Sample records for ntu nephelometric turbidity

  1. Microsoft Word - 2902ntu.dot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    902-NTU (10-2004) Supersedes (6-2000) issue SNL COMPUTER BANNER Banner for all SNL Computing SF 2902-NTU (10-2004) WARNING NOTICE TO USERS This is a Federal computer system and is...

  2. English Literature Resources of NTU Library National Taiwan University Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    English Literature Resources of NTU Library National Taiwan University Library #12;MLA Inter- national Bibliography Literature Online, Early English Books Online Naxos Spoken Word Library19 7 14 15 Naxos Spoken Word Library Literature Online Literature Resource Center Shakespeare

  3. Quantifying turbidity current interactions with topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straub, Kyle M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis advances our understanding of how transport properties of turbidity currents are mediated by interactions with seafloor topography, specifically channelized surfaces. Turbidity currents are responsible for ...

  4. Wen-Hann Sheu Professor of Dept. of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, NTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Su-Yun

    Wen-Hann Sheu Position Professor of Dept. of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, NTU Research Fields Scientific computing for science and engineering problems Research Interests · Explore

  5. NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

  6. NTU Wakeboarding Handbook 2013 -14 www.facebook.com/groups/trentwakeboard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    NTU Wakeboarding Handbook 2013 - 14 www.facebook.com/groups/trentwakeboard www and let off some steam. Even if you only come to training sessions and you've never been riding, everyone

  7. NTU Library User's Guide w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    My L ve Affairwith Library NTU Library User's Guide #12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;C Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro How to find to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

  8. w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    #12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro A wonderful place to stay I want to read books... I want to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

  9. environment.team@ntu.ac.uk Reviewed and updated March 2014 NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    : ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY As one of the UK's largest Universities, encompassing three campuses, 26,000 students for the above to be achieved. NTU's Environmental Policy is fully supported by the Senior Management Team their acceptance of the Environmental Policy, are key to its success. As such, this will provide an ongoing focus

  10. Effect of Canister Movement on Water Turbidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRIMBLE, D.J.

    2000-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Requirements for evaluating the adherence characteristics of sludge on the fuel stored in the K East Basin and the effect of canister movement on basin water turbidity are documented in Briggs (1996). The results of the sludge adherence testing have been documented (Bergmann 1996). This report documents the results of the canister movement tests. The purpose of the canister movement tests was to characterize water turbidity under controlled canister movements (Briggs 1996). The tests were designed to evaluate methods for minimizing the plumes and controlling water turbidity during fuel movements leading to multi-canister overpack (MCO) loading. It was expected that the test data would provide qualitative visual information for use in the design of the fuel retrieval and water treatment systems. Video recordings of the tests were to be the only information collected.

  11. NTU Health Exam Requirement for Incoming Exchange / Visiting Students In order to understand the general health condition of coming students, and to meet the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    .ntu.edu.tw/oia/index.php/doc/view/sn/209/block/85/lang/en and bring it to the hospital. The required items are included in the "NTU: Abdomen: Heart: Oral Cavity: Others: Muscles/Bones/Joints: Visual Acuity: Uncorrected R L

  12. ATMOSPHERIC TURBIDITY DETERMINATION FROM IRRADIANCE RATIOS Chris Gueymard Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Solar Energy Center Physics Department 1679 Clearlake Rd. University of Oregon Cocoa, FL 32922 and humidity. If precipitable water is too high or too low, a too low or too high turbidity is inevitably pre, are that it is more sensitive to in- strumental error because two radiometers are involved (instead of one

  13. Estimation of atmospheric turbidity over Ghardaia city , A. Irbahb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to optimize their performances since an increase in turbidity reduces the output current of solar cells (Malik of the solar radiation that reaches the Earth's surface under cloudless sky and describes the optical thickness are obtained from data recorded between 2004 and 2008 at Gharda¨ia. The results show that both parameters have

  14. Interrelation of surface tension, optical turbidity, and color of operational transformer oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L'vov, S. Yu.; Lyut'ko, E. O.; Lankau, Ya. V.; Komarov, V. B.; Seliverstov, A. F.; Bondareva, V. N.; L'vov, Yu. N.; L'vov, M. Yu.; Ershov, B. G.

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the acidity, optical turbidity, surface tension, and color of transformer oil from 54 power transformers, autotransformers, and shunt reactors are reported. Changes in surface tension, optical turbidity, and color are found to obey adequate linear correlations, while the acidity has no correlation with any of these properties. Numerical criteria for the maximum permissible state (quality) of the oil with respect to optical turbidity and color are obtained. Recommendations to operating staff are provided for cases in which the criteria for optical turbidity and color are exceeded.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of turbidity in coastal waters from Lansat imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bright, Jon Branson

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 1977 ABSTRACT Quantitative Evaluation of Turbi. dity in Coastal Waters From Landsat Image y (December 1977) Jon Branson Bright, B. S. , Texas AhII Dniversity Directed by: Dr. Wesley P. James The purpose of this research program... that turbi tlity did not always give the same values of suspended solid' as did other methods. NcCluney (13) found nine definitions of turbidity in a search of the literature and classified them into two & roups& those based on compari. son wi. th si...

  16. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Turbidity Sensor 4112 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump to:2MHK ISDB/Sensors/Turbidity

  17. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Turbidity Sensor 4705 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump to:2MHK ISDB/Sensors/TurbidityMHK

  18. Measuring large optical reflection matrices of turbid media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hyeonseung; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the measurement of a large optical reflection matrix (RM) of a highly disordered medium. Incident optical fields onto a turbid sample are controlled by a spatial light modulator, and the corresponding fields reflected from the sample are measured using full-field Michelson interferometry. The number of modes in the measured RM is set to exceed the number of resolvable modes in the scattering media. We successfully study the subtle intrinsic correlations in the RM which agrees with the theoretical prediction by random-matrix theory when the effect of the limited numerical aperture on the eigenvalue distribution of the RM is taken into account. The possibility of the enhanced delivery of incident energy into scattering media is also examined from the eigenvalue distribution which promises efficient light therapeutic applications.

  19. Evolution of a non-cohesive granular bed subject to a succession of erosive turbidity currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangel, Roberto Carlos

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment was performed to study the evolution of a non-cohesive granular bed subject to a succession of erosive turbidity currents to evaluate the applicability of a proposed interface model that prescribes a relationship ...

  20. Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losleben, Tamar

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

  1. Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO)

    1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical imaging through turbid media is demonstrated using a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate. An apparatus and method for detecting ballistic and/or snake light while rejecting unwanted diffusive light for imaging structures within highly scattering media are described. Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in rhodamine 590 is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore has lost memory of the structures within the scattering medium. Images have been obtained of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye, which demonstrates the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic and/or snake light in optical mammography is discussed.

  2. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-85 AN ATTEMPT TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTS OF AN ANTI-TURBIDITY SYSTEM ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -TURBIDITY SYSTEM ON SEDIMENT DISPERSION FROM A HOPPER DREDGE Kisaburo Nakata . Katsuya Tsurusaki National Research. SUSPENDED SOLIDS DISPERSION MODEL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4. INTERCOMPARISON OF MODEL of an Anti-Turbidity System on Sediment Dispersion from a Hopper Dredge Kisaburo Nakatal , Katsuya Tsurusak

  3. Practical application of the "turbid water" flag in ocean color imagery: Interference with sun-glint contaminated pixels in open ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contaminated by residual sun-glint may lead to a raising of the "turbid flag" in zones where such a turbidity as such) when studying coastal zones influenced by river discharges and sediment resuspension. More

  4. Apparent and inherent optical properties of turbid estuarine waters: measurements, empirical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    constituents). Such data could significantly limit the number of costly field campaigns necessary to estab zones that are directly affected by human activities (global warming, pollution, dredg- ing of at least several years).6 To develop an operational use of ocean color remote-sensing data in turbid waters

  5. Polarized light propagation in highly scattering turbid media with a distribution of the particle size: a Monte Carlo study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Wonshill

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The light propagation in highly scattering turbid media composed of the particles with different size distribution is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation model implemented in Standard C. Monte Carlo method has been widely utilized to study...

  6. Review Of Low-Flow Bladder Pump And High-Volume Air Piston Pump Groundwater Sampling Systems At Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, S. S.; Bailey, G. A.; Jackson, T. O.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using dedicated the lowflow system, and review data for sample system affects on nitrate concentrations.

  7. Review of low-flow bladder pump and high-volume air piston pump groundwater sampling systems at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Sue S.; Jackson, Timmie Okchumpulla (Weston Solutions, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Bailey, Glenn A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using dedicated the lowflow system, and review data for sample system affects on nitrate concentrations.

  8. Turbidity current flow over an obstacle and phases of sediment wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Moshe

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the flow of particle-laden turbidity currents down a slope and over an obstacle. A high-resolution 2D computer simulation model is used, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. It includes poly-disperse particle grain sizes in the current and substrate. Particular attention is paid to the erosion and deposition of the substrate particles, including application of an active layer model. Multiple flows are modeled from a lock release that can show the development of sediment waves (SW). These are stream-wise waves that are triggered by the increasing slope on the downstream side of the obstacle. The initial obstacle is completely erased by the resuspension after a few flows leading to self consistent and self generated SW that are weakly dependant on the initial obstacle. The growth of these waves is directly related to the turbidity current being self sustaining, that is, the net erosion is more than the net deposition. Four system parameters are found to influence the SW growth: (1) slope, (2) current ...

  9. Assessing the potential of SeaWiFS and MODIS for estimating chlorophyll concentration in turbid productive waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitelson, Anatoly

    purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which near-infrared (NIR) to red reflectance ratios productive waters using red and near-infrared bands Giorgio Dall'Olmoa,b,*, Anatoly A. Gitelsona,b , Donald C estimation of Chl in turbid productive waters has so far not been feasible from satellite sensors. The main

  10. Nonlinear Neural Network-Based Mixture Model for Estimating the Concentration of Nitrogen Salts in Turbid Inland Waters Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    of water constituents by training the MLP with ground spectra of nitrogen salts, which are commonly used which are commonly used for industrial purposes; mineral contaminants such as heavy metals, phosphorus in Turbid Inland Waters Using Hyperspectral Imagery Javier Plaza, Pablo Martínez, Rosa Pérez, Antonio Plaza

  11. Is it appropriate to model turbidity currents with the Three-Equation Model?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Peng; He, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Three-Equation Model (TEM) was developed in the 1980s to model turbidity currents (TCs) and has been widely used ever since. However, its physical justification was questioned because self-accelerating TCs simulated with the steady TEM seemed to violate the turbulent kinetic energy balance. This violation was considered as a result of very strong sediment erosion that consumes more turbulent kinetic energy than is produced. To confine bed erosion and thus remedy this issue, the Four-Equation Model (FEM) was introduced by assuming a proportionality between the bed shear stress and the turbulent kinetic energy. Here we analytically proof that self-accelerating TCs simulated with the original steady TEM actually never violate the turbulent kinetic energy balance, provided that the bed drag coefficient is not unrealistically low. We find that stronger bed erosion, surprisingly, leads to more production of turbulent kinetic energy due to conversion of potential energy of eroded material into kinetic energy of ...

  12. EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation’s (SRR’s) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a “peanut” vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A “go/no-go” decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a “go” decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a “no-go” determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the issuance of the initial version of this report but under the scope of the original request for technical assistance, WSE asked for this report to be revised to include the “go/no-go” CU value corresponding to 0.28 wt% solids. It was this request that led to the preparation of Revision 1 of the report. The results for the 0.28 wt% solids value were developed following the same approach as that utilized for the 0.14 wt% solids value. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a “go/no-go” CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the “go/no-go” decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the “go/no-go” criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from the sludge batch, Sludge Batch 7b, being processed at the time of this testing. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

  13. Evaluation Of A Turbidity Meter For Use At The Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahannah, R. N.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation's (SRR's) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a ''peanut'' vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 wt%. A ''go/no-go'' decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a ''go'' decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a ''no-go'' determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a ''go/no-go'' CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the ''go/no-go'' decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the ''go/no-go'' criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), the sludge batch currently being processed. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

  14. Quantitative broadband absorption and scattering spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady state methodologies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tromberg, Bruce J. (Irvine, CA); Berger, Andrew J. (Rochester, NY); Cerussi, Albert E. (Lake Forest, CA); Bevilacqua, Frederic (Costa Mesa, CA); Jakubowski, Dorota (Irvine, CA)

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses a combination of frequency-domain and steady-state reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light steady-state measurement, whereas the frequency-domain data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption and reduced scattering derived from the frequency-domain data are used to calibrate the intensity of the steady-state measurements and to determine the reduced scattering coefficient at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. The absorption coefficient spectrum is determined by comparing the steady-state reflectance values with the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. Absorption spectra of a turbid phantom and of human breast tissue in vivo, derived with the combined frequency-domain and steady-state technique, agree well with expected reference values.

  15. Annotated bibliography: Marine geologic hazards of the Hawaiian Islands with special focus on submarine slides and turbidity currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normark, W.R.; Herring, H.H.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography was compiled to highlight the submarine geology of the Hawaiian Islands and identify known and potential marine geologic hazards with special emphasis on turbidity currents, submarine slides and tsunamis. Some references are included that are not specific to Hawaii but are needed to understand the geologic processes that can affect the integrity of submarine cables and other man-made structures. Entries specific to the Hawaiian Island area are shown in bold type.

  16. Measurement of fluid-flow-velocity profile in turbid media by the use of optical Doppler tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Milner, T.E.; Chen, Zhongping; Nelson, J.S. [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92715 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia 30460 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical Doppler tomography is demonstrated to be a simple, accurate, and noncontact method for measuring the fluid velocity of laminar flow in small-diameter ({approximately}0.5-mm) ducts. Studies are described that utilize circular (square) plastic (glass) ducts infused with a moving suspension of polymer micro-spheres in air and buried in an optically turbid medium. The measurement of Doppler-shifted frequencies of backscattered light from moving microspheres is used to construct a high-resolution spatial profile of fluid-flow velocity in the ducts. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  17. Apparatus and method for qualitative and quantitative measurements of optical properties of turbid media using frequency-domain photon migration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tromberg, B.J.; Tsay, T.T.; Berns, M.W.; Svaasand, L.O.; Haskell, R.C.

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical measurements of turbid media, that is media characterized by multiple light scattering, is provided through an apparatus and method for exposing a sample to a modulated laser beam. The light beam is modulated at a fundamental frequency and at a plurality of integer harmonics thereof. Modulated light is returned from the sample and preferentially detected at cross frequencies at frequencies slightly higher than the fundamental frequency and at integer harmonics of the same. The received radiance at the beat or cross frequencies is compared against a reference signal to provide a measure of the phase lag of the radiance and modulation ratio relative to a reference beam. The phase and modulation amplitude are then provided as a frequency spectrum by an array processor to which a computer applies a complete curve fit in the case of highly scattering samples or a linear curve fit below a predetermined frequency in the case of highly absorptive samples. The curve fit in any case is determined by the absorption and scattering coefficients together with a concentration of the active substance in the sample. Therefore, the curve fitting to the frequency spectrum can be used both for qualitative and quantitative analysis of substances in the sample even though the sample is highly turbid. 14 figs.

  18. Diabat L., Remund J., Wald L., 2003. Linke turbidity factors for several sites in Africa. Solar Energy, 75, 2, 111-119. Copyright UFAE Meteotest -Ecole des Mines de Paris Armines 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy, 75, 2, 111-119. Copyright UFAE ­ Meteotest - Ecole des Mines de Paris ­ Armines 1 LINKE TURBIDITY turbidity factor (TL) has been estimated at sixteen locations in Africa (9 stations in Egypt, 2 month with a sufficient accuracy. Though limited to the Mediterranean area, Egypt and sub

  19. Accepted, subject to re-review, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, ASCE, version of January 2006 Role of Ponded Turbidity Currents in Reservoir Trap Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    , because some of this sediment may pass out of the reservoir without settling out. Here a model of trap. The dam causes a sustained turbidity current to reflect and form a muddy pond bounded upstream by a hydraulic jump. If the interface of this muddy pond rises above any vent or overflow point at the dam

  20. New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Böcklin, Christoph, E-mail: boecklic@ethz.ch; Baumann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Jürg [Institute of Electromagnetic Fields, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers.

  1. 1 Journey to Lean 2 NTU community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Water 44 Recycling 45 Gym 46 Battery Recycling Bin 47 Library 48 Monitoring System 49 Emergency 55 Plaza :_ #12; 56 Alert Facilities 57 Please Keep Quiet 58 Please Recycle 59 Aluminum 60

  2. Microsoft Word - 2902ntu.dot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverviewCleanupShipping Form3 A LCF U

  3. Treatability of Stormwater Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    for Chemical Treatment · Type 1 water: high turbidity, >100 NTU, and high alkalinity, >250 mg/L as CaCO3, CaCO3 (alkalinity may need to be added for alum or ferric chloride). · Type 3 water: low turbidity, 250 mg/L as CaCO3 (most stormwaters approach this category

  4. Surgical dredging controls turbidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seagren, E.H. [Ellicott Machine Corp. International, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to remove contaminated and uncontaminated sediments located under a column of water is increasing. Small hydraulic dredges offer flexibility in the removal of sediments in industrial lagoons, wetlands, drinking water ponds, and environmentally sensitive areas.

  5. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    : The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

  6. To be published: Brittney Dawney and Joshua M. Pearce, "Optimizing the solar water disinfection (SODIS) method by decreasing turbidity with NaCl", Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development 2(2) pp, 87-94 (2012). doi: 10.2166/washdev.2012.04

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (SODIS) method by decreasing turbidity with NaCl", Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development 2, 2 (2012) 87-94" DOI : 10.2166/washdev.2012.043 #12;To by decreasing turbidity with NaCl", Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development 2(2) pp, 87

  7. Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste - 13532

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job [EIC Laboratories, Inc., 111 Downey St., Norwood, MA, 02062 (United States)] [EIC Laboratories, Inc., 111 Downey St., Norwood, MA, 02062 (United States); Bryan, Samuel; Lines, Amanda; Levitskaia, Tatiana [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source. (authors)

  8. Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Lines, Amanda M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source.

  9. ICSICSICSICS http://cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw/~thlin/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    (duplexer; RF passive device)· SWr GMD44 (duplexer; RF passive device) · Invensense MPU3050 MPU3050 Triple software ICS 15 #12;ICSICS IC d ig h IC design house Start-up company Design service company FoundryFoundry System house ... Pain is inevitable; suffering is optional. 16 #12;

  10. Testing of a hybrid membrane system for groundwater desalination in an Australian national park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Andrea; Richards, Bryce S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in reducing high feedwater turbidity of up to 370 NTU. For the system, designed for a production of about 1000 L/d for remote communities, the specific energy consumption (SEC) was below 5 W.h/L when operated at a pressure above 7 bar. Retention of multivalent...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A LAMINATED DISK FOR THE SPIN TEK ROTARY MICROFILTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Funded by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, EM-31, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) partnered with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to develop a filter disk that would withstand a reverse pressure or flow during operation of the rotary microfilter. The ability to withstand a reverse pressure and flow eliminates a potential accident scenario that could have resulted in damage to the filter membranes. While the original welded filter disks have been shown to withstand and reverse pressure/flow in the static condition, the filter disk design discussed in this report will allow a reverse pressure/flow while the disks are rotating. In addition, the laminated disk increases the flexibility during filter startup and cleaning operations. The new filter disk developed by SRNL and SpinTek is manufactured with a more open structure significantly reducing internal flow restrictions in the disk. The prototype was tested at the University of Maryland and demonstrated to withstand the reverse pressure due to the centrifugal action of the rotary filter. The tested water flux of the disk was demonstrated to be 1.34 gpm in a single disk test. By comparison, the water flux of the current disk was 0.49 gpm per disk during a 25 disk test. The disk also demonstrated rejection of solids by filtering a 5 wt % Strontium Carbonate slurry with a filtrate clarity of less the 1.4 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) throughout the two hour test. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to adapt the rotary microfilter for radioactive service in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. One potential weakness is the loose nature of the membrane on the filter disks. The current disk is constructed by welding the membrane at the outer edge of the disk. The seal for the center of the membrane is accomplished by an o-ring in compression for the assembled stack. The remainder of the membrane is free floating on the disk. This construction requires that a positive pressure be applied to the rotary filter tank to prevent the membrane from rising from the disk structure and potentially contacting the filter turbulence promoter. In addition, one accident scenario is a reverse flow through the filtrate line due to mis-alignment of valves resulting in the membrane rising from the disk structure. The structural integrity of the current disk has been investigated, and shown that the disk can withstand a significant reverse pressure in a static condition. However, the disk will likely incur damage if the filter stack is rotated during a reverse pressure. The development of a laminated disk would have several significant benefits for the operation of the rotary filter including the prevention of a compromise in filter disk integrity during a reverse flow accident, increasing operational flexibility, and increasing the self cleaning ability of the filter. A laminated disk would allow the filter rotor operation prior to a positive pressure in the filter tank. This would prevent the initial dead-head of the filter and prevent the resulting initial filter cake buildup. The laminated disk would allow rotor operation with cleaning fluid, eliminating the need for a recirculation pump. Additionally, a laminated disk would allow a reverse flow of fluid through the membrane pores removing trapped particles.

  12. THE WORDS OF OMEGASTHE WORDS OF OMEGAS http://http://www.math.ntu.edu.tw/~shiehnrwww.math.ntu.edu.tw/~shiehnr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Su-Yun

    :19)28:19) #12;left: Fortuna( a goddess), right: anleft: Fortuna( a goddess), right: an astragalusastragalus

  13. Reviewed and updated March 2013 NTU Sustainable Construction and Refurbishment Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    to energy efficiency and costs in use. Achieve British Research Establishment Environmental Assessment government targets, for example zero carbon new build non domestic buildings by 2019 and at least 80% carbon

  14. Sustainable Food Policy Nottingham Trent University (NTU) recognises that food production and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    where possible, o Minimise waste and pollution through effective recycling and waste disposal systems, o assured meat and poultry; · We only use organic eggs and milk in freshly prepared meals and beverages Monitor, record and take the necessary action with regard to plate waste. Reviewed and updated: February

  15. Chien-Cheng Chang Professor, Institute of Applied Mechanics and Department of Math., NTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Su-Yun

    Energy, Solar Energy, Lithium Battery­vibration and fluid me- chanics of wind turbines, solar panel)­ mechanics, heat transfer of microstructures (theory, computation and experiments) · Energy Research in Wind

  16. NTU Singapore visit 27/28 February 2012 Workshop, Monday 27 February, Pfizer Lecture Theatre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    :45-6:05 Dominic Wright Inorganic Synthesis: from Molecules and Molecular Catalysis to Nanotechnology 6 Materials Chemistry of Batteries and Fuel Cells 1:50-2:10 Soo-Ying Lee Femtosecond stimulated Raman Diversity Oriented Synthesis 3:35-3:55 Rod Bates Synthesis of Heterocyclic Natural Products 4:00-4:10 Chris

  17. Towards Long-Term Mobility Tracking in NTU Hospital's Elder Care Center Chun-Chieh Hsiao1, 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    to automatically track elders' activities can be classified into two categories: non-intrusive and intrusive. For the non- intrusive methods, the devices to acquire daily activities are deployed in the environment], technologies of laser range finder and infrared are respectively utilized to allow non- intrusive tracking

  18. Interferometric photomechanical spectroscopy and imaging of biological and turbid media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Barry

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The medical field is currently experiencing rapid growth in the area of optical diagnostics. Minimally-invasive spectroscopic and imaging modalities enable physicians to make increasingly accurate diagnoses in real time, ...

  19. Field deployable dynamic lighting system for turbid water imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorman, Geoffrey Allen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ocean depths provide an ever changing and complex imaging environment. As scientists and researches strive to document and study more remote and optically challenging areas, specifically scatter-limited environments. ...

  20. apple juice turbidity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have collected a considerable amount of data relating to apple (Malus domestica Biggs, Alan R. 130 Crop Conditions Apple Diseases: What To Do? Environmental Sciences and...

  1. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During second quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (second quarter 1995 is the fourth of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and radium-226 exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west at a rate of 1300 feet per year. Groundwater flow in the Barnwell/McBean was to the northeast at a rate of 50 feet per year.

  2. Eddy pump dredging: Does it produce water quality impacts?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creek, K.D. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., Ramon, CA (United States); Sagraves, T.H. [RESNA Industries, Magalia, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During a prototype demonstration at Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s (PG&E`s) Cresta Reservoir, the feasibility of a new dredging technique was tested for its reported ability to produce only minimal water quality impacts. The technique, developed by PBMK Consultants and Engineers, uses the EDDY Pump, a patented submerged slurry pump system with a higher solids-to-liquid ratio and lower re-suspension of sediment than achieved by conventional suction dredging. Turbidity and total suspended solids concentrations of water samples collected adjacent to and downstream of the pump head were similar to those of samples collected adjacent to and upstream of the pump head. Dissolved oxygen downstream of the pump head remained near saturation. The dredged sediment was pumped 600 m upstream of the pump head and discharged back to the surface of Cresta Reservoir. Increases in turbidity and total suspended solids downstream of the discharge site were minor. Throughout the demonstration, turbidity levels and total suspended solids concentrations remained well below allowable levels set by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board - no more than a 25 NTU turbidity increase over ambient background nor more than 80 mg/I total suspended solids, absolute.

  3. Instructions of NTU Health Exam for Exchange Students from China In order to understand the general health condition of the new students, and to meet the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Hypertension Cervical cancer Gout or hyperuricemia Psychiatric disorders None of the diseases described

  4. 1 Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Polymeric Biomaterials Laboratory 2 Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratoire de Technologie des Composites et Polymres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    /v% · Highly hydrated polymer Its long chains form random coils occupying molecular domains containing large synthetic crosslinks. The synthesis of such a macromolecular network in the form of a hydrogel has volumes of water · Key role in wound healing, promoting cell motility and differentiation Hyaluronic Acid

  5. Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    -Ming Lu National Center for High Performance Computing PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU

  6. September 2011 Publicado por la O cina de Asuntos Internacionales Toda la informacin contenida en este folleto est disponible en linea. Para informacin ms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    requeridos Hay dos centros de lenguaje en NTU. Por favor contac- tarlos directamente para la solicitud

  7. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Thrombosuction and Tirofiban Infusion (ITTI) trial Department of Internal Medicine, NTU Hospital Department

  8. Effects of elevated turbidity and nutrients on the net production of a tropical seagrass community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, J.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging effects on seagrass communities in the Florida Keys were examined by (1) comparing impacts on net production resulting from dredging and natural weather events, (2) determining changes in community photosynthetic efficiency, (3) evaluating shading and nutrient effects on net production, and (4) developing a systems dynamics model. Net community production was estimated during numerous meteorological and dredging events using the Odum-Hoskins oxygen technique in flow-through field microcosms. In other experiments, shading and nutrients (phosphorus, nitrate, and ammonia) were manipulated to simulate dredge plume conditions. The greatest depression in net community production resulted from severe thunderstorms and dredging events, respectively. In field microcosm experiments, significant interaction occurred between shading and nutrient concentration. The model of seagrass production was most sensitive to changes in nutrient-seagrass relationships, seagrass production estimates, and seagrass-light interactions. Recovery of seagrass biomass following numerous dredging events (3.5 years) was longer than that from the estimated total annual thunderstorms encountered (1 year) but shorter than recovery from hurricane events (4.1 years).

  9. Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collin, Clair

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

  10. Large River Food Webs: Influence of Nutrients, Turbidity, and Flow, and Implications for Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roach, Katherine

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    supporting consumers in rivers with different physicochemical characteristics, and hypotheses of how these factors affect instream productivity (R = respiration, NPP = net primary production). ........................................ 44 Figure 2... CHAPTER I GENERAL INTRODUCTION Humans have historically constructed civilizations along the banks of rivers. In addition to providing vital supplies of water and easy access to nutrient-rich, alluvial soils, rivers filter and remove nutrients...

  11. Angular domain optical imaging of turbid media using enhanced micro-tunnel filter arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    performed in tissue mimicking phantoms using a 2-cm thick optical cell with 0.25% IntralipidTM and a near infrared laser. This paper also presents experimental results of the angular domain imaging system employing novel micro-tunnel arrays with minimal internal reflection which can accept the non- scattered

  12. Human induced turbidity changes in Poyang Lake between 2000 and 2010: Observations from MODIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    variabil- ity such as El Niño and La Niño transitions have also lead to dramatic variations sediment resuspension and mass transport [Acker et al., 2004; Chen et al., 200

  13. Measurement of blood analytes in turbid biological tissue using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Tae-Woong, 1974-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of blood constituents provide diagnostic information in clinical procedures. Among the medical community, there is great interest in developing an optical method of concentration measurements that eliminates ...

  14. Digital optical phase conjugation for delivering two-dimensional images through turbid media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamauchi, Toyohiko

    Optical transmission through complex media such as biological tissue is fundamentally limited by multiple light scattering. Precise control of the optical wavefield potentially holds the key to advancing a broad range of ...

  15. File:06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealandORCEncroachment.pdf Jump to:-FD-aIDCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Jump to:Open Energy Information

  16. SIR Estimation in Hexagonal Cellular Networks with Best Server Mattia Minelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    Technological University Nanyang Avenue, Singapore mattia1@e.ntu.edu.sg Marceau Coupechoux T´el´ecom Paris

  17. Climate-driven chlorophyll-a changes in a turbid estuary: Observations from satellites and implications for management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    . © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Coastal ocean eutrophication has been reported). Algal blooms, mostly a typical result of eutrophication, are indicators of degraded water quality, 1999, 2003). In response to eutrophication, various government agencies and environmental groups have

  18. In 2006, the Alliance of Coastal Technology (ACT) evaluated the performance of five commercial-ready, in situ turbidity sensors at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    A transmissometer ( =660nm) ­ data denoted by cp Both scattering sensors were equipped with integrated copper wipers, wiper), heavy bio-fouling, or when the sensor experienced obvious drift. We selected a subset

  19. Brief History 01 Library Organiza on 02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    The National Taiwan University (NTU) was established in March of 1928. The present Main Library was officially & Social Sciences Library Medical Library Organization Chart 2 #12;Library Collections The role of the NTU#12;Brief History 01 Library Organiza on 02 Library Collec ons 03 Electronic Resources Special

  20. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION ADVANCED SUBSTRATE ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Information regarding SMART: http://smart.mit.edu/home.html Professor Fitzgerald's Web Site: http AND SMART, C.S. TAN, NTU AND SMART, AND S.F. YOON, NTU AND SMART BACKGROUND: There is an opening in MIT's Singapore research center (SMART) for post-doctoral fellow in the area of advanced substrate engineering

  1. Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue gas streams to electricity. The NTU-effectiveness method, exergy, and ...

  2. Tailoring the Lasing Modes in Semiconductor Nanowire Cavities Using Intrinsic Self-Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Qihua

    groundbreaking work on utilizing semiconductor NW cavities to compensate the damping loss and amplify Division of Microelectronics, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 § Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N), Nanyang Technological University, 50

  3. TESTING OF A ROTARY MICROFILTER TO SUPPORT HANFORD APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; David Stefanko, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers are investigating and developing a rotary microfilter for solid-liquid separation applications at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the success of that work, the Hanford Site is evaluating the use of the rotary microfilter for its Supplemental Pretreatment process. The authors performed rotary filter testing with a full-scale, 25-disk unit with 0.5 {micro} filter media manufactured by Pall Corporation using a Hanford AN-105 simulant at solids loadings of 0.06, 0.29, and 1.29 wt%. The conclusions from this testing are: (1) The filter flux at 0.06 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.26 gpm/ft{sup 2} (6.25 gpm total). (2) The filter flux at 0.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.17 gpm/ft{sup 2} (4 gpm total). (3) The filter flux at 1.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.10 gpm/ft{sup 2} (2.4 gpm total). (4) Because of differences in solids loadings, a direct comparison between crossflow filter flux and rotary filter flux is not possible. The data show the rotary filter produces a higher flux than the crossflow filter, but the improvement is not as large as seen in previous testing. (5) Filtrate turbidity measured < 4 NTU in all samples collected. (6) During production, the filter should be rinsed with filtrate or dilute caustic and drained prior to an extended shutdown to prevent the formation of a layer of settled solids on top of the filter disks. (7) Inspection of the seal faces after {approx} 140 hours of operation showed an expected amount of initial wear, no passing of process fluid through the seal faces, and very little change in the air channeling grooves on the stationary face. (8) Some polishing was observed at the bottom of the shaft bushing. The authors recommend improving the shaft bushing by holding it in place with a locking ring and incorporated grooves to provide additional cooling. (9) The authors recommend that CH2MHill Hanford test other pore size media to determine the optimum pore size for Hanford waste.

  4. Thng 9, 2010 Xut bn bi Office of International Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Loan, ã thông báo các chng trình ào to cp bng cht lng cao vi chi phí hp lý (khong t 3200~4500 USD mt nm cht lng. Bên cnh các chng trình cp bng, NTU còn có 2 trung tâm ngoi ng tuyt vi cho nhng ai thích thú.v...) c trao cho các sinh viên t yêu cu cht lng. Bên cnh các chng trình cp bng, NTU còn có 2 trung tâm

  5. A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO INTERNAL WAVES AND THE CHASING THEREOF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , DOX, CHL, TURBIDITY Monday, October 21, 13 #12;NEMO: A NEW COASTAL OBSERVATORY Monday, October 21, 13

  6. Green-Aware Workload Scheduling in Geographically Distributed Data Centers Changbing Chen, Bingsheng He, Xueyan Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Xueyan

    : {chchangb, bshe, asxytang}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Renewable (or green) energy, such as solar or wind, has with renewable energy sources. While green energy supply for a single data center is intermittent due to daily/seasonal effects, our workload scheduling algorithm is aware of different amounts of green energy supply

  7. Placement of Digital Microfluidic Biochips Using the T-tree Formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Yao-Wen

    Placement of Digital Microfluidic Biochips Using the T-tree Formulation Ping-Hung Yuh, chia@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT Droplet-based microfluidic biochips have recently gained much attention and are expected that adopts a topological representation to solve the placement problem of digital microfluidic biochips

  8. Lai & Barkan 1 AN ENHANCED PARAMETRIC RAILWAY CAPACITY EVALUATION TOOL (RCET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    as safer and more efficient in terms of land-use and energy efficiency. Therefore, public officials-2-2363-9990 Email: yclai@ntu.edu.tw Christopher P.L. Barkan Associate Professor Director ­ Railroad Engineering and Tables) = 7,311 words * Corresponding author #12;Lai & Barkan 2 ABSTRACT Many railroad lines

  9. OFC Review 2013 Software Defined Network (SDN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and transmission rate w/o hardware change Dedicated PCE to scale OpenFlow architectutre #12;Network ArchitectureOFC Review 2013 Software Defined Network (SDN) M. Farhan Habib May 10, 2013 Friday Group Meeting Networks Lab @ UCD #12;NTu3F: SDN in Today's Network #12;SDN: What and Why · Traditional distributed

  10. A TEST OF EARTHQUAKE EARLY WARNING SYSTEM USING LOW COST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    A TEST OF EARTHQUAKE EARLY WARNING SYSTEM USING LOW COST ACCELEROMETER IN HUALIEN, TAIWAN Y.-M. Wu early warning system was first motivated by the Hualien offshore earthquake (Mw = 7.8) in November 15 Abstract The earthquake early warning (EEW) research group at the National Taiwan University (NTU) and one

  11. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Oncology Summit 2013 Department of Internal Medicine, NTU College of Medicine Hepatitis Research Center%IFIF 201421 2 #12;IF IF IF10 BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL Volume: 347 Article Number: f6008 Amplification of HOXD-Harboring Chromosome Region Is Implicated in Mulitiple- Walled Carbon Nanotubes

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON EVOLUTIONARY COMPUTATION, VOL. 14, NO. 3, JUNE 2010 329 Generalizing Surrogate-Assisted Evolutionary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Yaochu

    , 2010. This paper was supported by Honda Research Institute Europe GmbH, Germany. D. Lim is with Center (e-mail: dlim@ntu.edu.sg). Y. Jin and B. Sendhoff are with Honda Research Institute Europe GmbH, Offenbach 63073, Germany (e-mail: yaochu.jin@honda-ri.de; bernhard.sendhoff@honda-ri.de). Y. S. Ong

  13. Motivated Learning for the Development of Autonomous Systems$ Janusz A. Starzyka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Ah-Hwee

    Motivated Learning for the Development of Autonomous Systems$ Janusz A. Starzyka , James T. Grahama in part by the Singapore National Re- search Foundation Interactive Digital Media R&D Program, under@ohio.edu (James T. Graham), pawel.raif@polsl.pl (Pawel Raif), asahtan@ntu.edu.sg (Ah-Hwee Tan

  14. Stresa, Italy, 25-27 April 2007 DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A DIAPHRAGM MICRO-PUMP WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stresa, Italy, 25-27 April 2007 DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A DIAPHRAGM MICRO-PUMP@ntu.edu.tw, 8862-23629976 ABSTRACT In this study, a new type of thin, compact, and light weighed diaphragm micro-pump-diaphragm pump with two valves is fabricated in an aluminum case by using highly accurate CNC machine

  15. Web Unit Mining Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Centre for Advanced Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aixin, Sun

    Web Unit Mining ­ Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Web Pages Aixin Sun Centre for Advanced Technological University Singapore, 639798 aseplim@ntu.edu.sg ABSTRACT In web classification, most researchers assume that the ob- jects to classify are individual web pages from one or more web sites. In practice

  16. Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    of Oldenburg (Core Provider) NTU Athens (Specialisation Provider: Wind Energy) #12; EUREC Module, Lectures, Labs and Seminars Core Oldenburg 1. Semester, Winter Term Module Title Term Titel Solar Energy Titel Wind Energy Winter Wind Energy I Tutorial Wind Energy Systems Wind Tunel (Lab

  17. Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model...

  18. Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    , 14:30 ~ 15:30 TITLE Probe Nanoscale Morphologies of Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cell from cells are promising renewable energy sources because of their low production cost, high mechanical Sinica PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar

  19. A moving-mesh relaxation scheme for one-dimensional barotropic two-phase flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyue, Keh-Ming

    . However, due to the non-monotonic behavior of the mixture sound speed (denoted by c) ver- sus the volume-mail: shyue@math.ntu.edu.tw 1 Introduction Cavitation is commonly defined as a phenomenon in a liquid-flowing system when the pressure of the liquid falls sufficiently low in some re- gion of the flow so that vapor

  20. 3D Cinematography Principles and Their Applications to Stereoscopic Media Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouhyoung, Ming

    3D Cinematography Principles and Their Applications to Stereoscopic Media Processing Chun-Wei Liu Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan cyy@csie.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT This paper introduces 3D cinematography show that by incorporating 3D cinematography prin- ciples, the proposed methods yield more comfortable

  1. Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Development and Benchmark of New Multi-Coefficient Double-Hybrid Density Functional Theory with SCS-MP2 and MP Cheng University PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract We have developed a series. The performance of MC-DFT can be further improved combining energies from ab initio MP2 and SCS-MP2 calculation

  2. Risk Assessment Risk communication 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    · 1 1997 2003 WHO #12;6060 NTU Alumni Bimonthly No.87 Fault tree Event tree [2] Nuclear reactor of nuclear power plants. Reliability Engineering and Safety System, 52:297-314. [4] Jonas Hagmann. 2012. Fukushima: probing the analytical and epistemological limits of risk analysis. Journal of Risk Research. 15

  3. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 09 January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belles, Xavier

    , Taipei 106, Taiwan. e-mail: m480@ntu.edu.tw Hypertrehalosemic hormone (HTH) is a peptide hormone pleiotropic actions related to catabolic reaction and stress response. AKH peptides have been demon- strated pathway of HTH involved in anti-oxidative stress, we have characterized a HIH receptor cDNA in Blattella

  4. Cloud Computing: a Perspective Study Lizhe WANG, Gregor von LASZEWSKI, Younge ANDREW, Xi HE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud Computing: a Perspective Study Lizhe WANG, Gregor von LASZEWSKI, Younge ANDREW, Xi HE Service@ntu.edu.sg Received 1 Dec 2008 Abstract The Cloud computing emerges as a new computing paradigm which aims to provide study the Cloud computing paradigm from various aspects, such as definitions, distinct features

  5. OneClick: A Framework for Capturing Users' Network Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    @cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT To learn about users' experiences in using network applica- tions, we present a lightweight, non-intrusive of the application in use. OneClick is particularly effective because it is lightweight, non-intrusive, and efficient- iments. It is non-intrusive because the user does not need to pay much attention to the scoring procedure

  6. Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    -Einstein condensates SPEAKER Prof. Shih-Chuan Gou Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Atomic Bose-Einstein condensates conned to a dual a test of the scaling laws for defect formation by quenching a Bose gas to degeneracy in this geometry

  7. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION WIDEGAP NONNITRIDE FET INTEGRATION ON SI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information regarding SMART: http://smart.mit.edu/home.html Professor Fitzgerald's Web Site: http, MIT AND SMART, AND KEN LEE, NTU AND SMART You will be part of a team conducting cuttingedge material systems. This position will be located at MIT's new research center in Singapore, called SMART

  8. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    ;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Module name: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Section Classes Evaluation of Wind Energy Potential Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines

  9. Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 933-950, December 2006 Methane Venting in Gas Hydrate Potential Area Offshore of SW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    933 Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 933-950, December 2006 Methane Venting in Gas Hydrate-mail: tyyang@ntu.edu.tw Water column samples were collected systematically in several poten- tial gas hydrate are considered to have originated from dissociation of gas hydrates and/or a deeper gas reservoir. (Key words

  10. La Jolla Canyon and Scripps Canyon Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueggeman, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of five turbidity currents." Sedimentology 37(1): 1-5. Ancoastal geomorphology, and in sedimentology which he alwaysfilm. Developments in Sedimentology. 6th International

  11. JOURNAL OF SEDIMENTARY RESEARCH, VOL. 72, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER, 2002, P. 641656 Copyright 2002, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 1527-1404/02/072-641/$03.00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    of flow in these beds is indicated by the presence of small- to large- scale hummocky cross bedding reflect liquefaction and gravity-driven movement and hence their orientations indicate-stratification and rare small two-dimensional ripples. Wave-modified turbidity currents differ from deep-sea turbidity cur

  12. Multiphase Turbulent Flow Ken Kiger -UMCP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    emulsions Multi-phase Steam bubble in H20 Ice slurry Coal particles in air Sand particle in H20 #12://www.physics.utoronto.ca/~nonlin/turbidity/turbidity.html #12;Material processing ­ generation of particles & composite materials Energy production ­ coal

  13. National Marine Fisheries Service Southwest Region Habitat Conservation Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Maintenance Dredge Project Area BMPs for turbidity control required Hydraulic Dredge, no overflow Sand (>80 of dredging activities Yes Dredging activities cease until turbidity dissipates No Modify dredging operation (reduced bucket deployment...etc.) Yes No N Eelgrass is present within 250 m buffer of Maintenance Dredge

  14. Effects of Small Impoundments on Total Watershed Sediment Yield in Northeast Kansas, April through August 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Guy M.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    sediment concentration hydrograph at Dam 38 ................. 48 21. Figure 21: Aerial view of LDMD 5 showing general locations of elevation and turbidity sensors (photo source: Google Earth...) ................................................................................... 49 22. Figure 22: View looking upstream LDMD 5 from the top of the dam. The outflow structure is visible in the foreground. Photo taken April 2011 ........................................... 50 23. Figure 23: View of inflow turbidity sensor...

  15. Modification of a biosand filter in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kikkawa, Izumi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four local plastic design (LPD) BSFs were constructed in Northern Region, Ghana, to test and evaluate an experimental modification of the LPD BSF for treatment of highly turbid water. Modifications of the LPD BSFs were ...

  16. Near-Field Sediment Resuspension Measurement and Modeling for Cutter Suction Dredging Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henriksen, John Christopher

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment resuspension and turbidity created during dredging operations is both an economical and environmental issue. The movement of sediment plumes created from dredging operations has been predicted with numerical modeling, however, these far...

  17. Early Channel Evolution in the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation, West Texas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunderson, Spencer

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Submarine channels are important conduits for sediment in deep marine environments, and understanding their formation is critical to modeling basin fill processes. Most models describing channel evolution focus on turbidity currents as the erosive...

  18. 1999 Macmillan Magazines LtdNATURE |VOL 402 |18 NOVEMBER 1999 |www.nature.com 291 letters to nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahar, Sonya

    Daphnia9 , in North American rivers where muddy turbidity limits vision. Instead, paddle®sh use.m.s.) of a randomly varying electrical stimulus passed through the water in the swim mill, between plate electrodes

  19. Measurement of the Time-Resolved Reflection Matrix for Enhancing Light Energy Delivery into a Scattering Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Youngwoon

    Multiple scatterings occurring in a turbid medium attenuate the intensity of propagating waves. Here, we propose a method to efficiently deliver light energy to the desired target depth in a scattering medium. We measure ...

  20. Measuring Large Optical Transmission Matrices of Disordered Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hyeonseung

    We report a measurement of the large optical transmission matrix (TM) of a complex turbid medium. The TM is acquired using polarization-sensitive, full-field interferometric microscopy equipped with a rotating galvanometer ...

  1. Near-infrared approaches for cell culture monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung Joon

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on a laser turbidity sensor was developed. The total cell concentration predicted with optical method was in excellent agreement with off-line cell counting data. The results from the two experiments suggest that such analyte concentration and laser...

  2. Depositional environment and facies relationships of the Canyon sandstone, Val Verde Basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Michael Harold

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    units of the Bouma turbi- dit. e sequence. The sequence of sedimentary structures and change in grain size indicate that the Canyon sandstone was deposited from a turbidity current flow. Complete bed sets are present within the cored interval...

  3. Southeast Herbicide Applicator Conference October 3-5, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    to application Soft Water (low alkalinity) applications may cause low pH resulting in fish Mortality Calcium be applied when there is little or no Wind Turbidity improved in a matter of hours #12;Check pond

  4. Observing ocean changes at the nation's first SWAC system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (conductivity, temperature, pressure) · + oxygen, fluorescence and turbidity · ADCP: 300kHz · Nitrate sensor-2 years operational Items of note and path forward Photo: Christopher Pala, www.onewater.org Mahalo

  5. Experimental nursery pond cultivation of the seagrass Halodule beaudettei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, David J.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted from April through July of hics. l 998 to assess the cultivation of Halodule beaudettei (den Hartog) den Hartog (shoal-grass) in experimental nursery ponds. The effects of pond flow-regime, water turbidity, culture media...

  6. Late Pleistocene to Recent sediment transport pathways of the Green Canyon OCS area, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, John Patrick

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    remobilizes sediments which are then carried further downslope. These remobilized sediments may be transported as debris flows or other undifferentiated high-density flows, or may develop into turbidity currents which deposit graded sediments in response...

  7. Characterization of the 3-D Properties of the Fine-Grained Turbidite 8 Sand Reservoir, Green Canyon 18, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plantevin, Matthieu Francois

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -grained turbidity currents is composed of alternating sand and shale layers, whose extension is assumed to be large. They correspond to levee and overbank deposits that are usually associated to channel systems. The high porosity values, coming from unconsolidated...

  8. Quantifying channelized submarine depositional systems from bed to basin scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, William J., 1965-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The challenges of directly observing active turbidity currents necessitates the consideration of preserved deposits for deciphering the behavior of these systems. In this thesis, I take advantage 3-D subsurface seismic ...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic random medium Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    39 Discrete-ordinates solution of short-pulsed laser transport in two-dimensional turbid media Summary: of the medium is L W 10 mm. The medium is anisotropically scattering with...

  10. Special Issue "Underwater Sensor Nodes and Underwater Sensor Networks" A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    aquatic environments. Marine surveillance, pollution detection and monitoring, and oceanographic data (salinity, conductivity, turbidity, pH, oxygen, temperature, depth, etc.) - Sediments and pollution sensor nodes - Acoustic sensors - Underwater sensor network architectures - Wired and wireless protocols

  11. Chile, 2009 HYDRAULIC MANAGEMENT OF FILAMENTOUS ALGAE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    7 th ISE & 8 th HIC Chile, 2009 HYDRAULIC MANAGEMENT OF FILAMENTOUS ALGAE IN OPEN-CHANNEL NETWORKS mechanical interventions to avoid overflows. Moreover, drifting algae cells increase water turbidity

  12. Inter-annual variability in phytoplankton summer blooms in the freshwater tidal reaches of the Schelde estuary (Belgium)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    of the Schelde estuary (Belgium) Marie Lionard a,*, Koenraad Muylaert b , Abdel Hanoutti c , Tom Maris d , Miche to be negligible due to the high turbidity of the water (e.g. Uncles and Stephens, 1993). An increase

  13. attenuates experimental autoimmune: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More tests with water of different degrees of turbidity, and possibly wave filed at the water surface are in progress and wi... Simpson, A; Cho, H J; Liu, H 2014-01-01 8 Th1 Cells...

  14. attenuates experimental colitis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More tests with water of different degrees of turbidity, and possibly wave filed at the water surface are in progress and wi... Simpson, A; Cho, H J; Liu, H 2014-01-01 3...

  15. attenuates experimental stroke: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More tests with water of different degrees of turbidity, and possibly wave filed at the water surface are in progress and wi... Simpson, A; Cho, H J; Liu, H 2014-01-01 4 An...

  16. Solute dispersion in the coastal boundary layer of southern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of southern Lake Michigan, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 118, 1606­1617, doi:10.1002/jgrc.20136. 1. Introduction [2) with turbid waters contributing to increased survival by limiting sunlight penetration, removal of bacteria

  17. Ultrasonic measurement of porous medium in an aqueous environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daubon, Jose C

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a medical ultrasonic scanning device was studied as a measuring tool for determining the physical characteristics of soft porous media in an turbid aqueous environment. Three different sponge types were used as the soft objects. A method...

  18. Oil removal for produced water treatment and micellar cleaning of ultrafiltration membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beech, Scott Jay

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be useful as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Membrane cleaning of produced water...

  19. eschweizerbartxxx Effects of flamingos in Doana marshes 167

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figuerola, Jordi

    rainfall. Key words: Flamingos, macrophytes, turbidity, nutrients, chironomids, sediment resuspension, and preventing resuspension of the sediments (Jeppesen et al. 1998, Scheffer 1998). It is therefore important of submerged plants and enhance sediment resuspension (Scheffer et al. 1993, Scheffer 1998). However

  20. High-resolution simulations of particle-driven gravity currents F. Necker a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meiburg, Eckart H.

    to show that resuspension of sediment back into the particle-driven current is unlikely to occur by differential loading with suspended particles. Turbidity currents in oceans or lakes, which can lead

  1. Supplement 23, Part 1, Authors: A-Z 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Kirby, Margie D.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The light propagation in highly scattering turbid media composed of the particles with different size distribution is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation model implemented in Standard C. Monte Carlo method has been widely utilized to study...

  2. Water quality and chemistry of an alpine stream: a case study of Sneffels Creek, Yankee Boy Basin, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heggie, Tracey Michelle

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction potential (orp) were measured at forty-one study sites along Sneffels Creek. Temperature, tds, conductivity, and orp are positively correlated and show an inverse relationship with elevation and channel width. Turbidity is highly variable along...

  3. Evaluation of the complementary use of the ceramic (Kosim) filter and Aquatabs in Northern Region, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanton, Andrew A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kosim filter is a ceramic water filter that is currently used in Northern Ghana. Based on prior MIT research in Northern Ghana, this technology is effective at removing 92% of turbidity, 99.4% of total coliforms, and ...

  4. The effects of selected environmental variables on filtration rate of Mytilopsis leucophaeata and evaluation of its potential role in the purification of mariculture effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Patrick Hays

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laivlotte 2020 turbidity meter (Table I). Cuttlefish ink, colloidal carbon suspensions, microalgae cultures and mariculture eIHuent were used to provide measurable suspended particles which could be removed by the mussel filtration apparatus in order... concentration versus filtration rate, including Aquadag?, Sepia ink and cultured Nannoch/orops/s (microalgae). A specific amount of each colloid was suspended in filtered seawater Concentrations were estimated by relative turbidity measurements. Wang (1990...

  5. A water quality characterization of a tidally influenced flood control canal of Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polasek, Jeffrey Steven

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H), specific conductance, sulfide, total organic carbon (TOC), and turbidity samples were collected at seven stations in HBDC and from the effluent of two municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWTP) discharging into HBDC in order to detect significant... to MWTP outfall. Specific conductance patterns mirrored salinity trends. TOC levels showed a steady bayward decrease. Turbidity levels were consistently highest in bottom waters. No trends were apparent for COD, pH, and sulfide. HBDC water quality...

  6. Engineering faculty forum. Final report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, L.V.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to develop and broadcast monthly one-hour teleconferences to support the professional development of engineering faculty. The {open_quotes}Engineering Faculty Forum{close_quotes} was available nationwide over the NTU Satellite Network and was also available from a C-Band Satellite. There was no cost to participate in the live teleconferences for the two year period. The programs were developed in response to a questionnaire sent to engineering faculty members across the United States. Copies of the flyers and a print out of each course participation form has been included as a part of this report.

  7. Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

  8. Thng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thng tin trong t ri ny u c trn m ng. c thng tin chi ti t v c p nh t, xin vui lng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Tháng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thông tin trong t ri này u có trên m ng. có thông tin chi ti t và c p nh t, xin vui lòng tra c u t i website c a chúng tôi : httpThông tin nhanh NTU, tr ng i h c t ng h p l n nh t và lâu i nh t ài Loan, ã thông báo các chng trình ào

  9. {kshirai,t-yagi}@jaist.ac.jp [3, 5, 9, 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirai, Kiyoaki

    {kshirai,t-yagi}@jaist.ac.jp 1 ( ) [1, 2] [8] ( ) [3, 5, 9, 10] EDR [6] 2 SVM Support Vector 3 [8] EDR 6 ID 3c5631 , 1f66e3 3c5631 1f66e3 3c5631 1f66e3 EDR 1 3http://www.csie.ntu.edu.tw/%7 1 SVM (2 ) (3 ) 2 2 4.1 SVM 5 20 4.2 ( ) ( (2)) = (2) Oh 5 Oh=10 ( ) 5 EDR [6] EDR 20 EDR ID EDR 20

  10. Wave variability and wave spectra for wind generated gravity waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretschneider, Charles L.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    \\c7) cJ\\y \\ pj?7y T7jwJc ObD 6? U7)u7yc s{ 6\\?7( jy Mr\\i)\\yc( OOO H? nsy{ji7yu7 1j_jc( {s) ns))7P\\cjsy ns7{{juj7yc( PjPc 8e $7(c {s) 1jy7\\)jcL s{ h7w)7((jsy OOZ nT^U$0h k?? t ^ $T0vh* v. 6^k0 2U0n$h^ .hva /v?'$ I?2$h?nC$?v' O9 p7y7)\\P O?Q ?9 0y...7)wL nsy(ji7)\\cjsy( O?Q Q? I7)j?\\cjsy s{ V 2d7uc)\\ s{ V ^ 126 nT^U$0h k t 6^k0 k^h?^m?1?$* ^ 'I /v?'$ I?2$h?mC$?v' ?jjj C? t t2d7uc)\\ s{ , , O?D %? U7)jsi 2d7uc)\\ O?o 69 .)7lr7yuL 2d7uc)\\ OQb H? U)sd7)cj7( s{ 6\\?7 2d7uc)\\ OQQt U7\\? s{ ) t2d7...

  11. Vertical distribution of caged estuarine fish in thermal effluent subject to gas supersaturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanowsky, Peter Anthony

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . indicates lack of significance; I = March - May 1977; Iz November 1977 ? Janury 1978. 21 2. 60 2. 68 2. 76 2. 84 2. 92 3. 00 3. 08 3. 16 3. 24 3. 32 14. 5 17. 5 20. 5 23. 5 26. 5 29. 5 32. 5 TEMPERATURE (C) Figure 2. ? Relationship between... 2. 16 O 2. 76 3. 36 Q 3. 96 4. 56 5. 16 9 15 21 27 33 39 45 51 57 63 69 TURBIDITY (FTU) Figure 8. ? Relationship between the mean depth of the large modal group of Atlantic croaker and turbidity recorded daily between 1200-1500 hours. 29 0...

  12. From: MORMAN David A Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2006 11:21 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and forest landowners. Among the 19 indicators are six addressing maintaining and improving water quality.a. Water quality of forest streams (Water quality index) Metrics: · Physical/chemical properties (temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, pH, phosphorus, nitrogen, nitrate, ammonium nitrate, total solids) 1

  13. Docent Briefing NUTRIENTS...Why all the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    April 2014 14:1 · 16 M people · Mixed land uses · Shallow but seasonally stratified · Estuary and restoration is solid...stay with it! · Substantial reductions of N and P result in improved water quality Increased algae, hypoxia, turbidity #12;Back River Stats Pop density 5.3/acre dense Land use 80

  14. Stability and flocculation of nanosilica by conventional organic polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , solar panels, sports equipment, cleaning products and dietary supplements. It is by far the most vastly concentrations of different coagulants and flocculants used were determined by electrophoresis and turbidity potential route to treat other types of NPs. The treatment proposed to reach a ratio of average diameters d

  15. Runoff Polishing by Natural Media Filtration: Upflow vs. Downflow Mukesh R. Pratap1, Shirley E. Clark2, Robert Pitt3, Christopher D. Roenning2, Daniel P. Treese2, and Christina Y.S. Siu2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    . Turbidity removal seen in both modes (data not shown). Some washout of media likely in both modes, but washout of media lasted longer in the upflow mode. Phosphate removal (data not shown) was possible) Maintenance: remove upper media layer Disadvantages: Clogging Pretreatment (i.e., sedimentation to reduce

  16. Forestry and Water -An Update on Water Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the freshwater environment Implementing good practice Halladale: Turbidity 01.01.1995 - 01.01.2011 0 2 4 6 8 10;17/11/116 Demonstrating how the integrated application of a range of land management practices can help reduce flood risk Agricultural production -£1,113 -£911 -£306 Forestry Costs -£710 -£539 -£369 Net Present Value £906 £4,379 £9

  17. Unit Operation Efficiency Improvement Through Motionless Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, L. T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actual case his tories. Figure 9 lists 5 industrial appli cations where the ener9Y savings wer 90% more. In Case #1, the turbidity of i ~ B ing river water had to be reduced an A pH balanced. This required the addi (> (> of clay slurry, alum...

  18. PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, COLLEGE OF FAMILY AND CONSUMER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navara, Kristen

    ADDITION TO THE CHILLER The USDA-Food Safety Inspection Service recently required companies to demonstrate that redwater being pumped back into chillers from the rechiller is "cleaner" or "hase less bacteria and turbidity" than water coming out of the chillers in the overflow. This regulation has caused some

  19. P.A. Nelson S.M. Kajiura G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV-filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajiura, Stephen

    P.A. Nelson Ã? S.M. Kajiura Ã? G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV levels of solar radiation than they had previously experienced in the source habitat in the turbid waters spectrum, but sharks exposed to greater solar radiation showed increased UV blocking in their corneal

  20. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Beer and Wort J A Stephen Viggiano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairchild, Mark D.

    Spectrophotometric Analysis of Beer and Wort J A Stephen Viggiano Chester F Carlson Center of beers and laboratory worts were measured spectropho- tometrically. The applicability of the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer law to beers and worts without visible turbidity, the independence of cell position for measurement

  1. An Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters as Sensors to Obtain the Concentration of Suspended Mass in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    An Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters as Sensors to Obtain the Concentration of Suspended, acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) and other acoustic sensors have been used by researchers in the ocean than optical turbidity sensors, and the high-frequency velocity measurements allow for a direct

  2. Comparison of inherent optical properties as a surrogate for particulate matter concentration in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    - ated with each of the sensors participating in the ACT Tech- nology Evaluation. In Table A1, we provide is available and should not be applied to other turbidity sensors. For all sensors, the correlation coefficient. Output of type-II regressions between PM and the measurements of the different scattering sensors. Note

  3. Calcareous nannoplankton and benthic foraminiferal assemblages from the Nazar Canyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g. upwelling, internal waves, and turbidity currents), the distance From Deep-sea to Coastal Zones: Methods waves) may be locally promoting favourable conditions for calcareous nannoplankton, as shown by high the coast shifts from an N ­ S to a NE ­ SW orientation, probably capturing most of the long-shore sediment

  4. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksnes, Dag L.

    are a ubiquitous feature of the oceans. The waves are formed by variable wind stress and the actions of tides and currents on the ocean bottoms and continental margins (Garrett & Munk 1979). Several effects of internal in light penetration through the turbid surface layer of the sea. Illustration: Hege Vestheim OPENPEN

  5. Determination of refractive indices of porcine skin tissues and Intralipid at eight wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the presence of coherent and diffuse reflection near the specular reflection angle. An existing method has been biological tissues, however, light scattering dominates from ultraviolet to near-infrared spectral regions system for accurate measurement of coherent reflectance curves of turbid samples and analyzed

  6. Modeling the Effects of Oyster Reefs and Breakwaters on Seagrass Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Elizabeth W.

    like breakwaters by attenu- ating waves, thus decreasing sediment resuspension. We developed a quasi), a parameter controlled by resuspension-induced turbidity, was calculated in simulations in which wave height influencing SGP, with higher waves increasing sediment resuspension and decreasing SGP. Submerged breakwaters

  7. Great Lakes CoastWatch Research and Product Development Primary Investigator: George Leshkevich -NOAA/GLERL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    imagery from new satellite sensors such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for ice classification SWA calibration software, the collaboration with researchers at the German Aerospace Center (DLR at the University of Toledo to develop an improved turbidity product and data base: 1. SAR research and field

  8. Supporting Information Hydration and Conformational Mechanics of Single

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidler, Scott

    Zauscher Substrate Preparation and ELP Coupling. To minimize unspecific interactions between ELP and a gold are listed. The transition temperature is defined at the maximum in the turbidity gradient while heating at 1 thousand force-extension curves were collected. Only a fraction of the measured curves, however, represent

  9. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talke, Stefan

    and sediment distribution in highly turbid estuaries: An analytical model S.A. Talkea,Ã,1 , H.E. de Swarta , H gradient and six model parameters: settling velocity, vertical mixing, horizontal dispersion, total Motivated by field studies of the Ems estuary which show longitudinal gradients in bottom sediment

  10. Anhang Eawag-Jahresbericht 2011 Abgeschlossene Doktorarbeiten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    /in Hochschule Akhavan Samira Application of SWAT Model to Investigate Nitrate Leaching in Hamadan terrestrial stages of aquatic insects into studies of dispersal and recruitment in streams Robinson Zürich Bonalumi Matteo Effect of pumped-storage operations on temperature, turbidity and sedimentation

  11. Marine biota response to clastic sediment influx: A quantitative approach Stephen W. Lokier a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    shallow-water mixed carbonate- volcani/siliciclastic depositional environments--the Miocene Wonosari/siliciclastic sediment within these mixed successions have allowed assessment of the influence of these factors and 4) feeding mechanisms relative to: a) sediment settling, b) turbidity, c) abrasion, d) energy, e

  12. The Influence of Availability Costs on Optimal Heat Exchanger Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witte, L. C.

    3.62 2272.5 2230.2 2691.5 0.1433 110 3.86 2321. 3 2129.6 2740.3 0.4154 145 4.03 2344.5 2066.2 2763.5 0.7005 165 . 4.29 2371. 0 1960.0 2790.0 1. 3978 195 2385.0 4.67 230 2804.0 1813.8 2.795 2370.7 5.24 270 2789.7 1605.2 5.499 The scheme... clearly affects the optimal NTU hat will result. Thus the effect of the s r roundings and function of a particularlheat exchanger on its irreversibility costs is inherently contained in the curves of iq ure 2. The parameter Thi/Tci ranges ftom 1...

  13. Contamination of the transformer oil of power transformers and shunting reactors by metal-containing colloidal particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L'vov, S. Yu. [LLC 'Presselektro' (Russian Federation); Komarov, V. B.; Bondareva, V. N.; Seliverstov, A. F. [A. N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IFCE of RAS) (Russian Federation); Lyut'ko, E. O.; L'vov, Yu. N. [JSC 'R and D Centre for Power Engineering' (Russian Federation); Ershov, B. G. [A. N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IFCE of RAS) (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a measurement of the contamination of the oil in 66 transformers by metal-containing colloidal particles, formed as a result of the interaction of the oil with the structural materials (the copper of the windings, the iron of the tank and core etc.), and also the results of measurements of the optical turbidity of the oil in 136 transformers when they were examined at the Power Engineering Research and Development Center Company are presented. Methods of determining the concentration of copper and iron in transformer oil are considered. The limiting values of the optical turbidity factors, the copper and iron content are determined. These can serve as a basis for taking decisions on whether to replace the silica gel of the filters for continuously purifying the oil of power transformers and the shunting reactors in addition to the standardized oil contamination factors, namely, the dielectric loss tangent and the acidity number of the oil.

  14. Sedimentary environments and processes in a shallow, Gulf Coast Estuary-Lavaca Bay, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bronikowski, Jason Lee

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    point, the bedload cannot migrate seaward pass the null point. As a result, coarser sediment deposits form upstream of the null point. During flooding, the null point and bedload deposits migrate down into the bay. A turbidity maximum exists... correlation between low and high backscatter to muddy and sandy substrates. Low backscatter correlated to fine grain sediment and the high backscatter to coarser sediment deposits at grab locations, and these were extrapolated to the entire bay floor...

  15. Stocking and Management Recommendations for Texas Farm Ponds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For example, what size pond is to be stocked? Generally, ponds less than one acre receive different recommendations than larger ponds. The extent of water surface fluctuations, degree of expected fishing pressure and the muddiness of the water are a few... balance between bass and forage. Spawning devices may be installed to encourage reproduction of catfish. Expect most or all of the reproduction to be removed by bass, particularly in clear ponds. In muddy or turbid ponds, more catfish will avoid bass...

  16. Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinarts, Mary Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the three types of turbidite channels. After Berg (1978) 44 47 49 50 LIST OF FIGURES - Continued Figure Page lg Idealized depositional model for turbi dite constructional channels. After Berg (1978) 51 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Regional... (1962) from turbidity current deposits . Bouma 's complete turbi di te is defined as follows: pelitic shale upper unit of parallel laminae D current ripple unit lower unit of parallel laminae 8 massive graded unit In terms of flow regime...

  17. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePaul, Gilbert John

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    overbank sandstones. Sandstones become thinner and less frequent upward in the section. Thin sand- stones 1n the predominantly shale section are widespread and exhibit sedimentary structures commonly observed in turbidity-current deposits (ABCDE, ABDE... feet of depth. Production in the Upper Wilcox section is from multiple sandstone units within a shale section on a local structural closure (Fig. 2). The properties of these sandstone units and the local stratigraphic variation determine...

  18. Analyses of azimuthal seismic anisotrophy in the vertically fractured Spraberry and Dean formations, Midland County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarmo, Bernadus Supraptomo

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The zone of interest is the Spraberry trend, which consists of Spraberry and Dean formations. The Spraberry trend, which is a deep sub-marine fan complex deposited from turbidity currents (Wilkinson, 1953; Hanford, 1981; Tyler and Gholston, 1988), forms... and sandstone (McLennan and Bradley, 1951; Schmidt, 1954; Hanford, 1981; Tyler and Gholston, 1988). The Dean formation consists of sandstone, gray-white to brown sandstone with thin streaks of tan to brown limestone and black shale (Mc Lennan and Bradley...

  19. Lawrence Residence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interpreted as of turbidity-flow origin. The embayment 1s filled with a dominant shale section wh1ch contains microfauna believed to represent bathyal depths. , Cores retrieved from fields in Jefferson County, southeast Texas, were studied to examine... shale samples Shell Hebert Ranch 1-C and Humble 1 Port Acres Gas Unit 1 48 14 Scanning electron micrographs of characteristic Frio foraminifera from selected wells including Shell Hebert Ranch 1-C and Humble 1 Port Acres Gas Unit 1, Jefferson County...

  20. Contrasting processes of deposition for the Eagleford "B" sandstone, Bryan, IDS, and Kurten fields, Brazos County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golding, Robert Martin

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sectional view of Eagleford sand- ridge depositional model showing vertical and lateral facies relationships. Modified from Phillips (1987) and Gaynor and Swift (1988) 83 25 Plan view of Eagleford sand-ridge depo- sitional model showing lateral facies... distribution and rotation of shelf current flow across the ridge. From Phillips (1987) 84 26 Depositional model proposed by Turner and Conger (1981) for Kurten field sandstones. Figure shows prograding Harris Delta, river mouth by-passing, shelf turbidity...

  1. Holistic random encoding for imaging through multimode fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Hwanchol; Chung, Euiheon; Choi, Wonshik; Lee, Heung-No

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The input numerical aperture (NA) of multimode fiber (MMF) can be effectively increased by placing turbid media at the input end of the MMF. This provides the potential for high-resolution imaging through the MMF. While the input NA is increased, the number of propagation modes in the MMF and hence the output NA remains the same. This makes the image reconstruction process underdetermined and may limit the quality of the image reconstruction. In this paper, we aim to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the image reconstruction in imaging through MMF. We notice that turbid media placed in the input of the MMF transforms the incoming waves into a better format for information transmission and information extraction. We call this transformation as holistic random (HR) encoding of turbid media. By exploiting the HR encoding, we make a considerable improvement on the SNR of the image reconstruction. For efficient utilization of the HR encoding, we employ sparse representation (SR), a relatively new signal r...

  2. Reservoir compartmentalization of deep-water Intra Qua Iboe sand (Pliocene), Edop field, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobile Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria); Shanmugam, G. [Mobile Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integration of 3-D seismic and sedimentological information provides a basis for recognizing and mapping individual flow units within the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Core examination show the following depositional facies: A-Sandy slump/mass flow, B-Muddy slump/mass flow, C. Bottom current reworking. D-Non-channelized turbidity currents, E. Channelized (coalesced) turbidity currents. F-Channelized (isolated) turbidity currents, G-Pelagic/hemipelagic, H-Levee, I-Reworked slope, J-Wave dominated, and K-Tide dominated facies. With the exception of facies J and K, all these facies are of deep-water affinity. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope environment in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated scaward, deposition began with a channel dominated deep-water system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated deep-water system (IQI 3, the principle reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated shallow-water system (IQI 4). Compositional and textural similarities between the deep-water facies result in similar log motifs. Furthermore, these depositional facies are not readily apparent as distinct seismic facies. Deep-water facies A, D, E, and F are reservoir facies, whereas facies B, C, G, H, and I are non-reservoir facies. However, Facies G is useful as a seismically mappable event throughout the study area. Mapping of these non-reservoir events provides the framework for understanding gross reservoir architecture. This study has resulted in seven defined reservoir units within the IQI, which serves as the architectural framework for ongoing reservoir characterization.

  3. Properties and potential uses of water treatment sludge from the Neches River of southeast Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kan, Weiqun

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sludge due to its huge amount and increasing public concern. However, only a few studies were focused on potential use of WTP sludge. The characteristics and potential use of WTP sludge are still not well understood. Previous studies of WTP alum sludge... plants that coagulate, filter, and oxidize a surface water for removal of turbidity, color, bacteria, algae, organic compounds, and iron or manganese. These plants generally use alum Al~(SO4) or iron FeC13 salts for coagulation and produce alum or iron...

  4. Structures, Molecular Descriptors, Model Development and Biopharmaceutical Property Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolger, Michael

    2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-section Outlet Bile Guide wire Balloon Inlet Jejunal perfusion Bile Balloon Balloon Lennernas, H, et al. Pharm. Res. 9:1243-1251 (1992) Loc-I-Gut Perfusion GPEN Kansas 2006 Epithelial Cell Permeability Assay Li, A.P., DDT, 6(7):339-348 8 GPEN... Thermodynamic solubility at a known pH. Molecule could be ionized 0% - 100%. ? HTS-turbidity: (Rank order of solubility only) ? Precipitation of molecule from solution in organic solvent by adding pH 7 buffer. Hendriksen BA, Sanchez MF, and Bolger MB: (2003...

  5. An investigation of the depolarization of backscattered electromagnetic waves using a lidar polarimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelmi, Gary Joe

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -2 Values of Q' for Rough Surfaces 91 V-3 C-1 C-2 Values of Volume Reflection Coefficients for Rough Surfaces Turbid Water Data Rough Surface Data 140 141 LIST OF FIGURFS Figure ~pa e II-1 Scattering geometry for the surface scatter... components are given by: 19 H, (a. . ~, ) Z-, E (ct, - g, ) (n. x 7, ) Egg (I I- 2) The components in the plane of incidence are: Ea = ECa, , n, )n. + Ccz, -d ) 4. 3 E H = -(o. , -d )+ (I 1-3) The local surface currents are now found. If the sub...

  6. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During first quarter 1993, samples from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, and parameters characterizing suitability as a drinking water supply. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in four of the wells. Iron and manganese each exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells PAC 2, 5, and 6.

  7. Multi-layer diffusion approximation for photon transport in biological tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollmann, Joseph

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    turbid medium illuminated by normal incidence usually took about one and a half hours while oblique incidence required fifteen hours. 4.1 Results Both the single-source and double-source approximations are tested in two cases. First, the thickness... )sin()sin( imta nn ?? = (A2) Photons incident upon the medium at an angle greater than the critical angle, given by ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? = m a c n n asin? , (A3) are assumed to be internally reflected. The radiance or intensity of light...

  8. Distribution of cesium-137 in the Mississippi Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pflaum, Ronald Charles

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of sediment mixing by organisms and large scale sediment transport by slumps and turbidity currents. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to thank B. J. Presley for serving as chairman of my com- mittee, for encouragement in pursuing this project, and for all his help... though time spent on this thesis resulted in time away from my work with his research group. Several people helped in the design of this project and with the field work and they are most deserving of thanks: J. H. Trefry, W. Keeney-Kennicutt, J. R...

  9. Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pauli, Adam T. (Cheyenne, WY); Robertson, Raymond E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Chatham, IL); Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

  10. Clarification of construction and mining rainfall runoff 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Roberta Davyd

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H, coagulant dose, and mixing on the efficiency of selected coagulants are evaluated. For the use of either the polymer, American Cyanamid Super- floc 340 or alum with lime for pH adjustment, lower pH levels gave improved removal of total suspended solids... and turbidity. The doses found to be most effective for treatment of pond waters from the mine site are 8 mgll of Superfloc 340 and 80 mg/1 of alum with iv 22. 4 mg/1 lime for pH adjustment. Mixing of Superfloc 340 was found to be critical and increased...

  11. Ozone treatment in a closed culture system for Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    media was brought to 3. 0 ppt with "Instant Ocean" salt and pH was adjusted with either sodium hydroxide or sulfuric acid. 2. The accumulation of residual ozone was investigated in the tap water-based culture medium alone and with 12 ppm total ammonia..., turbidity and other organic substances was very effective, but no significant reduction in ammonia nitrogen content wss achieved, unless an oyster shell filter was introduced in the media. fea lty f tf 1 * 9 11 9 b*Mt ~btt demonstrated. Ozone...

  12. Solving Water Quality Problems in the Home 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    unnecessary. Private well water should be tested at least every 2 years for coliform bacteria and nitrates. Also test for lead if the house is old and contains iron or copper pipes, fittings, plumbing fixtures or solder. Other contaminants need to be measured... Reddish-brown slime Iron bacteria Off-color appearance: Cloudy Turbidity Black Hydrogen sulfide, manganese Brown or yellow Iron, tannic acid Unusual taste and odor: Rotten egg Hydrogen sulfide Metallic pH, corrosive index, iron, zinc, copper, lead Septic...

  13. Sequence stratigraphy, facies architecture and reservoir distribution, Cretaceous lowstand fan reservoirs, Southern Basin, onshore Trinidad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprague, A.R.; Larue, D.K.; Faulkner, B.L. [Exxon Production Research Company, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thick Albian-Campanian mass-flow sandstones in the Southern Basin Trinidad were deposited within submarine canyons incised into the northern continental slope of South America and as associated down-dip basin-floor lowstand fans. The contemporaneous slope to basin-floor break lay across the Southern Basin area with turbidity current paleoflow being to the northwest. North of this paleo-slope break graded to massive, channelized, high-density turbidite sandstones occur interstratified with shaly overbank and channel abandonment deposits. A progression of depositional sub-environments from proximal through distal lowstand fan can be recognized. All fine and thin upward but can be discriminated by the occurrence of slumps, debris flows and conglomerates, the grain-size and bedding scale of sandstones and the characteristics of low-density turbidites and mudrocks. South of the paleo-slope break mass-flow deposits comprise muddy slumps and debris flows rich in granules and pebbles deposited in slope canyons. During periods of turbidity current by-pass or fan abandonment hemipelagic settling processes predominated. Reservoir distribution maps of these lowstand fans have been constructed utilizing geometric constraints, analogs and paleoslope determinations from oriented core. The interpreted canyon locations and orientations are key to the understanding of reservoir distribution on the basin-floor tract to the north: a vital component in the exploration of the basin.

  14. Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

  15. Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

  16. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett

    2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

  17. Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobler, C J; Grigoriev, I V; Berry, D L; Dyhrman, S T; Wilhelm, S W; Salamov, A; Lobanov, A V; Zhang, Y; Collier, J L; Wurch, L L; Kustka, A B; Dill, B D; Shah, M; VerBerkomes, N C; Kuo, A; Terry, A; Pangilinan, J; Lindquist, E A; Lucas, S; Paulsen, I; Hattenrath-Lehmann, T K; Talmage, S; Walker, E A; Koch, F; Burson, A M; Marcoval, M A; Tang, Y; LeCleir, G R; Coyne, K J; Berg, G M; Bertrand, E M; Saito, M A; Gladyshev, V N

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements demonstrated that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the first HAB genome (A. anophagefferens) and compared its gene complement to those of six competing phytoplankton species identified via metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on the gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 mbp) and more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen utilization, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

  18. Spectral solar irradiance before and during a Harmattan dust spell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyefa, Z.D. [Federal Univ. of Technology, Akure (Nigeria)] [Federal Univ. of Technology, Akure (Nigeria); Holmgren, B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the ground-level spectral distributions of the direct, diffuse and global solar irradiance between 300 and 1100 nm were made at Akure (7.15{degree}N, 5.5{degree}E), Nigeria, in December 1991 before and during a Harmattan dust spell employing a spectroradiometer (LICOR LI-1800) with 6 nm resolution. The direct spectral solar irradiance which was initially reduced before the dust storm was further attenuated by about 50% after the spell. Estimated values of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} indicated an increase of about 146% of this parameter while the Angstrom wavelength-exponent {alpha} decreased by about 65% within the 2-day study period. The spectral diffuse-to-direct and diffuse-to-global ratios suggest that the main cause of the significant reduction in solar irradiance at the surface was the scattering by the aerosol which led to an increase in the diffuse component. The global irradiance though reduced, was less sensitive to changing Harmattan conditions. It is recommended that solar energy devices that use radiation from Sun and sky be used under fluctuating Harmattan conditions. There are some deviations from the Angstrom formula under very turbid Harmattan conditions which could be explained by the relative increase of the particle sizes. 31 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Metal ions in water and sediments of the Pom-Atasta Lagoon, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez, G.F.; Enciso, G.; Morales, J.W. [UNAM, Distrito Federal (Mexico). Instituto de Ciencias Del Mar y Limnologia] [UNAM, Distrito Federal (Mexico). Instituto de Ciencias Del Mar y Limnologia; Sharma, V.K. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Nischt, S.L.; Domingo, G.L. [PEMEX, Campeche (Mexico)] [PEMEX, Campeche (Mexico)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature, salinity, turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS), pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured in the surface water of the Pom-Atasta Lagoon at 15 stations during 5 sampling events from September 1996--May 1997. Concentrations of Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, Pb, Cr, Ag, Fe, Co, and Ba were also determined in the water and sediments at 15 stations during the study period. The values of salinity, turbidity, and TSS were related to the inputs of river water into the lagoon. Metals in the water and sediments showed no spatial variation. Seasonality in the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Ag, and Ba in the water was found and may be related to the resuspension of sediments in the lagoon. The concentrations of metals in sediments did not give significant seasonal variation. Metals in sediments were not correlated with the iron, suggesting an anthropogenic source of metals in the Pom-Atasta Lagoon. The concentrations of dissolved Pb were above the value recommended by the National Water Commission of Mexico.

  20. Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor; Gobler, Christopher; Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Terry, Astrid; Pangillian, Jasmyn; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Berry, Dianna; Dyhrman, Sonya; Wilhelm, Steven; Lobanov, Alexei; Zhang, Yan; Collier, Jackie; Wurch, Louie; Kusta, Adam; Dill, Brian; Shsh, Manesh; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Paulsen, Ian; Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa; Talmage, Stephanie; Walker, Elyse; Koch, Florian; Burson, Amanda; Marcoval, Maria; Tang, Yin-Zhong; LeCleir, Gary; Coyne, Kathyrn; Berg, Gry; Bertrand, Erin; Saito, Mak; Gladyshev, Vadim

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking, because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements showed that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the genome of A. anophagefferens and compared its gene complement with those of six competing phytoplankton species identified through metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 Mbp) and has more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen use, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species, with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus, has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

  1. SLUDGE PARTICLE SEPAPATION EFFICIENCIES DURING SETTLER TANK RETRIEVAL INTO SCS-CON-230

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DEARING JI; EPSTEIN M; PLYS MG

    2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to release, into the Hanford Document Control System, FA1/0991, Sludge Particle Separation Efficiencies for the Rectangular SCS-CON-230 Container, by M. Epstein and M. G. Plys, Fauske & Associates, LLC, June 2009. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) will retrieve sludge from the 105-K West Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Settler Tanks and transfer it to container SCS-CON-230 using the Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS). The sludge will enter the container through two distributors. The container will have a filtration system that is designed to minimize the overflow of sludge fines from the container to the basin. FAI/09-91 was performed to quantify the effect of the STRS on sludge distribution inside of and overflow out of SCS-CON-230. Selected results of the analysis and a system description are discussed. The principal result of the analysis is that the STRS filtration system reduces the overflow of sludge from SCS-CON-230 to the basin by roughly a factor of 10. Some turbidity can be expected in the center bay where the container is located. The exact amount of overflow and subsequent turbidity is dependent on the density of the sludge (which will vary with location in the Settler Tanks) and the thermal gradient between the SCS-CON-230 and the basin. Attachment A presents the full analytical results. These results are applicable specifically to SCS-CON-230 and the STRS filtration system's expected operating duty cycles.

  2. Simulation model air-to-air plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple simulation model of an air-to-air plate heat exchanger is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows the eflcient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is to shorten computation time and to use only input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part-load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important in energy eficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculations or load calculations with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short- time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control theory, are neglected. The part-load behavior is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part-load condition. If the heat transfer coefficients on the two exchanger sides are not equal (i. e. due to partial bypassing of air), their ratio can be easily calculated and set as a parameter. The model is static and uses explicit equations only. The explicit model formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability, which allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods like automatic system optimization. This paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for any particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

  3. TESTING OF THE SPINTEK ROTARY MICROFILTER USING ACTUAL HANFORD WASTE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUBER HJ

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter was tested on actual Hanford tank waste. The samples were a composite of archived Tank 241-AN-105 material and a sample representing single-shell tanks (SST). Simulants of the two samples have been used in non-rad test runs at the 222-S laboratory and at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The results of these studies are compared in this report. Two different nominal pore sizes for the sintered steel rotating disk filter were chosen: 0.5 and 0.1 {micro}m. The results suggest that the 0.5-{micro}m disk is preferable for Hanford tank waste for the following reasons: (1) The filtrate clarity is within the same range (<<4 ntu for both disks); (2) The filtrate flux is in general higher for the 0.5-{micro}m disk; and (3) The 0.1-{micro}m disk showed a higher likelihood of fouling. The filtrate flux of the actual tank samples is generally in the range of 20-30% compared to the equivalent non-rad tests. The AN-105 slurries performed at about twice the filtrate flux of the SST slurries. The reason for this difference has not been identified. Particle size distributions in both cases are very similar; comparison of the chemical composition is not conclusive. The sole hint towards what material was stuck in the filter pore holes came from the analysis of the dried flakes from the surface of the fouled 0.1-{micro}m disk. A cleaning approach developed by SRNL personnel to deal with fouled disks has been found adaptable when using actual Hanford samples. The use of 1 M nitric acid improved the filtrate flux by approximately two times; using the same simulants as in the non-rad test runs showed that the filtrate flux was restored to 1/2 of its original amount.

  4. Tuning metal–carboxylate coordination in crystalline metal–organic frameworks through surfactant media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Junkuo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ye, Kaiqi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); He, Mi [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Xiong, Wei-Wei; Cao, Wenfang; Lee, Zhi Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wu, Tom [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Huo, Fengwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Xiaogang [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Zhang, Qichun, E-mail: qczhang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it has been widely demonstrated that surfactants can efficiently control the size, shape and surface properties of micro/nanocrystals of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) due to the strong interactions between surfactants and crystal facets of MOFs, the use of surfactants as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals is unprecedented. In addition, compared with ionic liquids, surfactants are much cheaper and can have multifunctional properties such as acidic, basic, neutral, cationic, anionic, or even block. These factors strongly motivate us to develop a new synthetic strategy: growing crystalline MOFs in surfactants. In this report, eight new two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) MOFs have been successfully synthesized in an industrially-abundant and environmentally-friendly surfactant: polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Eight different coordination modes of carboxylates, ranging from monodentate ?{sup 1} mode to tetra-donor coordination µ{sub 3}-?{sup 1}:?{sup 2}:?{sup 1} mode, have been founded in our research. The magnetic properties of Co-based MOFs were investigated and MOF NTU-Z6b showed a phase transition with a Curie temperature (T{sub c}) at 5 K. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. - Graphical abstract: Surfactants have been used as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals for the first time. Eight new two-dimensional or three-dimensional MOFs were successfully synthesized in surfactant polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Coordination modes of carboxylates up to eight were founded. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Surfactant-thermal synthesis of crystalline metal–organic frameworks. • Eight new 2-D or 3-D metal–organic frameworks. • Eight different metal–carboxylate coordination modes.

  5. COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEIYU SHEN; ROYCE ABBOTT; T.D. WHEELOCK

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The agglomeration of ultrafine-size coal particles in an aqueous suspension by means of microscopic gas bubbles was demonstrated in numerous experiments with a scale model mixing system. Coal samples from both the Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam and the Upper Freeport Seam were used for these experiments. A small amount of i-octane was added to facilitate the process. Microscopic gas bubbles were generated by saturating the water used for suspending coal particles with gas under pressure and then reducing the pressure. Microagglomerates were produced which appeared to consist of gas bubbles encapsulated in coal particles. Since dilute particle suspensions were employed, it was possible to monitor the progress of agglomeration by observing changes in turbidity. By such means it became apparent that the rate of agglomeration depends on the concentration of microscopic gas bubbles and to a lesser extent on the concentration of i-octane. Similar results were obtained with both Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Upper Freeport coal.

  6. Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castaño, Gabriel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

  7. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  8. Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barefield Il, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements like plutonium and uranium; (2) a LIBS system that can be deployed in harsh environments such as gloveboxes and hot cells providing relative compositional analysis of process streams for example ratios like Cm/Pu and Cm/U; and (3) an inspector field deployable system that can be used to analyze the elemental composition of microscopic quantities of samples containing plutonium and uranium. In this paper we will describe our current development and performance testing results both in a fixed lab and measurements in field deployable configurations using LIBS instrumentation developed for applications to international safeguards.

  9. Simulation model finned water-air-coil withoutcondensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple simulation model of a finned water-to- air coil without condensation is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows eficient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is short computation time and use of input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important for energy efficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculation or load calculation with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short-time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control performance, are neglected. The part load behavior of the coil is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature on the water side and the air side. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part load conditions. Geometrical data for the coil are not required, The calculation of the convective heat transfer coefficients at nominal conditions is based on the ratio of the air side heat transfer coefficients multiplied by the fin eficiency and divided by the water side heat transfer coefficient. In this approach, the only geometrical information required are the cross section areas, which are needed to calculate the~uid velocities. The formulas for estimating this ratio are presented. For simplicity the model ignores condensation. The model is static and uses only explicit equations. The explicit formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability. This allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods such as automatic system optimization. The paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for a particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

  10. ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

  11. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

  12. Treatment of dredged sludge by mechanical dehydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekawa, T.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge deposits in the water area damage the ecosystems and environments; their elimination has always been an urgent task for human communities. Generally, sludge deposits are dredged out of the bottom of the water area, transported to, and discharged at a large disposal area on land. Recently, however, it has become increasingly difficult to secure disposal areas and routes of speedy transportation for disposal of dredged sludge. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to reduce both the volume of dredged sludge and the size of the disposal area. This mechanical method is different from the conventional engineering dehydration by loading, consolidation, and drainage in that the dredged sludge is separated into sludge cakes and clean water that can be returned to the water area through mechanical centrifugal dehydration. Sludge deposits are distributed thin and wide on the bottom of the water area, and a pump dredge has been proved effective in many cases for dredging the upper layers of sludge deposits accurately and without creating turbidity in water. This mechanical sludge treatment technique can be most efficient when used in combination with a pump dredge. This method offers the following advantages: (a) It requires smaller space for treatment and disposal of dredged sludge than the conventional method. (b) Facilities and costs for transportation can be reduced. (c) Various systems can be adopted for transportation of sludge cakes. (d) This system is transportable and compact and can be constructed anywhere either on land or on water.

  13. Analytical support for a new, low-level radioactive wastewater treatment plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, V.D.; Marsh, J.H.; Ingram, L.M.; Melton, W.L.; Magonigal, E.J.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) located in Aiken, SC, is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company under contract with the US Department of Energy. The mission of SRS is to manufacture radioisotopes for use in national defense and space exploration. The F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) is a wastewater treatment plant supporting SRS for low-level radioactive process waste streams. In order to comply with the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the facility had to become operational by November 8, 1988. The F/H ETF employs pH adjustment, microfiltration, organic removal, reverse osmosis, evaporation, and ion exchange to remove contaminants prior to discharge to the environment via a state-permitted outfall. Concentrated contaminants removed by these processes are diverted to other facilities for further processing. The ETF is supported by a 24 hr/day facility laboratory for process control and characterization of influent feed, treated effluent water, and concentrated waste. Permit compliance analyses reported to the state of SC are performed by an offsite certified contract laboratory. The support laboratory is efficiently organized to provide: metal analyses by ICP-AES, alpha/beta/gamma activity counting, process ions by Ion Selective Electrode (ISE), oil and grease analyses by IR technique, mercury via cold vapor AA, conductivity, turbidity, and pH. All instrumentation is contained in hoods for radioactive sample handling.

  14. Fate of human viruses in groundwater recharge systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Landry, E.F.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this research program was to determine the ability of a well-managed tertiary effluent-recharge system to return virologically acceptable water to the groundwater aquifer. The study assessed the quality of waters renovated by indigenous recharge operations and investigated a number of virus-soil interrelationships. The elucidation of the interactions led to the establishment of basin operating criteria for optimizing virus removal. Raw influents, chlorinated tertiary effluents, and renovated wastewater from the aquifer directly beneath a uniquely designed recharge test basin were assayed on a weekly basis for the presence of human enteroviruses and coliform bacteria. High concentrations of viruses were routinely isolated from influents but were isolated only on four occasions from tertiary-treated sewage effluents. In spite of the high quality effluent being recharged, viruses were isolated from the groundwater observation well, indicating their ability to penetrate the unsaturated zone. Results of poliovirus seeding experiments carried out in the test basin clearly indicated the need to operate recharge basins at low (e.g. 1 cm/h) infiltration rates in areas having soil types similar to those found at the study site. The method selected for reducing the test basin infiltration rate involved clogging the basin surface with settled organic material from highly turbid effluent. Alternative methods for slowing infiltration rates are discussed in the text.

  15. Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

  16. Modeling and forecasting the distribution of Vibrio vulnificus in Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, John M.; Rhodes, M.; Brown, C. W.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Leight, A.; Long, Wen; Wood, R.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim is to construct statistical models to predict the presence, abundance and potential virulence of Vibrio vulnificus in surface waters. A variety of statistical techniques were used in concert to identify water quality parameters associated with V. vulnificus presence, abundance and virulence markers in the interest of developing strong predictive models for use in regional oceanographic modeling systems. A suite of models are provided to represent the best model fit and alternatives using environmental variables that allow them to be put to immediate use in current ecological forecasting efforts. Conclusions: Environmental parameters such as temperature, salinity and turbidity are capable of accurately predicting abundance and distribution of V. vulnificus in Chesapeake Bay. Forcing these empirical models with output from ocean modeling systems allows for spatially explicit forecasts for up to 48 h in the future. This study uses one of the largest data sets compiled to model Vibrio in an estuary, enhances our understanding of environmental correlates with abundance, distribution and presence of potentially virulent strains and offers a method to forecast these pathogens that may be replicated in other regions.

  17. Sampling and analysis of water from Upper Three Runs and its wetlands near Tank 16 and the Mixed Waste Management Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April and September 1993, sampling was conducted to characterize the Upper Three Runs (UTR) wetland waters near the Mixed Waste Management Facility to determine if contaminants migrating from MWMF are outcropping into the floodplain wetlands. For the spring sampling event, 37 wetlands and five stream water samples were collected. Thirty-six wetland and six stream water samples were collected for the fall sampling event. Background seepline and stream water samples were also collected for both sampling events. All samples were analyzed for RCRA Appendix IX volatiles, inorganics appearing on the Target Analyte List, tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and gross radiological activity. Most of the analytical data for both the spring and fall sampling events were reported as below method detection limits. The primary exceptions were the routine water quality indicators (e.g., turbidity, alkalinity, total suspended solids, etc.), iron, manganese, and tritium. During the spring, cadmium, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, potassium-40, ruthenium-106, and trichloroethylene were also detected above the MCLs from at least one location. A secondary objective of this project was to identify any UTR wetland water quality impacts resulting from leaks from Tank 16 located at the H-Area Tank Farm.

  18. Using Advanced Scientific Diving Technologies to Assess the Underwater Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, John A.; Williams, Greg D.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Blanton, Michael L.

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific diving can provide unique information for addressing complex environmental issues in the marine environment and is applied to a variety of increasingly important issues throughout Puget Sound, including habitat degradation, endangered species, biological availability of contaminants, and the effects of overwater structures and shoreline protection features. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory uses trained scientific divers in conjunction with advanced technologies to collect in-situ information best obtained through direct observation and requiring minimal environmental disturbance. For example, advances in underwater communications allow divers to discuss observations and data collection techniques in real time, both with each other and with personnel on the surface. Other examples include the use of Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON), an underwater camera used to capture digital images of benthic structures, fish, and organisms during low light and high turbidity levels; the use of voice-narrated underwater video; and the development of sediment collection methods yielding one-meter cores. The combination of using trained scientific SCUBA divers and advanced underwater technologies is a key element in addressing multifaceted environmental problems, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the underwater environment and more reliable data with which to make resource management decisions.

  19. Predicting stream water quality using artificial neural networks (ANN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, J.A.

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting point and nonpoint source runoff of dissolved and suspended materials into their receiving streams is important to protecting water quality and traditionally has been modeled using deterministic or statistical methods. The purpose of this study was to predict water quality in small streams using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The selected input variables were local precipitation, stream flow rates and turbidity for the initial prediction of suspended solids in the stream. A single hidden-layer feedforward neural network using backpropagation learning algorithms was developed with a detailed analysis of model design of those factors affecting successful implementation of the model. All features of a feedforward neural model were investigated including training set creation, number and layers of neurons, neural activation functions, and backpropagation algorithms. Least-squares regression was used to compare model predictions with test data sets. Most of the model configurations offered excellent predictive capabilities. Using either the logistic or the hyperbolic tangent neural activation function did not significantly affect predicted results. This was also true for the two learning algorithms tested, the Levenberg-Marquardt and Polak-Ribiere conjugate-gradient descent methods. The most important step during model development and training was the representative selection of data records for training of the model.

  20. Smolt Passage Behavior and Flow-Net Relationship in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1984-1985 Final Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgi, Albert E.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The migration routes of downstream migrant salmonids in the forebay of John Day Dam were defined and assessed in relation to current velocities and water turbidity and temperature. Forebay current patterns were obtained from current meters at fixed sampling stations, the distribution of outmigrants was determined from purse seine sampling, and migration routes of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead were identified by radio telemetry techniques. All species of emigrating salmonids alter their distribution across the forebay as they approach the dam. Fish abundance was positively correlated with water clarity. There was no evidence to suggest that the migration routes were in response to current patterns in the forebay. Radio telemetry studies demonstrated that a certain segment of yearling chinook salmon approaching the dam are predisposed to spill passage (Washington side of the river) by virtue of their lateral position across the forebay. A new application of radio tag methodology was assessed and found to be useful in evaluating the effectiveness of spill for bypassing outmigrant salmon. A program system and cartographic model was developed which displays for any specified hour forebay current patterns at prevailing river flows and dam operations. The system can be used at other dam sites where investigations may wish to detail forebay current patterns.

  1. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

  2. California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsline, D.S.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

  3. Quick, portable toxicity testing of marine or terrigenous fluids, sediments, or chemicals with bioluminescent organism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L. [Lumitox Gulf L.C., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A hand-held, battery-operated instrument, which measures bioluminescence inhibition of the microscopic marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula, is capable of field-testing substances for toxicity. The organism is sensitive to ppb of strong toxicants. It tolerates some solvents in concentrations necessary for testing lipophylic samples. A test consumes only micrograms of sample. This method requires no adjustments for salinity, pH, color, or turbidity. It has been used successfully to test oil-well drilling fluids, brines produced with oil, waters and sediments from streams and lakes and petroleum-plant effluents containing contaminants such as benzene. The test is non-specific; however, if the substance is known, the end-point effects a direct measurement of its concentration. One-hour toxicity screening tests in the field produce results comparable to the standard four-hour laboratory test. Keeping the sample in the dark during incubation and testing, together with shortness of the overall procedure, eliminates anomalies from light-sensitive substances. Day-to-day variation, as well as among test replicates, is less than 10%. This quick method yields results comparable with a quick test that uses Photobacterium phosphoria, and with 96-hour tests that use Mysidopsis bahia, Artemia salina, Gonyaulax polyedra, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Cyprinodon variegatus.

  4. Characteristics of the C Shale and D Shale reservoirs, Monterey Formation, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; McIntyre, J.L. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States); McJannet, G.S. [Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper Miocene C Shale and D Shale reservoirs of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation have cumulative oil and gas production much higher than the originally estimated recovery. These San Joaquin basin reservoirs are the lowest of the Stevens producing zones at Elk Hills and currently produce from a 2800-acre area on the 31 S anticline. The C Shale contains lower slope and basin plain deposits of very fine grained, thinly bedded, graded turbidites, pelagic and hemipelagic claystone, and slump deposits. Although all units are oil-bearing, only the lower parts of the graded turbidity intervals have sufficient horizontal permeability to produce oil. The D Shale consists of chart, claystone, carbonates and slump deposits, also originating in a lower slope to basin plain setting. All D Shale rock types contain oil, but the upper chart interval is the most productive. The chart has high matrix porosity, and due to a complex horizontal and vertical microfracture system, produces at a highly effective rate. Core samples indicate more oil-in-place is present in the thin, graded C Shale beds and in the porous D Shale chart than is identifiable from conventional electric logs. High gas recovery rates are attributed mostly to this larger volume of associated oil. Gas also enters the reservoirs from the adjacent 26R reservoir through a leaky normal fault. Significant gas volumes also may desorb from immature organic material common in the rock matrix.

  5. Characteristics of the C Shale and D Shale reservoirs, Monterey Formation, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; McIntyre, J.L. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper Miocene C Shale and D Shale reservoirs of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation have cumulative oil and gas production much higher than the originally estimated recovery. These San Joaquin basin reservoirs are the lowest of the Stevens producing zones at Elk Hills and currently produce from a 2800-acre area on the 31 S anticline. The C Shale contains lower slope and basin plain deposits of very fine grained, thinly bedded, graded turbidites, pelagic and hemipelagic claystone, and slump deposits. Although all units are oil-bearing, only the lower parts of the graded turbidity intervals have sufficient horizontal permeability to produce oil. The D Shale consists of chart, claystone, carbonates and slump deposits, also originating in a lower slope to basin plain setting. All D Shale rock types contain oil, but the upper chart interval is the most productive. The chart has high matrix porosity, and due to a complex horizontal and vertical microfracture system, produces at a highly effective rate. Core samples indicate more oil-in-place is present in the thin, graded C Shale beds and in the porous D Shale chart than is identifiable from conventional electric logs. High gas recovery rates are attributed mostly to this larger volume of associated oil. Gas also enters the reservoirs from the adjacent 26R reservoir through a leaky normal fault. Significant gas volumes also may desorb from immature organic material common in the rock matrix.

  6. Characterization of highly scattering media by measurement of diffusely backscattered polarized light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hielscher, Andreas H. (Brooklyn, NY); Mourant, Judith R. (Los Alamos, NM); Bigio, Irving J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for recording spatially dependent intensity patterns of polarized light that is diffusely backscattered from highly scattering media are described. These intensity patterns can be used to differentiate different turbid media, such as polystyrene-sphere and biological-cell suspensions. Polarized light from a He-Ne laser (.lambda.=543 nm) is focused onto the surface of the scattering medium, and a surface area of approximately 4.times.4 cm centered on the light input point is imaged through polarization analysis optics onto a CCD camera. A variety of intensity patterns may be observed by varying the polarization state of the incident laser light and changing the analyzer configuration to detect different polarization components of the backscattered light. Experimental results for polystyrene-sphere and Intralipid suspensions demonstrate that the radial and azimuthal variations of the observed pattern depend on the concentration, size, and anisotropy factor, g, of the particles constituting the scattering medium. Measurements performed on biological cell suspensions show that intensity patterns can be used to differentiate between suspensions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells. Introduction of the Mueller-matrix for diffusely backscattered light, permits the selection of a subset of measurements which comprehensively describes the optical properties of backscattering media.

  7. Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.D.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

  8. Lithofacies distribution in Smackover/Haynesville (Oxfordian) depositional sequence, MAFLA Area, northeastern Gulf Coast Basin, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boronow, T.C. (Shell Western Exploration and Production, Inc., Houston, TX (USA)); Prather, B.E. (Shell Offshore Inc., New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation of a basal carbonate unit a downlap or maximum flooding surface, and approximated time lines in a prograding unit provide the time-stratigraphic framework for mapping the distribution of reservoir, seal, and source lithofacies within the Smackover/Haynesville depositional sequence. Seismic sequence analysis of offshore data core control, onshore to offshore regional stratigraphic sections, and time-slice lithofacies maps show this depositional sequence to consist of a deepening-upward transgressive system tract (TST) and a shallowing-upward highstand systems tract (HST). The TST is composed of predominantly lime mudstones and microlaminated mudstones. These mudstones are source rocks for Norphlet and Smackover accumulations and top seals for some Norphlet accumulations. Reservoir rocks in the TST were deposited in high-energy environments localized over paleotopographic highs and around basin margins. The HST over most of offshore MAFLA is dominated by siliciclastic deposition. In these areas, the HST is characterized by sigmoid clinoform seismic character. The clinoforms result from interbedded carbonates. Source rocks occur in bottomsets and foresets, and grainstones are located in the topsets of these carbonate interbeds. The source rocks are part of a condensed zone deposited in a starved basin and grainstones were deposited at the paleostrandline. Sandstone reservoirs deposited by turbidity currents are found in bottomsets and shoreface sandstones occur in topsets of siliciclastic beds. The HST in onshore and offshore areas not affected by siliciclastic influx consists of shoaling-upward carbonate to evaporite parasequence sets. Here, grainstone reservoirs are capped by Buckner anhydrite top seals.

  9. Sediment pass-through, an alternative to reservoir dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, L.L.; Lee, W.H. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Tu, S. [Pacific and Gas Electric Co., San Ramon, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is studying an alternative {open_quotes}Sediment Management Plan{close_quotes} (SMP) to control sediments at Rock Creek Reservoir and the downstream Cresta Reservoir on the North Fork Feather River in Plumas County. The reservoirs are part of the 182,000 kW Rock Creek-Cresta Project hydroelectric development. Approximately 5.4 million cubic meters of sediments, deposited in the two reservoirs since they were placed in service in 1949 and 1950, partially obstruct the dams` low level outlets and pipe inlets supplying water for spillway gate operations. The sediments jeopardize the reliable and efficient operation of the dams and powerhouses. The SMP includes retrofitting Rock Creek and Cresta Dams with additional low-level gated outlets and modification of trash racks at the existing low level outlet pipes at each dam to improve sediment pass-through (SPT) capacity during high flows. Also, to enable construction of the dam modifications and to facilitate the initiation of SPT operation, dredging of approximately 46,000 cubic meters at Rock Creek Reservoir and 57,000 cubic meters at Cresta Reservoir can be accomplished using a new slurry pump dredging technology to minimize turbidity and re-suspension of solids during dredging. It is proposed to deposit the sediment on the reservoir bottoms, upstream of the areas to be dredged. The dredged sediments subsequently would be flushed from the reservoirs during SPT operations to ultimately be deposited in the dead storage volume of a large downstream reservoir, Lake Oroville. The SPT management plan supersedes more costly plans for major dredging, and may preclude the need for future maintenance dredging at the reservoirs.

  10. Red Fork sandstones (lower Pennsylvanian) in deeper parts of Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiting, P.H.; Levine, S.D.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Red Fork sandstones in the deeper part of the Anadarko basin are the downdip equivalents of fluvial and deltaic sandstones in the Cherokee Group. The sandstones have repetitive, ordered sequences of sedimentary structures in vertical section. Individual bedsets display sharp basal contacts, gradational tops, and contorted bedding. The characteristics indicate these basinal sandstones were deposited by turbidity currents. The sandstones occur as narrow, linear constructional channels that are dip-trending. The lateral change from channel-fill to overbank facies takes place abruptly. The sandstones are very fine-grained litharenites with an average composition of 58% quartz, 8% feldspar, 17% rock fragments, 5% other grains, and 12% matrix. Cement consists mainly of calcite ranging from 2 to 40% of the bulk volume. Quartz content tends to decrease upward and matrix increases upward within bedsets. The compositional grading is accompanied by a decrease in grain size upward within bedsets, indicating deposition during a decreasing flow-regime. Red Fork sandstones are low-permeability reservoirs with an average porosity and permeability of 7.8% and 0.1 md, respectively. Natural gas reservoirs occur mainly in the thicker, channel sequences. The bedding character of the channel and overbank facies is reflected in ..gamma..-ray log responses. Log characters of the two facies are used to interpret turbidite sections of uncored areas. The interpretations are adapted to the East Clinton field for prediction of constuctional channel reservoirs. The interpretation of dip-trending turbidite deposits may aid in exploration and development of the Red Fork sandstones.

  11. Deltaic sedimentation in saline, alkaline Lake Bogoria, Kenya: Response to environmental change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renaut, R.W. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Tiercelin, J.J. (Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Domaines Oceaniques)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake Bogoria is a meromictic, saline (90 g/l TDS), alkaline (pH: 10.3) lake with Na-CO[sub 3]-Cl waters, located in a narrow half-graben in the central Kenya Rift. It is fed by hot springs, direct precipitation, and a series of ephemeral streams that discharge into the lake via small deltas and fan-deltas. Examination of the exposed deltas and >50 short cores from the lake floor, have revealed a wide range of deltaic and prodeltaic sediments, including turbidites and subaqueous debris-flow deposits. Studies of 3 long cores and the exposed delta stratigraphy have shown how the style of deltaic sedimentation has responded to environmental changes during the last 30,000 years. During humid periods when lake level is high the lake waters are fresher and less dense. Theoretically, high sediment yield and more constant discharge may promote underflow (hyperpycnal flow), generating low-density turbidity currents. In contrast, during low stages with dense brine, the less dense, inflowing waters carry fine sediment plumes toward the center of the lake where they settle from suspension (hypopycnal flow). Although applicable as a general model, the sediment record shows that reality is more complex. Variations in meromixis and level of the chemocline, together with local and temporal differences in sediment yield and discharge, may permit density flows even when the lake is under a predominant hypopycnal regime. During periods of aridity when sodium carbonate evaporites were forming, exposed delta plains were subject to desiccation with local development of calcrete and zeolitic paleosols.

  12. Microbial dissolved organic phosphorus utilization in the Hudson River Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, J.W. (Texas A M Univ., College Station (United States)); Angel, D.L. (City College of New York, NY (United States))

    1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hudson River Estuary has large inputs of phosphorus and other nutrients from sewage discharge. Concentrations of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) reach at least 4 uM during the summer low-flow period. Biological utilization of phosphorus and other nutrients is usually minimal because of the high turbidity and short residence time of the water. Therefore SRP is normally a conservative tracer of salinity, with maximum concentrations found off Manhattan and decreasing to the north. Despite this abundance of SRP, some components of the dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) appear to be rapidly cycled by microbes. The objective of this study was to measure this DIP cycling during both the high- and low-flow periods. We measured the concentrations of SRP and DOP, the SRP turnover rate, algal and bacterial biomass, and the substrate turnover rates of two microbial cell-surface phosphatases, alkaline phosphatase (AP) and 5[prime] - nucleotidase (5PN). SRP concentrations ranged from about 0.5-4 uM, DOP was usually less than 1 uM. SRP and AP turnover were slow (generally < 5%/h), but 5PN substrate turnover was high with a median rate of 100%/h. Furthermore, over 30% of the phosphate hydrolyzed by 5PN was immediately taken up. If the nucleotide-P concentration is conservatively assumed to be 5 nM, than the rate of phosphate utilization from DOP is nearly equal to that from SRP. That is paradoxical considering the large SRP concentration, but suggests that much of this SRP may be biologically unavailable due to complexation with iron or other processes.

  13. An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of Langat River estuary, Selangor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamzah, Zaini, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Rosli, Tengku Nurliana Tuan Mohd, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Saat, Ahmad, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Wood, Ab. Khalik, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An estuary is an area that has a free connection with the open sea and it is a dynamic semi-enclosed coastal bodies. Ex-mining, aquaculture and industrial areas in Selangor are the sources of pollutants discharged into the estuary water. Radionuclides are considered as pollutants to the estuary water. Gamma radiations emitted by natural radionuclides through their decaying process may give impact to human. The radiological effect of natural radionuclides which are {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, were explored by determining the respective activity concentrations in filtered water along the Langat estuary, Selangor. Meanwhile, in- situ water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolve oxygen (DO), salinity, total suspended solid (TSS), pH and turbidity were measured by using YSI portable multi probes meter. The activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in samples are in the range of 0.17 - 0.67 Bq/L, 0.16 - 0.97 Bq/L and 1.22 - 5.57 Bq/L respectively. On the other hand, the concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 were determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF). The thorium concentrations are between 0.17 ppm to 0.28 ppm and uranium concentrations were 0.25 ppm to 0.31 ppm. The results show activity concentrations of radionuclides are slightly high near the river estuary. The Radium Equivalent, Absorbed Dose Rate, External Hazard Index, and Annual Effective Dose of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K are also studied.

  14. Particle Restabilization in Silica/PEG/Ethanol Suspensions: How Strongly do Polymers Need To Adsorb To Stabilize Against Aggregation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F. (UIUC)

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of increasing the concentration of a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol on the stability of 44 nm diameter silica nanoparticles suspended in ethanol. Polymer concentration, c{sub p}, is increased from zero to that characterizing the polymer melt. Particle stability is accessed through measurement of the particle second-virial coefficient, B{sub -2}, performed by light scattering and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The results show that at low polymer concentration, c{sub p} < 3 wt %, B{sub -2} values are positive, indicating repulsive interactions between particles. B{sub -2} decreases at intermediate concentrations (3 wt % < c{sub p} < 50 wt %), and particles aggregates are formed. At high concentrations (50 wt % < c{sub p}) B{sub -2} increases and stabilizes at a value expected for hard spheres with a diameter near 44 nm, indicating the particles are thermodynamically stable. At intermediate polymer concentrations, rates of aggregation are determined by measuring time-dependent changes in the suspension turbidity, revealing that aggregation is slowed by the necessity of the particles diffusing over a repulsive barrier in the pair potential. The magnitude of the barrier passes through a minimum at c{sub p} {approx} 12 wt % where it has a value of {approx}12kT. These results are understood in terms of a reduction of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attractions with increasing c{sub p}. Depletion attractions are found to play a minor role in particle stability. A model is presented suggesting displacement of weakly adsorbed polymer leads to slow aggregation at intermediate concentration, and we conclude that a general model of depletion restabilization may involve increased strength of polymer adsorption with increasing polymer concentration.

  15. An investigation of cathodoluminescence in albite from the A-type Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalby, Kim N.; Anderson, Alan J.; Mariano, Anthony N.; Gordon, Robert A.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Wirth, Richard (Missouri SU); (SFX); (Simon); (GFZ)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals red and blue colors within single, non-turbid albite (Ab{sub 98-99}) grains from the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia. A 720 nm X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) peak characterizes red CL regions, while a 280 nm XEOL feature dominates blue CL regions. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence results indicate that red CL and the 720 nm XEOL peak intensities relate to total Fe concentrations. The relationship between red CL and Fe content is confirmed by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The XEOL technique is used to exclude the Fe K-edge as the cause of red CL. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that Fe in both the red and blue CL regions is Fe{sup 3+}, and that red CL activation may relate to the Si-Al order of the feldspar and to the distribution of Fe on tetrahedral sites. The CL textures, combined with EMPA and LA-ICPMS analyses, indicate that blue CL albite (Ab98) regions contain higher concentrations of Ca, Ti, Pb and rare earth elements, and were replaced, in part, by a more Fe-rich, trace element depleted albite (Ab99) which displays red CL. Complex diffraction contrasts and amorphous deposits identified in transmission electron microscope images suggest that aqueous fluids have reacted with both red and blue CL regions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures of up to 430 C provide a lower estimate of the fluid temperature.

  16. Slump dominated upper slope reservoir facies, Intra Qua Iboe (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integration of sedimentologic and 3D seismic data provides a basis for unraveling complex depositional processes and sand distribution of the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Nearly 3,000 feet of conventional core was examined in interpreting slump/slide/debris flow, bottom current, turbidity current, pelagic/hemipelagic, wave and tide dominated facies. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated seaward, deposition began with a turbidite channel dominated slope system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated slope system (IQI 3, the principal reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated, collapsed shelf-edge deltaic system (IQI 4). Using seismic time slices and corresponding depositional facies in the core, a sandy {open_quotes}fairway{open_quotes} has been delineated in the IQI 3. Because of differences in stacking patterns of sandy and muddy slump intervals, seismic facies show: (1) both sheet-like and mounded external forms (geometries), and (2) parallel/continuous as well as chaotic/hummocky internal reflections. In wireline logs, slump facies exhibits blocky, coarsening-up, fining-up, and serrated motifs. In the absence of conventional core, slump facies may be misinterpreted and even miscorrelated because seismic facies and log motifs of slumps and debris flows tend to mimic properties of turbidite fan deposits. The slump dominated reservoir facies is composed of unconsolidated fine-grained sand. Thickness of individual units varies from 1 to 34 feet, but amalgamated intervals reach a thickness of up to 70 feet and apparently form connected sand bodies. Porosity commonly ranges from 20 to 35%. Horizontal permeability commonly ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 md.

  17. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) is the main limiting factor in our fisheries.

  18. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

  19. Determination of thermal and cementation histories from [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and ion microprobe stable isotope analyses: A San Joaquin Basin example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahon, K.I.; Harrison, T.M.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M. (UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the temperature and cementation histories of sedimentary basins is key to appraisal of their liquid hydrocarbon potential. Understanding the thermal history permits assessment of whether source rocks have experienced conditions appropriate for petroleum formation. The mobility of hydrocarbons and their storage capacity in sandstone reservoirs are directly related to porosity changes during diagenesis. Recent advances in [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating (stripping of Cl-correlated Ar[sub xs] Multi-Diffusion Domain model) and development of ion micro-probe techniques for precise ([+-]0.6[per thousand]) [mu]m-scale oxygen isotopic analysis provide a basis to quantitatively determine thermal and cementation histories. Arkosic sandstones of the Stevens turbidities, San Joaquin basin, are cemented by carbonates with minor amounts of clay and quartz. Detrital K-spars from depths of 4.12 (A4) and 6.61 km (Al) in the Stevens zone at Elk Hills yield thermal histories via the MDD model. These results indicate a broadly linear temperature rise of 9[+-]3[degrees]C/Ma over the past 10 Ma and predict current peak temperatures that are within error ([+-]25[degrees]C) of the measured values of 200[degrees] (Al) and 150[degrees]C (A4). Previous bulk isotopic analyses of cements from Stevens sands at North Coles Levee indicate that diagenetic pore fluids were modified by the introduction of hydrocarbons and CO[sub 2] from maturing source horizons. In situ O isotopic analyses of 10 [mu]m spots in these cements confirms this heterogeneity. A model cementation history can then be calculated by linking the oxygen isotopic composition of the cements (and temperature-dependent fractionation factor) with the thermal history independently established from thermochronometry.

  20. Determination of thermal and cementation histories from {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar and ion microprobe stable isotope analyses: A San Joaquin Basin example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahon, K.I.; Harrison, T.M.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M. [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the temperature and cementation histories of sedimentary basins is key to appraisal of their liquid hydrocarbon potential. Understanding the thermal history permits assessment of whether source rocks have experienced conditions appropriate for petroleum formation. The mobility of hydrocarbons and their storage capacity in sandstone reservoirs are directly related to porosity changes during diagenesis. Recent advances in {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating (stripping of Cl-correlated Ar{sub xs} Multi-Diffusion Domain model) and development of ion micro-probe techniques for precise ({+-}0.6{per_thousand}) {mu}m-scale oxygen isotopic analysis provide a basis to quantitatively determine thermal and cementation histories. Arkosic sandstones of the Stevens turbidities, San Joaquin basin, are cemented by carbonates with minor amounts of clay and quartz. Detrital K-spars from depths of 4.12 (A4) and 6.61 km (Al) in the Stevens zone at Elk Hills yield thermal histories via the MDD model. These results indicate a broadly linear temperature rise of 9{+-}3{degrees}C/Ma over the past 10 Ma and predict current peak temperatures that are within error ({+-}25{degrees}C) of the measured values of 200{degrees} (Al) and 150{degrees}C (A4). Previous bulk isotopic analyses of cements from Stevens sands at North Coles Levee indicate that diagenetic pore fluids were modified by the introduction of hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} from maturing source horizons. In situ O isotopic analyses of 10 {mu}m spots in these cements confirms this heterogeneity. A model cementation history can then be calculated by linking the oxygen isotopic composition of the cements (and temperature-dependent fractionation factor) with the thermal history independently established from thermochronometry.

  1. Stevens and earlier miocene turbidite sandstones, southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, G.W.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick marine turbidite succession, dominantly coarse sandstone, underlies the southern part of the San Joaquin Valley. Sands are pebbly to fine grained, commonly poorly sorted, quartzose to arkosic, and are interbedded with dark shales bearing deep-water foraminifers. Graded bedding is common and, with the depths of 2000 to 6000 ft (610 to 1830 m) implied by the fauna, is taken to indicate a turbidity-current origin for most of the sands. The upper, middle, and lower Miocene turbidite section was revealed by extensive coring at Paloma, and is similar to the more widespread and oil and gas productive upper Miocene Stevens sandstone. The central-basin Stevens was deposited as channel sands on deep-sea fans derived from several discrete troughs or canyons on the eastern and southeastern margin of the basin prior to their burial by prograding Santa Margarita sand. Sand channels and lobes in the Bakersfield arch area were controlled locally by compaction structures. The rising Paloma anticline deflected Stevens sands for a time and the very last sands were guided also by incipient folds on the outer Bakersfield arch. Coarse Stevens conglomerates and sands shed from the emergent Temblor Range were deflected by the Buena Vista Hills, Elk Hills, and other anticlinal shoals and were deposited in intervening gaps as thick oil-productive channel sands. They merge with sands from the east side in flowing axially into the distal northwestern basin. Facies recognized in the subsurface include a meander-channel facies developed in the prograded muddy slope area upstream from the massive braided-sand facies.

  2. Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States); McJannet, G.S. [Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

  3. Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

  4. Application of horizontal drilling in the development of a complex turbidite sandstone reservoir, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (USA)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (USA)); Hart, O.D. (Chevron Inc., Tupman, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal drilling techniques have been used at the Elk Hills field, to more effectively produce the complex 26R reservoir. This Stevens zone reservoir of the Miocene Monterey Formation contains turbid sediments deposited in a deep-sea fan setting and consists of several distinct sandstone layers averaging 150 ft thick and usually separated by mudstone beds. Layers in the reservoir dip as much as 50{degree} southwest. An expanding gas cap makes many vertical wells less favorable to operate. Horizontal completions were thought ideal for the pool because (1) original oil-water contact is level and believed stable, (2) water production is low, (3) a horizontal well provides for a long production life; and (4) several sandstone layers can be produced through one well. For the first well, the plan was to redrill an idle well to horizontal along an arc with a radius of 350 ft. The horizontal section was to be up to 1,000 ft long and extend northeast slightly oblique to dip just above the average oil-water contact. The well was drilled in September 1988, reached horizontal nearly as planned, was completed after perforating 210 ft of oil sand, and produced a daily average of 1,000 bbl oil and 8 bbl of water. However, structural influence was stronger than expected, causing the horizontal drill path to turn directly updip away from the bottom-hole target area. The well also encountered variable oil-water contacts, with more than half the horizontal section possibly water productive. Geologic and drilling data from the first well were used for planning another well. This well was drilled in October 1989, and was highly successful with over 1,000 ft of productive interval.

  5. The impact of shrimp trawling and associated sediment resuspension in mud dominated, shallow estuaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dellapenna, Timothy M.; Allison, Mead A.; Gill, Gary A.; Lehman, Ronald D.; Warnken, Kent W.

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    To address the relative importance of shrimp trawling on seabed resuspension and bottom characteristics in shallow estuaries, a series of disturbance and monitoring experiments were conducted at a bay bottom mud site (2.5 m depth) in Galveston Bay, Texas in July 1998 and May 1999. Based on pre- and post-trawl sediment profiles of 7Be; pore water dissolved oxygen and sulfide concentration; and bulk sediment properties, it was estimated that the trawl rig, including the net, trawl doors, and ‘‘tickler chain,’’ excavate the seabed to a maximum depth of approximately 1.5 cm, with most areas displaying considerably less disturbance. Water column profile data in the turbid plume left by the trawl in these underconsolidated muds (85e90% porosity; <0.25 kPa undrained shear strength) demonstrate that suspended sediment inventories of up to 85e90 mg/cm2 are produced immediately behind the trawl net; an order of magnitude higher than pre-trawl inventories and comparable to those observed during a 9e10 m/s wind event at the study site. Plume settling and dispersion caused suspended sediment inventories to return to pre-trawl values about 14 min after trawl passage in two separate experiments, indicating particles re-settle primarily as flocs before they can be widely dispersed by local currents. As a result of the passage of the trawl rig across the seabed, shear strength of the sediment surface showed no significant increase, suggesting that bed armoring is not taking place and the trawled areas will not show an increase in critical shear stress.

  6. Biomonitoring of fish communities, using the index of Biotic Integrity, as an indicator of the success of soil conservation measures in the Rabbit Creek and Middle Creek watersheds, Macon County, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish communities in two upper Little Tennessee River tributaries, Rabbit Creek and Middle Creek, both located in Macon County, North Carolina, were monitored using IBI methods in 1990 and again in 1992. A single site, each on the lower reaches of its respective creek, was chosen to reflect the influence of conditions throughout the watershed and to provide a measure of water quality exiting the watershed. The Rabbit Creek watershed (Holly Springs community) has a long history of settlement and agricultural use. Dominant land uses today are pasture in the bottom lands and residential development at higher elevations. Much of the upper portion of the Middle Creek watershed on the slopes of Scaly Mountain is devoted to cabbage farming, often on steep slopes and highly erodible soils. From the cabbage growing area, the creek drops 400 feet to the lower valley. Other common land uses include residential, livestock, and forest. Both streams are characterized by heavy sedimentation and frequent high turbidity. Both streams showed marked improvement between 1990 and 1992. In 1990, Rabbit Creek`s IBI score was 31.0, for a bioclass rating of ``poor.`` In 1992, the IBI score was 42.1 for a bioclass rating of ``fair.`` For Middle Creek, the corresponding figures and ratings are 42.1 (fair) and 54.5 (good). Examination of the data for Rabbit Creek shows a reduction in the proportion of pollution-tolerant species, a higher proportion of specialized insectivores, a higher catch rate (reflecting higher total numbers of fish), and an additional intolerant species. In both cases, the data (supported by visual observation) suggests the causative factor is reduced sedimentation.

  7. Controlling the self-assembly of binary copolymer mixtures in solution through molecular architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Greenall; P. Schuetz; S. Furzeland; D. Atkins; D. M. A. Buzza; M. F. Butler; T. C. B. McLeish

    2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study on the role of copolymer architecture in the self-assembly of binary PEO-PCL mixtures in water-THF, and show that altering the chain geometry and composition of the copolymers can control the form of the self-assembled structures and lead to the formation of novel aggregates. First, using transmission electron microscopy and turbidity measurements, we study a mixture of sphere-forming and lamella-forming PEO-PCL copolymers, and show that increasing the molecular weight of the lamella-former at a constant ratio of its hydrophilic and hydrophobic components leads to the formation of highly-curved structures even at low sphere-former concentrations. This result is explained using a simple argument based on the effective volumes of the two sections of the diblock and is reproduced in a coarse-grained mean-field model: self-consistent field theory (SCFT). Using further SCFT calculations, we study the distribution of the two copolymer species within the individual aggregates and discuss how this affects the self-assembled structures. We also investigate a binary mixture of lamella-formers of different molecular weights, and find that this system forms vesicles with a wall thickness intermediate to those of the vesicles formed by the two copolymers individually. This result is also reproduced using SCFT. Finally, a mixture of sphere-former and a copolymer with a large hydrophobic block is shown to form a range of structures, including novel elongated vesicles.

  8. Sedimentology, petrology, and gas potential of the Brallier Formation: upper Devonian turbidite facies of the Central and Southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundegard, P.D.; Samuels, N.D.; Pryor, W.A.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian Brallier Formation of the central and southern Appalachian basin is a regressive sequence of siltstone turbidites interbedded with mudstones, claystones, and shales. It reaches 1000 meters in thickness and overlies basinal mudrocks and underlies deltaic sandstones and mudrocks. Facies and paleocurrent analyses indicate differences between the depositional system of the Brallier Formation and those of modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences. The Brallier system is of finer grain size and lower flow intensity. In addition, the stratigraphic transition from turbidites to deltaic sediments is gradual and differs in its facies succession from the deposits of the proximal parts of modern submarine fans. Such features as massive and pebbly sandstones, conglomerates, debris flows, and massive slump structures are absent from this transition. Paleocurrents are uniformly to the west at right angles to basin isopach, which is atypical of ancient turbidite systems. This suggests that turbidity currents had multiple point sources. The petrography and paleocurrents of the Brallier Formation indicate an eastern source of sedimentary and low-grade metasedimentary rocks with modern relief and rainfall. The depositional system of the Brallier Formation is interpreted as a series of small ephemeral turbidite lobes of low flow intensity which coalesced in time to produce a laterally extensive wedge. The lobes were fed by deltas rather than submarine canyons or upper fan channel systems. This study shows that the present-day turbidite facies model, based mainly on modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences, does not adequately describe prodeltaic turbidite systems such as the Brallier Formation. Thickly bedded siltstone bundles are common features of the Brallier Formation and are probably its best gas reservoir facies, especially when fracture porosity is well developed.

  9. BACKPRESSURE TESTING OF ROTARY MICROFILTER DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowley, M.; Herman, D.

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), is modifying and testing the SpinTek{trademark} rotary microfilter (RMF) for radioactive filtration service in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The RMF has been shown to improve filtration throughput when compared to other conventional methods such as cross-flow filtration. A concern with the RMF was that backpressure, or reverse flow through the disk, would damage the filter membranes. Reverse flow might happen as a result of an inadvertent valve alignment during flushing. Testing was completed in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) located in SRNL to study the physical effects of backpressure as well as to determine the maximum allowable back-pressure for RMF disks. The RMF disks tested at the EDL were manufactured by SpinTek{trademark} Filtration and used a Pall Corporation PMM050 filter membrane (0.5 micron nominal pore size) made from 316L stainless steel. Early versions of the RMF disks were made from synthetic materials that were incompatible with caustic solutions and radioactive service as well as being susceptible to delaminating when subjected to backpressure. Figure 1-1 shows the essential components of the RMF; 3 rotating disks and 3 stationary turbulence promoters (or shear elements) are shown. Figure 1-2 show the assembly view of a 25 disk RMF proposed for use at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the Hanford Facility. The purpose of the testing discussed in this report was to determine the allowable backpressure for RMF disks as well as study the physical effects of backpressure on RMF disks made with the Pall PMM050 membrane. This was accomplished by pressurizing the disks in the reverse flow direction (backpressure) until the test limit was reached or until membrane failure occurred. Backpressure was applied to the disks with air while submerged in deionized (DI) water. This method provided a visual representation of membrane integrity via bubble flow patterns. Membrane failure was defined as the inability to filter effectively at the nominal filter pore size. Effective filtration was determined by turbidity measurements of filtrate that was produced by applying forward-pressure to the disks while submerged in a representative simulant. The representative simulant was Tank 8F simulated sludge produced for SRNL by Optima Chemical. Two disks were tested. Disk 1 was tested primarily to determine approximate levels of backpressure where membrane failure occurred. These levels were then used to define the strategy for testing the Disk 2; a strategy that would better define and quantify the mode of failure.

  10. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A. [Department of Geodynamics and Geophysics, Steinmann Institute, University of Bonn Nussallee 8, D-53115, Bonn (Germany)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the submarine debris speed can be faster than the tsunami speed. This information can be useful for early warning strategies in the coastal regions. These findings substantially increase our understanding of complex multi-phase systems and multi-physics and flows, and allows for the proper modeling of landslide and debris induced tsunami, the dynamics of turbidity currents and sediment transport, and the associated applications to hazard mitigation, geomorphology and sedimentology.

  11. Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Department of Geophysics

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx}20 % to 23%). This trend is explained by a sequence stratigraphic model which predicts progressive increase in sorting by turbidity current along the flow, as well as, quantified by a rock model that heuristically accounts for sorting. The results can be applied to improve quantitative predication of sediment parameters from seismic impedance, away from well locations.

  12. Hopewell Beneficial CO2 Capture for Production of Fuels, Fertilizer and Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    UOP; Honeywell Resins & Chemicals; Honeywell Process Solutions; Aquaflow Bionomics Ltd

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    For Phase 1 of this project, the Hopewell team developed a detailed design for the Small Scale Pilot-Scale Algal CO2 Sequestration System. This pilot consisted of six (6) x 135 gallon cultivation tanks including systems for CO2 delivery and control, algal cultivation, and algal harvesting. A feed tank supplied Hopewell wastewater to the tanks and a receiver tank collected the effluent from the algal cultivation system. The effect of environmental parameters and nutrient loading on CO2 uptake and sequestration into biomass were determined. Additionally the cost of capturing CO2 from an industrial stack emission at both pilot and full-scale was determined. The engineering estimate evaluated Amine Guard technology for capture of pure CO2 and direct stack gas capture and compression. The study concluded that Amine Guard technology has lower lifecycle cost at commercial scale, although the cost of direct stack gas capture is lower at the pilot scale. Experiments conducted under high concentrations of dissolved CO2 did not demonstrate enhanced algae growth rate. This result suggests that the dissolved CO2 concentration at neutral pH was already above the limiting value. Even though dissolved CO2 did not show a positive effect on biomass growth, controlling its value at a constant set-point during daylight hours can be beneficial in an algae cultivation stage with high algae biomass concentration to maximize the rate of CO2 uptake. The limited enhancement of algal growth by CO2 addition to Hopewell wastewater was due at least in part to the high endogenous CO2 evolution from bacterial degradation of dissolved organic carbon present at high levels in the wastewater. It was found that the high level of bacterial activity was somewhat inhibitory to algal growth in the Hopewell wastewater. The project demonstrated that the Honeywell automation and control system, in combination with the accuracy of the online pH, dissolved O2, dissolved CO2, turbidity, Chlorophyll A and conductivity sensors is suitable for process control of algae cultivation in an open pond systems. This project concluded that the Hopewell wastewater is very suitable for algal cultivation but the potential for significant CO2 sequestration from the plant stack gas emissions was minimal due to the high endogenous CO2 generation in the wastewater from the organic wastewater content. Algae cultivation was found to be promising, however, for nitrogen remediation in the Hopewell wastewater.

  13. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality issues including dissolved oxygen and/or turbidity. Regardless, angler fishing experience was the highest at Lake Billy Shaw. Trout in Mountain View Reservoir were in the best condition of the three reservoirs and anglers reported very good fishing there. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) remain the main limiting factors in the fisheries, particularly in late August to early September.

  14. Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

  15. Chinook Salmon Adult Abundance Monitoring; Hydroacoustic Assessment of Chinook Salmon Escapement to the Secesh River, Idaho, 2002-2004 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Mueller, R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate determination of adult salmon spawner abundance is key to the assessment of recovery actions for wild Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Onchorynchus tshawytscha), a species listed as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). As part of the Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Program, the Nez Perce Tribe operates an experimental project in the South Fork of the Salmon River subbasin. The project has involved noninvasive monitoring of Chinook salmon escapement on the Secesh River between 1997 and 2000 and on Lake Creek since 1998. The overall goal of this project is to accurately estimate adult Chinook salmon spawning escapement numbers to the Secesh River and Lake Creek. Using time-lapse underwater video technology in conjunction with their fish counting stations, Nez Perce researchers have successfully collected information on adult Chinook salmon spawner abundance, run timing, and fish-per-redd numbers on Lake Creek since 1998. However, the larger stream environment in the Secesh River prevented successful implementation of the underwater video technique to enumerate adult Chinook salmon abundance. High stream discharge and debris loads in the Secesh caused failure of the temporary fish counting station, preventing coverage of the early migrating portion of the spawning run. Accurate adult abundance information could not be obtained on the Secesh with the underwater video method. Consequently, the Nez Perce Tribe now is evaluating advanced technologies and methodologies for measuring adult Chinook salmon abundance in the Secesh River. In 2003, the use of an acoustic camera for assessing spawner escapement was examined. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in a collaborative arrangement with the Nez Perce Tribe, provided the technical expertise to implement the acoustic camera component of the counting station on the Secesh River. This report documents the first year of a proposed three-year study to determine the efficacy of using an acoustic camera to count adult migrant Chinook salmon as they make their way to the spawning grounds on the Secesh River and Lake Creek. A phased approach to applying the acoustic camera was proposed, starting with testing and evaluation in spring 2003, followed by a full implementation in 2004 and 2005. The goal of this effort is to better assess the early run components when water clarity and night visibility preclude the use of optical techniques. A single acoustic camera was used to test the technology for enumerating adult salmon passage at the Secesh River. The acoustic camera was deployed on the Secesh at a site engineered with an artificial substrate to control the river bottom morphometry and the passage channel. The primary goal of the analysis for this first year of deployment was to validate counts of migrant salmon. The validation plan involved covering the area with optical video cameras so that both optical and acoustic camera images of the same viewing region could be acquired simultaneously. A secondary test was contrived after the fish passage was complete using a controlled setting at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in which we tested the detectability as a function of turbidity levels. Optical and acoustic camera multiplexed video recordings of adult Chinook salmon were made at the Secesh River fish counting station from August 20 through August 29, 2003. The acoustic camera performed as well as or better than the optical camera at detecting adult Chinook salmon over the 10-day test period. However, the acoustic camera was not perfect; the data reflected adult Chinook salmon detections made by the optical camera that were missed by the acoustic camera. The conditions for counting using the optical camera were near ideal, with shallow clear water and good light penetration. The relative performance of the acoustic camera is expected to be even better than the optical camera in early spring when water clarity and light penetration are limited. Results of the laboratory tests at the Pacific North

  16. Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria, the following constituent list and sampling schedule is proposed: Constituent; Sampling Frequency Site-Specific Parameters; Hexavalent chromium (a); Semiannual Chloride; Semiannual Fluoride; Semiannual Nitrate; Semiannual Nitrite; Semiannual Specific conductance (field)(a); Semiannual Ancillary Parameters; Anions; Annual Alkalinity Annual Metals, (in addition to chromium); Annual pH (field) Semiannual Temperature (field); Semiannual Turbidity (field) Semiannual (a). These constituents will be subject to statistical tests after background is established. It will be necessary to install new monitoring wells and accumulate background data on the groundwater from those wells before statistical comparisons can be made. Until then, the constituents listed above will be evaluated by tracking and trending concentrations in all wells and comparing these results with the corresponding DWS or Hanford Site background concentration for each constituent. If a comparison value (background or DWS) for a constituent is exceeded, DOE will notify Ecology per WAC 173-303-645 (9) (g) requirements (within seven days or a time agreed to between DOE and Ecology).

  17. Geoscience Perspectives in Carbon Sequestration - Educational Training and Research Through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wronkiewicz, David; Paul, Varum; Abousif, Alsedik; Ryback, Kyle

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The most effective mechanism to limit CO{sub 2} release from underground Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS) sites over multi-century time scales will be to convert the CO{sub 2} into solid carbonate minerals. This report describes the results from four independent research investigations on carbonate mineralization: 1) Colloidal calcite particles forming in Maramec Spring, Missouri, provide a natural analog to evaluate reactions that may occur in a leaking GCS site. The calcite crystals form as a result of physiochemical changes that occur as the spring water rises from a depth of more than 190'?. The resultant pressure decrease induces a loss of CO{sub 2} from the water, rise in pH, lowering of the solubility of Ca{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and calcite precipitation. Equilibrium modelling of the spring water resulted in a calculated undersaturated state with respect to calcite. The discontinuity between the observed occurrence of calcite and the model result predicting undersaturated conditions can be explained if bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) are directly involved in precipitation process rather than just carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). 2) Sedimentary rocks in the Oronto Group of the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) system contain an abundance of labile Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-silicate minerals that will neutralize carbonic acid and provide alkaline earth ions for carbonate mineralization. One of the challenges in using MCR rocks for GCS results from their low porosity and permeability. Oronto Group samples were reacted with both CO{sub 2}-saturated deionized water at 90°C, and a mildly acidic leachant solution in flow-through core-flooding reactor vessels at room temperature. Resulting leachate solutions often exceeded the saturation limit for calcite. Carbonate crystals were also detected in as little as six days of reaction with Oronto Group rocks at 90oC, as well as experiments with forsterite-olivine and augite, both being common minerals this sequence. The Oronto Group samples have poor reservoir rock characteristics, none ever exceeded a permeability value of 2.0 mD even after extensive dissolution of calcite cement during the experiments. The overlying Bayfield Group – Jacobsville Formation sandstones averaged 13.4 ± 4.3% porosity and a single sample tested by core-flooding revealed a permeability of ~340 mD. The high porosity-permeability characteristics of these sandstones will allow them to be used for GCS as a continuous aquifer unit with the overlying Mt. Simon Formation. 3) Anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can enhance the conversion rate of CO{sub 2} into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage. SRB accelerated carbonate mineralization reactions between pCO{sub 2} values of 0.0059 and 14.7 psi. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for SRB metabolism. The use of a {sup 13}CO{sub 2} spiked gas source also produced carbonate minerals with ~53% of the carbon being derived from the gas phase. The sulfate reducing activity of the microbial community was limited, however, at 20 psi pCO{sub 2} and carbonate mineralization did not occur. Inhibition of bacterial metabolism may have resulted from the acidic conditions or CO{sub 2} toxicity. 4) Microbialite communities forming in the high turbidity and hypersaline water of Storrs’ Lake, San Salvador Island, The Bahamas, were investigated for their distribution, mineralogy and microbial diversity. Molecular analysis of the organic mats on the microbialites indicate only a trace amount of cyanobacteria, while anaerobic and photosynthetic non-sulfur bacteria of the phyla Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of class Gammaproteobacteria were abundant.

  18. CROSSFLOW FILTRATION: EM-31, WP-2.3.6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing crossflow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed some of those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Crossflow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate solutions. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Integrated Salt Disposition Process and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the crossflow filter feed flow rate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and crossflow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to evaluate methods to improve filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today. Experiments that use non-radioactive simulants for actual waste always carry the inherent risk of not eliciting prototypic results; however, they will assist in focusing the scope needed to minimize radioactive testing and thus maximize safety. To that end this investigation has determined: (1) Waste simulant SB6 was found to be more challenging to filtration than a SRS Tank 8F simulant; (2) Higher solids concentration presents a greater challenge to filtration; (3) Filter cake is something that should be properly developed in initial filter operation; (4) Backpulsing is not necessary to maintain a good filter flux with salt wastes; (5) Scouring a filter without cleaning will lead to improved filter performance; (6) The presence of a filter cake can improve the solids separation by an order of magnitude as determined by turbidity; (7) A well developed cake with periodic scouring may allow a good filter flux to be maintained for long periods of time; and (8) Filtrate flux decline is reversible when the concentration of the filtering slurry drops and the filter is scoured.

  19. Extended Sleeve Products Allow Control and Monitoring of Process Fluid Flows Inside Shielding, Behind Walls and Beneath Floors - 13041

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Mark W. [Flowserve Corporation, 1978 Foreman Drive Cookeville, TN 38506 (United States)] [Flowserve Corporation, 1978 Foreman Drive Cookeville, TN 38506 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout power generation, delivery and waste remediation, the ability to control process streams in difficult or impossible locations becomes increasingly necessary as the complexity of processes increases. Example applications include radioactive environments, inside concrete installations, buried in dirt, or inside a shielded or insulated pipe. In these situations, it is necessary to implement innovative solutions to tackle such issues as valve maintenance, valve control from remote locations, equipment cleaning in hazardous environments, and flow stream analysis. The Extended Sleeve family of products provides a scalable solution to tackle some of the most challenging applications in hazardous environments which require flow stream control and monitoring. The Extended Sleeve family of products is defined in three groups: Extended Sleeve (ESV), Extended Bonnet (EBV) and Instrument Enclosure (IE). Each of the products provides a variation on the same requirements: to provide access to the internals of a valve, or to monitor the fluid passing through the pipeline through shielding around the process pipe. The shielding can be as simple as a grout filled pipe covering a process pipe or as complex as a concrete deck protecting a room in which the valves and pipes pass through at varying elevations. Extended Sleeves are available between roughly 30 inches and 18 feet of distance between the pipeline centerline and the top of the surface to which it mounts. The Extended Sleeve provides features such as ± 1.5 inches of adjustment between the pipeline and deck location, internal flush capabilities, automatic alignment of the internal components during assembly and integrated actuator mounting pads. The Extended Bonnet is a shorter fixed height version of the Extended Sleeve which has a removable deck flange to facilitate installation through walls, and is delivered fully assembled. The Instrument Enclosure utilizes many of the same components as an Extended Sleeve, yet allows the installation of process monitoring instruments, such as a turbidity meter to be placed in the flow stream. The basis of the design is a valve body, which, rather than having a directly mounted bonnet has lengths of concentric pipe added, which move the bonnet away from the valve body. The pipe is conceptually similar to an oil field well, with the various strings of casing, and tubing installed. Each concentric pipe provides a required function, such as the outermost pipes, the valve sleeve and penetration sleeve, which provide structural support to the deck flange. For plug valve based designs, the next inner pipe provides compression on the environmental seals at the top of the body to bonnet joint, followed by the innermost pipe which provides rotation of the plug, in the same manner as an extended stem. Ball valve ESVs have an additional pipe to provide compressive loading on the stem packing. Due to the availability of standard pipe grades and weights, the product can be configured to fit a wide array of valve sizes, and application lengths, with current designs as short as seven inches and as tall as 18 feet. Central to the design is the requirement for no special tools or downhole tools to remove parts or configure the product. Off the shelf wrenches, sockets or other hand tools are all that is required. Compared to other products historically available, this design offers a lightweight option, which, while not as rigidly stiff, can deflect compliantly under extreme seismic loading, rather than break. Application conditions vary widely, as the base product is 316 and 304 stainless steel, but utilizes 17-4PH, and other allows as needed based on the temperature range and mechanical requirements. Existing designs are installed in applications as hot as 1400 deg. F, at low pressure, and separately in highly radioactive environments. The selection of plug versus ball valve, metal versus soft seats, and the material of the seals and seats is all dependent on the application requirements. The design of the Extended Sleeve family of products provid