uranium. In this paper we will describe our current development and performance testing results both in a fixed lab and measurements in field deployable configurations using LIBS instrumentation developed for applications to international safeguards.

Barefield Il, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Mobilization of colloidal particles by low-frequency dynamic stress stimulation  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring seismic events and artificially generated low-frequency (1 to 500 Hertz) elastic waves have been observed to alter the production rates of oil and water wells, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing production, and to influence the turbidity of surface and well water. The decreases in production are of particular concern - especially when artificially generated elastic waves are applied as a method for enhanced oil recovery. The exact conditions that result in a decrease in production remain unknown. While the underlying environment is certainly complex, the observed increase in water well turbidity after natural seismic events suggests the existence of a mechanism that can affect both the subsurface flow paths and mobilization of in-situ colloidal particles. This paper explores the macroscopic and microscopic effects of low-frequency dynamic stress stimulations on the release of colloidal particles from an analog core representing an infinitesimal section along the propagation paths of an elastic wave. Experiments on a column packed with 1-mm borosilicate beads and loaded with polystyrene microspheres demonstrate that axial mechanical stress oscillations enhance the mobilization of captured microspheres. Increasing the amplitude of the oscillations increases the number of microspheres released and can also result in cyclical spikes in effluent microsphere concentration during stimulation. Under a prolonged period of stimulation, the cyclical effluent spikes coincided with fluctuations in the column pressure data, and continue at a diminished level after stimulation. This behavior can be attributed to rearrangements of the beads in the column, resulting in possible changes to the void space and/or tortuosity of the packing. Optical microscopy observations of the beads during low frequency oscillations reveal that individual beads rotate, thereby rubbing against each other and scraping away portions of the adsorbed microspheres. These results support the theory that mechanical interactions between porous matrix grains are important mechanisms in flow path alteration and the mobilization of naturally occurring colloidal particles during elastic wave stimulation. These results also point to both continuous and discrete, en masse releases of colloidal particles, perhaps due to circulation cells within the packing material.

Beckham, Richard Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Amr, Abdel - Fattah I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peter, Roberts M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reem, Ibrahim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tarimala, Sowmitri [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Radioactive and chemical contamination of the water resources in the former uranium mining and milling sites of Mailuu Suu (Kyrgyzstan)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An assessment of the radioactive and chemical contamination of the water resources at the former uranium mines and processing sites of Mailuu-Suu, in Kyrgyzstan, was carried out. A large number of water samples were collected from the drinking water distribution system (DWDS), rivers, shallow aquifers and drainage water from the mine tailings. Radionuclides and trace metal contents in water from the DWDS were low in general, but were extremely high for Fe, Al and Mn. These elements were associated with the particle fractions in the water and strongly correlated with high turbidity levels. Overall, these results suggest that water from the DWDS does not represent a serious radiological hazard to the Mailuu Suu population. However, due to the high turbidities and contents of some elements, this water is not good quality drinking water. Water from artesian and dug wells were characterized by elevated levels of U (up to 10?g/L) and some trace elements (e.g. As, Se, Cr, V and F) and anions (e.g. Cl?, NO3?, SO42?). In two artesian wells, the WHO guideline value of 10?g/L for As in water was exceeded. As the artesian wells are used as a source of drinking water by a large number of households, special care should be taken in order to stay within the WHO recommended guidelines. Drainage water from the mine tailings was as expected highly contaminated with many chemicals (e.g. As) and radioactive contaminants (e.g. U). The concentrations of U were more than 200 times the WHO guideline value of 30?g/L for U in drinking water. A large variation in 234U/238U isotopic ratios in water was observed, with values near equilibrium at the mine tailings and far from equilibrium outside this area (reaching ratios of 2.3 in the artesian well). This result highlights the potential use of this ratio as an indicator of the origin of U contamination in Mailuu Suu.

J.A. Corcho Alvarado; B. Balsiger; S. Rllin; A. Jakob; M. Burger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The impacts of the great Mississippi/Atchafalaya River flood on the oceanography of the Atchafalaya Shelf  

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Abstract Rivers are the primary means by which water, sediment, and dissolved material are transported from the continents to the ocean. Despite previous advances, much remains to be learned about the dynamics of large shelf-discharging rivers, and their functional differences with deep water-discharging rivers, particularly with respect to the distribution of sediments in the coastal zone. The great Mississippi/Atchafalaya River flood of 2011 provided an excellent opportunity to examine the impacts of a large, shelf-discharging river on the coastal ocean, and the role that event pulses from such rivers play in the delivery of sediment to the inner continental shelf. Vessel-based surveys were conducted on the inner-continental shelf within the Atchafalaya and Mississippi River plume regions, providing in situ measurements of salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, particle size, and current velocity profiles. MODIS satellite images and 7Be measurements were used to assist in data interpretation. We demonstrate that the Atchafalaya River plume produced intense vertical gradients in temperature, salinity, oxygen and turbidity. This occurred despite the shallow bathymetry of this system and the presence of winds, which alternated between onshore to offshore, and that might have otherwise mixed systems with less freshwater. Sedimentation rates along the inner-continental shelf were about 510 times greater than those measured previously during smaller typical floods. This large deposit is likely to be preserved, at least in the near term, because sedimentation occurred beyond normal depths of wave reworking and the intense stratification induced by this flood likely reduced mixing at the time of sedimentation. A sediment budget for this system reveals that sediment fluxes to the coastal zone during 2011 were similar to those observed in previous years, suggesting that this system is supply limited, rather than transport limited. As such, we postulate that the major impact of this flood was to change the location of the depocenter of Atchafalaya River sediments, rather than increase the annual flux of sediments to the coastal zone. These findings imply that extreme flood events may not be an ideal analog for coastal restoration along this deltaic coast.

Alexander S. Kolker; Chunyan Li; Nan D. Walker; Chet Pilley; Alexander D. Ameen; Georgia Boxer; Cyndhia Ramatchandirane; Mohammad Ullah; Kelly A. Williams

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Coastwatch | Data.gov  

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Coastwatch Coastwatch Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Coastwatch Dataset Summary Description NOAA CoastWatch was established in 1987 in response to two significant environmental events. A Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) event occurred off the coast of North Carolina transporting the toxic Gymnodinium breve cells from Florida via the Gulf Stream into the colder coastal waters near Cape Lookout. Also, a severe mammal die-off occurred, where more than 700 bottlenose dolphins died off the mid-Atlantic coast. Both instances prompted Federal and State officials to explore additional data sources for monitoring the coastal waters, such as near real-time satellite data. CoastWatch has expanded from POES/AVHRR SST data for the East Coast to providing a variety of environmental data (i.e. SST, ocean color, winds, etc.) from several different satellite platforms covering all U.S. coastal waters, including Hawaii and Alaska. Today, sea surface temperature maps support meteorological weather predictions and also support commercial and recreational activities (e.g., fishing). Biologists utilize ocean color radiometry data and derived chlorophyll-a and total suspended matter/turbidity products to identify runoff plumes and blooms and also predict HABs; and sailors and commercial shipping pilots use ocean surface vector winds for safe navigation.

400

Review of technologies for oil and gas produced water treatment  

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Produced water is the largest waste stream generated in oil and gas industries. It is a mixture of different organic and inorganic compounds. Due to the increasing volume of waste all over the world in the current decade, the outcome and effect of discharging produced water on the environment has lately become a significant issue of environmental concern. Produced water is conventionally treated through different physical, chemical, and biological methods. In offshore platforms because of space constraints, compact physical and chemical systems are used. However, current technologies cannot remove small-suspended oil particles and dissolved elements. Besides, many chemical treatments, whose initial and/or running cost are high and produce hazardous sludge. In onshore facilities, biological pretreatment of oily wastewater can be a cost-effective and environmental friendly method. As high salt concentration and variations of influent characteristics have direct influence on the turbidity of the effluent, it is appropriate to incorporate a physical treatment, e.g., membrane to refine the final effluent. For these reasons, major research efforts in the future could focus on the optimization of current technologies and use of combined physico-chemical and/or biological treatment of produced water in order to comply with reuse and discharge limits.

Ahmadun Fakhrul-Razi; Alireza Pendashteh; Luqman Chuah Abdullah; Dayang Radiah Awang Biak; Sayed Siavash Madaeni; Zurina Zainal Abidin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Performance optimization of biological waste treatment by flotation clarification at a chemical manufacturing facility  

SciTech Connect

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., utilizes a deep-tank activated sludge wastewater treatment system with a dissolved air flotation clarifier (DAF) to effectively treat amine wastes containing residual organics, ammonia-nitrogen and organic nitrogen. The bio-system, a deep tank aeration system, produces a high quality final effluent low in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), ammonia and organic nitrogen, turbidity and total suspended solids. Prior to installing the DAF, treatment performance was at risk with a gravity clarifier. Waste treatment performance was jeopardized by poor settling bio-flocs and uncontrollable solids-liquid separation problems within the gravity clarifier. The solids settleability problems resulted primarily from mixed liquor nitrogen supersaturation degassing in the clarifier. As a result of the degassing, biomass floated on the gravity clarifier or overflowed the effluent weir. As a result of biomass loss periodically organic carbon and total Kjeldahl nitrogen loadings had to be reduced in order to maintain optimal food-to-mass ratios. As biomass levels dropped within the aeration basin, waste treatment performance was at risk and waste loads had to be decreased causing waste inventories to increase in storage tanks.

Kerecz, B.J. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Miller, D.R. [Komline-Sanderson, Peapack, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report  

SciTech Connect

The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

Gorsline, D.S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Purification of domestic sewage by water-hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)  

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Sewage management is posing serious techno-economic problems in cities, particularly in developing countries. A new technology, sewage purification by water-hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), is a possible solution. This paper studied the suitability and effectiveness of water-hyacinth in treating domestic sewage. A 28-day experiment was performed under a controlled environment of a screen-house subjected to natural conditions. Several parameters were measured and analysed, including the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), faecal coliform count, nitrate and phosphate contents, pH value, heavy metals, turbidity, odour and colour at intervals of seven days. Laboratory analyses indicated that the water-hyacinth culture drastically reduced the faecal coliforms by about 80%. BOD dropped from 900 to 460 mg litre?1. COD was reduced from 1,424 to 766 mg litre?1 while the nitrogen content increased by about 77.5% and the phosphorus content rose by 63.3%. The pH value fell slightly from 8.58 to 7.81. The initial pungent odour of the raw sewage gradually disappeared during the purification period while the deep yellowish colour turned almost colourless in the final effluent sample. The sludge from the culture was rich and applicable as a bio-fertiliser. After comparison with the World Health Organisation Stream Standards, it was determined that the final effluent from water-hyacinth could be used for irrigation and fishing activities, or recycled to a flowing stream for other uses except for drinking purposes.

G.A. Alade; S.O. Ojoawo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Mentum deformities in Chironomidae communities as indicators of anthropogenic impacts in Swartkops River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Swartkops River is located in Eastern Cape of South Africa and drains a heavily industrialised catchment and has suffered deterioration in water quality due to pollution. Water quality impairment in the Swartkops River has impacted on its biota. Deformities in the mouth parts of larval Chironomidae, particularly of the mentum, represent sub-lethal effects of exposure to pollutants, and were therefore employed as indictors of pollution in the Swartkops River. Chironomid larvae were collected using the South African Scoring System version 5 (SASS5) protocol. A total of 4838 larvae, representing 26 taxa from four sampling sites during four seasons were screened for mentum deformities. The community incidences of mentum deformity were consistently higher than 8% at Sites 24, indicating pollution stress in the river. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) conducted on arcsine transformed data revealed that the mean community incidence of mentum deformity was significantly higher (p0.05) between seasons across sites. Severe deformities were consistently higher at Site 3. Strong correlations were found between deformity indices and the concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), total inorganic nitrogen (TIN), orthophosphatephosphorus (PO4P), electrical conductivity (EC) and turbidity.

O.N. Odume; W.J. Muller; C.G. Palmer; F.O. Arimoro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Predicting stream water quality using artificial neural networks (ANN)  

SciTech Connect

Predicting point and nonpoint source runoff of dissolved and suspended materials into their receiving streams is important to protecting water quality and traditionally has been modeled using deterministic or statistical methods. The purpose of this study was to predict water quality in small streams using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The selected input variables were local precipitation, stream flow rates and turbidity for the initial prediction of suspended solids in the stream. A single hidden-layer feedforward neural network using backpropagation learning algorithms was developed with a detailed analysis of model design of those factors affecting successful implementation of the model. All features of a feedforward neural model were investigated including training set creation, number and layers of neurons, neural activation functions, and backpropagation algorithms. Least-squares regression was used to compare model predictions with test data sets. Most of the model configurations offered excellent predictive capabilities. Using either the logistic or the hyperbolic tangent neural activation function did not significantly affect predicted results. This was also true for the two learning algorithms tested, the Levenberg-Marquardt and Polak-Ribiere conjugate-gradient descent methods. The most important step during model development and training was the representative selection of data records for training of the model.

Bowers, J.A.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

Reservoir description of a sand-rich submarine fan complex for a steamflood project: upper Miocene Potter sandstone, North Midway Sunset field, California  

SciTech Connect

Nearly 650 m of cores from the upper Miocene Potter sandstone in Mobil's Alberta/Shale property, North Midway Sunset field, California, were examined to determine depositional facies, sand-body geometry, and reservoir quality for a proposed steamflood project. The Potter represents a sand-rich submarine fan complex with braided-channel, meandering-channel, levee, and crevasse-splay facies. The braided-channel facies (gravel and coarse sand) is thick (up to 100 m), sheetlike (> 500 m wide), and highly permeable (10,000 + md). The meandering-channel facies (coarse to medium sand) is up to 20 m thick, over 400 m long, lenticular in geometry, and exhibits an upward decrease in permeability (e.g., 9000 to 500 md) related to grain size that fines upward. The levee facies (in bioturbated sand) is up to 21 m thick, shows variable geometry, and is generally low in permeability (100-1500 md). The crevasse splay (medium sand) is up to 12 m thick, sheetlike (> 300 m wide), and shows moderately high permeability (2000-8000 md). The braided-channel facies was a product of density-modified grain flows, and the remaining three facies were deposited by turbidity currents. Steam flooding of the Potter reservoir should perform extremely well because the entire reservoir is composed of relatively clean sand and the reservoir lacks both horizontal and vertical permeability barriers.

Shanmugam, G.; Clayton, C.A.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The contribution by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) on the depositional processes of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group (Formation) in Arkansas and Oklahoma highlights a few important processes that are often overlooked. Their work on the fabric of some high-density flow deposits is interesting in light of the debate over the nature of these types of deposits (Lowe, 1982; Hiscott, 1994). However, we disagree with some of the observations and interpretations they use in making their argument for a new depositional model, and submit that (1) turbidity current deposits (turbidites) are a major lithofacies component in the DeGray Spillway cut is not difficult, and (4) because it is not necessary to preserve conventional dogma, a change in nomenclature is more appropriate than a change in depositional models. Finally, their call for application of their debris-flow model to the North Sea, Gulf of Mexico, offshore Nigeria, and elsewhere is disturbing because they would have the petroleum industry relinquish the idea of predictability in deep-water reservoirs.

Bouma, A.H. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); DeVries, M.B. [Exxon Company, Houston, TX (United States); Stone, C.G. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Submarine-fan sedimentation, Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

More than 10,000 m (32,808 ft) of interbedded sandstones and shales comprise the Upper Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian flysch succession (Stanley, Jackfork, Johns Valley, Atoka) in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma. Deposited primarily by turbidity current and hemipelagic processes in bathyal and abyssal water depths, these strata formed major submarine-fan complexes that prograded in a westward direction along the axis of an elongate remnant ocean basin that was associated with the collision and suturing of the North American and African-South American plates. A longitudinal fan system is visualized as the depositional framework for these strata, which were deposited in a setting analogous to the modern Bengal fan of the Indian Ocean. Facies analysis of the Jackfork formation indicates that inner fan deposits are present in the vicinity of Little Rock, Arkansas; middle fan channel and interchannel deposits occur at DeGray Dam and Friendship, Arkansas; and outer fan depositional-lobe deposits are present in southeastern Oklahoma. Boulder-bearing units (olistostromes), many with exotic clasts, were shed laterally into the Ouachita basin. They occur throughout the flysch succession and in all fan environments (i.e., inner, middle, and outer). This relationship may serve as a useful criterion for recognizing analogous longitudinal fan systems in the rock record.

Moiola, R.J.; Shanmugam, G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Solar disinfection of wild Salmonella sp. in natural water with a 18L CPC photoreactor: Detrimental effect of non-sterile storage of treated water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the first time solar disinfection of liters of water containing wild Salmonella sp. and total coliforms was carried out in a compound parabolic collector (CPC) photoreactor at temperatures of almost 50C. Using surface water with high turbidity, this treatment was efficient in completely inactivating Salmonella sp. without regrowth during the subsequent 72h of dark sterile storage. However if the solar treated water is poured in a non- sterile container, bacteria regrowth occurs even if 10mgL?1 of H2O2 is added before the storage. On the other hand, 30mgL?1 of H2O2 added when the irradiation started was completely depleted within 2 h and did not prevent bacterial regrowth during post-irradiation storage in non-sterile containers, demonstrating that storage of large volumes of water treated by solar irradiation was not optimal. Finally, total coliforms (Escherichia coli included) showed a far higher sensitivity than Salmonella sp. and demonstrated to be an inappropriate indicator for monitoring bacterial contamination in water during solar disinfection processes.

Frdric Sciacca; Julin A. Rengifo-Herrera; Joseph Wth; Csar Pulgarin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Deposition and diagenesis of a cratonic Silurian platform reef, Pipe Creek Jr. , Indiana  

SciTech Connect

Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Pipe Creek Jr. paragenesis record the stratigraphic and burial evolution of the cratonic Silurian platform of Indiana during Late Silurian to Pennsylvanian. A variety of several diagenetic fluids acting over geological time affected the reef. The paragenetic sequence is as follows: (1) precipitation of turbid, fibrous, blotchy cathodoluminescent (CL) cement; (2) dolomitization of mud-rich facies; (3) precipitation of clear, zoned CL equant calcite cements; (4) fracturing and karst formation, partially filled by geopetal silt and sandstone; (5) precipitation of clear, dull CL, ferroan to nonferroan equant calcite cement, ferroan dolomite overgrowth and equant dolomite cement in moldic porosity, caves and fractures; (6) microdissolution and hydrocarbon emplacement; and (7) stylolitization. The New Albany Shale was both the hydrocarbon source and top seal to the fossil Pipe Creek Jr. oil field with original oil in place estimated at 11 million bbl. The level of organic metamorphism of the New Albany Shale, the oil residue, and the two-phase fluid inclusions in the burial cements suggest that sediments accumulated on the platform throughout Mississippian time.

Simo, A.; Lehmann, P.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Deposition and diagenesis of a cratonic Silurian platform reef, Pipe Creek Jr. , Indiana  

SciTech Connect

Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Pipe Creek Jr. paragenesis record the stratigraphic and burial evolution of the cratonic Silurian platform of Indiana during Late Silurian to Pennsylvanian. A variety of several diagenetic fluids acting over geological time affected the reef. The paragenetic sequence is as follows: (1) precipitation of turbid, fibrous, blotchy cathodoluminescent (CL) cement; (2) dolomitization of mud-rich facies; (3) precipitation of clear, zoned CL equant calcite cements; (4) fracturing and karst formation, partially filled by geopetal silt and sandstone; (5) precipitation of clear, dull CL, ferroan to nonferroan equant calcite cement, ferroan dolomite overgrowth and equant dolomite cement in moldic porosity, caves and fractures; (6) microdissolution and hydrocarbon emplacement; and (7) stylolitization. Carbonate grew and fibrous cements precipitated in an open marine environment. During Late Silurian an increasingly restricted environment stopped reef growth and dolomite replaced mud-rich faces. The reefs were then subaerially exposed and two meteoric cement sequences, non-luminescent to bright luminescent, precipitated prior to Mid-Devonian fracture-controlled karsting. Caves and fractures crosscut former cement stages and were filled by sandstones. Later, the platform was buried by the late Mid-Devonian organic-rich New Albany Shale, and clear, dull CL calcite cement and ferroan dolomite precipitated. Hydrocarbon migration postdates all cements and created minor moldic porosity and predates stylolitization.

Simo, A.; Lehmann, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A review of validation methodologies and statistical performance indicators for modeled solar radiation data: Towards a better bankability of solar projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the context of the current rapid development of large-scale solar power projects, the accuracy of the modeled radiation datasets regularly used by many different interest groups is of the utmost importance. This process requires careful validation, normally against high-quality measurements. Some guidelines for a successful validation are reviewed here, not just from the standpoint of solar scientists but also of non-experts with limited knowledge of radiometry or solar radiation modeling. Hence, validation results and performance metrics are reported as comprehensively as possible. The relationship between a desirable lower uncertainty in solar radiation data, lower financial risks, and ultimately better bankability of large-scale solar projects is discussed. A description and discussion of the performance indicators that can or should be used in the radiation model validation studies are developed here. Whereas most indicators are summary statistics that attempt to synthesize the overall performance of a model with only one number, the practical interest of more elaborate metrics, particularly those derived from the KolmogorovSmirnov test, is discussed. Moreover, the important potential of visual indicators is also demonstrated. An example of application provides a complete performance analysis of the predictions of clear-sky direct normal irradiance obtained with six models of the literature at Tamanrasset, Algeria, where high-turbidity conditions are frequent.

Christian A. Gueymard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

An efficient strategy for the inversion of bidirectional reflectance models with satellite remote sensing data  

SciTech Connect

The angular distribution of radiation scattered by the earth surface contains information on the structural and optical properties of the surface. Potentially, this information may be retrieved through the inversion of surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models. This report details the limitations and efficient application of BRDF model inversions using data from ground- and satellite-based sensors. A turbid medium BRDF model, based on the discrete ordinates solution to the transport equation, was used to quantify the sensitivity of top-of-canopy reflectance to vegetation and soil parameters. Results were used to define parameter sets for inversions. Using synthetic reflectance values, the invertibility of the model was investigated for different optimization algorithms, surface and sampling conditions. Inversions were also conducted with field data from a ground-based radiometer. First, a soil BRDF model was inverted for different soil and sampling conditions. A condition-invariant solution was determined and used as the lower boundary condition in canopy model inversions. Finally, a scheme was developed to improve the speed and accuracy of inversions.

Privette, J.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

The effect of heavy metals on the activated sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of heavy metal shock loading on biological treatment systems was studied by traditional methods and molecular biological techniques. Two kinds of SBR (sequence batch reactor) operation units, unacclimated and acclimated activated sludge systems, were studied. The addition of special nutrients and powdered activated carbon (PAC) to stimulate heavy metal uptake and recovery were studied. The kinetic constants could be used to describe the effect of the inhibition of substance utilisation. The results showed that heavy metal shock loading had a greater effect on the unacclimated activated sludge system than on the acclimated one. The special nutrients greatly enhanced the uptake of copper, and the PAC improved sludge settling and decreased the turbidity of the effluent. The variation of dominant species and the diversity of the bacterial community were analysed using 16S ribosomal DNA. Compared with the slight change of dominant species during acclimation by copper, there was a great change in the acclimated system shocked by a high concentration of copper. The results confirmed that the acclimation could improve the resistance of microorganisms to heavy metal toxicity.

B. Xie; K.S. Kang; E. Nakamura; K. Itoh

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Innovative sludge stabilization method  

SciTech Connect

Sludge is generated in many water and wastewater treatment processes, both biological and physical/chemical. Examples include biological sludges from sanitary and industrial wastewater treatment operations and chemical sludges such as those produced when metals are removed from metal plating wastewater. Even some potable water plants produce sludge, such as when alum is used as a flocculating agent to clarify turbid water. Because sludge is produced from such a variety of operations, different techniques have been developed to remove water from sludges and reduce the sludge volume and mass, thus making the sludge more suitable for recovery or disposal. These techniques include mechanical (e.g., filter presses), solar (sludge drying beds), and thermal. The least expensive of these methods, neglecting land costs, involves sludge drying beds and lagoons. The solar method was widely used in sewage treatment plants for many years, but has fallen in disfavor in the US; mechanical and thermal methods have been preferred. Since environmental remediation often requires managing sludges, this article presents a discussion of a variation of sludge lagoons known as evaporative sludge stabilization. Application of this process to the closure of two 2.5 acre (10117 m{sup 2}) hazardous waste surface impoundments will be discussed. 1 ref., 2 figs.

Riggenbach, J.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Projected Performance of Three- and Four-Junction Devices Using GaAs and GaInP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the efficiencies expected for three- and four-junction devices for both space and terrestrial applications. For space applications, the effects of temperature and low concentration are investigated. For terrestrial applications, a concentration of 500 suns is assumed and the theoretical efficiencies are calculated as a function of spectral variations including the effects of air mass, turbidity, and water-vapor content. INTRODUCTION Ga 0.5 In 0.5 P/GaAs two-terminal, two-junction solar cells, invented and developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, are in production at both TECSTAR and Spectrolab. The immediate market for these devices is in space; a future (potentially larger) market is terrestrial concentrator systems. The next-generation cells will add additional junction(s) in order to increase the efficiency. Work on a three-junction cell using an active Ge junction under the Ga 0.5 In 0.5 P/GaAs dual-junction cell has already been reported [1]. Ho...

Gainp; S. R. Kurtz; Sarah R. Kurtz; D. Myers; D. Myers; J.M. Olson; J. M. Olson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Voice of the turtle: The underwater acoustic repertoire of the long-necked freshwater turtle, Chelodina oblonga  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chelodina oblonga is a long-necked freshwater turtle found predominantly in the wetlands on the Swan Coastal Plain of Western Australia. Turtles from three populations were recorded in artificial environments set up to simulate small wetlands. Recordings were undertaken from dawn to midnight. A vocal repertoire of 17 categories was described for these animals with calls consisting of both complex and percussive spectral structures. Vocalizations included clacks clicks squawks hoots short chirps high short chirps medium chirps long chirps high calls cries or wails hooos grunts growls blow bursts staccatos a wild howl and drum rolling. Also a sustained vocalization was recorded during the breeding months consisting of pulse sequences that finished rhythmically. This was hypothesized to function as an acoustic advertisement display. Chelodina oblonga often lives in environments where visibility is restricted due to habitat complexity or poor light transmission due to tannin-staining or turbidity. Thus the use of sound by turtles may be an important communication medium over distances beyond their visual range. This study reports the first records of an underwater acoustic repertoire in an aquatic chelonian.

Jacqueline C. Giles; Jenny A. Davis; Robert D. McCauley; Gerald Kuchling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Conformational changes in polyelectrolytes and the effect on metal binding  

SciTech Connect

There has been considerable interest in the complexation of metals and other cations by natural humic and fulvic acids, as well as synthetic polyelectrolytes. In order to explain the binding observed for metals, and other species by organic polyelectrolytes, steric effects have been proposed. In this work, the effects of pH changes in aqueous solution on two synthetic polyelectrolytes, polymaleic acid (PMA) and polyacrylic acid (PAA), have been examined by laser Raman spectroscopy and turbidity measurements. These results are compared to Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and (/sup 13/C) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra for solid samples of PMA, PAA, and fulvic and humic acids. Two types of carboxylic acid groups were detected for PMA in aqueous solution. Crystallization of PMA in a narrow pH range was observed. These data are consistent with strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding occurring in PMA at a pH of approximately 4. This implication of these results on the use of these compounds as models for fulvic and humic acids is discussed. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Marley, N.A.; Gaffney, J.S.; Minai, Y.; Choppin, G.R.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Freeze-dried snake antivenoms formulated with sorbitol, sucrose or mannitol: Comparison of their stability in an accelerated test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Freeze-drying is used to improve the long term stability of pharmaceutical proteins. Sugars and polyols have been successfully used in the stabilization of proteins. However, their use in the development of freeze-dried antivenoms has not been documented. In this work, whole IgG snake antivenom, purified from equine plasma, was formulated with different concentrations of sorbitol, sucrose or mannitol. The glass transition temperatures of frozen formulations, determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), ranged between ?13.5C and ?41C. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the different stabilizers, the freeze-dried samples were subjected to an accelerated stability test at 402C and 755% relative humidity. After six months of storage at 40C, all the formulations presented the same residual humidity, but significant differences were observed in turbidity, reconstitution time and electrophoretic pattern. Moreover, all formulations, except antivenoms freeze-dried with mannitol, exhibited the same potency for the neutralization of lethal effect of Bothrops asper venom. The 5% (w:v) sucrose formulation exhibited the best stability among the samples tested, while mannitol and sorbitol formulations turned brown. These results suggest that sucrose is a better stabilizer than mannitol and sorbitol in the formulation of freeze-dried antivenoms under the studied conditions.

Mara Herrera; Virgilio Tattini Jr.; Ronaldo N.M. Pitombo; Jos Mara Gutirrez; Camila Borgognoni; Jos Vega-Baudrit; Federico Solera; Maykel Cerdas; lvaro Segura; Mauren Villalta; Maringela Vargas; Guillermo Len

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. Critical infrastructure includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layers resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water supply managers include: monitoring turbidity levels in raw water intakes, and if necessary increasing chlorination to compensate for higher turbidity; managing water demand; and communicating monitoring results with the public to allay fears of contamination. Ash can cause major damage to wastewater disposal systems. Ash deposited onto impervious surfaces such as roads and car parks is very easily washed into storm drains, where it can form intractable masses and lead to long-term flooding problems. It can also enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), both through sewer lines and by direct fallout. Damage to modern \\{WWTPs\\} can run into millions of dollars. Ash falls reduce visibility creating hazards for ground transportation. Dry ash is also readily remobilised by vehicle traffic and wind, and dry and wet ash deposits will reduce traction on paved surfaces, including airport runways. Ash cleanup from road and airports is commonly necessary, but the large volumes make it logistically challenging. Vehicles are vulnerable to ash; it will clog filters and brake systems and abrade moving parts within engines. Lastly, modern telecommunications networks appear to be relatively resilient to volcanic ash fall. Signal attenuation and interference during ash falls has not been reported in eruptions over the past 20years, with the exception of interference from ash plume-generated lightning. However, some telecommunications equipment is vulnerable to airborne ash, in particular heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems which may become blocked from ash ingestion leading to overheating. This summary of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure provides insight into the relative vulnerability of infrastructure under a range of different ashfall scenarios. Identifying and quantifying these impacts is an essential step in building resilience within these critical systems. We have attempted to consider interdependencies between sectors in a holistic way using systems thinking. As modern society becomes increasingly complex and interdependent this

Thomas M. Wilson; Carol Stewart; Victoria Sword-Daniels; Graham S. Leonard; David M. Johnston; Jim W. Cole; Johnny Wardman; Grant Wilson; Scott T. Barnard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Light extinction in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

Laulainen, N.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Lower granite GIS data description and collection guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The Lower Granite Geographic Information System (GIS) was developed jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) Walla Walla District and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the project is to use GIS technology to analyze impacts of the drawdown mitigation option on the physical and biological environment of the Lower Granite Reservoir. The drawdown mitigation option is based on the hypothesis that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean would result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios; to accomplish this, reservoir elevations would be lowered to increase channel velocities. Altering the elevation of the reservoirs on the Snake River is expected to have a variety of impacts to the Physical environment including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gases, and turbidity. The GIS was developed to evaluate these changes and the resulting impacts on the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River, as well as other aquatic organisms and terrestrial wildlife residing in the adjacent riparian areas. The Lower Granite GIS was developed using commercial hardware and software and is supported by a commercial relational database. Much of the initial system development involved collecting and incorporating data describing the river channel characteristics, hydrologic properties, and aquatic ecology. Potentially meaningful data for the Lower Granite GIS were identified and an extensive data search was performed. Data were obtained from scientists who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The next six sections of this document describe the bathymetry, fish abundance, substrate, sediment chemistry, and channel hydrology data.

Gordon, J.L.; Evans, B.J.; Perry, E.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Slump dominated upper slope reservoir facies, Intra Qua Iboe (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria  

SciTech Connect

An integration of sedimentologic and 3D seismic data provides a basis for unraveling complex depositional processes and sand distribution of the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Nearly 3,000 feet of conventional core was examined in interpreting slump/slide/debris flow, bottom current, turbidity current, pelagic/hemipelagic, wave and tide dominated facies. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated seaward, deposition began with a turbidite channel dominated slope system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated slope system (IQI 3, the principal reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated, collapsed shelf-edge deltaic system (IQI 4). Using seismic time slices and corresponding depositional facies in the core, a sandy {open_quotes}fairway{open_quotes} has been delineated in the IQI 3. Because of differences in stacking patterns of sandy and muddy slump intervals, seismic facies show: (1) both sheet-like and mounded external forms (geometries), and (2) parallel/continuous as well as chaotic/hummocky internal reflections. In wireline logs, slump facies exhibits blocky, coarsening-up, fining-up, and serrated motifs. In the absence of conventional core, slump facies may be misinterpreted and even miscorrelated because seismic facies and log motifs of slumps and debris flows tend to mimic properties of turbidite fan deposits. The slump dominated reservoir facies is composed of unconsolidated fine-grained sand. Thickness of individual units varies from 1 to 34 feet, but amalgamated intervals reach a thickness of up to 70 feet and apparently form connected sand bodies. Porosity commonly ranges from 20 to 35%. Horizontal permeability commonly ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 md.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Slump and debris-flow dominated upper slope facies in the Cretaceous of the Norwegian and northern North Seas (61-67{degrees}N): Implications for sand distribution  

SciTech Connect

A regional sedimentological study of Cretaceous sequences in the Mid-Norway region (Norwegian Sea) and in the Agat region (Agat field area, northern North Sea) reveals that these sequences were predominantly deposited in an upper continental slope environment by slumps and debris flows. Examination of nearly 500 m of core from 14 wells shows eight distinct lithofacies: facies 1 (contorted conglomerate and pebbly sandstone) represents deposits of sandy slumps and debris flows, possibly in a channel setting; facies 2 (contorted sandstone) is the most widespread and is the product of sandy slumps and debris flows; facies 3 (contorted mudstone) indicates deposition from muddy slumps and debris flow; facies 4 (rippled sandstone) suggests bottom-current reworking; facies 5 (graded sandstone) represents turbidity-current deposits and is very rare; facies 6 (laminated mudstone) is a product of pelagic or hemipelagic deposition; facies 7 (cross-bedded sandstone) is indicative of tidal processes, and facies 8 (laminated sandstone) represents delta-front and shelf deposits. These facies and their association suggest a shelf-edge delta to upper slope environment of deposition. Existing core data document deltaic facies only in the Mid-Norway region. The proposed shelf-edge delta and upper slope model has important implications for sand distribution. (1) This model provides and alternative to the conventional submarine-fan model previously applied to these sequences. (2) Although slump and debris-flow emplaced sands are usually discontinuous and unpredictable, highly amalgamated slump and debris-flow sands may develop thick reservoirs. (3) By using the Eocene Frigg Formation as an analog, it is predicted that externally mounded seismic facies in the study area may be composed of sandy slumps and debris flows.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Lehtonen, L.R. [Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S.Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States); Straume, T.; Syvertsen, S.E.; Hodgkinson, R.J.; Skibeli, M. [Mobil Exploration Norway Inc., Stavanger (Norway)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on PIT-tagging of wild Chinook salmon parr in Idaho in 2003 and the subsequent monitoring of these fish and similarly tagged fish from Oregon. We report estimated parr-to-smolt survival and arrival timing of these fish at Lower Granite Dam, as well as interrogation data collected at several other sites throughout the Snake and Columbia River system. This research continues studies that began under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding in 1991. Results from previous study years were reported by Achord et al. (1994; 1995a,b; 1996a; 1997; 1998; 2000; 2001a,b; 2002, 2003, 2004). Goals of this ongoing study are: (1) Characterize the migration timing and estimate parr-to-smolt survival of different stocks of wild Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon smolts at Lower Granite Dam. (2) Determine whether consistent migration patterns are apparent. (3) Determine what environmental factors influence migration patterns. (4) Characterize the migration behavior and estimate survival of different wild juvenile fish stocks as they emigrate from their natal rearing areas. This study provides critical information for recovery planning, and ultimately recovery for these ESA-listed wild fish stocks. In 2003-2004, we also continued to measure water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, turbidity, water depth, and pH at five monitoring stations in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho for the Baseline Environmental Monitoring Program. These data, along with parr/smolt migration, survival, and timing data, will help to discern patterns or characteristic relationships between fish movement/survival and environmental factors.

Achord, Stephen; Hodge, Jacob M.; Sandford, Benjamin P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The impact of shrimp trawling and associated sediment resuspension in mud dominated, shallow estuaries  

SciTech Connect

To address the relative importance of shrimp trawling on seabed resuspension and bottom characteristics in shallow estuaries, a series of disturbance and monitoring experiments were conducted at a bay bottom mud site (2.5 m depth) in Galveston Bay, Texas in July 1998 and May 1999. Based on pre- and post-trawl sediment profiles of 7Be; pore water dissolved oxygen and sulfide concentration; and bulk sediment properties, it was estimated that the trawl rig, including the net, trawl doors, and tickler chain, excavate the seabed to a maximum depth of approximately 1.5 cm, with most areas displaying considerably less disturbance. Water column profile data in the turbid plume left by the trawl in these underconsolidated muds (85e90% porosity; <0.25 kPa undrained shear strength) demonstrate that suspended sediment inventories of up to 85e90 mg/cm2 are produced immediately behind the trawl net; an order of magnitude higher than pre-trawl inventories and comparable to those observed during a 9e10 m/s wind event at the study site. Plume settling and dispersion caused suspended sediment inventories to return to pre-trawl values about 14 min after trawl passage in two separate experiments, indicating particles re-settle primarily as flocs before they can be widely dispersed by local currents. As a result of the passage of the trawl rig across the seabed, shear strength of the sediment surface showed no significant increase, suggesting that bed armoring is not taking place and the trawled areas will not show an increase in critical shear stress.

Dellapenna, Timothy M.; Allison, Mead A.; Gill, Gary A.; Lehman, Ronald D.; Warnken, Kent W.

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

Xylan derivatives and their application potential Mini-review of own results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical modification of xylan is a promising path to new biopolymer ethers and esters with specific properties depending on the functional groups, the degree of substitution, and the substitution pattern. The reaction of 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan (GX) from birch with sodium monochloroacetate and 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride in aqueous sodium hydroxide/slurry medium is described. The influence of the conditions of activation on product structure and properties are discussed in some detail. Methylation of GX was investigated under completely heterogeneous conditions or starting with dissolved polymer using methyl halides as reagents in the presence of NaOH. An activation of the biopolymer has been carried out before the reaction to enhance the accessibility of the reagents. Furthermore, novel xylan esters were efficiently synthesized by conversion of the hemicellulose with furan- and pyroglutamic acid as well as ibuprofen and N,N?-carbonyldiimidazole as activating agent under homogeneous conditions in dimethyl sulfoxide. This conditions are also appropriate to synthesize novel xylan ester containing xylan-4-[N,N,N-trimethylammonium]butyrate chloride moieties. Homogeneous syntheses of xylan sulfates could be carried out in a N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)/LiCl as solvent applying sulfur trioxide complexes with DMF or pyridine. Advanced analytical techniques including NMR spectroscopy, HPLC, scanning electron microscopy, rheology, measurements of turbidity and surface tension allow description of structureproperty-relationships; selected results will be briefly discussed. Xylan esters may form spherical nanoparticles of a size down to 60nm and a narrow particle size distribution applying a simple dialysis process and may be used for drug delivery applications. For cationic xylan derivatives a wide range of applications as paper strength additives, flocculation aids, and antimicrobial agents are proposed.

Katrin Petzold-Welcke; Katrin Schwikal; Stephan Daus; Thomas Heinze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Potential hydrologic effects of developing coal and other geoenergy resources in Oregon: a review  

SciTech Connect

Geoenergy resources in Oregon, in addition to coal, include noncommercial deposits of oil shale, natural gas, and geothermal heat. Commercial quantities of natural gas were discovered at Mist in northwestern Oregon in 1979. Gas presently is being produced from five wells and additional exploratory drilling is underway. More than 2 million acres of Oregon land is under lease for petroleum and natural gas exploration, mostly in the Astoria embayment-Willamette syncline, central (Oregon) Paleozoic-Mesozoic basin, and eastern Tertiary nonmarine basin. The Cascade Range and eastern Oregon contain sizable resources of geothermal heat, of which a small part has been developed for space heating at Klamath Falls and Lakeview. Thirteen Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRA's) comprising 432,000 acres have been identified, 422,000 acres are currently leased for geothermal development. KGRA's judged to have potential for generation of electrical power are Newberry Crater, Crump Geyser, and Alvord Desert. No adverse hydrologic effects have been noted to date from coal or other geoenergy exploration or development in Oregon, and no effects are expected if federal and state regulations are adhered to. The southwestern Oregon coals would have to be mined by underground methods. Potential hydrologic impacts would be local increases in sedimentation, turbidity, and mineralization of surface and ground water. Water-quality degradation, including both thermal pollution and increased concentrations of dissolved minerals, could result from geothermal development. Other potential problems include land subsidence and consumptive use of water associated with both coal and geothermal development. 53 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Sidle, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

434

Canyon and channel networks of Peru-Chile fore arc at Arica Bight  

SciTech Connect

Canyons and channels of the Peru-Chile fore arc between 17{degree}30'S to 19{degree}30'S form a complex, integrated network revealed in SeaMARC II side-scan mosaics. The largest canyon, incised 200-600 m, is bordered by a series of sidewall slumps, producing a sinuosity that mimics subaerial meanders. The canyon courses across the Arequipa fore-arc basin floor, across a structural high and onto the middle trench slope to about 4,000 m where it disappears into a background of complex small-scale structures, From 500-2,500 m depth the canyon strikes north-south oblique to the regional slope. At 2,500 m, it abruptly turns to the southwest toward the trench axis. At this elbow, a second canyon heads on the midslope and also trends north-south until 3,500 m, where it too abruptly changes to a southwest course. A history of stream piracy analogous to subaerial systems is implied in this geometry. Tributaries join this main canyon from the landward side, forming a dendritic pattern. These channels have levees which are linked by submarine crevasse splays to sediment waves on the Arequipa basin floor. The orientation of the waves is reminiscent of bow waves from a passing ship, oblique to channel and pointing downslope, and may provide an indication of the vertical extent of passing turbidity currents. Sediments are dominantly olive gray, hemipelagic silts with sands present only immediately adjacent to the canyons. Boulders of mudstone line portions of the canyon floor. Sands are absent from the lowermost slope and trench axis, as are any indications of submarine fans. Sands may be rare in this system, with those that are present kneaded into the active margin system along the lower trench slope.

Coulbourn, W.T. (Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, Honolulu (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Small-angle neutron scattering study of structure and kinetics of temperature-induced protein gelation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phase diagram, structural evolution, and kinetics of temperature-induced protein gelation of protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) have been studied as a function of solution pH and protein concentration. The protein gelation temperature represents the onset of turbidity in the protein solution, which increases significantly with increasing pH beyond the isoelectric pH of the protein molecule. On the other hand, the gelation temperature decreases with an increase in protein concentration only in the low-protein-concentration regime and shows a small increasing trend at higher protein concentrations. The structural evolution and kinetics of protein gelation have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering. The structure of the protein molecule remains stable up to temperatures very close to the gelation temperature. On increasing the temperature above the gelation temperature, the protein solution exhibits a fractal structure, an indication of gel formation due to aggregation. The fractal dimension of the gel increases with increasing temperature, suggesting an increase in branching between the aggregates, which leads to stronger gels. The increase in both solution pH and protein concentration is found to delay the growth in the fractal structure and its saturation. The kinetics of gelation has been studied using the temperature-jump process of heating. It is found that the structure of the protein gels remains invariant after the heating time (?1min), indicating a rapid formation of gel structure within this time. The protein gels prepared through gradual and temperature-jump heating routes do not always show the same structure. In particular, at higher temperatures (e.g., 85C), while gradual heating shows a fractal structure, there is collapse of such fractal structure during temperature-jump heating.

S. Chodankar; V. K. Aswal; J. Kohlbrecher; R. Vavrin; A. G. Wagh

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

436

Geophysical exploration in the Lautertal at the Combat Maneuver Training Center, Hohenfels, Germany  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical exploration was conducted in the Lautertal at the Combat Maneuver Training Center, Hohenfels, Germany, to determine the shallow geological framework of a typical dry valley in this karstic environment. The complementary methods of electromagnetic surveying, vertical electrical soundings, and seismic refraction profiling were successful in determining the depth and configuration of the bedrock surface, the character of the unconsolidated deposits resting on the bedrock surface, and the nature of the bedrock surface. Channels and other depressions in the bedrock surface are aligned with structurally induced fractures in the bedrock. The unconsolidated deposits consist of coarse alluvium and colluvium, which are confined to these channels and other depressions, and fine-grained loam and loess, which cover most of the Lautertal. Wide ranges in the electrical and elastic parameters of the bedrock surface are indicative of carbonate rock that is highly fractured and dissolved at some locations and competent at others. Most local groundwater recharge occurs in the uplands where the Middle Kimmeridge (Delta) Member of the Maim Formation (Jurassic) is widely exposed. These carbonate rocks are known to be susceptible to dissolution along the fractures and joints; thus, they offer meteoric waters ready access to the main shallow aquifers lower in the Malm Formation. These same rocks also form the bedrock surface below many of the dry valleys, but in the Lautertal, the infiltration of meteoric waters into the subsurface is generally impeded by the surficial layer of fine-grained loam and loess, which have low hydraulic conductivity. Further, the rocks of the Middle Kimmeridge Member appear to be closely associated with the localized occurrence of turbidity in such perennial streams as the Lauterach.

Heigold, P.C.; Thompson, M.D.; Borden, H.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of Langat River estuary, Selangor  

SciTech Connect

An estuary is an area that has a free connection with the open sea and it is a dynamic semi-enclosed coastal bodies. Ex-mining, aquaculture and industrial areas in Selangor are the sources of pollutants discharged into the estuary water. Radionuclides are considered as pollutants to the estuary water. Gamma radiations emitted by natural radionuclides through their decaying process may give impact to human. The radiological effect of natural radionuclides which are {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, were explored by determining the respective activity concentrations in filtered water along the Langat estuary, Selangor. Meanwhile, in- situ water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolve oxygen (DO), salinity, total suspended solid (TSS), pH and turbidity were measured by using YSI portable multi probes meter. The activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in samples are in the range of 0.17 - 0.67 Bq/L, 0.16 - 0.97 Bq/L and 1.22 - 5.57 Bq/L respectively. On the other hand, the concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 were determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF). The thorium concentrations are between 0.17 ppm to 0.28 ppm and uranium concentrations were 0.25 ppm to 0.31 ppm. The results show activity concentrations of radionuclides are slightly high near the river estuary. The Radium Equivalent, Absorbed Dose Rate, External Hazard Index, and Annual Effective Dose of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K are also studied.

Hamzah, Zaini, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Rosli, Tengku Nurliana Tuan Mohd, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Saat, Ahmad, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Wood, Ab. Khalik, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reservoir characteristics of Lower Wilcox Sandstones, Lobo Trend, Webb and Zapata Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

To date, over 340 bcf of gas have been produced from the Lobo sandstones in the Laredo field area at depths of less than 10,000 ft (3050 m). Gas accumulation is controlled by faulting and erosional truncation. The resulting structural complexity has made accurate prediction of reservoir sandstones difficult. Cored sections display repetitive ordered sequences of sedimentary structures and textural and compositional gradations indicative of turbidity-current deposits. The reservoir sandstones were deposited as constructional channels having vertical and lateral variation from channel-fill to channel-margin to overbank deposits. Channel-fill units are 2-10 ft (0.61-3.05 m) thick and composed of AB, AE, and ABE bedsets. Channel-margin units are 1-3 ft (0.31-0.92 m) thick and contain thinner, more complete ABC, ABE and ABCE sequences. Overbank deposits consist of highly bioturbated, thinly interbedded sandstones and shales. Sandstones are feldspathic litharenites that have 15% matrix and 15% calcite cement. Porosities average 16% and permeabilities range from 0.54 to 12 md, decreasing with increased matrix, cement, and bioturbation. The channel-fill sandstones are linear, dip-trending bodies less than 3000 ft (915 m) wide, which bifurcate downdip into distributary channels. High-intensity, small-scale, soft-sediment deformation indicates the sandstones were deposited in an unstable outer-shelf to upper-slope environment. A slumped, dip-trending channel-fill interpretation for the Lobo sandstones provides a mechanism for sediment transport beyond the present downdip limits of the trend.

Henke, K.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Technical evaluation of a small-scale reverse osmosis desalination unit for domestic water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tunisian standards for drinking water tolerate a maximum Total Dissolved Salts (TDS) of 1.5 g/L. The domestic water presents usually a salinity greater than 0.5 g/L. In the last few years, several small capacity reverse osmosis desalination prototypes have been marketed. They are used to desalinate brackish water with TDS lower than 1.5 g/L. The performances of such type of RO units with respect to the Tunisia tap waters are needed. A technico-economical evaluation of small-scale (100 L/day) reverse osmosis desalination unit has been studied. Water pre-treatment is composed of three filtration operations. Water is pumped through the RO membrane with maximum pressure of 6 bars. Before use, the desalinated water is treated with UV light. The salinity and the temperature of the tested domestic water are located respectively between 0.5 and 1.3 g/L and between 12 and 29C. The pre-treatment allows eliminating all the suspension matters, as the turbidity and the Solid Density Index are reduced to zero FTU and surrounding one unit respectively. No chemicals are used in the pre-treatment, so membrane scaling can not be avoided if reject water presents a high scaling power. The supersaturation relative to calcium carbonate and gypsum were estimated for reject water. Their values indicate that the tested waters have no risk to scale the RO membrane. The recovery rate of the RO unit was evaluated vs. different operating conditions such as applied pressure, raw water TDS and water temperature. The small capacity unit was able to deliver a treated water of a 100 mg/L TDS with a conversion rate ranging between 25 and 37%. The water treatment cost was evaluated at 0.01 /L which is roughly the tenth of that of bottled table water.

H. Elfil; A. Hamed; A. Hannachi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin The Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin: Complex Depositional and Temporal Variations Across an Anaerobic Marine Basin Authors: S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks Venue: 2008 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Annual Convention and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, April 19-24, 2008 “The Geology of Mudrocks”, session chaired by S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http://www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an extensive, platform marginal, organic-rich, mudrock succession that formed along the southern and western margins of Laurussia during the Devonian and Mississippian. Studies of >35 Woodford cores reveal wide variability in facies, organic content, and mineralogy that can be related to age and paleogeographic setting. Woodford facies include silt-rich mudstones (detrital silica), siliceous mudstones (biogenic silica), calcareous mudstones, and claystones. Recent studies show that facies are partitioned between two temporally distinct successions: a Middle Devonian silt- and carbonate-rich section that is irregularly distributed across the basin, and an Upper Devonian siliceous claystone/mudstone section that is widespread and separated from underlying successions by a significant hiatus. All Woodford rocks contain mixtures of illite, kaolinite, chlorite, and mixed layer clays; total clay and chlorite abundance is lowest in distal Upper Devonian rocks. Although silica content is variable, Upper Devonian mudrocks typically contain more abundant biogenic silica, especially in distal parts of the basin, whereas Middle Devonian rocks are dominated by detrital silica. The two successions display consistent differences in depositional facies. The silt-rich Middle Devonian section is cross-laminated, locally graded, and commonly bioturbated. Upper Devonian mudrocks, by contrast, are dominated by fine-scale, parallel laminations and show no evidence of infaunal activity. These rocks also contain common conodonts, radiolarians, spore bodies, and deep-water brachiopods. The data suggest that the lower Woodford was deposited by deep water, turbid flow, whereas the upper Woodford accumulated under more distal, low energy, poorly oxygenated, hemipelagic conditions

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441

Analysis of the optical design of the NSLS-II Coherent Hard X-ray beamline  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the NSLS-II offer excellent opportunities for the development of experimental techniques exploiting x-ray coherence. Coherent light scattered by a heterogeneous sample produces a speckle pattern characteristic for the specific arrangement of the scatterers. This may vary over time, and the resultant intensity fluctuations can be measured and analyzed to provide information about the sample dynamics. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) extends the capability of dynamic light scattering to opaque and turbid samples and extends the measurements of time evolution to nanometer length scales. As a consequence XPCS became crucial in the study of dynamics in systems including, but not being limited to, colloids, polymers, complex fluids, surfaces and interfaces, phase ordering alloys, etc. In this paper we present the conceptual optical design and the theoretical performance of the Coherent Hard X-ray (CHX) beamline at NSLS-II, dedicated to XPCS and other coherent scattering techniques. For the optical design of this beamline, there is a tradeoff between the coherence needed to distinguish individual speckles and the phase acceptance (high intensity) required to measure fast dynamics with an adequate signal-to-noise level. As XPCS is a 'photon hungry' technique, the beamline optimization requires maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured intensity-intensity autocorrelation function. The degree of coherence, as measured by a two-slit (Young) experiment, is used to characterize the speckle pattern visibilities. The beamline optimization strategy consists of maximization of the on-sample intensity while keeping the degree of coherence within the 0.1-0.5 range. The resulted design deviates substantially from an ad-hoc modification of a hard x-ray beamline for XPCS measurements. The CHX beamline will permit studies of complex systems and measurements of bulk dynamics down to the microsecond time scales. In general, the 10-fold increase in brightness of the NSLS-II, compared to other sources, will allow for measurements of dynamics on time-scales that are two orders of magnitude faster than what is currently possible. We also conclude that the common approximations used in evaluating the transverse coherence length would not be sufficiently accurate for the calculation of the coherent properties of an undulator-based beamline, and a thorough beamline optimization at a low-emittance source such as the NSLS-II requires a realistic wave-front propagation analysis.

Fluerasu A.; Chubar, O.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Baltser, J.; Wiegart, Lutz; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Carlucci-Dayton, M.; Berman, L.

2011-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes  

SciTech Connect

Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx}20 % to 23%). This trend is explained by a sequence stratigraphic model which predicts progressive increase in sorting by turbidity current along the flow, as well as, quantified by a rock model that heuristically accounts for sorting. The results can be applied to improve quantitative predication of sediment parameters from seismic impedance, away from well locations.

Department of Geophysics

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

INITIAL TEST WELL CONDITIONING AT NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

Three test wells, PB-1, PB-2, and PB-3, were drilled at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a natural analogue study to evaluate radionuclide transport processes during March-April 2003. The initial pumping to condition the wells was completed during December 2003. The PB-1 well, drilled immediately adjacent to the Nopal I ore body, was continuously cored to a depth of 250 m, terminating 20 m below the top of the measured water level. The PB-2 and PB-3 wells, which were drilled on opposite sides of PB-1 at a radial distance of approximately 40 to 50 m outside of the remaining projected ore body, were also drilled to about 20 m below the top of the measured water level. Each test well was completed with 4-inch (10.2-cm) diameter PVC casing with a slotted liner below the water table. Initial conditioning of all three wells using a submersible pump at low pump rates [less than 1 gallon (3.8 1) per minute] resulted in measurable draw down and recoveries. The greatest drawdown ({approx}15 m) was observed in PB-2, whereas only minor (<1 m) drawdown occurred in PB-3. For PB-1 and PB-2, the water turbidity decreased as the wells were pumped and the pH values decreased, indicating that the contamination from the drilling fluid was reduced as the wells were conditioned. Test wells PB-1 and PB-2 showed increased inflow after several borehole volumes of fluid were removed, but their inflow rates remained less that the pumping rate. Test well PB-3 showed the smallest drawdown and least change in pH and conductivity during initial pumping and quickest recovery with a rise in measured water level after conditioning. The 195 gallons (750 l) of water pumped from PB-3 during conditioning was discharged through a household sponge. That sponge showed measurable gamma radiation, which decayed to background values in less than 12 hours. Preliminary interpretations include filtration of a radioisotope source with a short half-life or of a radioisotope that volatized as the sponge dried, such as Rn-222 and its short-lived daughters. No filtration was used during the pumping of PB-1 or PB-2.

R.D. Oliver; J.C. Dinsmoor; S.J. Goldstein; I. Reyes; R. De La Garza

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

444

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.  

SciTech Connect

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality issues including dissolved oxygen and/or turbidity. Regardless, angler fishing experience was the highest at Lake Billy Shaw. Trout in Mountain View Reservoir were in the best condition of the three reservoirs and anglers reported very good fishing there. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) remain the main limiting factors in the fisheries, particularly in late August to early September.

Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami  

SciTech Connect

The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the submarine debris speed can be faster than the tsunami speed. This information can be useful for early warning strategies in the coastal regions. These findings substantially increase our understanding of complex multi-phase systems and multi-physics and flows, and allows for the proper modeling of landslide and debris induced tsunami, the dynamics of turbidity currents and sediment transport, and the associated applications to hazard mitigation, geomorphology and sedimentology.

Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A. [Department of Geodynamics and Geophysics, Steinmann Institute, University of Bonn Nussallee 8, D-53115, Bonn (Germany)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

446

Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques  

SciTech Connect

To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" 6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:12:12 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP31","MTTIPP3PG1","MTTIP_R30-ME0_1","MTTIPP3AG1","MTTIPP3AO1","MTTIPP3EC1","MTTIP_R30-NIZ_1","MTTIPP3KU1","MTTIP_R30-NLY_1","MTTIPP3NI1","MTTIP_R30-NQA_1","MTTIPP3SA1","MTTIPP3TC1","MTTIPP3VE1","MTTIPP3VV1","MTTIP_R30-NAL_1","MTTIPP3AR1","MTTIP_R30-NAA_1","MTTIPP3AS1","MTTIP_R30-NAU_1","MTTIP_R30-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R30-NBF_1","MTTIP_R30-NBA_1","MTTIP_R30-NBO_1","MTTIPP3BE1","MTTIP_R30-NBH_1","MTTIP_R30-NBN_1","MTTIP_R30-NBL_1","MTTIP_R30-NBR_1","MTTIP_R30-NBX_1","MTTIP_R30-NBU_1","MTTIP_R30-NBM_1","MTTIP_R30-NCM_1","MTTIPP3CA1","MTTIP_R30-NCD_1","MTTIP_R30-NCI_1","MTTIP_R30-NCH_1","MTTIPP3CO1","MTTIPP3CF1","MTTIPP3CG1","MTTIP_R30-NCW_1","MTTIP_R30-NCS_1","MTTIP_R30-NHR_1","MTTIP_R30-NCY_1","MTTIP_R30-NCZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NDA_1","MTTIPP3EG1","MTTIP_R30-NES_1","MTTIP_R30-NEK_1","MTTIP_R30-NEN_1","MTTIP_R30-NFI_1","MTTIPP3FR1","MTTIPP3GB1","MTTIP_R30-NGG_1","MTTIP_R30-NGM_1","MTTIP_R30-NGH_1","MTTIP_R30-NGR_1","MTTIP_R30-NGT_1","MTTIP_R30-NGV_1","MTTIP_R30-NHU_1","MTTIP_R30-NIN_1","MTTIPP3ID1","MTTIP_R30-NEI_1","MTTIP_R30-NIS_1","MTTIPP3IT1","MTTIP_R30-NIV_1","MTTIP_R30-NJM_1","MTTIP_R30-NJA_1","MTTIP_R30-NKZ_1","MTTIPP3KS1","MTTIP_R30-NKG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLI_1","MTTIP_R30-NLH_1","MTTIP_R30-NMY_1","MTTIP_R30-NMT_1","MTTIP_R30-NMR_1","MTTIPP3MX1","MTTIP_R30-NMQ_1","MTTIP_R30-NMO_1","MTTIP_R30-NNL_1","MTTIPP3NA1","MTTIP_R30-NNZ_1","MTTIPP3NO1","MTTIP_R30-NMU_1","MTTIP_R30-NPK_1","MTTIP_R30-NPM_1","MTTIP_R30-NPP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPE_1","MTTIP_R30-NRP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPL_1","MTTIP_R30-NPO_1","MTTIP_R30-NPZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NRO_1","MTTIP_R30-NRS_1","MTTIP_R30-NSN_1","MTTIP_R30-NSK_1","MTTIP_R30-NSF_1","MTTIPP3SP1","MTTIPP3SW1","MTTIP_R30-NSZ_1","MTTIPP3SY1","MTTIP_R30-NTW_1","MTTIPP3TH1","MTTIP_R30-NTO_1","MTTIPP3TD1","MTTIP_R30-NTS_1","MTTIP_R30-NTU_1","MTTIP_R30-NTX_1","MTTIP_R30-NUR_1","MTTIPP3UK1","MTTIP_R30-NUY_1","MTTIP_R30-NUZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NVM_1","MTTIPP3VQ1","MTTIPP3YE1"

448

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:03:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIP_R10-NMR_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"

449

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:02:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIP_R10-NTN_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"

450

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

98,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 98,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r50_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r50_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:20:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Coast (PADD 5) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP51","MTTIPP5PG1","MTTIP_R50-ME0_1","MTTIP_R50-NAG_1","MTTIP_R50-NAO_1","MTTIPP5EC1","MTTIP_R50-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NKU_1","MTTIP_R50-NLY_1","MTTIP_R50-NNI_1","MTTIP_R50-NQA_1","MTTIPP5SA1","MTTIP_R50-NTC_1","MTTIPP5VE1","MTTIPP5VV1","MTTIPP5AR1","MTTIP_R50-NAA_1","MTTIPP5AS1","MTTIP_R50-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R50-NBF_1","MTTIP_R50-NBA_1","MTTIP_R50-NBO_1","MTTIP_R50-NBE_1","MTTIP_R50-NBN_1","MTTIP_R50-NBL_1","MTTIP_R50-NBR_1","MTTIP_R50-NBX_1","MTTIP_R50-NCM_1","MTTIPP5CA1","MTTIP_R50-NCD_1","MTTIP_R50-NCI_1","MTTIPP5CH1","MTTIPP5CO1","MTTIPP5CF1","MTTIP_R50-NCG_1","MTTIP_R50-NCS_1","MTTIP_R50-NHR_1","MTTIP_R50-NDA_1","MTTIP_R50-NDR_1","MTTIP_R50-NEG_1","MTTIP_R50-NES_1","MTTIP_R50-NEK_1","MTTIP_R50-NEN_1","MTTIP_R50-NFI_1","MTTIP_R50-NFR_1","MTTIP_R50-NGB_1","MTTIP_R50-NGM_1","MTTIP_R50-NGR_1","MTTIP_R50-NGT_1","MTTIP_R50-NGV_1","MTTIP_R50-NHK_1","MTTIP_R50-NHU_1","MTTIP_R50-NIN_1","MTTIPP5ID1","MTTIP_R50-NIS_1","MTTIP_R50-NIT_1","MTTIP_R50-NIV_1","MTTIP_R50-NJM_1","MTTIP_R50-NJA_1","MTTIP_R50-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NKS_1","MTTIP_R50-NLH_1","MTTIP_R50-NMY_1","MTTIP_R50-NMT_1","MTTIPP5MX1","MTTIP_R50-NMO_1","MTTIP_R50-NNL_1","MTTIP_R50-NNA_1","MTTIP_R50-NNZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NNU_1","MTTIP_R50-NNO_1","MTTIP_R50-NMU_1","MTTIP_R50-NPM_1","MTTIP_R50-NPP_1","MTTIPP5PE1","MTTIP_R50-NRP_1","MTTIP_R50-NPL_1","MTTIP_R50-NPO_1","MTTIP_R50-NRO_1","MTTIP_R50-NRS_1","MTTIPP5SN1","MTTIP_R50-NSF_1","MTTIP_R50-NSP_1","MTTIP_R50-NPG_1","MTTIP_R50-NSW_1","MTTIP_R50-NSY_1","MTTIP_R50-NTW_1","MTTIP_R50-NTH_1","MTTIP_R50-NTD_1","MTTIP_R50-NTS_1","MTTIP_R50-NTU_1","MTTIP_R50-NTX_1","MTTIP_R50-NUR_1","MTTIPP5UK1","MTTIP_R50-NUY_1","MTTIP_R50-NVM_1","MTTIPP5VQ1","MTTIP_R50-NYE_1"

451

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:11:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP31","MTTIPP3PG1","MTTIP_R30-ME0_1","MTTIPP3AG1","MTTIPP3AO1","MTTIPP3EC1","MTTIP_R30-NIZ_1","MTTIPP3KU1","MTTIP_R30-NLY_1","MTTIPP3NI1","MTTIP_R30-NQA_1","MTTIPP3SA1","MTTIPP3TC1","MTTIPP3VE1","MTTIPP3VV1","MTTIP_R30-NAL_1","MTTIPP3AR1","MTTIP_R30-NAA_1","MTTIPP3AS1","MTTIP_R30-NAU_1","MTTIP_R30-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R30-NBF_1","MTTIP_R30-NBA_1","MTTIP_R30-NBO_1","MTTIPP3BE1","MTTIP_R30-NBH_1","MTTIP_R30-NBN_1","MTTIP_R30-NBL_1","MTTIP_R30-NBR_1","MTTIP_R30-NBX_1","MTTIP_R30-NBU_1","MTTIP_R30-NBM_1","MTTIP_R30-NCM_1","MTTIPP3CA1","MTTIP_R30-NCD_1","MTTIP_R30-NCI_1","MTTIP_R30-NCH_1","MTTIPP3CO1","MTTIPP3CF1","MTTIPP3CG1","MTTIP_R30-NCW_1","MTTIP_R30-NCS_1","MTTIP_R30-NHR_1","MTTIP_R30-NCY_1","MTTIP_R30-NCZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NDA_1","MTTIPP3EG1","MTTIP_R30-NES_1","MTTIP_R30-NEK_1","MTTIP_R30-NEN_1","MTTIP_R30-NFI_1","MTTIPP3FR1","MTTIPP3GB1","MTTIP_R30-NGG_1","MTTIP_R30-NGM_1","MTTIP_R30-NGH_1","MTTIP_R30-NGR_1","MTTIP_R30-NGT_1","MTTIP_R30-NGV_1","MTTIP_R30-NHU_1","MTTIP_R30-NIN_1","MTTIPP3ID1","MTTIP_R30-NEI_1","MTTIP_R30-NIS_1","MTTIPP3IT1","MTTIP_R30-NIV_1","MTTIP_R30-NJM_1","MTTIP_R30-NJA_1","MTTIP_R30-NKZ_1","MTTIPP3KS1","MTTIP_R30-NKG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLI_1","MTTIP_R30-NLH_1","MTTIP_R30-NMY_1","MTTIP_R30-NMT_1","MTTIP_R30-NMR_1","MTTIPP3MX1","MTTIP_R30-NMQ_1","MTTIP_R30-NMO_1","MTTIP_R30-NNL_1","MTTIPP3NA1","MTTIP_R30-NNZ_1","MTTIPP3NO1","MTTIP_R30-NMU_1","MTTIP_R30-NPK_1","MTTIP_R30-NPM_1","MTTIP_R30-NPP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPE_1","MTTIP_R30-NRP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPL_1","MTTIP_R30-NPO_1","MTTIP_R30-NPZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NRO_1","MTTIP_R30-NRS_1","MTTIP_R30-NSN_1","MTTIP_R30-NSK_1","MTTIP_R30-NSF_1","MTTIPP3SP1","MTTIPP3SW1","MTTIP_R30-NSZ_1","MTTIPP3SY1","MTTIP_R30-NTW_1","MTTIPP3TH1","MTTIP_R30-NTO_1","MTTIP_R30-NTN_1","MTTIPP3TD1","MTTIP_R30-NTS_1","MTTIP_R30-NTU_1","MTTIP_R30-NTX_1","MTTIP_R30-NUR_1","MTTIPP3UK1","MTTIP_R30-NUY_1","MTTIP_R30-NUZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NVM_1","MTTIPP3VQ1","MTTIPP3YE1"

452

Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria, the following constituent list and sampling schedule is proposed: Constituent; Sampling Frequency Site-Specific Parameters; Hexavalent chromium (a); Semiannual Chloride; Semiannual Fluoride; Semiannual Nitrate; Semiannual Nitrite; Semiannual Specific conductance (field)(a); Semiannual Ancillary Parameters; Anions; Annual Alkalinity Annual Metals, (in addition to chromium); Annual pH (field) Semiannual Temperature (field); Semiannual Turbidity (field) Semiannual (a). These constituents will be subject to statistical tests after background is established. It will be necessary to install new monitoring wells and accumulate background data on the groundwater from those wells before statistical comparisons can be made. Until then, the constituents listed above will be evaluated by tracking and trending concentrations in all wells and comparing these results with the corresponding DWS or Hanford Site background concentration for each constituent. If a comparison value (background or DWS) for a constituent is exceeded, DOE will notify Ecology per WAC 173-303-645 (9) (g) requirements (within seven days or a time agreed to between DOE and Ecology).

Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

453

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Prior to 1992, decisions on dam operations and use of stored water relied on recoveries of branded hatchery fish, index counts at traps and dams, and flow patterns at the dams. The advent of PIT-tag technology provided the opportunity to precisely track the smolt migrations of many wild stocks as they pass through the hydroelectric complex and other monitoring sites on their way to the ocean. With the availability of the PIT tag, a more complete approach to these decisions was undertaken starting in 1992 with the addition of PIT-tag detections of several wild spring and summer chinook salmon stocks at Lower Granite Dam. Using data from these detections, we initiated development of a database on wild fish, addressing several goals of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning Council and Conservation Act (NPPC 1980). Section 304(d) of the program states, ''The monitoring program will provide information on the migrational characteristics of the various stocks of salmon and steelhead within the Columbia Basin.'' Further, Section 201(b) urges conservation of genetic diversity, which will be possible only if wild stocks are preserved. Section 5.9A.1 of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program states that field monitoring of smolt movement will be used to determine the best timing for water storage releases and Section 5.8A.8 states that continued research is needed on survival of juvenile wild fish before they reach the first dam with special attention to water quantity, quality, and several other factors. The goals of this ongoing study are as follows (1) Characterize the migration timing and estimate parr-to-smolt survival of different stocks of wild Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon smolts at Lower Granite Dam. (2) Determine whether consistent migration patterns are apparent. (3) Determine what environmental factors influence these patterns. (4) Characterize the migrational behavior and estimate survival of different wild juvenile fish stocks as they emigrate from their natal rearing areas. This study provides critical information for recovery planning, and ultimately recovery for these ESA-listed wild fish stocks. This report provides information on PIT tagging of wild chinook salmon parr in 2002 and the subsequent monitoring of these fish. Fish were monitored as they migrated through two in-stream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek and at juvenile migrant traps in 2002 and 2003 as well as through interrogation systems at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams during 2003. Fish were also monitored by the PIT-tag trawl in the mouth of the Columbia River in 2003. In 2002-2003, we also continued to collect environmental data for the Baseline Environmental Monitoring Program, which was developed from 1993 to 1997. The project was designed to collect data for use in conjunction with data on parr and smolt movements to discern patterns or characteristic relationships between these movements and environmental factors. Water quality data collected consist of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, turbidity, water depth, and pH measured at five monitoring stations in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho.

Achord, Stephen; McNatt, Regan A.; Hockersmith, Eric E. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Geoscience Perspectives in Carbon Sequestration - Educational Training and Research Through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations  

SciTech Connect

The most effective mechanism to limit CO{sub 2} release from underground Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS) sites over multi-century time scales will be to convert the CO{sub 2} into solid carbonate minerals. This report describes the results from four independent research investigations on carbonate mineralization: 1) Colloidal calcite particles forming in Maramec Spring, Missouri, provide a natural analog to evaluate reactions that may occur in a leaking GCS site. The calcite crystals form as a result of physiochemical changes that occur as the spring water rises from a depth of more than 190'?. The resultant pressure decrease induces a loss of CO{sub 2} from the water, rise in pH, lowering of the solubility of Ca{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and calcite precipitation. Equilibrium modelling of the spring water resulted in a calculated undersaturated state with respect to calcite. The discontinuity between the observed occurrence of calcite and the model result predicting undersaturated conditions can be explained if bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) are directly involved in precipitation process rather than just carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). 2) Sedimentary rocks in the Oronto Group of the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) system contain an abundance of labile Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-silicate minerals that will neutralize carbonic acid and provide alkaline earth ions for carbonate mineralization. One of the challenges in using MCR rocks for GCS results from their low porosity and permeability. Oronto Group samples were reacted with both CO{sub 2}-saturated deionized water at 90C, and a mildly acidic leachant solution in flow-through core-flooding reactor vessels at room temperature. Resulting leachate solutions often exceeded the saturation limit for calcite. Carbonate crystals were also detected in as little as six days of reaction with Oronto Group rocks at 90oC, as well as experiments with forsterite-olivine and augite, both being common minerals this sequence. The Oronto Group samples have poor reservoir rock characteristics, none ever exceeded a permeability value of 2.0 mD even after extensive dissolution of calcite cement during the experiments. The overlying Bayfield Group Jacobsville Formation sandstones averaged 13.4 4.3% porosity and a single sample tested by core-flooding revealed a permeability of ~340 mD. The high porosity-permeability characteristics of these sandstones will allow them to be used for GCS as a continuous aquifer unit with the overlying Mt. Simon Formation. 3) Anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can enhance the conversion rate of CO{sub 2} into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage. SRB accelerated carbonate mineralization reactions between pCO{sub 2} values of 0.0059 and 14.7 psi. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for SRB metabolism. The use of a {sup 13}CO{sub 2} spiked gas source also produced carbonate minerals with ~53% of the carbon being derived from the gas phase. The sulfate reducing activity of the microbial community was limited, however, at 20 psi pCO{sub 2} and carbonate mineralization did not occur. Inhibition of bacterial metabolism may have resulted from the acidic conditions or CO{sub 2} toxicity. 4) Microbialite communities forming in the high turbidity and hypersaline water of Storrs Lake, San Salvador Island, The Bahamas, were investigated for their distribution, mineralogy and microbial diversity. Molecular analysis of the organic mats on the microbialites indicate only a trace amount of cyanobacteria, while anaerobic and photosynthetic non-sulfur bacteria of the phyla Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of class Gammaproteobacteria were abundant.

Wronkiewicz, David; Paul, Varum; Abousif, Alsedik; Ryback, Kyle

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

Kootenai River White Sturgeon Recovery Implementation Plan and Schedule; 2005-2010, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

SciTech Connect

Kootenai River white sturgeon have been declining for at least 50 years and extinction of the wild population is now imminent (Paragamian et al. 2005). Only 630 adults were estimated to remain in 2002 from a population ten times that size just 20 years ago. Significant recruitment of young sturgeon has not been observed since the early 1970s and consistent annual recruitment has not been seen since the 1950s. The remaining wild population consists of a cohort of large, old fish that is declining by about 9% per year as fish die naturally and are not replaced. At this rate, the wild population will disappear around the year 2040. Numbers have already reached critical low levels where genetic and demographic risks are acute. The Kootenai River White Sturgeon Recovery Team was convened in 1994, provided a draft Recovery Plan in 1996 and the first complete Recovery Plan for Kootenai River white sturgeon in 1999 (USFWS 1996, 1999). The Plan outlined a four part strategy for recovery, including: (1) measures to restore natural recruitment, (2) use of conservation aquaculture to prevent extinction, (3) monitoring survival and recovery, and (4) updating and revising recovery plan criteria and objectives as new information becomes available. Sturgeon recovery efforts are occurring against a backdrop of a broader ecosystem protection and restoration program for the Kootenai River ecosystem. With abundance halving time of approximately 8 years, the Kootenai River white sturgeon population is rapidly dwindling, leaving managers little time to act. Decades of study consistently indicate that recruitment failure occurs between embryo and larval stages. This assertion is based on four key observations. First, almost no recruitment has occurred during the last 30 years. Second, thousands of naturally produced white sturgeon embryos, most viable, have been collected over the past decade, resulting from an estimated 9 to 20 spawning events each year. Third, Kootenai River white sturgeon spawning has been documented during most years from 1990 through 2005. Finally, no larvae and very few wild juveniles have been collected during recent decades despite years of intensive sampling. Concurrently, post-release hatchery reared juveniles (as young as 9 months of age at release) consistently exhibit successful growth and survival (Ireland et al. 2002). Recruitment has failed, in part because fish are currently spawning at sites where or when conditions appear unsuitable for successful incubation and early rearing. Research to date suggests that recruitment failure is caused by egg or larval suffocation, predation and/or other mortality factors associated with these early life stages. A variety of interrelated factors have clearly contributed to the decline of Kootenai white sturgeon; various hypotheses for recruitment failure are not mutually exclusive. Anders et al. (2002) suggested that Kootenai River white sturgeon recruitment failure is likely the result of additive mortality from: (1) increased predation efficiencies due to low turbidity, velocity, and an relative increase in predatory fishes, (2) a reduced number of eggs produced by a dwindling spawning population, and (3) spawning in habitat lacking interstitial space (embryo suffocation). Quite simply, the combined egg and embryo mortality from all biotic and abiotic factors kills more eggs and embryos than the dwindling wild population is currently capable of producing. Thus, natural recruitment failure appears to be caused by some combination of habitat and stock limitation, by the mechanisms mentioned above. Although past research has helped narrow the range of possible causes of natural recruitment failure, the relative significance of each potential impact remains uncertain because multiple ecological, biological, and physical habitat changes occurred simultaneously. This makes it difficult to choose among competing hypotheses and difficult to know where exactly to focus recovery efforts for maximum benefit. In an ideal world, specific recovery measures would be identified and imple

Anders, Paul

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect

This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo trutta) had low densities, and limited distribution throughout the basin. A large return of adult spring chinook to the Touchet River drainage in 2001 produced higher densities of juvenile chinook in 2002 than have been seen in recent years, especially in the Wolf Fork. The adult return in 2002 was substantially less than what was seen in 2001. Due to poor water conditions and trouble getting personnel hired, spawning surveys were limited in 2002. Surveyors found only one redd in four Walla Walla River tributaries (Cottonwood Ck., East Little Walla Walla, West Little Walla Walla, and Mill Ck.), and 59 redds in Touchet River tributaries (10 in the North Fork Touchet, 30 in the South Fork Touchet, and 19 in the Wolf Fork). Bull trout spawning surveys in the upper Touchet River tributaries found a total of 125 redds and 150 live fish (92 redds and 75 fish in the Wolf Fork, 2 redds and 1 fish in the Burnt Fork, 0 redds and 1 fish in the South Fork Touchet, 29 redds and 71 fish in the North Fork Touchet, and 2 redds and 2 fish in Lewis Ck.). A preliminary steelhead genetics analysis was completed as part of this project. Results indicate differences between naturally produced steelhead and those produced in the hatchery. There were also apparent genetic differences among the naturally produced fish from different areas of the basin. Detailed results are reported in Bumgarner et al. 2003. Recommendations for assessment activities in 2003 included: (1) continue to monitor the Walla Walla River (focusing from the stateline to McDonald Rd.), the Mill Ck system, and the Little Walla Walla System. (2) reevaluate Whiskey Ck. for abundance and distribution of salmonids, and Lewis Ck. for bull trout density and distribution. (3) select or develop a habitat survey protocol and begin to conduct habitat inventory and assessment surveys. (4) summarize bull trout data for Mill Ck, South Fork Touchet, and Lewis Ck. (5) begin to evaluate temperature and flow data to assess if the habitat conditions exist for spring chinook in the Touchet River.

Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z