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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Microsoft Word - 2902ntu.dot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

902-NTU (10-2004) Supersedes (6-2000) issue SNL COMPUTER BANNER Banner for all SNL Computing SF 2902-NTU (10-2004) WARNING NOTICE TO USERS This is a Federal computer system and is...

2

Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NTU nephelometric turbidity unit OD outside diameter pCiL picocuries per liter PMIT Production Multi-Finger Imaging Tool Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA U.S....

3

Turbidity in Eastern Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unsworth and Monteith's aerosol attenuation coefficient ?A was calculated with hourly cloudless sky data at Goose Bay, Montreal and Woodbridge (near Toronto) for the period 1968 to 1978. Turbidity was less on average (?A < 0.11) than for British ...

T. C. Uboegbulam; J. A. Davies

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

Evans, Paul

5

Atmospheric Turbidity Analyzed by Means of Standardized Linke's Turbidity Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of standardized Linke's turbidity factor TLAM2 allows the conversion of the usual TL values, which exhibit virtual diurnal variations into new ones, which are strictly representative of the atmospheric turbidity caused by both water ...

J. C. Grenier; A. De La Casinire; T. Cabot

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Atmospheric Turbidity over Central North Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some 8500 observations of atmospheric turbidity, taken at Raleigh, North Carolina from July 1969 to July 1975 are analyzed for within-day and day-to-day variations and their dependence on meteorological parameters. The annual average turbidity of ...

James T. Peterson; Edwin C. Flowers; Guillermo J. Berri; Cheryl L. Reynolds; John H. Rudisill

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Storm Water Best Management Practices Manual for Transmission Line Rights-of-Way Construction and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a general construction storm water permit that would require implementation of best management practices (BMPs) to meet a specific nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU) and total suspended solids (TSS) limit as well as additional erosion and sediment control requirements from construction sites. These new requirements will provide unique challenges for those designing, constructing, and maintaining transmission line rights-of-way (ROWs). This techn...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

Calculated ngstrim's Turbidity Coefficients for Fairbanks, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ngstrim's turbidity coefficient, ?, was determined from measurements of direct normal solar irradiance (broadband) at Fairbanks, Alaska (latitude, 64.82). The frequency distribution and seasonal changes of derived values were similar to those ...

John D. Fox

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Sea Surface Temperature Sensitivity to Water Turbidity from Simulations of the Turbid Black Sea Using HYCOM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the sensitivity of sea surface temperature (SST) to water turbidity in the Black Sea using the eddy-resolving (3.2-km resolution) Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), which includes a nonslab K-profile parameterization (KPP)...

A. Birol Kara; Alan J. Wallcraft; Harley E. Hurlburt

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Turbidity Determination from Broadband Irradiance Measurements: A Detailed Multicoefficient Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically modeled method is presented to obtain accurate turbidity determinations from broadband direct irradiance measurements. The method uses parameterizations of various extinction processes affecting the transfer of shortwave radiation in ...

Christian A. Gueymard

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Turbidity study of solar ponds utilizing seawater as salt source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of experiments were conducted to study the turbidity reduction in solar ponds utilizing seawater as salt source. The experiment on the turbidity reduction efficiency with chemicals indicates that alum (KAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O) has a better turbidity control property because of its strongly flocculating and also well depressing the growing of algae and bacteria in the seawater. In comparison with bittern and seawater, our experiment shows that the residual brine after desalination can keep limpidity for a long time even without any chemical in it. Experiments were also conducted on the diffusion of turbidity and salinity, which show that the turbidity did not diffuse upwards in the solution. In the experiment on subsidence of soil in the bittern and saline with the same salinity, it was found that soil subsided quite quickly in the pure saline water, but very slowly in the bittern. In this paper we also proposed an economical method to protect the solar pond from the damage of rain. Finally, thermal performance of a solar pond was simulated in the conditions of different turbidities using a thermal diffusion model. (author)

Li, Nan; Sun, Wence; Shi, Yufeng [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Yin, Fang [YLab, 358 South 700 East, Suit B-139, Salt Lake City, UT 84102 (United States); Zhang, Caihong [Dalian Thermoelectric Group Co. Ltd., Dalian 116001 (China)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Evaluation of Pressure Transducers under Turbid Natural Waters*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure measurements made in two turbid natural waters have led to the inference that the effective depth-mean in situ density values, ?eff, of these waters are less than (?2.70%6.5%) their bulk densities (i.e., densities of watersediment ...

Antony Joseph; Ehrlich Desa; Elgar Desa; David Smith; Vani B. Peshwe; Vijaykumar; J. A. Erwin Desa

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Modelling the propagation of turbid density inflows into a stratified lake: Daecheong Reservoir, Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many reservoirs and associated downstream ecosystems located in the Asian monsoon climate region are under increased pressure from the long-term negative effects of turbid flood runoff. Despite the ubiquitous use of turbidity (C"T) as a barometer of ... Keywords: Daecheong Reservoir, ELCOM-CAEDYM, Real-time reservoir management, Reservoir density flow, Stratified reservoir, Turbidity modelling

S. W. Chung; M. R. Hipsey; J. Imberger

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Holey Random Walks: Optics of Heterogeneous Turbid Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a probabilistic theory of random walks in turbid media with non-scattering regions. It is shown that important characteristics such as diffusion constants, average step lengths, crossing statistics and void spacings can be analytically predicted. The theory is validated using Monte Carlo simulations of light transport in heterogeneous systems in the form of random sphere packings, and good agreement is found. The role of step correlations is discussed, and differences between unbounded and bounded systems are investigated. Our results are relevant to the optics of heterogeneous systems in general, and represent an important step forward in the understanding of media with strong (fractal) heterogeneity in particular.

Svensson, Tomas; Grisi, Marco; Savo, Romolo; Burresi, Matteo; Wiersma, Diederik S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Digital optical phase conjugation of fluorescence in turbid tissue  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a method for phase conjugating fluorescence. Our method, called reference free digital optical phase conjugation, can conjugate extremely weak, incoherent optical signals. It was used to phase conjugate fluorescent light originating from a bead covered with 0.5 mm of light-scattering tissue. The phase conjugated beam refocuses onto the bead and causes a local increase of over two orders of magnitude in the light intensity. Potential applications are in imaging, optical trapping, and targeted photochemical activation inside turbid tissue.

Vellekoop, Ivo M.; Cui Meng; Yang Changhuei [Department of Electrical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Interrelation of surface tension, optical turbidity, and color of operational transformer oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the acidity, optical turbidity, surface tension, and color of transformer oil from 54 power transformers, autotransformers, and shunt reactors are reported. Changes in surface tension, optical turbidity, and color are found to obey adequate linear correlations, while the acidity has no correlation with any of these properties. Numerical criteria for the maximum permissible state (quality) of the oil with respect to optical turbidity and color are obtained. Recommendations to operating staff are provided for cases in which the criteria for optical turbidity and color are exceeded.

L'vov, S. Yu.; Lyut'ko, E. O.; Lankau, Ya. V.; Komarov, V. B.; Seliverstov, A. F.; Bondareva, V. N.; L'vov, Yu. N.; L'vov, M. Yu.; Ershov, B. G.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-5-318 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

18

Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

Losleben, Tamar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Atmospheric Turbidity at Tucson, Arizona, 195683: Variations and Their Causes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation data collected over the last 27 years at the University of Arizona have been analyzed to determine the major causes of time variations in the local turbidity of the atmosphere. The most extreme perturbations have been associated ...

R. J. Szymber; W. D. Sellers

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

An Examination of Reduction Techniques for Determining the Linke Turbidity Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard reduction techniques for the Linke turbidity factor are examined and found to yield errors of as much as 10%, resulting from a failure to recognize the importance of the wavelength sensitivities of pyrheliometers and the assumption that ...

L. W. Thomason; R. J. Szymber; B. M. Herman

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Effects of the Mount St. Helens Volcanic Cloud on Turbidity at Ann Arbor, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of turbidity were made at the University of Michigan irradiance and meteorological measurement facility just prior to, during and after the passage of the volcanic cloud from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. They were ...

Edward Ryznar; Michael R. Weber; Thomas S. Hallaron

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home...

23

Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical imaging through turbid media is demonstrated using a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate. An apparatus and method for detecting ballistic and/or snake light while rejecting unwanted diffusive light for imaging structures within highly scattering media are described. Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in rhodamine 590 is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore has lost memory of the structures within the scattering medium. Images have been obtained of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye, which demonstrates the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic and/or snake light in optical mammography is discussed.

Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO)

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

24

Research on Turbidity Removal and Byproduct Magnesium Hydroxide in Alkalify Flocculation Desalination Pretreatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reverse osmosis desalination is becoming an effective approach in seawater desalination to solve the shortage of freshwater resource. Since reverse osmosis desalination plants depend on high quality feed water to ensure. Turbidity is the most important ... Keywords: Alkalify Flocculation, Desalination Pretreatment

Liuhe Yishouzhi; Wuyan Wujiaquan

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

File:06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 25 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:14, 1 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:14, 1 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (25 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file:

26

Modulated 3D cross-correlation light scattering: improving turbid sample characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate characterization using static light scattering (SLS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) methods mandates the measurement and analysis of singly-scattered light. In turbid samples, the suppression of multiple scattering is therefore required to obtain meaningful results. One powerful technique for achieving this, known as 3D cross-correlation, uses two simultaneous light scattering experiments performed at the same scattering vector on the same sample volume in order to extract only the single scattering information common to both. Here we present a significant improvement to this method in which the two scattering experiments are temporally separated by modulating the incident laser beams and gating the detector outputs at frequencies exceeding the timescale of the system dynamics. This robust modulation scheme eliminates cross-talk between the two beam- detector pairs and leads to a four-fold improvement in the cross-correlation intercept. We measure the dynamic and angular-dependent scattering intensity of turbid colloidal suspensions and exploit the improved signal quality of the modulated 3D cross-correlation DLS and SLS techniques.

Ian Block; Frank Scheffold

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediations (SRRs) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a peanut vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A go/no-go decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a go decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a no-go determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the issuance of the initial version of this report but under the scope of the original request for technical assistance, WSE asked for this report to be revised to include the go/no-go CU value corresponding to 0.28 wt% solids. It was this request that led to the preparation of Revision 1 of the report. The results for the 0.28 wt% solids value were developed following the same approach as that utilized for the 0.14 wt% solids value. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a go/no-go CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the go/no-go decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the go/no-go criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from the sludge batch, Sludge Batch 7b, being processed at the time of this testing. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

28

Quantitative broadband absorption and scattering spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady state methodologies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses a combination of frequency-domain and steady-state reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light steady-state measurement, whereas the frequency-domain data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption and reduced scattering derived from the frequency-domain data are used to calibrate the intensity of the steady-state measurements and to determine the reduced scattering coefficient at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. The absorption coefficient spectrum is determined by comparing the steady-state reflectance values with the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. Absorption spectra of a turbid phantom and of human breast tissue in vivo, derived with the combined frequency-domain and steady-state technique, agree well with expected reference values.

Tromberg, Bruce J. (Irvine, CA); Berger, Andrew J. (Rochester, NY); Cerussi, Albert E. (Lake Forest, CA); Bevilacqua, Frederic (Costa Mesa, CA); Jakubowski, Dorota (Irvine, CA)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

29

Annotated bibliography: Marine geologic hazards of the Hawaiian Islands with special focus on submarine slides and turbidity currents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography was compiled to highlight the submarine geology of the Hawaiian Islands and identify known and potential marine geologic hazards with special emphasis on turbidity currents, submarine slides and tsunamis. Some references are included that are not specific to Hawaii but are needed to understand the geologic processes that can affect the integrity of submarine cables and other man-made structures. Entries specific to the Hawaiian Island area are shown in bold type.

Normark, W.R.; Herring, H.H.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Large River Food Webs: Influence of Nutrients, Turbidity, and Flow, and Implications for Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans impact rivers in many ways that modify ecological processes yielding ecosystem services. In order to mitigate anthropogenic impacts, scientists are challenged to understand interactions among physicochemical factors affecting large river food webs. An understanding of socioeconomic factors also is critical for ecosystem management. In this dissertation, I explore spatiotemporal patterns in floodplain river food webs and political barriers to management of environmental flows, an important factor influencing river ecology. In Chapter II, I reviewed the scientific literature to test conceptual models of river food webs and predictions of environmental factors that might produce variation in basal production sources supporting consumer biomass. My review indicates that algae are the predominant production source for large rivers worldwide, but consumers assimilate C3 plants in rivers 1) with high sediment loads and low transparency during high flow pulses, 2) with high dissolved organic matter concentrations, and 3) following periods of high discharge or leaf litter fall that increase the amount of terrestrial material in the particulate organic matter pool. In Chapter III, I descrobe field research conducted to examine relationships among hydrology, nutrient concentrations, turbidity, and algal primary production and biomass in the littoral zone of five rivers in Texas, Peru, and Venezuela differing in physicochemical conditions. I used stable isotope signatures to estimate contributions of algal-versus terrestrial-based production sources to consumers during different hydrologic periods. My research indicates that during flow pulses in floodplain rivers, a decrease in algal biomass and productivity, combined with increased inputs of terrestrial organic matter, can result in increased terrestrial support of metazoan consumers in the aquatic food web. In 2007, Texas Senate Bill 3 directed that environmental flow recommendations be developed for river basins. Despite emphasis on use of the "best available science" to develop environmental flow regimes and "stakeholder involvement" to address needs of all water users, for the first two basins to complete the SB3 process, final environmental flow rules did not mimic a natural flow regime. In Chapter IV, I reviewed this process, concluding that incentives for river authorities to increase compromise with diverse stakeholders should result in more sustainable management of freshwater.

Roach, Katherine

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

32

Nephelometric determination of the chemical oxygen demand in filtrates after the ultrafiltration purification of used lubricants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regions with developed industry are characterized by a large amount of lubricants in wastewater, and controlling the amount of mineral oil in the water in these regions is of prime importance. One of the methods of purifying used lubricants is ultrafiltration. In most cases, ultrafiltration purification is performed in BTU-0.5/2 tubular units with F-1 Teflon membranes. It is known that, in the case of the ultrafiltration purification of dispersed systems, the part of the dispersed phase with a particle size smaller than the diameter of membrane pores usually penetrates to the filtrate. The formation of the dispersed phase with a smaller size of particles is also possible because oil particles of a larger size are pressed through the membrane due to the wetting of the membrane material with the dispersed phase, which is the case of Teflon membranes. As a result, water produced by the ultrafiltration purification of lubricant-containing wastes contains oil particles 10-100 nm in size, which is comparable to the membrane pores. The amount of these particles can be small, which makes their determination difficult. Moreover, the method of controlling the amount of oil in the filtrate should be rapid, sensitive, and simple enough to allow its application in industrial conditions.

Bykadorov, N.U.; Radchenko, S.S. [Volgograd State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A high resolution geophysical investigation of spatial sedimentary processes in a paraglacial turbid outwash fjord: Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simpson Bay is a turbid, outwash fjord located in northeastern Prince William Sound, Alaska. A high ratio of watershead:basin surface area combined with high precipitation and an easily erodable catchment create high sediment inputs. Fresh water from heavy precipitation and meltwater from high alpine glaciers enter Simpson Bay through bay head rivers and small shoreline creeks that drain the catchment. Side scan sonar, seismic profiling, and high resolution bathymetry were used to investigate the record of modern sedimentary processes. Four bottom types and two seismic faces were described to delineate the distribution of sediment types and sedimentary processes in Simpson Bay. Sonar images showed areas of high backscatter (coarse grain sediment, bedrock outcrops and shorelines) in shallow areas and areas of low backscatter (estuarine mud) in deeper areas. Seismic profiles showed that high backscatter areas reflected emergent glacial surfaces while low backscatter areas indicated modern estuarine mud deposition. The data show terminal morainal bank systems and grounding line deposits at the mouth of the bay and rocky promontories, relict medial moraines, that extend as terrestrial features through the subtidal and into deeper waters. Tidal currents and mass wasting are the major influences on sediment distribution. Hydrographic data showed high spatial variability in surface and bottom currents throughout the bay. Bottom currents are tide dominated, and are generally weak (5-20 cm s-1) in the open water portions of the bay while faster currents are found associated with shorelines, outcrops, and restrictive sills. Tidal currents alone are not enough to cause the lack of estuarine mud deposition in shallow areas. Bathymetric data showed steep slopes throughout the bay suggesting sediment gravity flows. Central Alaska is a seismically active area, and earthquakes are most likely the triggering mechanism of the gravity flows.

Noll, Christian John, IV

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Atmospheric Turbidity in the Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis is presented of 800 measurements of atmospheric monochromatic aerosol optical depth made poleward of 65 latitude. The atmosphere of the southern polar region appears to be uncontaminated but is charged with a background aerosol having ...

Glenn E. Shaw

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

AOCS Official Method Ca 19-86  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phospholipids in Vegetable Oils Nephelometric Method AOCS Official Method Ca 19-86 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The nephelometric method measu

36

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total organic halogens exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A new airmass independent formulation for the Linke turbidity coefficient.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of TL at air mass = 2 (Kasten 1988, Grenier 1994). Linke himself (1942) recognised the variation of TL to improve the formulation, Louche (1986) and Grenier ( 1994, 1995) added ab- sorption by the permanent atmosphere. Grenier (1994, 1995), using a similar approach, added some minor changes to the spectral absorp

Perez, Richard R.

38

MEE 452: Example 3-2 ShellShell--andand--Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis:Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minmaxminmax min ,;; ,min)()( C C NTU C UA NTU TC q q q CCCcmCcmC UA CHCpCHpH #12;Tube arrangement in shell

Kostic, Milivoje M.

39

Microsoft Word - Appendix A Alluvial GW Samples.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Groundwater Samples, Groundwater Samples, January 2000 through April 2011 This page intentionally left blank Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5

40

Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5 Common Ions Ca mg/L 266 214 206 207

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Microsoft Word - Appendix B Bedrock GW Samples.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Results for Bedrock Groundwater Samples, Analytical Results for Bedrock Groundwater Samples, January 2000 through April 2011 This page intentionally left blank Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride μg/L 124 242

42

Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05&  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 This page intentionally left blank Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5 Common Ions Ca mg/L 266 214 206 207

43

Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06a,b  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 This page intentionally left blank Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride μg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81

44

Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

10 10 This page intentionally left blank Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5 Common Ions Ca mg/L 266 214 206 207

45

Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride μg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81 Mg mg/L 10.5 9.99

46

Microsoft Word - S02459_2006Annual GW Rpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Page 1 Page 1 Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity b µmhos/cm 560 560 DO b mg/L 1.4 -- ORP b mV -51 -46 pH b s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature b C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity b NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride µg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81 Mg mg/L 10.5 9.99

47

Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

10 10 This page intentionally left blank Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride μg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81

48

Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

Collin, Clair

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Transport in quenched disorder: light diffusion in strongly heterogeneous turbid media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical and experimental study of light transport in disordered media with strongly heterogeneous distribution of scatterers formed via non-scattering regions. Step correlations induced by quenched disorder are found to prevent diffusivity from diverging with increasing heterogeneity scale, contrary to expectations from annealed models. Spectral diffusivity is measured for a porous ceramic where nanopores act as scatterers and macropores render their distribution heterogeneous. Results agree well with Monte Carlo simulations and a proposed analytical model.

Svensson, Tomas; Adolfsson, Erik; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Wiersma, Diederik S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

How Does Solar Attenuation Depth Affect the Ocean Mixed Layer? Water Turbidity and Atmospheric Forcing Impacts on the Simulation of Seasonal Mixed Layer Variability in the Turbid Black Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fine-resolution (?3.2 km) Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) is used to investigate the impact of solar radiation attenuation with depth on the predictions of monthly mean sea surface height (SSH), mixed layer depth (MLD), buoyancy and heat ...

A. Birol Kara; Alan J. Wallcraft; Harley E. Hurlburt

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Modeling of temperature and turbidity in a natural lake and a reservoir connected by pumped-storage operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a theoretical limit of 30% extraction, only half of the Betz Limit (Gorlov, 2001). One novel approach which. 26 Jul. 2005. A4. *cited internally as (French, 2005)* Gorlov, Alexander, A. Gorban and V. Silantyev. (2001). *cited internally as (Gorlov, 2001)* Hammons, T.J. "Technology and Status of Developments

Wehrli, Bernhard

52

Atmospheric Turbidity at the Antarctic Coastal Station Georg-von-Neumayer (78S, 8W, 40 m MSL)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectral actinometric measurements of direct solar radiation were made on all 17 clear days during 1981/82. From broadband measurements using cutoff fillers, a number of common measures for aerosol extinction as well as precipitable-water content ...

Friedrich Obleitner

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Results for Post-ROD Biomonitoring Analytical Results for Post-ROD Biomonitoring Baseline Surface Water and Sediment This page intentionally left blank Biomonitoring Data a Sediment Surface Water Surface Location Date Sampled Se (mg/kg) Se (µg/L) Se b (µg/L) Alkalinity b (mg/L) Conductivity (µmhos/cm) pH (s.u.) Temperature (C) Turbidity (NTU) 10/06/04 3.3 3.7 3 273 1481 8.1 14.5 -- 10/06/04 -- 3.6 2.9 -- -- -- -- -- 04/05/05 1.3 2.9 2.2 170 810 7.92 12.08 38.5 10/11/05 1.9 3 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.56 3.6EJ -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/04/06 0.58 4.1E -- -- -- -- -- -- P-S1 04/09/07 4.3 4.5 -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 3 1.6 1.2 292 1500 7.72 13.3 53.5 04/05/05 0.86 2.8 2.4 171 785 7.99 13.1 37.4 10/11/05 0.51 3.2E 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.55 3.4J -- -- -- -- -- --

54

Ozone (o3) efficacy on reduction of phytophthora capsici in recirculated horticultural irrigation water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microorganisms that cause plant disease have been isolated in recirculated irrigation water and increase the risks of disease incidence in horticultural operations. Ozone is an effective oxidizer used to disinfect drinking water supplies and treat industrial wastewater. The objective of this research was to investigate using ozone gas as part of a strategy to reduce the incidence of Phytophthora deBary in recirculated irrigation water. An isolate of Phytophthora capsici Leonian was cultured to induce sporulation. Spore dilutions were placed in aliquots of reverse osmosis water and bubbled with ozone gas (O3) to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mgL-1. Ozonated samples were plated and observed for colony forming units. Increasing ozone concentrations reduced the number of colony forming units to 0 at 1.5 mg L-1 03. Turbidity effects on efficacy on Phytophthora capsici were tested using bentonite clay at 0 to 2.0 nephelometric turbidity units and ozone concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg L-1. Increasing bentonite did not affect the efficacy of increasing ozone concentrations on reducing colony formation to 0 at 1.5 mgL-1 O3. Bioassays using Phytophthora capsici on Capsicum annuum L. seedlings confirmed apparent pathogenicity. Reverse osmosis water, containing a soluble fertilizer at 0 to 300 mg L-1 N, was ozonated to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mgL-1 O3 and used to irrigate Chrysanthemum x morifolium T. de Romatuelle. Increasing ozone concentrations did not interact with increasing fertilizer levels to affect the final growth parameters. Chrysanthemum exposed to ozone gas concentrations of 0.5 to 1.5 mgL-1 showed symptomatic ozone damage. Complete soluble fertilizer solutions with micronutrients were ozonated from 0 to 1.5 mgL-1 O3 and analysed for nutrient content. Increasing ozone levels did not interact with fertilizers to affect macronutrients. Increasing ozone interacted with iron at a high fertilizer level. Ozone did not affect the efficacy of paclobutralzol in controlling growth in Viola x wittrockiana. Ozone was effective in controlling Phytophthora capsici in recirculated irrigation water with minimum impact on plant growth. Adjustments in fertility regiemes may be needed to counteract the oxidizing affect of ozone on micronutrients.

McDonald, Garry Vernon

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

On the Effects of Haptic Display in Brush and Ink Simulation for Chinese Painting and Calligraphy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jeng-sheng Yeh jsyeh@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Ting-yu Lien andie@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Ming Ouhyoung ming to construct a 3D brush. Then we simulate the ink-water transfer system for ink spreading and color blending plus a paper model, and a model for ink and water transfer. With force feedback, a user experiences

Ouhyoung, Ming

56

Appendix H biomonitoring data table H-1.xls  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baseline Surface Baseline Surface Water, Sediment, and Benthic Macroinvertebrate Samples This page intentionally left blank Table H-1: Biomonitoring Sediment and Surface Water Data a Sediment Surface Location Date Sampled Se (mg/kg) Se (µg/L) Se b (µg/L) Alkalinity b (mg/L) Conductivity (µmhos/cm) ORP (mV) pH (s.u.) Temperature (C) Turbidity (NTU) 10/06/04 3.3 3.7 3 273 1481 -- 8.1 14.5 -- 10/06/04 -- 3.6 2.9 -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/05/05 1.3 2.9 2.2 170 810 -- 7.92 12.08 38.5 10/11/05 1.9 3 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.56 3.6EJ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/04/06 0.58 4.1E -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/09/07 4.3 4.5 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/08/08 1.1 4 -- -- 858 82 7.32 8.6 -- 04/08/08 -- 3.9 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 06/23/10 -- 9.3 -- 260 2024 156.1 7.1 20.76 20.6 06/23/10 -- 9.3 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 3 1.6 1.2 292 1500 -- 7.72 13.3 53.5 04/05/05 0.86 2.8 2.4 171 785 -- 7.99 13.1 37.4 10/11/05 0.51 3.2E 2.8 --

57

430 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW DECEMBER 1936 ON THE COMPUTATION OF ATMOSPHERIC TURBIDITY AND WATER VAPOR FROM SOLAR RADIATION MEASUREMENTS-A CORRECTION TO PREVIOUS NOTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a paper in the REVIEW for November 1936, page 377, appears the following statement: I was greatly shocked when I discovered that the mean of values derived from Iv-Ir and from In,-I,, had been employed in determining the values of 0 for dry air. I very much regret this error for which I assume full responsibility. However, at a. conference with my former associates at the Weather Bureau, it has now been made clear that the supposed erroneous niebhod was correct. Therefore, no corrections are necessary to earlier computed values of 8. In computing values of P from Iff--Ir, I macle use of a method that Hoelper has criticised on the ground that I,- Ir is too small a number to give accurate results. In RECENT ADDITIONS The following have been selected from among the titles of books recently received as representing those most likely to be useful to Weather Bureau officials in their meteorological work and studies:

Heck Nicholas Hunter; Knoche Walter; Sapsford H. B; Scott Harold W

1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

mep client impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IDAHO ... ClIeNT SuCCeSS: PCS edveNTuReS, INC. Idaho TechHelp's Export Excellence program gave me the opportunity to meet ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

59

Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue gas streams to electricity. The NTU-effectiveness method, exergy, and ...

Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Leaching: Fundamentals and Industrial Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He graduated from NTU in Athens, Greece with a Diploma of Engineering degree in 1975, obtained his M.Sc. degree in 1977 and his Ph.D in 1981 from McGill.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microsoft Word - S02459_2006Annual GW Rpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baseline Surface Water and Sediment This page intentionally left blank Biomonitoring Data a Sediment Surface Location Date Sampled Se (mg/kg) Se (µg/L) Se b (µg/L) Alkalinity b (mg/L) Conductivity (µmhos/cm) pH (s.u.) Temperature (C) Turbidity (NTU) 10/06/04 3.3 3.7 3 273 1481 8.1 14.5 -- 10/06/04 -- 3.6 2.9 -- -- -- -- -- 04/05/05 1.3 2.9 2.2 170 810 7.92 12.08 38.5 10/11/05 1.9 3 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.56 3.6EJ -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 3 1.6 1.2 292 1500 7.72 13.3 53.5 04/05/05 0.86 2.8 2.4 171 785 7.99 13.1 37.4 10/11/05 0.51 3.2E 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.55 3.4J -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 2.2 2 1.6 306 1523 7.72 12.2 50.7 04/05/05 3.4 3 2.5 176 803 8.04 13.92 33.6 10/11/05 4.1 3.1 2.6 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 1.4 3.4J -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 0.18 2.8 2.3 328 1830 6.6 9.9 1.91 04/05/05 0.14J 4.1 3.8 323 1606 6.84 10.89 1.57 10/11/05 0.033U 0.67 0.75 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.13 0.56J

62

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM, Singapore 639798 (E-mail: jwlim3@e.ntu.edu.sg) Abstract The anaerobic digestion of brown water (BW), food in a decentralized reactor via anaerobic digestion. The bio-methane potential of these substrates at different feed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

MMDS 08 Edward Chang, Google 1 Mining LargeMining Largescale Social Networksscale Social Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MMDS 08 Edward Chang, Google 1 Mining LargeMining Largescale Social Networksscale Social Networks Challenges & Scalable SolutionsChallenges & Scalable Solutions Edward Chang Google Research #12;MMDS 08 Edward Chang, Google 2 Collaborators · Prof. Chih-Jen Lin (NTU) · Hongjie Bai (Google) · Wen-Yen Chen

Chang, Edward Y.

64

Library OneSearch: User Guide (v1.4) 2 Overview: Library OneSearch ..........................................................................3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rep NTU's institutional repository of research output To search any of these collections, simply enter your search terms into the box under these tabs and click `Search'. You can change the collection which OneSearch: User Guide (v1.4) 7 Entering a database into the `Name' field and clicking `Find databases

Evans, Paul

65

Library OneSearch: User Guide (v1.6) 2 Overview: Library OneSearch ..........................................................................3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's institutional repository of research output To search any of these collections, simply enter your search terms. Searching for ebooks If you only want to search NTU ebooks, click the `Books and Audio-Visual' tab and enter your search terms. Results will be displayed; click the `Books' link on the left-hand toolbar: Next

Evans, Paul

66

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cable contractors, tropical cyclones and geology. Dept. ofpressure center. Tropical cyclones are usually accompaniedor plankton. case of 'TROPICAL CYCLONE TUNICATES TURBIDITY

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site AikenAikenSouth Carolina Sample analyses include pH, specific gravity, maximum oil content, turbidity, conductivity, flashpoint, Total Inorganic Carbon,...

68

CX-009061: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Sample analyses include pH, specific gravity, maximum oil content, turbidity, conductivity, flashpoint, Total Inorganic Carbon,...

69

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), and pH to be accomplished in B-150. Other waste methods (turbidity, flash point, and conductivity) are...

70

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), turbidity, flash point, conductivity, and pH. Undiluted sample is used for all methods listed. Clean...

71

Biological Nitrogen Removal in a Gravity Flow Biomass Concentrator Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Membrane technology is a well established method for wastewater treatment with advantages including: relatively easy to operate; low turbidity and BOD in the effluent; and (more)

Scott, Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Serpentine Thermal Coupling Between a Stream and a Conducting Body  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we document the effect of flow configuration on the heat transfer performance of a serpentine shaped stream embedded in a conducting solid. Several configurations with fixed volume of fluid are considered: U-shaped with varying spacing between the parallel portions of the U, serpentine shapes with three elbows, and conducting soil with several parallelepipedal shapes. We show that the spacing must be greater than a critical value in order for the heat transfer density of the stream-solid configuration to be the highest that it can be. Spacings larger than this critical value do not yield improvements in heat transfer density. We also show that even though the heat transfer is time dependent, the stream-solid configuration has an effective number of heat transfer units Ntu that is nearly constant in time. The larger Ntu values correspond to the configurations with greater heat transfer density.

Kobayashi, H.; Lorente, S.; Anderson, R.; Bejan, A.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Khesbn no. 108 - Autumn 1986 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t OlriT . 'tND tJlD i2.1y11 Dty:rti[, Ey.r JrrDyD 13 'ltJDt''12 ! jg ntu JrN ll$n /rti\\,rn itir-'ii u! : Jii:Niii ,l )lt''lr{ lX, rn lD,t? D]'l]'rti lB'lylj'";'rylDr111 6tr1 . '

Admin, LAYCC

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A high-resolution 2-DH numerical scheme for process-based modeling of 3-D turbidite fan stratigraphy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generic three-dimensional process-based model is presented, aimed at simulation of the construction of turbidite fan stratigraphy by low-density turbidity current events. It combines theoretical formulations on density flow and sediment transport of ... Keywords: MacCormack scheme, Operator splitting, Shock-capturing technique, Stratigraphic modeling, Turbidite reservoirs, Turbidity currents

Remco M. Groenenberg; Kees Sloff; Gert Jan Weltje

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Effect of Temperature on Biological Activated Carbon Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This experiment investigated the removal of CODMn, UV254, nitrate nitrogen and turbidity by the biological activated charcoal (BAC) reactor in the temperature of 4-18C and 19 to 26C. The result showed that the CODMn removal ability of BAC was limited ... Keywords: BAC, Nitrate nitrogen, turbidity, UV254

Yang Shidong; Liu Zhidong; Cui Fengguo; Zhang Lanhe

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Morton et al. 1976). In a study conducted by Goodwin (1972), the thymol turbidity test was used to measure the irritant effect of TNT on the liver of munition plant...

77

Modification of a biosand filter in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four local plastic design (LPD) BSFs were constructed in Northern Region, Ghana, to test and evaluate an experimental modification of the LPD BSF for treatment of highly turbid water. Modifications of the LPD BSFs were ...

Kikkawa, Izumi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Influence of Urban Aerosol on Spectral Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From a dataset of spectral distribution of global and disuse solar irradiances measured in Barcelona during the last three years, the influence of turbidity caused by urban aerosol on spectral composition of solar radiation and transmissivity of ...

J. Lorente; A. Reda; X. De Cabo

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Evaluation of the complementary use of the ceramic (Kosim) filter and Aquatabs in Northern Region, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kosim filter is a ceramic water filter that is currently used in Northern Ghana. Based on prior MIT research in Northern Ghana, this technology is effective at removing 92% of turbidity, 99.4% of total coliforms, and ...

Swanton, Andrew A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Estimating solar irradiance using a geostationary satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optical thickness. Solar Energy 56(3), 239244. Louche A. ,of Linke turbidity factor. Solar Energy 37, 393396. Mrquezfrom Satellite Images. Solar Energy 56, 207212. BP, 2009.

Urquhart, Bryan Glenn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

be installed on the common discharge lines from the turbidity meters on each sandfilter train. The check valves are to prevent the potential for contaminated water from the 10 inch...

82

Katabatic Winds on Ice Sheets: A Refinement of the Prandtl Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Katabatic winds on ice sheets and glaciers are buoyancy-driven flows, much like turbidity currents in the ocean. These winds are driven by radiative cooling of the ice surface and are not resolved by the typical horizontal and vertical ...

R. J. Zammett; A. C. Fowler

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Effects of the Internal Flow Structure on SPM Entrapment in the Rotterdam Waterway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field measurements are presented, which are the first to quantify the processes influencing the entrapment of suspended particulate matter (SPM) at the limit of saltwater intrusion in the Rotterdam Waterway. The estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) ...

Michel A. J. de Nijs; Johan C. Winterwerp; Julie D. Pietrzak

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Estimating solar irradiance using a geostationary satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rayleigh optical thickness. Solar Energy 56(3), 239244.of Linke turbidity factor. Solar Energy 37, 393396. Mrquez2009. Global Concentrated Solar Power Industry Report 2010

Urquhart, Bryan Glenn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Profiling atmospheric aerosols | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a number of instruments that use low power lasers (the instrument is called Micropulse Lidar, MPL) to measure the turbidity of the atmosphere above the ground. For the first time,...

86

Performance optimization of rotary dehumidifiers  

SciTech Connect

A rotary dehumidifier consists of a rotating porous matrix made of a desiccant with mechanically supporting materials. The dehumidification performance of a rotary dehumidifier wheel depends on its rotational speed, the sorption properties of the desiccant, the heat and mass transfer characteristics of the matrix, and the size of the dehumidifier. The effect of the rotational speed on the dehumidification performance of a rotary dehumidifier has been investigated by Zheng, Worek, and Novosel (1993). this paper extends that previous work and investigates the effects of desiccant sorption properties, the heat and mass transfer characteristics, and the size of the rotary dehumidifier on the dehumidification performance. The results show that the using desiccant materials in a rotary dehumidifier with different adsorption characteristics results in a wide variation in dehumidification performance. However, the maximum performance of a rotary dehumidifier occurs for a desiccant material having an isotherm shape that can be characterized to have a separation factor of 0.07. Also, as the desiccant moisture uptake increases, the dehumidifier performance also increases. However, the performance improvement for a desiccant matrix having a maximum moisture uptake of larger than 0.25 by weight is not significant. The heat and mass transfer properties and the size of rotary dehumidifier are characterized by the number of transfer units NTU. Generally, the larger the NTU, the better dehumidification performance. However, similar to the maximum moisture uptake, when the NTU is larger than 12, the performance will not improve significantly. Also, the dehumidifier with the most favorable adsorption characteristic has a slower rotational speed, which results in lower power requirements to rotate the desiccant wheel and smaller carry-over losses.

Zheng, W.; Worek, W.M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Novosel, D. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Engineering faculty forum. Final report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to develop and broadcast monthly one-hour teleconferences to support the professional development of engineering faculty. The {open_quotes}Engineering Faculty Forum{close_quotes} was available nationwide over the NTU Satellite Network and was also available from a C-Band Satellite. There was no cost to participate in the live teleconferences for the two year period. The programs were developed in response to a questionnaire sent to engineering faculty members across the United States. Copies of the flyers and a print out of each course participation form has been included as a part of this report.

Baldwin, L.V.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), turbidity, flash point, conductivity, and pH. Undiluted sample is used for Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), turbidity, flash point, conductivity, and pH. Undiluted sample is used for all methods listed. Clean samples are analyzed on bench instruments, while radioactive samples are run on instruments located in radiological containment hoods. Instrumentation include clean and radiological use turbidimeters, balances, flash point devices, conductivity meters and probes, and titration systems. Standards and calibrants include the following: 1) turbidity - sealed glass vials purchased as a calibration kit; 2) conductivity - deionized water and purchased standards (KCl solutions); 3) Density - deionized water; 4) flash point - dodecane (2mL); 5) pH - 25 mL ACS Certified pH buffers - pH 4.0, pH 7.0, and pH 10.0.

90

CX-002991: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2991: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2991: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002991: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Turbidity Meter Discharge Check Valves CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 06/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Check Valves are to be installed on the common discharge lines from the turbidity meters on each sandfilter train. The check valves are to prevent the potential for contaminated water from the 10 inch drain header from discharging back through the turbidity meters. The work will be performed inside the diked area inside the 105-22L building. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002991.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002993: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000825: Categorical Exclusion Determination

91

H-area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During first quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses (exclusive of boron and lithium) and turbidity measurements. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells during first quarter 1994. Carbon tetrachloride and heptachlor epoxide exceeded the final PDWS in well HAC 4. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in wells HAC 1 and 2. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 3. Total organic halogens was elevated in wells HAC 2 and 3. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Early Channel Evolution in the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation, West Texas, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submarine channels are important conduits for sediment in deep marine environments, and understanding their formation is critical to modeling basin fill processes. Most models describing channel evolution focus on turbidity currents as the erosive and constructive force in channel initiation. However, slope failure and slumping can be significant drivers of channelization, particularly in upper slope and ramp environments. Determining the relative roles of slumping and erosion by turbidity currents can provide important insight into the timing of channelization and the geometries of subsequent deposits. Samples were collected from Guadalupe Mountains National Park from two primary localities at Salt Flat Bench (Figure 2). Three vertical sections were measured at both locations. A total of 16 samples were collected for petrographic analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging. Spectacular outcrop quality makes the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation in Guadalupe Mountains National Park an ideal location for the study of early channel evolution. A detailed facies analysis of fine-grained channel deposits was conducted in the Upper Brushy Canyon Formation in the Salt Flat Bench outcrops. After channelization, an interval of relative condensation dominated by hemipelagic settling of organic matter and silt was followed by an interval of incomplete sediment bypass by turbidity currents. This sequence of events suggests that sea level was at a relative highstand at the time of channel inception, whereas channel inception by turbidity currents is expected during a lowstand. Slumping rather than erosion by turbidity currents is the most likely mechanism to have initiated a channel at the study area. There is no evidence for the existence for high energy currents until after the interval of condensation. However, the action of weak contour currents during early channel evolution is observed in outcrop and microtextural features. Early carbonate cementation of channel-lining silts may have stabilized the slump surface with respect to erosion by later turbidity currents.

Gunderson, Spencer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter report 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1992, samples from the seven older KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, and other constituents. New wells FAC 8 and 9 received the first of four quarters of comprehensive analyses and GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are discussed in this report.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, samples from the seven older KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, and other constituents. New wells FAC 8 and 9 received the first of four quarters of comprehensive analyses and GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are discussed in this report.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

K-Area acid/caustic basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclides, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum, iron, total organic halogens, and turbidity exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. The upgradient KAC wells contained no elevated constituents.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Preliminary analysis of two aspects of magma-powered electric-generation plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two aspects critical to the development of magma electric generation plants using closed heat exchanger systems are addressed. The heat transfer between the cold fluid in the downcomer and the hot fluid in the upcomer is analyzed using an NTU-effectiveness technique. The results indicate the hot fluid must be thermally insulated from the colder fluid in order to yield a useful temperature difference at the surface. A preliminary system analysis is conducted to determine the well cost requirements of an economically competitive magma electric plant. There is no economic incentive to make the magma tap wellbore larger than conventional deep gas wells. The cost competitiveness of a magma/electric plant is influenced by the depth to the magma, the convective heat flux of the magma, and the expected life of each well.

Hoover, E.R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model is employed to predict the cooling tower performance at various conditions. Natural convection when the fan is off is accounted by using an assumed airflow rate. The energy savings at five cities representing different typical climates are studied using typical meteorological year data. The results show that, if the tower capacity can be increased by 50% and 100% by running extra tower cells, the annual total fan power usage can be reduced by 44% and 61%, respectively. A cumulative saving percent curve is generated to help estimate the annual total savings percent when extra cooling tower capacity is available during only part of a year.

Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Rep. Prog. Phys. 53 (1990) 659-705. Printed in the UK The liquid-crystalline blue phases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dispersion 3.6. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements 3.7. Morphological studies 3.8. Electric-field effects 3.9. Crystal growth rate 3.10. Viscoelastic properties 3.11. Circular dichroism 4. Theory 4-uniform turbidity. ..' (Reinitzer 1888). This historical detection of selective reflection in the blue phase

Seideman, Tamar

99

A Model for Saharan Dust Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the source strength and the deposition rate of the dust emerging from the Sahara are assessed. For this purpose a multichannel sunphotometer has been developed and a turbidity network covering 11 stations has been set up in the ...

Guillaume A. d'Almeida

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A New Solar Radiation Penetration Scheme for Use in Ocean Mixed Layer Studies: An Application to the Black Sea Using a Fine-Resolution Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1/25 1/25 cos(lat) (longitude latitude) (?3.2-km resolution) eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) is introduced for the Black Sea and used to examine the effects of ocean turbidity on upper-ocean circulation features ...

A. Birol Kara; Alan J. Wallcraft; Harley E. Hurlburt

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Criterion Five: Engagement and Service As called for by its mission, IUPUI identifies its constituencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-faced man whose hair tur~ed gray after a terrible experiem1ce WIth the Blackfeet, to the IndIans known's men were slaughtered by the Blackfeet near the mouth of Smith's River; seven of the Missouri Fur Com to its snag-filled, turbid channels and the deadly Blackfeet infesting its headwaters. The rolling brown

Zhou, Yaoqi

102

ENVIRONMENT CANADA A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION ON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System (BBS) and a Fax Back System (FBS). The EC-INFO BBS and FBS User's Guides can be obtained stability climate conductivity delta formation earthquakes erosion flooding geology geomorphology glaciation erosion soils storrnwater stratification tectonics temperature (air, water) turbidity wetlands transport

103

Sedflux 2.0: An advanced process-response model that generates three-dimensional stratigraphy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sedflux 2.0 is the newest version of the Sedflux basin-filling model. Sedflux 2.0 provides a framework within which individual process-response models of disparate time and space resolutions communicate with one another to deliver multigrain-sized sediment ... Keywords: Boundary-layer transport, Flexure, Plumes, Stratigraphy, Turbidity currents

Eric W. H. Hutton; James P. M. Syvitski

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Wildl.Res., 1994, 21, 149-61 The Distribution and Abundance of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of dugongs sighted in Shark Bay during the survey were in waters colder than 18°C. Results of aerial surveys is an internationally significant dugong habitat. Introduction Aerial surveys (Prince et al. 1981; Anderson 1982, 1986 for availability bias (the proportion of animals invisible because of water turbidity) with survey

Marsh, Helene

105

Molly Lutcavage Scott Kraus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to influence spotter pilot par- ticipation. Aerial photographic surveys may provide a means ofobtaining area; Suzuki and Ishizuka, 1991; Safina, 1993). Aerial surveys have been used to obtain relative indices signals such as bioluminescence or turbid- ity fields. Visual biomass estimates from aerial survey data

106

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarterly report and summary 1993  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters indicating suitability as drinking water, and other constituents. One of the FAC piezometers was scheduled for these analyses but was dry. Analytical results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS in two wells. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in five wells. Iron exceeded standards in four wells, manganese exceeded standards in two wells, and total organic halogens exceeded standards in one well. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Contamination of the transformer oil of power transformers and shunting reactors by metal-containing colloidal particles  

SciTech Connect

The results of a measurement of the contamination of the oil in 66 transformers by metal-containing colloidal particles, formed as a result of the interaction of the oil with the structural materials (the copper of the windings, the iron of the tank and core etc.), and also the results of measurements of the optical turbidity of the oil in 136 transformers when they were examined at the Power Engineering Research and Development Center Company are presented. Methods of determining the concentration of copper and iron in transformer oil are considered. The limiting values of the optical turbidity factors, the copper and iron content are determined. These can serve as a basis for taking decisions on whether to replace the silica gel of the filters for continuously purifying the oil of power transformers and the shunting reactors in addition to the standardized oil contamination factors, namely, the dielectric loss tangent and the acidity number of the oil.

L'vov, S. Yu. [LLC 'Presselektro' (Russian Federation); Komarov, V. B.; Bondareva, V. N.; Seliverstov, A. F. [A. N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IFCE of RAS) (Russian Federation); Lyut'ko, E. O.; L'vov, Yu. N. [JSC 'R and D Centre for Power Engineering' (Russian Federation); Ershov, B. G. [A. N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IFCE of RAS) (Russian Federation)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Process and system for treating waste water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of treating raw or primary waste water using a powdered, activated carbon/aerated biological treatment system is disclosed. Effluent turbidities less than 2 JTU (Jackson turbidity units), zero TOC (total organic carbon) and in the range of 10 mg/l COD (chemical oxygen demand) can be obtained. An influent stream of raw or primary waste water is contacted with an acidified, powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture. Lime is then added to the slurry to raise the pH to about 7.0. A polyelectrolyte flocculant is added to the slurry followed by a flocculation period -- then sedimentation and filtration. The separated solids (sludge) are aerated in a stabilization sludge basin and a portion thereof recycled to an aerated contact basin for mixing with the influent waste water stream prior to or after contact of the influent stream with the powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture.

Olesen, Douglas E. (Kennewick, WA); Shuckrow, Alan J. (Pasco, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report, second quarter 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1994, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, radium-226, radium-228, turbidity, and comprehensive constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1994, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in five PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while specific conductance was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in wells HAC 1, 2, 3, and 4 during fourth quarter 1992. Tritium activities in upgradient well HAC 4 were similar to tritium levels in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Iron was elevated in well HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance and manganese were elevated in one downgradient well each. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. During 1992, tritium was the only constituent that exceeded the final PDWS. It did so consistently in all four wells during all four quarters, with little variability in activity.

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

DIDSON Acoustic Camera and Application: Case Study near EDF's Cruas Station with Comparison to Blueview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar, or DIDSON, is a type of imaging sonar that transmits sound pulses and converts the returning echoes into digital images, much like a medical ultrasound sonogram. Its advantage is that it can see through dark or turbid (cloudy) water in zero-visibility conditions. The DIDSON and similar units are increasingly being considered as advance warning tools for detecting waterborne debris or dense concentrations of aquatic organisms (fish and ...

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

Modeling Guidance for Developing Site-specific Nutrient Goals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the highest-profile challenges facing states and the regulated community is the development of scientifically sound nutrient goals, such as total maximum daily loads and site-specific numeric nutrient criteria. Goals must recognize that responses of receiving water to nutrients depend on site-specific characteristics (that is, morphology, hydrology, turbidity, temperature, etc.), all of which vary in space and time. There is a need for practical, model-based approaches and guidance for ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994 and 1994 summary  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for selected heavy metals, herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, major ions, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during fourth quarter are the focus of this report.

Chase, J.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

CORRECTINGFORVISIBILITYBIASIN STRIPTRANSECT AERIALSURVEYSOFAQUATICFAUNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by calculating and applying survey- spe.cific correction f".b*l;,1,i; ii.rt"., aeri,al zuieys of aquaiic- fat to observers because of water turbidity' J. W'U)L nANA@- s3(4Fr017-t(n4 f ) Aerial surveys have been used bias). Caughley (1979) argued that aerial survey estimalesaie mostuseful asindicestracking rel- ative

Marsh, Helene

115

H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses (exclusive of boron and lithium) and turbidity measurements. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells during second quarter 1994. Carbon tetrachloride exceeded the final PDWS in well HAC 4. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 3. Specific conductance and total organic halogens were elevated in well HAC 2. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Groundwater flow direction in the water stable beneath the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west during second quarter 1994. During previous quarters, the groundwater flow direction has been consistently to the northwest or the north-northwest. This apparent change in flow direction may be attributed to the lack of water elevations for wells HTF 16 and 17 and the anomalous water elevations for well HAC 2 during second quarter.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A Cross-Flow Ceramic Heat Recuperator for Industrial Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With increasing fuel costs, the efficient use of fuel is very important to the U.S. process heat industries. Increase in fuel usage efficiency can be obtained by transferring the waste exhaust heat to the cold combustion air. The metallic recuperators currently available suffer from problems of creep, corrosion and oxidation, particularly at high temperatures. The Department of Energy and GTE Products corporation have pursued a jointly funded venture, Contract No. EX-76-C-Q1-2162, to establish performance criteria and demonstrate a cross-flow ceramic heat recuperator for high temperature industrial heat recovery applications. The immediate goals of the ceramic recuperator project were to demonstrate a heat exchanger capable of handling high temperatures (1600-2400oF), that is compact with a high surface area and with costs comparable to the lower temperature metal heat exchangers. This paper describes the basic GTE Products Corporation design and details the design basis, the predicted recuperator performance, the ceramic and housing materials, the recuperator design procedure and the fabrication and assembly. The data provided includes NTU-Effectiveness and low friction and heat transfer ("f" and "J") plots.

Gonzalez, J. M.; Cleveland, J. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Rebello, W. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Optimized Design of a Furnace Cooling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of manufacturing furnace optimized re-design. The bottleneck in the production process is the cooling of heat treatment furnaces. These ovens are on an approximate 24-hour cycle, heating for 12 hours and cooling for 12 hours. Pressurized argon and process water are used to expedite cooling. The proposed modifications aim to minimize cycling by reducing cooling time; they are grouped into three fundamental mechanisms. The first is a recommendation to modify current operating procedures. This entails opening the furnace doors at higher than normal temperatures. A furnace temperature model based on current parameters is used to show the reduction in cooling time in response to opening the furnace doors at higher temperatures. The second mechanism considers the introduction of forced argon convection. Argon is used in the process to mitigate part oxidation. Cycling argon through the furnace during cooling increases convection over the parts and removes heat from the furnace envelope. Heat transfer models based on convective Nusselt correlations are used to determine the increase in heat transfer rate. The last mechanism considers a modification to the current heat exchanger. By decreasing the temperature of the water jacket and increasing heat exchanger efficiency, heat transfer from the furnace is increased and cooling time is shortened. This analysis is done using the Effectiveness-NTU method.

Morelli, F.; Bretschneider, R.; Dauzat, J.; Guymon, M.; Studebaker, J.; Rasmussen, B. P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Heat Transfer of a Multiple Helical Coil Heat Exchanger Using a Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study has focused on the use of coil heat exchangers (CHEs) with microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries to understand if CHEs can yield greater rates of heat transfer. An experimental study was conducted using a counterflow CHE consisting of 3 helical coils. Two separate tests were conducted, one where water was used as heat transfer fluid (HTF) on the coil and shell sides, respectively; while the second one made use of MPCM slurry and water on the coil and shell sides, respectively. The NTU-effectiveness relationship of the CHE when MPCM fluid is used approaches that of a heat exchanger with a heat capacity ratio of zero. The heat transfer results have shown that when using a MPCM slurry, an increase in heat transfer rate can be obtained when compared to heat transfer results obtained using straight heat transfer sections. It has been concluded that the increased specific heat of the slurry as well as the fluid dynamics in helical coil pipes are the main contributors to the increased heat transfer.

Gaskill, Travis

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Welcome to Analytical Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

METHODS OF INTEREST METHODS OF INTEREST Microwave/hot block digestion of solids Alpha spectroscopy Gamma spectroscopy (fixed and portable) Neutron and gamma ray measurements Gas proportional counting Gas chromatography Liquid scintillation counting Uranium and plutonium concentration and isotopic abundance by thermal ionization mass spectrometry Low mass, high resolution gas analysis by mass spectrometry Metallic impurities by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry Anion analysis by ion selective electrode and ion chromatography Wet chemistry analysis: pH, conductivity, density, turbidity, acid/base titrations Mercury analysis Carbon analysis Low-level uranium analysis by kinetic phosphorescence Volatile organics by gas chromatography with mass spectrometer detector/GC-MS

120

MIT jar test of the natural polymer chitosan with fresh pond water from the Cambridge Water Department, November-December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) jar tests of chitosan using CWD (Cambridge Water Department Treatment Plant) water was to demonstrate the effectiveness of chitosan as a coagulant in drinking water applications. The approach was to compare the performance of the natural organic coagulant, chitosan, to the performance of alum and other chemical coagulants in terms of the parameters turbidity, color, pH and alkalinity. Twenty-five jar tests were conducted during November and December, 1992, at Parsons Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Murcott, S.; Harleman, D.R.F.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1994, samples from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters characterizing suitability as a drinking water supply, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1994, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in four wells, while manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in three wells.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Removal of arsenic and other contaminants from storm run-off water by flotation, filtration, adsorption and ion exchange. Technical report, September-November 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of removing soluble arsenic (+5) from storm runoff water by dissolved air flotation (Supracell), dissolved air flotation and sand filtration combination (Sandfloat), granular carbon adsorption, and ion exchange processes was experimentally demonstrated. The best pretreatment unit was Sandfloat clarifier consisting of both flotation and filtration. Sandfloat clarifier consistently removed over 90% of arsenic, turbidity, and color, and over 50% of chemical oxygen demand and oil and grease. Using a Sandfloat or a Supracell for pretreatment, and then using either carbon adsorption or ion exchange for second-stage treatment, the soluble arsenic in the storm water can be totally removed.

Krofta, M.; Wang, L.K.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Simulation model air-to-air plate heat exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple simulation model of an air-to-air plate heat exchanger is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows the eflcient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is to shorten computation time and to use only input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part-load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important in energy eficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculations or load calculations with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short- time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control theory, are neglected. The part-load behavior is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part-load condition. If the heat transfer coefficients on the two exchanger sides are not equal (i. e. due to partial bypassing of air), their ratio can be easily calculated and set as a parameter. The model is static and uses explicit equations only. The explicit model formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability, which allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods like automatic system optimization. This paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for any particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

Wetter, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

SciTech Connect

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements demonstrated that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the first HAB genome (A. anophagefferens) and compared its gene complement to those of six competing phytoplankton species identified via metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on the gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 mbp) and more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen utilization, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

Gobler, C J; Grigoriev, I V; Berry, D L; Dyhrman, S T; Wilhelm, S W; Salamov, A; Lobanov, A V; Zhang, Y; Collier, J L; Wurch, L L; Kustka, A B; Dill, B D; Shah, M; VerBerkomes, N C; Kuo, A; Terry, A; Pangilinan, J; Lindquist, E A; Lucas, S; Paulsen, I; Hattenrath-Lehmann, T K; Talmage, S; Walker, E A; Koch, F; Burson, A M; Marcoval, M A; Tang, Y; LeCleir, G R; Coyne, K J; Berg, G M; Bertrand, E M; Saito, M A; Gladyshev, V N

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

Reservoir description is key to steamflood planning and implementation, Webster Reservoir, Midway-Sunset Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The Webster reservoir at Midway-Sunset field, Kern County, California, is an unconsolidated sand reservoir of Miocene age (''Stevens equivalent,'' Monterey Formation). The Webster was discovered in 1910 but, due to poor heavy oil (14/sup 0/ API) economics, development for primary production and subsequent enhanced recovery were sporadic. Currently, the reservoir produces by cyclic steam stimulation in approximately 35 wells. Cumulative oil production for the Webster since 1910 is about 13 million bbl. The Webster is subdivided into two reservoirs - the Webster Intermediate and Webster Main. The Webster Intermediate directly overlies the Webster Main in one area but it is separated by up to 300 ft of shale elsewhere. The combined thickness of both Webster reservoirs averages 250 ft and is located at a drilling depth of 1,100-1,800 ft. From evaluation of modern core data and sand distribution maps, the Webster sands are interpreted to have been deposited by turbidity currents that flowed from southwest to northeast in this area. Oil is trapped in the Webster reservoir where these turbidites were subsequently folded on a northwest-southeast-trending anticline. Detailed recorrelation on wireline logs, stratigraphic zonation, detailed reservoir description by zone, and sedimentary facies identification in modern cores has led to development of a geologic model for the Webster. This model indicates that the Webster Intermediate was deposited predominately by strongly channelized turbidity currents, resulting in channel-fill sands, and that the Webster Main was deposited by less restricted flows, resulting in more lobate deposits.

Hall, B.R.; Link, M.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

127

Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), and pH to be accomplished in B-150. Other waste methods (turbidity, Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), and pH to be accomplished in B-150. Other waste methods (turbidity, flash point, and conductivity) are encompassed in EEC TC-A-2010-042. Undiluted sample is used for pH and specific gravity. Radiological samples will be analyzed in B-150. Instrumentation includes balances, probes, and a titration system.Standards and calibrants are as follows: for specific gravity, deionized water is the calibrant; for pH, 25 mL of ACS certified pH buffers are the probe calibrants (pH 4.0, pH 7.0, and pH 10.0). Waste Analysis Characterization Methods in the Analytical Development Wet Chemistry Lab Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC-A-2011-0009 , Rev.0 Mar 8, 2011 Andrew R. Grainger

129

SLUDGE PARTICLE SEPAPATION EFFICIENCIES DURING SETTLER TANK RETRIEVAL INTO SCS-CON-230  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to release, into the Hanford Document Control System, FA1/0991, Sludge Particle Separation Efficiencies for the Rectangular SCS-CON-230 Container, by M. Epstein and M. G. Plys, Fauske & Associates, LLC, June 2009. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) will retrieve sludge from the 105-K West Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Settler Tanks and transfer it to container SCS-CON-230 using the Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS). The sludge will enter the container through two distributors. The container will have a filtration system that is designed to minimize the overflow of sludge fines from the container to the basin. FAI/09-91 was performed to quantify the effect of the STRS on sludge distribution inside of and overflow out of SCS-CON-230. Selected results of the analysis and a system description are discussed. The principal result of the analysis is that the STRS filtration system reduces the overflow of sludge from SCS-CON-230 to the basin by roughly a factor of 10. Some turbidity can be expected in the center bay where the container is located. The exact amount of overflow and subsequent turbidity is dependent on the density of the sludge (which will vary with location in the Settler Tanks) and the thermal gradient between the SCS-CON-230 and the basin. Attachment A presents the full analytical results. These results are applicable specifically to SCS-CON-230 and the STRS filtration system's expected operating duty cycles.

DEARING JI; EPSTEIN M; PLYS MG

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

130

H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarterly report and summary 1993  

SciTech Connect

The four monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin are sampled quarterly as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with a consent decree signed May 26, 1988, by the US District Court (District of South Carolina, Aiken Division). During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the monitoring wells received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), the SRS flagging criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are the focus of this report. During fourth quarter 1993, tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells, with activities between 3.8E + 01 and 4.6E + 01 pCi/mL. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance was elevated in well HAC 2, total organic halogens exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2 and 3, and manganese was elevated in wells HAC 3 and 4. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Metal ions in water and sediments of the Pom-Atasta Lagoon, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperature, salinity, turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS), pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured in the surface water of the Pom-Atasta Lagoon at 15 stations during 5 sampling events from September 1996--May 1997. Concentrations of Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, Pb, Cr, Ag, Fe, Co, and Ba were also determined in the water and sediments at 15 stations during the study period. The values of salinity, turbidity, and TSS were related to the inputs of river water into the lagoon. Metals in the water and sediments showed no spatial variation. Seasonality in the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Ag, and Ba in the water was found and may be related to the resuspension of sediments in the lagoon. The concentrations of metals in sediments did not give significant seasonal variation. Metals in sediments were not correlated with the iron, suggesting an anthropogenic source of metals in the Pom-Atasta Lagoon. The concentrations of dissolved Pb were above the value recommended by the National Water Commission of Mexico.

Vazquez, G.F.; Enciso, G.; Morales, J.W. [UNAM, Distrito Federal (Mexico). Instituto de Ciencias Del Mar y Limnologia] [UNAM, Distrito Federal (Mexico). Instituto de Ciencias Del Mar y Limnologia; Sharma, V.K. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Nischt, S.L.; Domingo, G.L. [PEMEX, Campeche (Mexico)] [PEMEX, Campeche (Mexico)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

High-amplitude reflection packets (HARPs) of the Mississippi Fan, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examination of seismic data from the deep-water Gulf of Mexico reveals the presence of High-Amplitude Reflection Packets (HARPs). An analog study conducted by the Ocean Drilling Program Leg 155 identified and described Amazon Fan HARPs as a stacked, relatively unconfined series of graded turbidites overlain by a channel-levee. HARP seismic facies thin laterally and onlap antecedent bathymetry (preexisting submarine topography). HARP areal extent is controlled by antecedent bathymetry and turbidity flow sediment volumes. Mississippi Fan HARP deposition can be described by three depositional models: the "avulsion" model, the "fill and spill" model, and the "transition" model. The "avulsion" depositional model, developed by Flood et al. (1991), describes avulsion of submarine channel-levees by turbidity flows. Subsequent turbidity flows exit the channel-levee at the avulsion point and are deposited as unchannelized HARPs. The "fill and spill" model, developed by Satterfield and Behrens (1990), describes turbidite deposition in the Gulf of Mexico salt province. Initial stages of the "fill and spill" model accurately describe the seismic geometries of HARPs confined by adjacent salt structures. The "transition" model was developed in this study to describe the Gulf of Mexico HARP seismic geometries seen in the transition zone from the salt province to the abyssal plain. The HARPs described by the "transition" model contain an upslope segment confined by salt structures and a downslope segment confined by antecedent bathymetry. Utilizing seismic data from the Gulf of Mexico and core and well-log data from the Amazon Fan, this study has determined that HARPs and related channel-levees have hydrocarbon play potential. HARP sheet sands, internal HARP channel fill, overlying channel-levee fill, and overbank levee sands are potential reservoir units. Detrital carbonate and hemipelagic shale source rocks are in place in the deep-water Gulf of Mexico. In addition, structurally derived migration pathways combine with percolation as potential migration processes. This study integrates identification and description of HARP seismic facies relationships, current and newly developed depositional models, interpretation of stratigraphic controls, HARP internal reservoir architecture, and determination of HARP hydrocarbon potential in order to predict HARP deposition in the Mississippi Fan and other mud-rich fans worldwide.

Francis, Jason Michael

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Temporal Characterization of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0010141 Goal The overall objective of the project is to investigate hydrate system dynamics beneath seafloor mounds—a structurally focused example of hydrate occurrence at the landward extreme of their stability field—in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Researchers will conduct observatory-based in situ measurements at Woolsey Mound, MC118 to: Characterize (geophysically) the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability and, Contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents, and seafloor

134

Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castao, Gabriel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

CX-002993: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

993: Categorical Exclusion Determination 993: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Analysis Characterization Methods in the Analytical Development Wet Chemistry Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), turbidity, flash point, conductivity, and pH. Undiluted sample is used for all methods listed. Clean samples are analyzed on bench instruments, while radioactive samples are run on instruments located in radiological containment hoods. Instrumentation include clean and radiological use turbidimeters, balances, flash point devices, conductivity meters and probes, and titration systems. Standards and calibrants include

136

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B2.5 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 17, 2010 June 17, 2010 CX-002764: Categorical Exclusion Determination Arkansas-City-Fayetteville CX(s) Applied: B2.5, A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 06/17/2010 Location(s): Fayetteville, Arkansas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 16, 2010 CX-002991: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Turbidity Meter Discharge Check Valves CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 06/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office June 16, 2010 CX-002784: Categorical Exclusion Determination Utah-County-Washington CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/16/2010 Location(s): Washington County, Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy June 15, 2010 CX-002776: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-City-Elk Grove

137

Three LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studies were studies were conducted by the Nutrients Dynamics teams of ND-07 at studies sites near Brasilia, Brazil. LBA-ECO ND-07 Hydrochemistry of Natural and Developed Land Cover, Brasilia, Brazil. Data set prepared by J.S.O. Silva and M. Bustamante. This data set reports on dissolved nutrient concentrations, as well as dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, conductivity, turbidity, and pH measured in water samples collected from nine streams, surface runoff, wells, lysimeters, and precipitation sites located in the state of Brasilia, Brazil, between September 2004 and December 2006. LBA-ECO ND-07 Microbial Biomass in Cerrado Soils, Brasilia, Brazil. Data set prepared by L.T. Viana, M. Molina, M. Bustamante, A.S. Pinto, K. Kisselle, R. Zepp, and R. Burke. This data set reports the microbial

138

Diffuse solar radiation and associated meteorological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Solar diffuse radiation data including global radiation, shortwave and longwave balances, net radiation and sunshine hours have been extensively analyzed to study the variation of diffuse radiation with turbidity and cloud discharges appearing in the form of atmospherics over the tropics. Results of surface radiation measurements at Calcutta, Poona, Delhi and Madras are presented together with some meteorological parameters. The monthly values of diffuse radiation and the monthly ratios of diffuse to global solar radiation have been examined, with a special emphasis in relation to the noise level of atmospherics at Calcutta in the very low frequency band. The results exhibit some definite seasonal changes which appear to be in close agreement with one another. 1

unknown authors

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION  

SciTech Connect

The agglomeration of ultrafine-size coal particles in an aqueous suspension by means of microscopic gas bubbles was demonstrated in numerous experiments with a scale model mixing system. Coal samples from both the Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam and the Upper Freeport Seam were used for these experiments. A small amount of i-octane was added to facilitate the process. Microscopic gas bubbles were generated by saturating the water used for suspending coal particles with gas under pressure and then reducing the pressure. Microagglomerates were produced which appeared to consist of gas bubbles encapsulated in coal particles. Since dilute particle suspensions were employed, it was possible to monitor the progress of agglomeration by observing changes in turbidity. By such means it became apparent that the rate of agglomeration depends on the concentration of microscopic gas bubbles and to a lesser extent on the concentration of i-octane. Similar results were obtained with both Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Upper Freeport coal.

MEIYU SHEN; ROYCE ABBOTT; T.D. WHEELOCK

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Removal of beryllium from drinking water by chemical coagulation and lime softening  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. Jar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride) and lime softening performed in removing beryllium from spiked waters. Centrifugation was used to simulate filtration. The two source waters used were raw Ohio River water and groundwater from the Great Miami Aquifer. The impact of initial beryllium concentration, coagulant dose, turbidity and pH on beryllium removal was examined and optimum treatment conditions were determined. Jar tests using alum and ferric chloride coagulants were able to achieve 95% and 85% removal of beryllium respectively from surface water. Removal efficiency increased as the pH was increased. Based on the data collected in the study, coprecipitation and precipitation are the two likely mechanisms responsible for beryllium removal.

Lytle, D.A.; Summers, R.S.; Sorg, T.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During third quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Simple solar spectral model for direct and diffuse irradiance on horizontal and tilted planes at the earth's surface for cloudless atmospheres  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new, simple model for calculating clear-sky direct and diffuse spectral irradiance on horizontal and tilted surfaces is presented. The model is based on previously reported simple algorithms and on comparisons with rigorous radiative transfer calculations and limited outdoor measurements. Equations for direct normal irradiance are outlined; and include: Raleigh scattering; aerosol scattering and absorption; water vapor absorption; and ozone and uniformly mixed gas absorption. Inputs to the model include solar zenith angle, collector tilt angle, atmospheric turbidity, amount of ozone and precipitable water vapor, surface pressure, and ground albedo. The model calculates terrestrial spectra from 0.3 to 4.0 ..mu..m with approximately 10 nm resolution. A major goal of this work is to provide researchers with the capability to calculate spectral irradiance for different atmospheric conditions and different collector geometries using microcomputers. A listing of the computer program is provided.

Bird, R.; Riordan, C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Clouds Height and Aerosol Dynamic Monitoring by Micro Pulse Backscattering Eye-safe Lidar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-time, clouds height monitoring, attenuation length measurement and remote atmospheric homogeneity sensing by micro pulse Lidar (MPL) is proposed for use together with UV-laser slant-path extinction measurements in the Pierre Auger experiment. The goal of the research reported here is to determine the feasibility of such a sensor for quatitative measurements during an experiment in autonomous mode regardless of weather. Preliminary results of an atmosphere sensing at the Pierre Auger site in Nov.1998 by micro pulse Lidar are presented and discussed. 1 Introduction The long term measurements of the atmospheric turbidity, meteovisibility, haze optical thickness and cloud base height are very important for the surface radiation budget and for climate modeling in general. These data are necessary both, for scientic use, as in the detection of extremely high energy cosmic rays by the uorescence technique [1], and for applied environmental monitoring, as in air trac control for...

Pershin And Lyash

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Low-frequency elastic waves alter pore-scale colloid mobilization  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring seismic events and artificially generated low-frequency elastic waves have been observed to alter the production rates of oil and water wells, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing production, and to influence the turbidity of water wells. TEe decreases in production are of particular concern - especially when artificially generated elastic waves are applied as a method for enhanced oil recovery. The exact conditions that result in a decrease in production remain unknown. While the underlying environment is certainly complex, the observed increase in water well turbidity after seismic events suggests the existence of a mechanism that can affect both the subsurface flow paths and mobilization of in-situ colloidal particles. This paper explores the macroscopic and microscopic effects of elastic wave stimulations on the release of colloidal particles and investigates the microscopic mechanism of particle release during stimulation. Experiments on a column packed with 1-mm borosilicate beads loaded with polystyrene microspheres demonstrate that low-frequency elastic wave stimulations enhance the mobilization of captured microspheres. Increasing the intensity of the stimulations increases the number of microspheres released and can also result in cyclical variations in effluent microsphere concentration during and after stimulations. Under a prolonged period of stimulation, the cyclical effluent variations coincided with fluctuations in the column pressure data. This behavior can be attributed to flow pathways fouling and/or rearrangements of the beads in the column. Optical microscopy observations of the beads during low frequency oscillations reveal that the individual beads rotate, thereby rubbing against each other and scraping off portions of the adsorbed microspheres. These results support the theory that mechanical interactions between soil grains are important mechanisms in flow path alteration and the mobilization of naturally occurring colloidal particles during elastic wave stimulation. These results also point to both continuous and discrete, en masse releases of colloidal particles.

Beckham, Richard Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdel-fattah, Amr I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roberts, Peter M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ibrahim, Reem [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tarimala, Sownitri [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Variables effecting ozone treatment of physical-chemical effluent  

SciTech Connect

The treatment of raw sewage from an on-site apartment area was investigated in a series of laboratory experiments in which changes in turbidity, pH, total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, and, in some cases, biochemical oxygen demands were determined. Raw sewage, but mainly the effluent following physical-chemical treatment, was examined for improvement in discharge quality by ozone treatment in combination with oxygen sparging, ionizing gamma radiation from /sup 60/Co heating, acidifying, and several other variables. The average composition of the raw sewage was a TOC of 125 ppM (range from 65 to 240), COD of 190 ppM (range from 85 to 475), turbidity of 145 J. U. (range from 60 to 350), and pH of 7.3 (range from 6.5 to 8.4). Physical chemical treatment usually consisted of the addition of CaO (to pH 11) and FeCl/sub 3/ as a coagulant aid in an inclined tube followed by course filtration; typical treatment time was 15 minutes giving an average reduction in TOC and COD of 40 to 60%. Subsequent treatment was usually performed with 200 cm/sup 3/ samples of the effluent in fine and course fritted bubblers. The combination of radiation plus ozone gave the largest reduction of TOC and COD. In one experiment, 15 minutes of treatment followed by 30 minutes of irradiation and ozonation reduced the raw sewage TOC from 95 to 14 ppM carbon and COD from 150 to 6 ppM oxygen. (auth)

Dietz, R.N.; Pruzansky, J.; Steinberg, M.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Simulation model finned water-air-coil withoutcondensation  

SciTech Connect

A simple simulation model of a finned water-to- air coil without condensation is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows eficient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is short computation time and use of input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important for energy efficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculation or load calculation with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short-time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control performance, are neglected. The part load behavior of the coil is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature on the water side and the air side. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part load conditions. Geometrical data for the coil are not required, The calculation of the convective heat transfer coefficients at nominal conditions is based on the ratio of the air side heat transfer coefficients multiplied by the fin eficiency and divided by the water side heat transfer coefficient. In this approach, the only geometrical information required are the cross section areas, which are needed to calculate the~uid velocities. The formulas for estimating this ratio are presented. For simplicity the model ignores condensation. The model is static and uses only explicit equations. The explicit formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability. This allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods such as automatic system optimization. The paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for a particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

Wetter, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Heat Transfer Performance and Piping Strategy Study for Chilled Water Systems at Low Cooling Loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature differential of chilled water is an important factor used for evaluating the performance of a chilled water system. A low delta-T may increase the pumping energy consumption and increase the chiller energy consumption. The system studied in this thesis is the chilled water system at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW Airport). This system has the problem of low delta-T under low cooling loads. When the chilled water flow is much lower than the design conditions at low cooling loads, it may lead to the laminar flow of the chilled water in the cooling coils. The main objective of this thesis is to explain the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils under low cooling loads. The water side and air side heat transfer coefficients at different water and air flow rates are calculated. The coefficients are used to analyze the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils at conditions ranging from very low loads to design conditions. The effectiveness-number of transfer units (NTU) method is utilized to analyze the cooling coil performance under different flow conditions, which also helps to obtain the cooling coil chilled water temperature differential under full load and partial load conditions. When the water flow rate drops to 1ft/s, laminar flow occurs; this further decreases the heat transfer rate on the water side. However, the cooling coil effectiveness increases with the drop of water flow rate, which compensates for the influence of the heat transfer performance under laminar flow conditions. Consequently, the delta-T in the cooling coil decreases in the transitional flow regime but increases in the laminar flow regime. Results of this thesis show that the laminar flow for the chilled water at low flow rate is not the main cause of the low delta-T syndrome in the chilled water system. Possible causes for the piping strategy of the low delta-T syndrome existing in the chilled water system under low flow conditions are studied in this thesis: (1) use of two way control valves; and (2) improper tertiary pump piping strategy.

Li, Nanxi 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements like plutonium and uranium; (2) a LIBS system that can be deployed in harsh environments such as gloveboxes and hot cells providing relative compositional analysis of process streams for example ratios like Cm/Pu and Cm/U; and (3) an inspector field deployable system that can be used to analyze the elemental composition of microscopic quantities of samples containing plutonium and uranium. In this paper we will describe our current development and performance testing results both in a fixed lab and measurements in field deployable configurations using LIBS instrumentation developed for applications to international safeguards.

Barefield Il, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Okanogan Subbasin Water Quality and Quantity Report for Anadromous Fish in 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fish need water of sufficient quality and quantity in order to survive and reproduce. The list of primary water quality indicators appropriate for monitoring of anadromous fish, as identified by the Upper Columbia Monitoring Strategy, includes: discharge, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, conductivity, nitrogen, phosphorus and ammonia. The Colville Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department began evaluating these water quality indicators in 2005 and this report represents data collected from October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006. We collected empirical status and trend data from various sources to evaluate each water quality indicator along the main stem Okanogan and Similkameen Rivers along with several tributary streams. Each water quality indicator was evaluated based upon potential impacts to salmonid survival or productivity. Specific conductance levels and all nutrient indicators remained at levels acceptable for growth, survival, and reproduction of salmon and steelhead. These indicators were also considered of marginal value for monitoring environmental conditions related to salmonids within the Okanogan subbasin. However, discharge, temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and pH in that order represent the water quality indicators that are most useful for monitoring watershed health and habitat changes and will help to evaluate threats or changes related to salmon and steelhead restoration and recovery. On the Okanogan River minimum flows have decreased over the last 12 years at a rate of -28.3CFS/year as measured near the town of Malott, WA. This trend is not beneficial for salmonid production and efforts to reverse this trend should be strongly encouraged. Turbidity levels in Bonaparte and Omak Creek were a concern because they had the highest monthly average readings. Major upland disturbance in the Bonaparte Creek watershed has occurred for decades and agricultural practices within the riparian areas along this creek have lead to major channel incision and bank instability. High sediment loads continue to threaten Omak and Bonaparte sub-watersheds. Major rehabilitation efforts are needed within these sub-watersheds to improve salmonid habitats. We found that for the past 12 years dissolved oxygen levels have been on a slightly downward trend during summer/fall Chinook egg incubation. Dissolved oxygen readings in early October, for summer/fall Chinook and from June through early July for summer steelhead can occasionally drop to the range from 8 to 10 mg/L and therefore warrant continued monitoring. Levels of pH represent an indicator that has little monitoring value throughout most of the subbasin. The Similkameen River drainage showed dramatic annual changes in the mean pH values and a declining trend for pH thus warranting continued monitoring. Average daily temperatures, in 2006, exceeded 25 C for eight days in July in the Okanogan River at Malott. Due to increased warm water temperatures, delays in migration have increased at a rate of 1.82 days per year over the last 10 years. Increases in water temperature can be linked to many anthropogenic activities. Increasing water temperatures within the Okanogan River watershed represent the single most limiting factor facing salmonids in main-stem habitats.

Colville Tribes, Department of Fish & Wildlife

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Quality and Membrane Treatability of the Lake Houston Water Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, sections of Harris and Montgomery counties located North and Northeast of Houston use groundwater almost exclusively. These areas have witnessed substantial population growth and associated increases in water demand. In 1999 approximately 60% of potable water in Houston and its adjoining communities was produced from surface water. The remaining approximately 40% was derived from groundwater. However, the "Subsidence District" which is the authority responsible for granting groundwater permits has mandated that groundwater use needs to be decreased to 20% within the next few years so as to limit subsidence. Pipelines are not available to distribute purified water from the existing surface water treatment plants located in the South and East of Houston to the Northern areas that actually require additional water. Because Lake Houston is located in the geographical area of interest and is a surface water source, the City of Houston is interested in developing it for its future water needs. Additionally, a favorable hydraulic gradient exists from the Lake to the proposed service areas in Harris and Montgomery counties. Federal regulations such as the Stage II of the Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Products Rule (1) and the Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (2) are expected to be promulgated in the near future. These rules are anticipated to introduce more stringent maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for total trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), possibly introduce new MCLs for individual species of THMs and HAAs, reduce turbidity levels, and enhance inactivation/removal requirements for Cryptosporidium. (Cryptosporidium was the causative protozoan for the more than 400,000 cases of acute gastrointestinal disease in Milwaukee, WI in March 1993.) The treatment processes in the City of Houston's existing water purification plants are not expected to be sufficient in meeting these anticipated regulations. Therefore, both regulatory requirements and engineering considerations point towards Lake Houston as an attractive surface water source for the next water purification plant to supply potable water to the City and its adjoining communities. However, water quality in Lake Houston can be characterized as being poor with high concentrations of turbidity, color, total organic carbon (TOC), nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen, etc. (3). Pressure-driven membrane processes can be employed as effective barriers against a wide range of contaminants including particles, turbidity, protozoan cysts and oocysts, bacteria, viruses, color, organic carbon, disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors, and dissolved metals. Additionally, microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) pretreatment may be necessary to reduce fouling rates and increase chemical cleaning intervals during surface water nanofiltration (NF) (4). Therefore, an integrated membrane system employing MF or UF pretreatment to NF is expected to be an important treatment candidate for Lake Houston water. Nanofiltration (NF) membranes typically operate at pressures less than 100 psi and are capable of high rejections of natural organic matter (NOM) and precursors to disinfection by-products (DBP) including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) (5-8), many of which are suspected carcinogens, mutagens, or teratogens.

Chellam, Shankar; Sharma, Ramesh; Shetty, Grishma; Wei, Ying

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Mobilization of colloidal particles by low-frequency dynamic stress stimulation  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring seismic events and artificially generated low-frequency (1 to 500 Hertz) elastic waves have been observed to alter the production rates of oil and water wells, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing production, and to influence the turbidity of surface and well water. The decreases in production are of particular concern - especially when artificially generated elastic waves are applied as a method for enhanced oil recovery. The exact conditions that result in a decrease in production remain unknown. While the underlying environment is certainly complex, the observed increase in water well turbidity after natural seismic events suggests the existence of a mechanism that can affect both the subsurface flow paths and mobilization of in-situ colloidal particles. This paper explores the macroscopic and microscopic effects of low-frequency dynamic stress stimulations on the release of colloidal particles from an analog core representing an infinitesimal section along the propagation paths of an elastic wave. Experiments on a column packed with 1-mm borosilicate beads and loaded with polystyrene microspheres demonstrate that axial mechanical stress oscillations enhance the mobilization of captured microspheres. Increasing the amplitude of the oscillations increases the number of microspheres released and can also result in cyclical spikes in effluent microsphere concentration during stimulation. Under a prolonged period of stimulation, the cyclical effluent spikes coincided with fluctuations in the column pressure data, and continue at a diminished level after stimulation. This behavior can be attributed to rearrangements of the beads in the column, resulting in possible changes to the void space and/or tortuosity of the packing. Optical microscopy observations of the beads during low frequency oscillations reveal that individual beads rotate, thereby rubbing against each other and scraping away portions of the adsorbed microspheres. These results support the theory that mechanical interactions between porous matrix grains are important mechanisms in flow path alteration and the mobilization of naturally occurring colloidal particles during elastic wave stimulation. These results also point to both continuous and discrete, en masse releases of colloidal particles, perhaps due to circulation cells within the packing material.

Beckham, Richard Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Amr, Abdel - Fattah I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peter, Roberts M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reem, Ibrahim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tarimala, Sowmitri [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion (<1200 mg/l). (4) Experimental tests with sludge batch 6 simulant and field turbidity data from a recent Tank 21 mixing evolution suggest the solid particles have higher density and/or larger size than indicated by previous analysis of SRS sludge and sludge simulants. (5) Tank 21 waste characterization, laboratory settling tests, and additional field turbidity measurements during mixing evolutions are recommended to better understand potential risk for extended (> 60 days) settling times in Tank 21.

Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Late Pleistocene to Recent sediment transport pathways of the Green Canyon OCS area, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses some of the complexities of sediment transport systems on the continental slope of the Green Canyon OCS area south of the Louisiana coast. Five Late Pleistocene to Recent sedimentary sequences are identified using a combination of seismic and well data. Sediments are transported through pathways characterized by erosional surfaces and numerous channels which form as sediments remobilize and become transported downslope. Pathway margins are constricted by physiographic highs. Several processes are identified as means of carrying fine-grained sediments to and across the continental slope. The most important of these are mass movements (slumps and slides), debris flows, and turbidity currents. Faulting and/or slumping at the shelf edge remobilizes sediments which are then carried further downslope. These remobilized sediments may be transported as debris flows or other undifferentiated high-density flows, or may develop into turbidity currents which deposit graded sediments in response to decreases in slope gradient. Slumps and slides off salt uplifts also deposit large volumes of sediments into adjacent intraslope basins and sediment transport pathways, where they may contribute significant amounts of material to the downslope transport of sediments. Discrete channels are not often observed in the pathways due to multiple episodes of channel formation and erosion which occurred during a single sea level lowstand. These multiple episodes tend to remove or obscure prominent channel features. Sedimentation is cyclic. During one sea level lowstand a sequence is deposited in and along narrow pathways which successively fill intraslope basins from the shelf edge downslope. As each basin is filled, sediments spill over and continue downslope to a lower basin. Sedimentation during the next sea level lowstand occurs in broader pathways. Less sediments are deposited in the intraslope basin areas because they remain filled from the previous sequence. By the time of deposition of the next sequence, movement of underlying salt sheets has changed the shape of the pathway. The sedimentation pattern repeats as lower depressions fill and sediments spill over. Pathways transport slope sediments in the Green canyon area. Discrete channels are not often observed in the pathways. This is a result of two mechanisms: 1) multiple episodes of erosion during a sea level lowstand tend to remove or obscure prominent channel features, and 2) most sediments deposited within the pathways are mass transport deposits which do not often become channelized. The pathways are characterized by erosional surfaces and numerous conduits which form as sediments remobilize and become transported downslope. They are laterally relatively persistent, being constricted by structural highs,

Swanson, John Patrick

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE  

SciTech Connect

SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

Herman, D.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

155

Nonpotable reuse: Development of health criteria and technologies for shower water recycle. (Reannouncement with new availability information)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army is evaluating recycle of field shower water as a conservation practice in arid regions and is seeking to define appropriate technologies and health criteria. Shower wastewaters at a military installation have been characterized in terms of physical, chemical and microbiological parameters. Two treatment technologies havebeen investigated. Microfiltration cartridges with a nominal pore size of 0.2 MU m achieved consistent removals of 75 15% of total organic carbon (TOC) and better than 99% of turbidity from synthetic shower water containing 50 to 100 mg/L of TOC as soap. An alternative treatmenttechnology utilized powered activated carbon and coagulation/flocculation/ sedimentation followed by diatomaceous earth filtration. A TOC reduction of 70 15% was achieved in three separate studies, although at a cost of 1 g/L or more of powered activated carbon. Revised quality criteria for recycled shower water have been developed with guidance from the National Research Council. Parameters which can practically be measured in the field are primarily associated with microbiological safety.

Burrows, W.D.; Schmidt, M.O.; Carnevale, R.M.; Schaub, S.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Characteristics of the C Shale and D Shale reservoirs, Monterey Formation, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper Miocene C Shale and D Shale reservoirs of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation have cumulative oil and gas production much higher than the originally estimated recovery. These San Joaquin basin reservoirs are the lowest of the Stevens producing zones at Elk Hills and currently produce from a 2800-acre area on the 31 S anticline. The C Shale contains lower slope and basin plain deposits of very fine grained, thinly bedded, graded turbidites, pelagic and hemipelagic claystone, and slump deposits. Although all units are oil-bearing, only the lower parts of the graded turbidity intervals have sufficient horizontal permeability to produce oil. The D Shale consists of chart, claystone, carbonates and slump deposits, also originating in a lower slope to basin plain setting. All D Shale rock types contain oil, but the upper chart interval is the most productive. The chart has high matrix porosity, and due to a complex horizontal and vertical microfracture system, produces at a highly effective rate. Core samples indicate more oil-in-place is present in the thin, graded C Shale beds and in the porous D Shale chart than is identifiable from conventional electric logs. High gas recovery rates are attributed mostly to this larger volume of associated oil. Gas also enters the reservoirs from the adjacent 26R reservoir through a leaky normal fault. Significant gas volumes also may desorb from immature organic material common in the rock matrix.

Reid, S.A.; McIntyre, J.L. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Reservoir description breathes new life into an old fireflood  

SciTech Connect

The MOCO T reservoir is a Miocene-age (''Stevens equivalent,'' Monterey Formation) unconsolidated sand reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, Kern County, California. This reservoir was discovered in 1957 as a deeper pay beneath the Monarch and Webster reservoirs. Due to low prices for heavy oil (14/sup 0/ API), the MOCO T was only partially developed and remained essentially shut-in until initiation of in-situ combustion in 1960. Exploitation of the MOCO T by the combustion process continues today, with cumulative production to date of approximately 14 million bbl of oil. The MOCO T reservoir is approximately 500 ft thick and lies at an average drill depth of 2,100-2,700 ft. Based on modern core data and sand distribution maps, these sands were probably deposited by channelized turbidity currents that flowed southwest to northwest in this area. Detailed recorrelation of wireline logs, stratigraphic zonation, and description of individual zones of the MOCO T reservoir in the context of a channelized turbidite system have led to: (1) determination of probable flow paths, vertically and laterally, between injectors and producers by zone, (2) control for workovers to optimize conformance between injection and production intervals, and (3) identification of previously unrecognized and undeveloped reserves. Integration of this geologic model with an understanding of how the combustion front has advanced through the MOCO T reservoir has led to successful placement of infill wells to produce the reservoir more efficiently and completely.

Hall, B.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Coastwatch | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coastwatch Coastwatch Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Coastwatch Dataset Summary Description NOAA CoastWatch was established in 1987 in response to two significant environmental events. A Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) event occurred off the coast of North Carolina transporting the toxic Gymnodinium breve cells from Florida via the Gulf Stream into the colder coastal waters near Cape Lookout. Also, a severe mammal die-off occurred, where more than 700 bottlenose dolphins died off the mid-Atlantic coast. Both instances prompted Federal and State officials to explore additional data sources for monitoring the coastal waters, such as near real-time satellite data. CoastWatch has expanded from POES/AVHRR SST data for the East Coast to providing a variety of environmental data (i.e. SST, ocean color, winds, etc.) from several different satellite platforms covering all U.S. coastal waters, including Hawaii and Alaska. Today, sea surface temperature maps support meteorological weather predictions and also support commercial and recreational activities (e.g., fishing). Biologists utilize ocean color radiometry data and derived chlorophyll-a and total suspended matter/turbidity products to identify runoff plumes and blooms and also predict HABs; and sailors and commercial shipping pilots use ocean surface vector winds for safe navigation.

159

Cross-flow filtration in physical-chemical treatment of municipal sewage effluents  

SciTech Connect

In separations of solids from liquids by filtration, the motion of liquid is customarily normal to the filtering surface, and solids are left on the filter. In a variation called cross-flow filtration, liquid is pumped parallel to the filtering surface. By this device, thickening of flux-limiting filtercake is slowed, and the original stream is separated into a large volume of filtrate and a concentrated slurry of solids. Results reported here were obtained in cross-flow filtration used as an element in physical-chemical treatment of municipal sewage, mostly with the effluent from primary settling, but in some cases, with clarified activated sludge effluent as feed. Filtrate from passage through fabric tubes (1-inch fire-hose jackets) of primary effluent, treated with iron or aluminum salts, with powdered activated carbon (PAC), or with both hydrolyzable ions and PAC, was generally of quality superior in turbidity, organic carbon and other respects to the effluent from biological secondary treatment. Effects on product quality and flux of pressure, circulation velocity, additive concentration, water recovery, pH and other variables were investigated. Based on production rates obtained, estimates of treatment costs were made.

Mahlman, H.A.; Sisson, W.G.; Kraus, K.A.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

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161

New petrofacies in upper Cretaceous section of southern California  

SciTech Connect

A distinctive sandstone-conglomerate petrofacies is recognized throughout the Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian-late Campanian) Chatsworth Formation in the Simi Hills. It is named the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies after the district where it was first recognized. The petrofacies is also recognized in the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian and possibly early Maestrichtian) Tuna Canyon Formation of the central Santa Monica Mountains. The conglomerates in the petrofacies are composed predominantly of angular pebble-size clasts of argillite, quartz-rich rocks (orthoquartzarenite, metaorthoquartzarenite, mice quartz schist) and leucocratic plutoniate (granite-granodiorite). The conglomerate texture and composition are mirrored in the sandstone. The uniformly angular character of the conglomerate clasts and the survival of argillite clasts indicate that the detritus underwent no more than 5 mi of subaerial transport before it entered the deep marine realm. Foraminifers collected from mudstones interbedded with the conglomerates indicate upper bathyal water depth at the site of deposition. A source terrane of low to moderate relief is indicated by the absence of cobbles and boulders. Bed forms, sedimentary structures, and textural features indicate the detritus moved north from its source terrane to be deposited by turbidity currents, debris flows, and grain flows on the Chatsworth Submarine Fan. The detritus of the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies was derived from basement rocks, now largely buried beneath the Los Angeles basin, that were being eroded during the formation of the Cretaceous Los Angeles erosion surface. The detritus came from the Los Angeles arch of that surface.

Colburn, I.P.; Oliver, D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Accumulation of Cd by the marine sponge Halichondria panicea pallas: Effects upon filtration rate and its relevance for biomonitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The marine demosponge Halichondria panicea Pallas, is a cosmopolitan species occurring in coastal waters with varied conditions of light, current, salinity and turbidity. H. panicea has a leuconoid structure and is composed of siliceous spicules and spongin fibers. Sponges are important members of many shallow water marine benthic communities, but comparatively little is known of their trace metal biology. Sponge architecture is constructed around a system of water canals and the physiology of the sponge is largely dependent on the currents of water flowing through their bodies. The volume of water pumped by a sponge is remarkable, ca. 100-1200 ml h[sup [minus]1] g[sup [minus]1]. This large volume of water passing through the body of a sponge means that most cells are in direct contact with the external medium. Many sponges are able to accumulate trace metals and are highly tolerant of such pollutants. This has led to the proposal that a [open quotes]sponge watch[close quotes] program be initiated supplementary to the existing [open quotes]mussel watch[close quotes] program. In view of the large volume of water passing through the bodies of sponges such as H. panicea, the suitability of this species as a biomonitoring organism was further investigated. This study describes the accumulation strategy of the demosponge H. panicea exposed to dissolved cadmium (Cd) and the effect of Cd upon sponge filtration rate.

Olesen, T.M.E.; Weeks, J.M. (Odense Univ. (Denmark))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Smolt Passage Behavior and Flow-Net Relationship in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1984-1985 Final Report of Research.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The migration routes of downstream migrant salmonids in the forebay of John Day Dam were defined and assessed in relation to current velocities and water turbidity and temperature. Forebay current patterns were obtained from current meters at fixed sampling stations, the distribution of outmigrants was determined from purse seine sampling, and migration routes of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead were identified by radio telemetry techniques. All species of emigrating salmonids alter their distribution across the forebay as they approach the dam. Fish abundance was positively correlated with water clarity. There was no evidence to suggest that the migration routes were in response to current patterns in the forebay. Radio telemetry studies demonstrated that a certain segment of yearling chinook salmon approaching the dam are predisposed to spill passage (Washington side of the river) by virtue of their lateral position across the forebay. A new application of radio tag methodology was assessed and found to be useful in evaluating the effectiveness of spill for bypassing outmigrant salmon. A program system and cartographic model was developed which displays for any specified hour forebay current patterns at prevailing river flows and dam operations. The system can be used at other dam sites where investigations may wish to detail forebay current patterns.

Giorgi, Albert E.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Smolt Passage Behavior and Flow-Net Relationships in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1983 [Amended] Annual Report of Research.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1983, the research program had three separate but complementary phases--monitoring current patterns in the forebay, defining fish distribution with purse seine sampling, and describing the migration routes of salmonid smolts using radio tracking techniques. Preliminary results from the radio-tracking and purse seining operations in FY83 suggest that the discharge from the John Day River and the turbid plume it forms in the forebay may have a pronounced effect on the distribution of smolts, especially chinook and sockeye salmon, as they approach the dam. The implication of these data is that the plume may be shunting salmon toward the Washington (spill) side of the river where they would be more susceptible to spill passage. This resulted in higher spill passage of tagged chinook salmon than the proportion of water being spilled. In contrast, spillway passage of steelhead not influenced by the plume is approximately the same as the proportion of water being spilled. These findings are based on limited data and must be considered preliminary at this time. Data describing the current patterns have just recently been reduced to a usable format and have not yet been correlated with findings from radio tracking and purse seining. Such data will be incorporated into an overall analysis of the relations of current patterns and John Day River discharge to fish migration patterns. Representative examples of prevailing current patterns during the spring migration have been completed and are included in this document.

Giorgi, Albert E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The use of geographic information systems technology for salmon habitat analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although Geographic Information Systems (GISs) have traditionally been used to analyze terrestrial animal habitats, identify migration patterns, and monitor ecosystems, they have rarely been used to understand aquatic species. The US Army Corps of Engineers is working with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other government agencies to exploit GIS technology for improving the survival of threatened and endangered salmon in the Snake River in the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The customized GIS will be used to map the physical environment of the river, to map the current biological environment, and to analyze potential impacts to both of these environments from several mitigation options. Data in both digital and textual formats have been obtained from scientists across the Pacific Northwest who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The mitigation options focus on studying the effects of lowering the reservoirs of the Snake River in an effort to speed juvenile salmon towards the ocean. The hypothesis being examined is that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean may result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios. Lowering the Snake River reservoirs is expected to have a variety of impacts to the physical environment, including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gasses, and turbidity. Each of these potential changes is being examined to assess their effects on the surrounding terrestrial wildlife and on both the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River.

Evans, B.J.; Gordon, J.V.; Mavros, W.V.; Perry, E.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Pinney, C. [US Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla, WA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Solar radiation model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several mathematical models have been developed within the past few years which estimate the solar radiation from other weather variables. Some of these models have been used to generate data bases which are extensively used in the design and analysis of solar system. Three of these solar radiation models have been used in developing the Augmented SOLMET Solar Data Tapes for the 26 SOLMET sites and the 222 ERSATZ Solar Data Tapes. One of the models, a theoretical one, predicts the solar noon radiation for clear sky conditions from the optical air mass, precipitable water vapor and turbidity variables. A second model, an empirical one, predicts the hourly total horizontal radiation from meteorological variables. And, a third model, also an empirical one, predicts the hourly direct normal radiation from the hourly total horizontal radiation. A study of the accuracy of these three solar radiation models is reported here. To assess the accuracy of these models, data were obtained from several US National Weather Service Stations and other sources, used the models to estimate the solar-radiation, and then compared the modeled radiation values with observed radiation values. The results of these comparisons and conclusions regarding the accuracy of the models are presented.

Hall, I.J.; Prairie, R.R.; Anderson, H.E.; Boes, E.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Sampling and analysis of water from Upper Three Runs and its wetlands near Tank 16 and the Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect

In April and September 1993, sampling was conducted to characterize the Upper Three Runs (UTR) wetland waters near the Mixed Waste Management Facility to determine if contaminants migrating from MWMF are outcropping into the floodplain wetlands. For the spring sampling event, 37 wetlands and five stream water samples were collected. Thirty-six wetland and six stream water samples were collected for the fall sampling event. Background seepline and stream water samples were also collected for both sampling events. All samples were analyzed for RCRA Appendix IX volatiles, inorganics appearing on the Target Analyte List, tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and gross radiological activity. Most of the analytical data for both the spring and fall sampling events were reported as below method detection limits. The primary exceptions were the routine water quality indicators (e.g., turbidity, alkalinity, total suspended solids, etc.), iron, manganese, and tritium. During the spring, cadmium, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, potassium-40, ruthenium-106, and trichloroethylene were also detected above the MCLs from at least one location. A secondary objective of this project was to identify any UTR wetland water quality impacts resulting from leaks from Tank 16 located at the H-Area Tank Farm.

Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

The six monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin are sampled quarterly as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with the terms of a consent decree signed May 26, 1988, by the US District Court (District of South Carolina, Aiken Division). During second quarter 1993, samples from the monitoring wells were analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters characterizing suitability as a drinking water supply, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria or turbidity standard are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS in wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin. Aluminum exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells PAC 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Iron and manganese each exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in wells PAC 2, 3, 5, and 6. Lead was elevated above its Flag 2 criterion in well PAC 5, and radium-228 was above its proposed DWS (Flag 2) in wells PAC 3 and 6. Radium-228 results that exceeded nonvolatile beta activities were reported in these and other wells.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Examination of pulverized waste recycled glass as filter media in slow sand filtration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate the pulverization of waste recycled glass to produce glass sand for slow sand filters. Pulverization experiments were performed using a fail mill pulverizer. The glass sand product from the pulverizer meets the size distribution requirements of ASTM-C-33 without size distribution adjustment. The size distribution must be adjusted to meet the grain size distribution requirements of the Ten States Standards and the USEPA for filter media used in slow sand filters. Pulverized glass that meet slow sand filter media specifications is an effective alternative to silica sand as a filter media for slow sand filtration. Three pilot plant slow sand filters with glass sand filter media were compared to a fourth filter containing silica sand filter media. Over an 8 month period of continuous operation, the performance of the glass sand filter media was as good or better than the silica sands, with removals of 56% to 96% for turbidity; 99.78% to 100.0% for coliform bacteria; 99.995% to 99.997% for giardia cysts; 99.92% and 99.97% for cryptosporidium oocysts. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, converting waste glass into filter media may be economically advantageous for recycling facilities.

Piccirillo, J.B.; Letterman, R.D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Relationship Between Survival of Columbia River Fall Chinook Salmon and In-River Environmental Factors : Analysis of Historic Data for Juvenile and Adult Salmonid Production: Phase 2. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project analyzes in greater detail the coded-wire-tag (CWT) returns of Priest Rapids Hatchery fall chinook for the years 1976--1989 initially begun by Hilborn et al. (1993a). These additional analyses were prompted by suggestions made by peer reviews of the initial draft report. The initial draft and the peer review comments are included in this final report (Appendices A and B). The statistical analyses paired Priest Rapids stock with potential downriver reference stocks to isolate in-river survival rates. Thirty-three potential reference stocks were initially examined for similar ocean recovery rates; the five stocks with the most similar recovery patterns (i.e., Bonneville Brights, Cowlitz, Gray's River, Tanner Creek, and Washougal) to the Priest Rapids stock were used in the subsequent analysis of in-river survival. Three alternate forms of multiple regression models were used to investigate the relationship between predicted in-river survival and ambient conditions. Analyses were conducted with and without attempts to adjust for smolt transportation at McNary Dam. Independent variables examined in the analysis included river flows, temperature, turbidity, and spill along with the total biomass of hatchery releases in the Columbia-Snake River Basin.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Donnelly, Robert F.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorption of sulfur dioxide from a simulated flue gas was investigated for the production of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a highly effective coagulant useful in treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The reaction for PFS synthesis took place near atmospheric pressure and at temperatures of 30-80 C. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved, with ferrous iron concentrations in the product less than 0.1%. A factorial analysis of the effect of temperature, oxidant dosage, SO{sub 2} concentration, and gas flow rate on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was carried out, and statistical analyses are conducted. The solid PFS was also characterized with different methods. Characterization results have shown that PFS possesses both crystalline and non-crystalline structure. The kinetics of reactions among FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O, NaHSO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was investigated. Characterizations of dry PFS synthesized from SO{sub 2} show the PFS possesses amorphous structure, which is desired for it to be a good coagulant in water and wastewater treatment. A series of lab-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of PFS synthesized from waste sulfur dioxide, ferrous sulfate and sodium chlorate. The performance assessments were based on the comparison of PFS and other conventional and new coagulants for the removal of turbidity and arsenic under different laboratory coagulant conditions. Pilot plant studies were conducted at Des Moines Water Works in Iowa and at the City of Savannah Industrial and Domestic (I&D) Water Treatment Plant in Port Wentworth, Georgia. PFS performances were compared with those of conventional coagulants. The tests in both water treatment plants have shown that PFS is, in general, comparable or better than other coagulants in removal of turbidity and organic substances. The corrosion behavior of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) prepared from SO{sub 2} and ferric chloride (FC) were compared. Results showed that both temperature and concentration of the coagulants substantially impact corrosion rates. The corrosion rates increased with the increase of temperature and concentration. The results from a scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that chloride caused more serious pitting than sulfate anion on both aluminum and steel specimens. Although SEM confirmed the existence of pitting corrosion, the results of weight loss indicated that the uniform corrosion predominate the corrosion mechanism, and pitting corrosion played a less important role. The test proved that PFS was less corrosive than FC, which may lead to the large-scale application of PFS in waste treatment. The kinetics of the new desulfurization process has been studied. The study results provide the theoretical guidance for improving sulfur removal efficiency and controlling the quality of PFS.

Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan; Adrienne Cooper

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Deltaic sedimentation in saline, alkaline Lake Bogoria, Kenya: Response to environmental change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake Bogoria is a meromictic, saline (90 g/l TDS), alkaline (pH: 10.3) lake with Na-CO[sub 3]-Cl waters, located in a narrow half-graben in the central Kenya Rift. It is fed by hot springs, direct precipitation, and a series of ephemeral streams that discharge into the lake via small deltas and fan-deltas. Examination of the exposed deltas and >50 short cores from the lake floor, have revealed a wide range of deltaic and prodeltaic sediments, including turbidites and subaqueous debris-flow deposits. Studies of 3 long cores and the exposed delta stratigraphy have shown how the style of deltaic sedimentation has responded to environmental changes during the last 30,000 years. During humid periods when lake level is high the lake waters are fresher and less dense. Theoretically, high sediment yield and more constant discharge may promote underflow (hyperpycnal flow), generating low-density turbidity currents. In contrast, during low stages with dense brine, the less dense, inflowing waters carry fine sediment plumes toward the center of the lake where they settle from suspension (hypopycnal flow). Although applicable as a general model, the sediment record shows that reality is more complex. Variations in meromixis and level of the chemocline, together with local and temporal differences in sediment yield and discharge, may permit density flows even when the lake is under a predominant hypopycnal regime. During periods of aridity when sodium carbonate evaporites were forming, exposed delta plains were subject to desiccation with local development of calcrete and zeolitic paleosols.

Renaut, R.W. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Tiercelin, J.J. (Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Domaines Oceaniques)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Slump dominated upper slope reservoir facies, Intra Qua Iboe (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria  

SciTech Connect

An integration of sedimentologic and 3D seismic data provides a basis for unraveling complex depositional processes and sand distribution of the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Nearly 3,000 feet of conventional core was examined in interpreting slump/slide/debris flow, bottom current, turbidity current, pelagic/hemipelagic, wave and tide dominated facies. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated seaward, deposition began with a turbidite channel dominated slope system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated slope system (IQI 3, the principal reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated, collapsed shelf-edge deltaic system (IQI 4). Using seismic time slices and corresponding depositional facies in the core, a sandy {open_quotes}fairway{open_quotes} has been delineated in the IQI 3. Because of differences in stacking patterns of sandy and muddy slump intervals, seismic facies show: (1) both sheet-like and mounded external forms (geometries), and (2) parallel/continuous as well as chaotic/hummocky internal reflections. In wireline logs, slump facies exhibits blocky, coarsening-up, fining-up, and serrated motifs. In the absence of conventional core, slump facies may be misinterpreted and even miscorrelated because seismic facies and log motifs of slumps and debris flows tend to mimic properties of turbidite fan deposits. The slump dominated reservoir facies is composed of unconsolidated fine-grained sand. Thickness of individual units varies from 1 to 34 feet, but amalgamated intervals reach a thickness of up to 70 feet and apparently form connected sand bodies. Porosity commonly ranges from 20 to 35%. Horizontal permeability commonly ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 md.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) is the main limiting factor in our fisheries.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

180

The impact of shrimp trawling and associated sediment resuspension in mud dominated, shallow estuaries  

SciTech Connect

To address the relative importance of shrimp trawling on seabed resuspension and bottom characteristics in shallow estuaries, a series of disturbance and monitoring experiments were conducted at a bay bottom mud site (2.5 m depth) in Galveston Bay, Texas in July 1998 and May 1999. Based on pre- and post-trawl sediment profiles of 7Be; pore water dissolved oxygen and sulfide concentration; and bulk sediment properties, it was estimated that the trawl rig, including the net, trawl doors, and tickler chain, excavate the seabed to a maximum depth of approximately 1.5 cm, with most areas displaying considerably less disturbance. Water column profile data in the turbid plume left by the trawl in these underconsolidated muds (85e90% porosity; <0.25 kPa undrained shear strength) demonstrate that suspended sediment inventories of up to 85e90 mg/cm2 are produced immediately behind the trawl net; an order of magnitude higher than pre-trawl inventories and comparable to those observed during a 9e10 m/s wind event at the study site. Plume settling and dispersion caused suspended sediment inventories to return to pre-trawl values about 14 min after trawl passage in two separate experiments, indicating particles re-settle primarily as flocs before they can be widely dispersed by local currents. As a result of the passage of the trawl rig across the seabed, shear strength of the sediment surface showed no significant increase, suggesting that bed armoring is not taking place and the trawled areas will not show an increase in critical shear stress.

Dellapenna, Timothy M.; Allison, Mead A.; Gill, Gary A.; Lehman, Ronald D.; Warnken, Kent W.

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An investigation of cathodoluminescence in albite from the A-type Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals red and blue colors within single, non-turbid albite (Ab{sub 98-99}) grains from the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia. A 720 nm X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) peak characterizes red CL regions, while a 280 nm XEOL feature dominates blue CL regions. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence results indicate that red CL and the 720 nm XEOL peak intensities relate to total Fe concentrations. The relationship between red CL and Fe content is confirmed by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The XEOL technique is used to exclude the Fe K-edge as the cause of red CL. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that Fe in both the red and blue CL regions is Fe{sup 3+}, and that red CL activation may relate to the Si-Al order of the feldspar and to the distribution of Fe on tetrahedral sites. The CL textures, combined with EMPA and LA-ICPMS analyses, indicate that blue CL albite (Ab98) regions contain higher concentrations of Ca, Ti, Pb and rare earth elements, and were replaced, in part, by a more Fe-rich, trace element depleted albite (Ab99) which displays red CL. Complex diffraction contrasts and amorphous deposits identified in transmission electron microscope images suggest that aqueous fluids have reacted with both red and blue CL regions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures of up to 430 C provide a lower estimate of the fluid temperature.

Dalby, Kim N.; Anderson, Alan J.; Mariano, Anthony N.; Gordon, Robert A.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Wirth, Richard (Missouri SU); (SFX); (Simon); (GFZ)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Technical assessment of the prevention of micro-fouling on OTEC heat-transfer surfaces through the use of ultraviolet radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To reduce or eliminate biofouling by microorganisms it has been suggested that the seawater entering the heat exchanger be sterilized (or at least sanitized) by uv radiation at 253.7 nm. The feasibility of applying this technology to OTEC is examined. Trivial calculations based on the Lambert-Beer equation and reasonable assumptions about seawater quality and the intensity of irradiation obtainable from a uv lamp suggest seawater may be transparent enough to a collimated beam of uv light to deliver effective germicidal doses to nearly 150 cm under some conditions. However, the practical limit on the depth of effective radiation from commercial lamps is severely restricted by many factors including the natural divergence of light, absorption and scattering in the media, intensity of radiation from the light source and so forth. Even under very favorable conditions a common design allowing uv light to penetrate 30 cm of water would have to permit the water at that distance to be in contact with the light for 20 seconds or so to deliver the germicidal effect of high quality sanitization but not necessarily sterilization. Macro-fouling, which may be more severe than micro-fouling, will not be affected by uv radiation (presuming an absence of symbiotic relationships). Parasitic power required for uv sources may be prohibitive under unfavorable conditions (i.e., unexpectedly high absorptivities of seawater, or excessive turbidity) or the absence of an industrial effort to scale up present uv equipment appropriate to OTEC needs. This latter event is unlikely for it appears that present uv lamps can be adapted to OTEC needs without major technological advancement. Power and cost estimates for uv installation and operation vary widely depending on the number of lamps needed for the OTEC configuration and the intensity of uv radiation actually required to prevent biofouling of heat transfer systems in OTEC designs.

Garrigan, G. A.; Schmitt, R. P.; Ciccone, V. J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Sedimentology, petrology, and gas potential of the Brallier Formation: upper Devonian turbidite facies of the Central and Southern Appalachians  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Devonian Brallier Formation of the central and southern Appalachian basin is a regressive sequence of siltstone turbidites interbedded with mudstones, claystones, and shales. It reaches 1000 meters in thickness and overlies basinal mudrocks and underlies deltaic sandstones and mudrocks. Facies and paleocurrent analyses indicate differences between the depositional system of the Brallier Formation and those of modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences. The Brallier system is of finer grain size and lower flow intensity. In addition, the stratigraphic transition from turbidites to deltaic sediments is gradual and differs in its facies succession from the deposits of the proximal parts of modern submarine fans. Such features as massive and pebbly sandstones, conglomerates, debris flows, and massive slump structures are absent from this transition. Paleocurrents are uniformly to the west at right angles to basin isopach, which is atypical of ancient turbidite systems. This suggests that turbidity currents had multiple point sources. The petrography and paleocurrents of the Brallier Formation indicate an eastern source of sedimentary and low-grade metasedimentary rocks with modern relief and rainfall. The depositional system of the Brallier Formation is interpreted as a series of small ephemeral turbidite lobes of low flow intensity which coalesced in time to produce a laterally extensive wedge. The lobes were fed by deltas rather than submarine canyons or upper fan channel systems. This study shows that the present-day turbidite facies model, based mainly on modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences, does not adequately describe prodeltaic turbidite systems such as the Brallier Formation. Thickly bedded siltstone bundles are common features of the Brallier Formation and are probably its best gas reservoir facies, especially when fracture porosity is well developed.

Lundegard, P.D.; Samuels, N.D.; Pryor, W.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the 1995 - 96 project period, four new habitat enhancement projects were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatilla River Basin. A total of 38,644 feet of high tensile smooth wire fencing was constructed along 3.6 miles of riparian corridor in the Meacham Creek, Wildhorse Creek, Greasewood Creek, West Fork of Greasewood Creek and Mission Creek watersheds. Additional enhancements on Wildhorse Creek and the lower Greasewood Creek System included: (1) installation of 0.43 miles of smooth wire between river mile (RM) 10.25 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek (fence posts and structures had been previously placed on this property during the 1994 - 95 project period), (2) construction of 46 sediment retention structures in stream channels and maintenance to 18 existing sediment retention structures between RM 9.5 and RM 10.25 Wildhorse Creek, and (3) revegetation of stream corridor areas and adjacent terraces with 500 pounds of native grass seed or close species equivalents and 5,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funds were cost shared with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, provided under this project, to accomplish habitat enhancements. Water quality monitoring continued and was expanded for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Physical habitat surveys were conducted on the lower 13 river miles of Wildhorse Creek and within the Greasewood Creek Project Area to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area.

Shaw, R.Todd

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Regional geologic characterization of the Second Bone Spring Sandstone, Delaware basin, Lea and Eddy Counties, New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bone Spring Formation is a series of interbedded siliciclastics and carbonates that were deposited in the Delaware basin during the Leonardian (Early Permian). It consists of the First, Second and Third Carbonate and the First, Second and Third Sandstone, as well as the informally named Avalon Sandstone. The Second Bone Spring Sandstone, the focus of the study, can be subdivided into 4 distinct sand bodies separated by pelagic zones. These sands are designated the A-D Sands. The depositional patterns of the Bone Spring Formation are reflective of the underlying structure that resulted from compression during the Mississippian and Pennsylvanian. The Second Bone Spring Sandstone (specifically the C Sand) is essentially a dolomitic, coarse siltstone that is composed of facies reflective of deposition by turbidity currents in a slope fan environment. The midfan, levee/overbank and hemipelagic environments of deposition identified in the Second Bone Spring Sandstone are consistent with those of the typical slope fan of Walker (1978). The slope fans of the C Sand were confined by north-to-south trending reverse faults, which inhibited lateral migration of both the fans and the channels within them. The A-D Sands are correlatable throughout the study area but thicken in the underlying structural lows. These thicker sands are lobate in plan view and are located adjacent to, rather than directly on top of, underlying thick sands. This is likely a result of differential compaction of underlying sediment which served to further confine the fans. The sediment comprising the Second Bone Spring Sandstone was likely transported through basinward migration of sand dunes in an arid environment during relative sea level lowstands. Periodically, brief rises in sea level choked off sediment supply allowing hemipelagic material to be draped over underlying sands. With sea level fall, sands were again deposited in the tectonic sub-basins.

Downing, Amanda Beth

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Evaluation of a precipitation-ion exchange process for treatment of laundry waste  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale pilot plant studies were conducted to evaluate chemical coagulation and ion exchange for decontamination of 2724-W laundry wastewater. Chemical coagulation is accomplished at pH 11 to avoid complexant problems and assure good transuranic radionuclide removals. Clinoptilolite is used to remove cesium and strontium. Results of the pilot plant studies are summarized as follows: Decontamination factors of 70 (strontium) and more than 100 (cesium) were achieved by chemical coagulation and ion exchange. Decontamination factors exceeding 90 were measured for europium by coagulation with a combination of ferric chloride, magnesium chloride, and calcium chloride added to the wastewater at pH 11. Coagulation with these three agents in the wastewater at pH 11 was more effective for turbidity removal than coagulation with lime. Addition of up to 1.7 lb of clinoptilolite fines per 1000 gallons of wastewater during coagulation did not substantially increase strontium and cesium removal. Filtration without chemical coagulation reduced suspended solids by only 25%. About 70% of the suspended solids remaining in the filtered wastewater were removed in the zeolite column causing plugging which could not be easily dislodged by backwashing. Plugging of the ion exchange columns by previously clarified wastewater required short periods of limited backwashing to relieve the plug. The plugging is due to CaCO/sub 3/ and is not expected to be a severe problem in a full-scale plant with brief detention times between filtration and ion exchange. A high pressure surface wash should be included in the columns to break up crust or plugs at the surface of the zeolite. Centrifugation of iron sludges for 2 min at 2000 g reduced the sludge volume to about 1% of the total wastewater volume. Wet iron sludges from the sludge storage tank were readily dewatered by vacuum filtration. 14 tables, 9 figures.

Mercer, B.W.; Ames, L.L.

1977-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project: 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla habitat improvement program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02, and targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Treatment areas included the lower 4 miles of Meacham Creek, the lower {1/4} mile of Boston Canyon Creek, and the Umatilla River between RM 78.5 and 80. The upper {1/2} of the Meacham Creek project area including Boston Canyon Creek, which were initially enhanced during 1989, were reentered for maintenance and continued enhancements. Approximately 2400 cu. yds. of boulders and 1000 cu. yds. of riprap was used in the construction of in-stream, stream bank and flood plain structures and in the anchoring of large organic debris (LOD) placements. In-stream structures were designed to increase instream cover and channel stability and develop of a defined thalweg to focus low summer flows. Flood plain structures were designed to reduce sediment inputs and facilitate deposition on flood plains. Riparian recovery was enhanced through the planting of over 1000 willow cuttings and 400 lbs. of grass seed mix and through the exclusion of livestock from the riparian corridor with 4.5 miles of high tensile smooth wire fence. Photo documentation and elevational transects were used to monitor changes in channel morphology and riparian recovery at permanent standardized points throughout the projects. Water quality (temperature and turbidity) data was collected at locations within the project area and in tributaries programmed for future enhancements.

Scheeler, Carl A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Aeolian Delivery of Organic Matter to a Middle Permian Deepwater Ramp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windblown dust is a significant source of sediment and organic matter for many basins, but its influence on ancient basins can be difficult to detect and quantify. We quantified the biomarker content, including n-alkanes, hopanes, and steranes of the Brushy Canyon Formation sandstones and siltstones to evaluate the significance of windblown dust in delivery of sediment and terrestrial organic matter to the Middle Permian Delaware Basin. Ramp siltstones of the basin have been interpreted as representing deposits of unconfined low-density turbidity currents or "aeolo-marine" sediments. We analyzed the organic contents of five samples of channel-confined turbiditic sandstones and siltstones and five samples of ramp siltstones outcropping in the Guadalupe Mountains National Park, West Texas, to estimate the relative proportions of terrestrial and marine organic matter in the two types of host rocks. The total organic carbon content of all samples varied from 0.07 percent - 2.04 percent. The abundance of high molecular weight n-alkanes (n-C27 and greater) suggests that terrestrial organic matter was present in nearly all samples. Terrestrial organic matter input to the basin was characterized using a crossplot of pristane/n-C17 versus phytane/n-C18. Ramp siltstones showed ~10-fold greater variation in terrestrial content than did turbiditic sandstones and siltstones. This observation is more consistent with the aeolo-marine interpretation of ramp siltstones, and suggests that terrestrial organic matter was delivered to the Delaware Basin by wind transport during deposition of the Brushy Canyon Formation.

Artan, Sinem

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Potential hydrologic effects of developing coal and other geoenergy resources in Oregon: a review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geoenergy resources in Oregon, in addition to coal, include noncommercial deposits of oil shale, natural gas, and geothermal heat. Commercial quantities of natural gas were discovered at Mist in northwestern Oregon in 1979. Gas presently is being produced from five wells and additional exploratory drilling is underway. More than 2 million acres of Oregon land is under lease for petroleum and natural gas exploration, mostly in the Astoria embayment-Willamette syncline, central (Oregon) Paleozoic-Mesozoic basin, and eastern Tertiary nonmarine basin. The Cascade Range and eastern Oregon contain sizable resources of geothermal heat, of which a small part has been developed for space heating at Klamath Falls and Lakeview. Thirteen Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRA's) comprising 432,000 acres have been identified, 422,000 acres are currently leased for geothermal development. KGRA's judged to have potential for generation of electrical power are Newberry Crater, Crump Geyser, and Alvord Desert. No adverse hydrologic effects have been noted to date from coal or other geoenergy exploration or development in Oregon, and no effects are expected if federal and state regulations are adhered to. The southwestern Oregon coals would have to be mined by underground methods. Potential hydrologic impacts would be local increases in sedimentation, turbidity, and mineralization of surface and ground water. Water-quality degradation, including both thermal pollution and increased concentrations of dissolved minerals, could result from geothermal development. Other potential problems include land subsidence and consumptive use of water associated with both coal and geothermal development. 53 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Sidle, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California  

SciTech Connect

A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Architectural characteristics of fine-grained submarine fans: A model applicable to the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Submarine fan deposits in the Gulf of Mexico, modern and ancient, fall in the category of fine-grained, low overall sand/shale ratio basin-floor fans. Models published over the years that have been applied to both exploration and production are based on sand-rich fans, most of which were deposited in active margin settings. These models should not be used for the Gulf of Mexico or any other deep water system with similar basinal settings. Observations from the excellent outcrops of the Permian Tanqua Karoo in southwestern South Africa, together with information from the modern Mississippi Fan, and the Jackfork turbidites in Arkansas, enable the construction of a model that addresses the architecture of both the macro and meso-scale depositional features of fine-grained turbidite systems. At the entrance to the basin floor the conduit, carved out across the slope, may start to widen. Most of the density flows moving through do not necessarily occupy the conduit`s entire width. The result is a complex of laterally and vertically stacked channel fills and associated levee-overbank deposits with a good degree of connectivity. The channel fills are mostly massive, whereas the levee deposits are low-contrast, low-resistivity thin-bedded sandstones and shales with high permeability. Such sandstones can be potentially very productive. The channels gradually become smaller and as their influence on directing the heads of turbidity currents decreases, oblong sheet sands are deposited, each having a very large width to thickness ratio and a high sand/shale ratio. The vertical stacking patterns within these sheet sands commonly display lateral offset of individual beds or groups of beds, and therefore form a distinct reservoir type with varying internal fluid-flow characteristics.

Bouma, A.H.; Coleman, J.H. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); DeV Wickens, H. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Characterization and origins of high-amplitude reflection packets, HARPs, along the Gulf of Mexico depositional profile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High amplitude reflection packets (HARPs) refer to sheet-like sand deposits, showing high-amplitude seismic-reflection character, which are thought to be associated with constructional channel systems. Based on observations of Quaternary deposits from the Amazon Fan, HARPs are interpreted to be related to channel avulsion events. The depositional model from the Amazon Fan suggests when levees fail, sediment gravity flows move through the break into interchannel lows, where lack of confinement results in sheet like sand deposits. Based on 2D and 3D seismic data, HARPs from the Gulf of Mexico not only form from updip channel avulsions, but from additional geological processes. In salt withdrawal minibasins, sediment gravity flows encounter an underfilled depocenter, where lack of confinement results in sheet like deposits. After initial spill into an outboard basin and the development of a graded slope equilibrium profile, slope channel complexes develop as conduits for sediment transport. These depositional processes characterize the "fill and spill" model and can result in the creation of HARP-like deposits. At the toe-of-the Sigsbee Escarpment, turbidity currents flow through nickpoints at the seaward edge of the escarpment and become unconfined, resulting in HARP-like deposition on the abyssal floor. Seismically, these deposits are laterally continuous, have low relief, pinchout downdip, and have internal channelization. Erosive, low-relief, discontinuous channels and a low-relief, flat-bottomed trough cut into the TS-HARP deposits. On the outer fan, at the seaward limit of submarine channels, sediment gravity flows will also become unconfined and deposit HARPs. These HARPs typically consist of shingled sheet-like deposits that may form larger scale mounded features. These observations indicate that HARP-like deposits can form from a variety of depositional processes and in variable depositional settings along the Gulf of Mexico depositional profile.

Rains, David Brian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Characterization of the 3-D Properties of the Fine-Grained Turbidite 8 Sand Reservoir, Green Canyon 18, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the internal organization of the Lower Pleistocene 8 Sand reservoir in the Green Canyon 18 field, Gulf of Mexico, helps to increase knowledge of the geology and the petrophysical properties, and hence contribute to production management in the area. Interpretation of log data from 29 wells, core and production data served to detail as much as possible a geological model destined for a future reservoir simulation. Core data showed that the main facies resulting from fine-grained turbidity currents is composed of alternating sand and shale layers, whose extension is assumed to be large. They correspond to levee and overbank deposits that are usually associated to channel systems. The high porosity values, coming from unconsolidated sediment, were associated to high horizontal permeability but generally low kv/kh ratio. The location of channel deposits was not obvious but thickness maps suggested that two main systems, with a northwest-southeast direction, contributed to the 8 Sand formation deposition. These two systems were not active at the same time and one of them was probably eroded by overlying formations. Spatial relationships between them remained unclear. Shingled stacking of the channel deposits resulted from lateral migration of narrow, meandering leveed channels in the mid part of the turbidite system. Then salt tectonics tilted turbidite deposits and led to the actual structure of the reservoir. The sedimentary analysis allowed the discrimination of three facies A, B and E, with given porosity and permeability values, that corresponded to channel, levee and overbank deposits. They were used to populate the reservoir model. Well correlation helped figure out the extension of these facies.

Plantevin, Matthieu Francois

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Asotin Creek ISCO Water Sample Data Summary: Water Year 2002, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pomeroy Ranger District operates 3 automated water samplers (ISCOs) in the Asotin Creek drainage in cooperation with the Asotin Model Watershed. The samplers are located on Asotin Creek: Asotin Creek at the mouth, Asotin Creek at Koch site, and South Fork Asotin Creek above the forks. At the end of Water Year (WY) 2001 we decided to sample from Oct. 1 through June 30 of each water year. This decision was based on the difficulty of obtaining good low flow samples, since the shallow depth of water often meant that instrument intakes were on the bed of the river and samples were contaminated with bed sediments. The greatest portion of suspended sediment is transported during the higher flows of fall and especially during the spring snow runoff period, and sampling the shorter season should allow characterization of the sediment load of the river. The ISCO water samplers collected a daily composite sample of 4 samples per day into one bottle at 6-hour intervals until late March when they were reprogrammed to collect 3 samples per day at 8-hour intervals. This was done to reduce battery use since battery failure had become an ongoing problem. The water is picked up on 24-day cycles and brought to the Forest Service Water Lab in Pendleton, OR. The samples are analyzed for total suspended solids (TSS), conductivity, and turbidity. A total dissolved solids value is estimated based on conductivity. The USGS gage, Asotin Creek at the mouth, No.13335050 has been discontinued and there are no discharge records available for this period.

Peterson, Stacia

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal was to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance the reservoir fishery in Libby. This report summarizes data collected from July 1984 through July 1985, and, where appropriate, presents data collected since 1983. The Canada, Rexford, and Tenmile areas of the reservoir are differentially affected by drawdown. Relative changes in water volume and surface area are greatest in the Canada area and smallest in the Tenmile area. Reservoir morphology and hydraulics probably play a major role in fish distribution through their influence on water temperature. Greatest areas of habitat with optimum water temperature for Salmo spp. and kokanee occurred during the spring and fall months. Dissolved oxygen, pH and conductivity levels were not limiting during any sampling period. Habitat enhancement work was largely unsuccessful. Littoral zone vegetation plantings did not survive well, primarily the result of extreme water level fluctuations. Relative abundances of fish species varied seasonally within and between the three areas. Water temperature is thought to be the major influence in fish distribution patterns. Other factors, such as food availability and turbidity, may mitigate its influence. Sampling since 1975 illustrates a continued increase in kokanee numbers and a dramatic decline in redside shiners. Salmo spp., bull trout, and burbot abundances are relatively low while peamouth and coarsescale sucker numbers remain high. A thermal dynamics model and a trophic level components model will be used to quantify the impact of reservoir operation on the reservoir habitat, primary production, secondary production and fish populations. Particulate carbon will be used to track energy flow through trophic levels. A growth-driven population dynamics simulation model that will estimate the impacts of reservoir operation on fish population dynamics is also being considered.

Chisholm, Ian

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:02:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIP_R10-NTN_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"

197

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" 6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:12:12 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP31","MTTIPP3PG1","MTTIP_R30-ME0_1","MTTIPP3AG1","MTTIPP3AO1","MTTIPP3EC1","MTTIP_R30-NIZ_1","MTTIPP3KU1","MTTIP_R30-NLY_1","MTTIPP3NI1","MTTIP_R30-NQA_1","MTTIPP3SA1","MTTIPP3TC1","MTTIPP3VE1","MTTIPP3VV1","MTTIP_R30-NAL_1","MTTIPP3AR1","MTTIP_R30-NAA_1","MTTIPP3AS1","MTTIP_R30-NAU_1","MTTIP_R30-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R30-NBF_1","MTTIP_R30-NBA_1","MTTIP_R30-NBO_1","MTTIPP3BE1","MTTIP_R30-NBH_1","MTTIP_R30-NBN_1","MTTIP_R30-NBL_1","MTTIP_R30-NBR_1","MTTIP_R30-NBX_1","MTTIP_R30-NBU_1","MTTIP_R30-NBM_1","MTTIP_R30-NCM_1","MTTIPP3CA1","MTTIP_R30-NCD_1","MTTIP_R30-NCI_1","MTTIP_R30-NCH_1","MTTIPP3CO1","MTTIPP3CF1","MTTIPP3CG1","MTTIP_R30-NCW_1","MTTIP_R30-NCS_1","MTTIP_R30-NHR_1","MTTIP_R30-NCY_1","MTTIP_R30-NCZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NDA_1","MTTIPP3EG1","MTTIP_R30-NES_1","MTTIP_R30-NEK_1","MTTIP_R30-NEN_1","MTTIP_R30-NFI_1","MTTIPP3FR1","MTTIPP3GB1","MTTIP_R30-NGG_1","MTTIP_R30-NGM_1","MTTIP_R30-NGH_1","MTTIP_R30-NGR_1","MTTIP_R30-NGT_1","MTTIP_R30-NGV_1","MTTIP_R30-NHU_1","MTTIP_R30-NIN_1","MTTIPP3ID1","MTTIP_R30-NEI_1","MTTIP_R30-NIS_1","MTTIPP3IT1","MTTIP_R30-NIV_1","MTTIP_R30-NJM_1","MTTIP_R30-NJA_1","MTTIP_R30-NKZ_1","MTTIPP3KS1","MTTIP_R30-NKG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLI_1","MTTIP_R30-NLH_1","MTTIP_R30-NMY_1","MTTIP_R30-NMT_1","MTTIP_R30-NMR_1","MTTIPP3MX1","MTTIP_R30-NMQ_1","MTTIP_R30-NMO_1","MTTIP_R30-NNL_1","MTTIPP3NA1","MTTIP_R30-NNZ_1","MTTIPP3NO1","MTTIP_R30-NMU_1","MTTIP_R30-NPK_1","MTTIP_R30-NPM_1","MTTIP_R30-NPP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPE_1","MTTIP_R30-NRP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPL_1","MTTIP_R30-NPO_1","MTTIP_R30-NPZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NRO_1","MTTIP_R30-NRS_1","MTTIP_R30-NSN_1","MTTIP_R30-NSK_1","MTTIP_R30-NSF_1","MTTIPP3SP1","MTTIPP3SW1","MTTIP_R30-NSZ_1","MTTIPP3SY1","MTTIP_R30-NTW_1","MTTIPP3TH1","MTTIP_R30-NTO_1","MTTIPP3TD1","MTTIP_R30-NTS_1","MTTIP_R30-NTU_1","MTTIP_R30-NTX_1","MTTIP_R30-NUR_1","MTTIPP3UK1","MTTIP_R30-NUY_1","MTTIP_R30-NUZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NVM_1","MTTIPP3VQ1","MTTIPP3YE1"

198

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:03:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIP_R10-NMR_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"

199

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

98,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 98,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r50_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r50_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:20:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Coast (PADD 5) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP51","MTTIPP5PG1","MTTIP_R50-ME0_1","MTTIP_R50-NAG_1","MTTIP_R50-NAO_1","MTTIPP5EC1","MTTIP_R50-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NKU_1","MTTIP_R50-NLY_1","MTTIP_R50-NNI_1","MTTIP_R50-NQA_1","MTTIPP5SA1","MTTIP_R50-NTC_1","MTTIPP5VE1","MTTIPP5VV1","MTTIPP5AR1","MTTIP_R50-NAA_1","MTTIPP5AS1","MTTIP_R50-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R50-NBF_1","MTTIP_R50-NBA_1","MTTIP_R50-NBO_1","MTTIP_R50-NBE_1","MTTIP_R50-NBN_1","MTTIP_R50-NBL_1","MTTIP_R50-NBR_1","MTTIP_R50-NBX_1","MTTIP_R50-NCM_1","MTTIPP5CA1","MTTIP_R50-NCD_1","MTTIP_R50-NCI_1","MTTIPP5CH1","MTTIPP5CO1","MTTIPP5CF1","MTTIP_R50-NCG_1","MTTIP_R50-NCS_1","MTTIP_R50-NHR_1","MTTIP_R50-NDA_1","MTTIP_R50-NDR_1","MTTIP_R50-NEG_1","MTTIP_R50-NES_1","MTTIP_R50-NEK_1","MTTIP_R50-NEN_1","MTTIP_R50-NFI_1","MTTIP_R50-NFR_1","MTTIP_R50-NGB_1","MTTIP_R50-NGM_1","MTTIP_R50-NGR_1","MTTIP_R50-NGT_1","MTTIP_R50-NGV_1","MTTIP_R50-NHK_1","MTTIP_R50-NHU_1","MTTIP_R50-NIN_1","MTTIPP5ID1","MTTIP_R50-NIS_1","MTTIP_R50-NIT_1","MTTIP_R50-NIV_1","MTTIP_R50-NJM_1","MTTIP_R50-NJA_1","MTTIP_R50-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NKS_1","MTTIP_R50-NLH_1","MTTIP_R50-NMY_1","MTTIP_R50-NMT_1","MTTIPP5MX1","MTTIP_R50-NMO_1","MTTIP_R50-NNL_1","MTTIP_R50-NNA_1","MTTIP_R50-NNZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NNU_1","MTTIP_R50-NNO_1","MTTIP_R50-NMU_1","MTTIP_R50-NPM_1","MTTIP_R50-NPP_1","MTTIPP5PE1","MTTIP_R50-NRP_1","MTTIP_R50-NPL_1","MTTIP_R50-NPO_1","MTTIP_R50-NRO_1","MTTIP_R50-NRS_1","MTTIPP5SN1","MTTIP_R50-NSF_1","MTTIP_R50-NSP_1","MTTIP_R50-NPG_1","MTTIP_R50-NSW_1","MTTIP_R50-NSY_1","MTTIP_R50-NTW_1","MTTIP_R50-NTH_1","MTTIP_R50-NTD_1","MTTIP_R50-NTS_1","MTTIP_R50-NTU_1","MTTIP_R50-NTX_1","MTTIP_R50-NUR_1","MTTIPP5UK1","MTTIP_R50-NUY_1","MTTIP_R50-NVM_1","MTTIPP5VQ1","MTTIP_R50-NYE_1"

200

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:11:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP31","MTTIPP3PG1","MTTIP_R30-ME0_1","MTTIPP3AG1","MTTIPP3AO1","MTTIPP3EC1","MTTIP_R30-NIZ_1","MTTIPP3KU1","MTTIP_R30-NLY_1","MTTIPP3NI1","MTTIP_R30-NQA_1","MTTIPP3SA1","MTTIPP3TC1","MTTIPP3VE1","MTTIPP3VV1","MTTIP_R30-NAL_1","MTTIPP3AR1","MTTIP_R30-NAA_1","MTTIPP3AS1","MTTIP_R30-NAU_1","MTTIP_R30-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R30-NBF_1","MTTIP_R30-NBA_1","MTTIP_R30-NBO_1","MTTIPP3BE1","MTTIP_R30-NBH_1","MTTIP_R30-NBN_1","MTTIP_R30-NBL_1","MTTIP_R30-NBR_1","MTTIP_R30-NBX_1","MTTIP_R30-NBU_1","MTTIP_R30-NBM_1","MTTIP_R30-NCM_1","MTTIPP3CA1","MTTIP_R30-NCD_1","MTTIP_R30-NCI_1","MTTIP_R30-NCH_1","MTTIPP3CO1","MTTIPP3CF1","MTTIPP3CG1","MTTIP_R30-NCW_1","MTTIP_R30-NCS_1","MTTIP_R30-NHR_1","MTTIP_R30-NCY_1","MTTIP_R30-NCZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NDA_1","MTTIPP3EG1","MTTIP_R30-NES_1","MTTIP_R30-NEK_1","MTTIP_R30-NEN_1","MTTIP_R30-NFI_1","MTTIPP3FR1","MTTIPP3GB1","MTTIP_R30-NGG_1","MTTIP_R30-NGM_1","MTTIP_R30-NGH_1","MTTIP_R30-NGR_1","MTTIP_R30-NGT_1","MTTIP_R30-NGV_1","MTTIP_R30-NHU_1","MTTIP_R30-NIN_1","MTTIPP3ID1","MTTIP_R30-NEI_1","MTTIP_R30-NIS_1","MTTIPP3IT1","MTTIP_R30-NIV_1","MTTIP_R30-NJM_1","MTTIP_R30-NJA_1","MTTIP_R30-NKZ_1","MTTIPP3KS1","MTTIP_R30-NKG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLI_1","MTTIP_R30-NLH_1","MTTIP_R30-NMY_1","MTTIP_R30-NMT_1","MTTIP_R30-NMR_1","MTTIPP3MX1","MTTIP_R30-NMQ_1","MTTIP_R30-NMO_1","MTTIP_R30-NNL_1","MTTIPP3NA1","MTTIP_R30-NNZ_1","MTTIPP3NO1","MTTIP_R30-NMU_1","MTTIP_R30-NPK_1","MTTIP_R30-NPM_1","MTTIP_R30-NPP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPE_1","MTTIP_R30-NRP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPL_1","MTTIP_R30-NPO_1","MTTIP_R30-NPZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NRO_1","MTTIP_R30-NRS_1","MTTIP_R30-NSN_1","MTTIP_R30-NSK_1","MTTIP_R30-NSF_1","MTTIPP3SP1","MTTIPP3SW1","MTTIP_R30-NSZ_1","MTTIPP3SY1","MTTIP_R30-NTW_1","MTTIPP3TH1","MTTIP_R30-NTO_1","MTTIP_R30-NTN_1","MTTIPP3TD1","MTTIP_R30-NTS_1","MTTIP_R30-NTU_1","MTTIP_R30-NTX_1","MTTIP_R30-NUR_1","MTTIPP3UK1","MTTIP_R30-NUY_1","MTTIP_R30-NUZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NVM_1","MTTIPP3VQ1","MTTIPP3YE1"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

A geological framework for temporal sedimentary dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geophysical, geochemical and geotechnical methods were used to investigate the spatial and temporal aspects of sediment distribution, accumulation, post-depositional alterations, and seafloor response and recovery to major events in a temperate, paraglacial, turbid outwash fjord. The goals of this study are to generate a complete geological model and compare the results to the global distribution of fjords. The over arching theme of this study is that the ratio of the area of the watershed to the area of the receiving basin can provide a first order indicator of many factors including glacial mass; the timing of glacial retreat; sediment input, accumulation, and preservation; and other factors. Temporal observations reveal the change of this fjord from a glaciated basin to and estuarine environment. These observations become important when viewed in the context of global climate change and the continued loss of ice. Preserved strata provide a 2800 yr record of changing modes of sedimentation as the system evolved from a glaciated basin to a non-glaciated fjord revealing a detailed chronology of change between end-member systems which can be used to infer changes as glaciers retreat from other fjords. Short lived radio isotopes were used to investigate post-depositional alteration of modern sediments. Without an understanding of how biological and physical processes work to modify sedimentary fabric during preservation, changes seen in sediment and rock core data cannot be accurately resolved. Physical processes can cause erosion and lateral transport; winnowing and armoring; and instantaneous sedimentation, all of which may be preserved. Biological processes can modulate the preservation of strata by destroying sedimentary fabric and integrating signals. The final fundamental need is to investigate the seafloor response and recovery to these events. Massive earthquakes are frequent in the study area and cause perturbations to sediment input and preservation. By understanding how lakes and deltas modulate sediment discharge after the event; how shorelines are modified after the event; and where sediment is deposited we can determine the influence these changes have on the environment and on humans.

Noll, Christian John

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin The Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin: Complex Depositional and Temporal Variations Across an Anaerobic Marine Basin Authors: S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks Venue: 2008 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Annual Convention and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, April 19-24, 2008 “The Geology of Mudrocks”, session chaired by S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http://www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an extensive, platform marginal, organic-rich, mudrock succession that formed along the southern and western margins of Laurussia during the Devonian and Mississippian. Studies of >35 Woodford cores reveal wide variability in facies, organic content, and mineralogy that can be related to age and paleogeographic setting. Woodford facies include silt-rich mudstones (detrital silica), siliceous mudstones (biogenic silica), calcareous mudstones, and claystones. Recent studies show that facies are partitioned between two temporally distinct successions: a Middle Devonian silt- and carbonate-rich section that is irregularly distributed across the basin, and an Upper Devonian siliceous claystone/mudstone section that is widespread and separated from underlying successions by a significant hiatus. All Woodford rocks contain mixtures of illite, kaolinite, chlorite, and mixed layer clays; total clay and chlorite abundance is lowest in distal Upper Devonian rocks. Although silica content is variable, Upper Devonian mudrocks typically contain more abundant biogenic silica, especially in distal parts of the basin, whereas Middle Devonian rocks are dominated by detrital silica. The two successions display consistent differences in depositional facies. The silt-rich Middle Devonian section is cross-laminated, locally graded, and commonly bioturbated. Upper Devonian mudrocks, by contrast, are dominated by fine-scale, parallel laminations and show no evidence of infaunal activity. These rocks also contain common conodonts, radiolarians, spore bodies, and deep-water brachiopods. The data suggest that the lower Woodford was deposited by deep water, turbid flow, whereas the upper Woodford accumulated under more distal, low energy, poorly oxygenated, hemipelagic conditions

203

Hopewell Beneficial CO2 Capture for Production of Fuels, Fertilizer and Energy  

SciTech Connect

For Phase 1 of this project, the Hopewell team developed a detailed design for the Small Scale Pilot-Scale Algal CO2 Sequestration System. This pilot consisted of six (6) x 135 gallon cultivation tanks including systems for CO2 delivery and control, algal cultivation, and algal harvesting. A feed tank supplied Hopewell wastewater to the tanks and a receiver tank collected the effluent from the algal cultivation system. The effect of environmental parameters and nutrient loading on CO2 uptake and sequestration into biomass were determined. Additionally the cost of capturing CO2 from an industrial stack emission at both pilot and full-scale was determined. The engineering estimate evaluated Amine Guard technology for capture of pure CO2 and direct stack gas capture and compression. The study concluded that Amine Guard technology has lower lifecycle cost at commercial scale, although the cost of direct stack gas capture is lower at the pilot scale. Experiments conducted under high concentrations of dissolved CO2 did not demonstrate enhanced algae growth rate. This result suggests that the dissolved CO2 concentration at neutral pH was already above the limiting value. Even though dissolved CO2 did not show a positive effect on biomass growth, controlling its value at a constant set-point during daylight hours can be beneficial in an algae cultivation stage with high algae biomass concentration to maximize the rate of CO2 uptake. The limited enhancement of algal growth by CO2 addition to Hopewell wastewater was due at least in part to the high endogenous CO2 evolution from bacterial degradation of dissolved organic carbon present at high levels in the wastewater. It was found that the high level of bacterial activity was somewhat inhibitory to algal growth in the Hopewell wastewater. The project demonstrated that the Honeywell automation and control system, in combination with the accuracy of the online pH, dissolved O2, dissolved CO2, turbidity, Chlorophyll A and conductivity sensors is suitable for process control of algae cultivation in an open pond systems. This project concluded that the Hopewell wastewater is very suitable for algal cultivation but the potential for significant CO2 sequestration from the plant stack gas emissions was minimal due to the high endogenous CO2 generation in the wastewater from the organic wastewater content. Algae cultivation was found to be promising, however, for nitrogen remediation in the Hopewell wastewater.

UOP; Honeywell Resins & Chemicals; Honeywell Process Solutions; Aquaflow Bionomics Ltd

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality issues including dissolved oxygen and/or turbidity. Regardless, angler fishing experience was the highest at Lake Billy Shaw. Trout in Mountain View Reservoir were in the best condition of the three reservoirs and anglers reported very good fishing there. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) remain the main limiting factors in the fisheries, particularly in late August to early September.

Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes  

SciTech Connect

Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx}20 % to 23%). This trend is explained by a sequence stratigraphic model which predicts progressive increase in sorting by turbidity current along the flow, as well as, quantified by a rock model that heuristically accounts for sorting. The results can be applied to improve quantitative predication of sediment parameters from seismic impedance, away from well locations.

Department of Geophysics

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Species Assemblage Structure and Ecomorphological Convergence in Perciform Fishes (Cichlidae and Centrarchidae) in Tropical and Temperate Floodplain Rivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, I used two independent perciform lineages (Neotropical Cichlidae and Nearctic Centrarchidae) to examine patterns of species richness and species coexistence a two spatial scales (e.g., macrohabitat and mesohabitat) and to examine inter-faunal patterns of ecomorphological convergence. The study was conducted during the low-water periods in four lowland rivers: the Cinaruco in Venezuela, the Tambopata in Peru, and the Neches and the Brazos rivers in Texas (USA). These rivers were chosen because of their similar characteristics, in terms of geomorphology, sediments, and water quality. The Cinaruco River and the Neches River have clear slightly-stained waters, whereas the Tambopata and the Brazos River have turbid waters with high loads of suspended sediments. I used morphological approaches as a surrogate to investigate patterns of species distribution in niche space, and predict patterns of species richness at different spatial scales. Despite high variation in the number of species in these two perciform assemblages, morphological analysis based on the means and standard deviations of nearest neighbor distance (NND) and mean distance to centroid (CD) revealed similar trends of morphological similarity in relation to species richness. Comparison of observed versus randomized data mesohabitat scale for all four rivers generally supported the niche expansion model of response to increase in species richness. At the scale of mesohabitats within rivers, most species assemblages appear to be organized by competitive interactions in accordance with the niche expansion model. The tropical species-rich Cinaruco River revealed particularly strong support for the niche expansion model. Intercontinental comparison of functional morphology and diets based on analysis of stomach contents and stable isotope ratios indicated broad morphological and dietary overlap between cichlid and centrarchid assemblages. For the most part, morphological ordinations showed that the two groups have diversified in a parallel manner within the confines of ram-suction modes of prey ingestion. This study concludes that even though differences are observed in historical and stochastic factors structuring fish assemblages in different geographic regions, consistent patterns of convergence at the species and assemblage levels results from natural selection under similar environmental conditions.

Montana, Carmen 1976-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

BACKPRESSURE TESTING OF ROTARY MICROFILTER DISKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), is modifying and testing the SpinTek{trademark} rotary microfilter (RMF) for radioactive filtration service in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The RMF has been shown to improve filtration throughput when compared to other conventional methods such as cross-flow filtration. A concern with the RMF was that backpressure, or reverse flow through the disk, would damage the filter membranes. Reverse flow might happen as a result of an inadvertent valve alignment during flushing. Testing was completed in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) located in SRNL to study the physical effects of backpressure as well as to determine the maximum allowable back-pressure for RMF disks. The RMF disks tested at the EDL were manufactured by SpinTek{trademark} Filtration and used a Pall Corporation PMM050 filter membrane (0.5 micron nominal pore size) made from 316L stainless steel. Early versions of the RMF disks were made from synthetic materials that were incompatible with caustic solutions and radioactive service as well as being susceptible to delaminating when subjected to backpressure. Figure 1-1 shows the essential components of the RMF; 3 rotating disks and 3 stationary turbulence promoters (or shear elements) are shown. Figure 1-2 show the assembly view of a 25 disk RMF proposed for use at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the Hanford Facility. The purpose of the testing discussed in this report was to determine the allowable backpressure for RMF disks as well as study the physical effects of backpressure on RMF disks made with the Pall PMM050 membrane. This was accomplished by pressurizing the disks in the reverse flow direction (backpressure) until the test limit was reached or until membrane failure occurred. Backpressure was applied to the disks with air while submerged in deionized (DI) water. This method provided a visual representation of membrane integrity via bubble flow patterns. Membrane failure was defined as the inability to filter effectively at the nominal filter pore size. Effective filtration was determined by turbidity measurements of filtrate that was produced by applying forward-pressure to the disks while submerged in a representative simulant. The representative simulant was Tank 8F simulated sludge produced for SRNL by Optima Chemical. Two disks were tested. Disk 1 was tested primarily to determine approximate levels of backpressure where membrane failure occurred. These levels were then used to define the strategy for testing the Disk 2; a strategy that would better define and quantify the mode of failure.

Fowley, M.; Herman, D.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the submarine debris speed can be faster than the tsunami speed. This information can be useful for early warning strategies in the coastal regions. These findings substantially increase our understanding of complex multi-phase systems and multi-physics and flows, and allows for the proper modeling of landslide and debris induced tsunami, the dynamics of turbidity currents and sediment transport, and the associated applications to hazard mitigation, geomorphology and sedimentology.

Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A. [Department of Geodynamics and Geophysics, Steinmann Institute, University of Bonn Nussallee 8, D-53115, Bonn (Germany)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

210

Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Dry-grind Highly Digestible Grain Sorghum Lines for Ethanol Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential of high digestible grain sorghum (HDGS) with a modified starch protein endosperm matrix to replace corn in ethanol production was investigated using dry grind simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Preliminary experiments showed that HDGS yielded higher amounts of glucose and ethanol than normal digestible grain sorghum (NDGS) and corn particularly in the first 48 hrs of fermentation. It was hypothesized that fast conversion of starch to glucose and ethanol during hydrolysis and fermentation are results of improved protein digestibility of HDGS. The invagination of protein structures in HDGS produced a flourier endosperm texture, softer kernels and lower starch content than the normal digestible protein (ND) lines. Highly digestible protein (HD) lines have better pasting properties (significantly lower pasting temperature, faster rate of gelatinization and higher peak viscosity) than ND lines based on the RVA profile. Increasing protein digestibility of the HDGS improved starch digestibility (increased rate of glucose conversion and total glucose yield during saccharification), which is supported by highly significant correlation of turbidity with rate of glucose conversion and efficiency of enzymatic conversion. The efficiency of ethanol conversion is significantly correlated with starch digestibility, pasting properties, and protein digestibility. Results also showed that HD sorghum lines had significantly faster rate of conversion and shorter reaction time needed to achieve completion than ND sorghum lines and corn. Increasing the dry solid concentration from 22% to 30% (w/v) increased the ethanol yield from 8% v/v to 13%v/v. This will allow considerable saving of water, reduced distillation cost and increased ethanol production for a given plant capacity and labor cost. Fineness of grind influences the amount of sugar formed due to variation in surface area of the flour. The hypothesis that finer particles has faster and higher glucose yield, defined as g of glucose converted per g of theoretical glucose, is supported by highly significant correlation of mass fraction of 3 to 60 mu m size range and mass median diameter (MMD) of 60 to 1000 mu m size range with glucose conversion efficiency and glucose conversion rate during saccharification and fermentation.

Hernandez, Joan R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

VIEW FROM THE PENNINES: EMBED WITH CAUSALITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most exciting visitors to the pond over the summer was a caddis fly. It danced on the surface like a dying moth until it broke through the surface tension and was able to dive down to lay its eggs on the bottom of the pond. By all accounts the caddis fly larva is a cross between Tyrannosaurus Rex and Professor Moriarty (Master of Disguise), so I look forward to trying to spot them next year. Not everything in the pond is so easy to explain. The water oscillates between crystal clarity and dull turbidity in ways I cannot explain. The transition is short a timescale of hours whilst the subsequent clear/muddy appearance lasts for days, though there may be more sophisticated gradations I am ignorant of. Something must trigger these changes, but since the only water coming into the pond is rainwater from the roof of the house, it is likely to be internal (animal, vegetable or mineral) rather than external, although temperature or the weather more generally might be a factor. My attempts to understand the pond water is really an attempt to find causal links between events in the pond or the weather and the appearance of the water. These links are often described mathematically via partial orders, and partial orders also arise in models of the structure of spacetime [1], and the behaviour of consumer choice. Partial orders can also be a useful way of analysing parallel computers and queuing problems. Given a set, a partial order is just a relation ? between some elements of the set with the natural property of an order: a ? b and b ? c implies that a ? c. However, unlike a total order which is defined for all elements of the set, there may be points which cannot be compared in a partial order. We say a ? b if a ? b and a ? = b. A simple example is the natural partial order on R n: x ?n y if and only if xi ? yi for each component i = 1,..., n. This is the partial order used by economists where it is a preference relation (the greedy consumer naturally prefers a bundle of goods which does not contain less of any good), but not all points in R n can be compared under this order.

Paul Glendinning; Paul Glendinning

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A chronostratigraphic framework for the northwestern slope of the gulf of mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediments from two cores, JPC31 and JPC46, were analyzed to better understand the relationship between climate and sediment deposition on the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. These two cores were selected from a suite of cores collected from the slope of the Gulf of Mexico after examining how bulk density varied with depth in the cores. The presence/absence of Globoratalia menardii, down-core variations of the 18O of Globigerinoides ruber, tephrochronology, and radiocarbon dating of G. ruber were used to determine the chronologies of the sediments in the cores. Globorotalia menardii were present until a depth of 100 cm in JPC31. The entrance of G. menardii in the Gulf of Mexico was dated at 8 kyr. Analysis of an ash layer found in both JPC31 and 46 yielded a date of 84 kyr, at depths of 700 cm and 1440 cm, respectively. Radiocarbon dating yielded four ages in JPC31. In sediment core JPC31, Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 1-5 were recorded. In sediment core JPC46, MIS 2-4 and a portion of MIS 5 were recorded. These results provide a framework for determining general sedimentation rates from the northwestern slope of the Gulf of Mexico. Events in the density profiles in JPC31 and JPC46 were correlated to corresponding events in the rest of the slope cores, allowing the chronologies of JPC31 and JPC46 to be transferred to the suite of the slope cores. Sedimentation rates along different portions of the slope were then calculated, and variations in these sedimentation rates were used to better understand slope sedimentary processes. Sedimentation rates on the northwestern slope of the Gulf of Mexico were calculated for the most recent 120,000 years and compared with climate to deduce trends. Sedimentation rates for MIS 1-5 ranged from 7 cm/kyr to 28 cm/kyr. The sedimentation rate for the last glaciation (MIS 2, 3, and 4) were the highest for the time interval studied. The lowered sea level during glacial advances brings sediments farther out onto the slope; therefore, a higher sedimentation rate is expected during this time. These rates varied from 22 cm/kyr near the coast to 7 cm/kyr toward the abyssal plains. Of the 12 cores analyzed along the slope, JPC23 and JPC24 had the lowest sedimentation rates. This is likely due to high density bottom currents and turbidity currents which carry sediments farther out on the slope. Therefore, the lowest sedimentation rates would be expected a great distance from the land mass and some distance from the abyssal plains.

Elston, Kristen Eileen

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Kootenai River Nutrient Dosing System and N-P Consumption: Year 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 2006 we designed and built low energy consumption, pump-operated system, for dosing of the liquid nutrient in the summer 2006 season. This operated successfully, and the system was used again during the 2007 and 2008 seasons for dosing. During the early winter period, 2008, laboratory tests were made of the liquid nutrient pump system, and it was noted that small amounts of air were being entrained on the suction side of the pump, during conditions when the inlet pressure was low. It was believed that this was the cause of diurnal fluctuations in the flow supplied, characteristic of the 2007 year flow data. Replacement of '0' rings on the inlet side of the pumps was the solution to this problem, and when tested in the field during the summer season, the flow supplied was found to be stable. A decision was made by the IKERT committee at the meeting of 20th to 21st May 2008 (held in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho) to use an injection flow rate of liquid fertilizer (polyammonium phosphate 10-34-0) to achieve a target phosphorus concentration of 3.0 {micro}g/L, after complete mixing in the river. This target concentration was the same as that used in 2006 and 2007. The proposed starting date was as early as possible in June 2008. Plans were made to measure the dosing flow in three ways. Two of the three methods of flow measurement (1 and 2 below) are inter-dependent. These were: (1) Direct measurement of flow rate by diverting dosing flow into a 1000 mL volume standard flask. The flow rate was computed by dividing the flask volume by the time required to fill the flask. This was done a few times only during the summer period. (2) Adjusting the flow rate reading of the Gamma dosing pump using the 'calibration' function to achieve agreement with the flow rate computed by method 1 above. (3) Direct measurement by electrical signal from conductive fluid passing through a magnetic field (Seametrics meter, as used in previous years). Values were recorded every 4 minutes by a data-logger. This instrument has been shown to be reliable, and in agreement with method 1 to within the expected uncertainty (within 2%). Liquid nutrients were delivered to the site in late May, and system testing was done the same day. High concentrations of suspended sediment in the water column, as indicated by shallow Secchi depth readings, were present in the river in the last part of May, into June. A plan was made to delay the start up of nutrient addition to a date later than 1st June, because the aquatic productivity was almost certainly to be compromised by insufficient light availability. Daily monitoring of Secchi depths was done, showing declining turbidity in early June. A decision was made to start the system on 15th June, by which time conditions were good.

Holderman, Charles

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

214

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to 1992, decisions on dam operations and use of stored water relied on recoveries of branded hatchery fish, index counts at traps and dams, and flow patterns at the dams. The advent of PIT-tag technology provided the opportunity to precisely track the smolt migrations of many wild stocks as they pass through the hydroelectric complex and other monitoring sites on their way to the ocean. With the availability of the PIT tag, a more complete approach to these decisions was undertaken starting in 1992 with the addition of PIT-tag detections of several wild spring and summer chinook salmon stocks at Lower Granite Dam. Using data from these detections, we initiated development of a database on wild fish, addressing several goals of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning Council and Conservation Act (NPPC 1980). Section 304(d) of the program states, ''The monitoring program will provide information on the migrational characteristics of the various stocks of salmon and steelhead within the Columbia Basin.'' Further, Section 201(b) urges conservation of genetic diversity, which will be possible only if wild stocks are preserved. Section 5.9A.1 of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program states that field monitoring of smolt movement will be used to determine the best timing for water storage releases and Section 5.8A.8 states that continued research is needed on survival of juvenile wild fish before they reach the first dam with special attention to water quantity, quality, and several other factors. The goals of this ongoing study are as follows (1) Characterize the migration timing and estimate parr-to-smolt survival of different stocks of wild Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon smolts at Lower Granite Dam. (2) Determine whether consistent migration patterns are apparent. (3) Determine what environmental factors influence these patterns. (4) Characterize the migrational behavior and estimate survival of different wild juvenile fish stocks as they emigrate from their natal rearing areas. This study provides critical information for recovery planning, and ultimately recovery for these ESA-listed wild fish stocks. This report provides information on PIT tagging of wild chinook salmon parr in 2002 and the subsequent monitoring of these fish. Fish were monitored as they migrated through two in-stream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek and at juvenile migrant traps in 2002 and 2003 as well as through interrogation systems at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams during 2003. Fish were also monitored by the PIT-tag trawl in the mouth of the Columbia River in 2003. In 2002-2003, we also continued to collect environmental data for the Baseline Environmental Monitoring Program, which was developed from 1993 to 1997. The project was designed to collect data for use in conjunction with data on parr and smolt movements to discern patterns or characteristic relationships between these movements and environmental factors. Water quality data collected consist of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, turbidity, water depth, and pH measured at five monitoring stations in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho.

Achord, Stephen; McNatt, Regan A.; Hockersmith, Eric E. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

CROSSFLOW FILTRATION: EM-31, WP-2.3.6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing crossflow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed some of those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Crossflow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate solutions. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Integrated Salt Disposition Process and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the crossflow filter feed flow rate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and crossflow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to evaluate methods to improve filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today. Experiments that use non-radioactive simulants for actual waste always carry the inherent risk of not eliciting prototypic results; however, they will assist in focusing the scope needed to minimize radioactive testing and thus maximize safety. To that end this investigation has determined: (1) Waste simulant SB6 was found to be more challenging to filtration than a SRS Tank 8F simulant; (2) Higher solids concentration presents a greater challenge to filtration; (3) Filter cake is something that should be properly developed in initial filter operation; (4) Backpulsing is not necessary to maintain a good filter flux with salt wastes; (5) Scouring a filter without cleaning will lead to improved filter performance; (6) The presence of a filter cake can improve the solids separation by an order of magnitude as determined by turbidity; (7) A well developed cake with periodic scouring may allow a good filter flux to be maintained for long periods of time; and (8) Filtrate flux decline is reversible when the concentration of the filtering slurry drops and the filter is scoured.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower l/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River in the vicinity of Gibbon, Oregon. In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach, consistent with other basin efforts, and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. During the 1994-95 project period, a one river mile demonstration project was implemented on two privately owned properties on Wildhorse Creek. This was the first watershed improvement project to be implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) off of the Reservation. Four 15 year riparian easements and two right-of-way agreements were secured for enhancement of one river mile on Wildhorse Creek and l/2 river mile on Meacham Creek. Enhancements implemented between river mile (RM) 9.5 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek included: (1) installation of 1.43 miles of smooth wire high tensile fence line and placement of 0.43 miles of fence posts and structures to restrict livestock from the riparian corridor, (2) construction of eighteen sediment retention structures in the stream channel to speed riparian recovery by elevating the stream grade, slowing water velocities and depositing sediments onto streambanks to provide substrate for revegetation, and (3) revegetation of the stream corridor, terraces and adjacent pasture areas with 644 pounds of native grass seed (when commercially available) or close species equivalents and 4,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Three hundred pounds of native grass/legume seed (including other grasses/legumes exhibiting native species characteristics) were broadcast in existing Boston Canyon Creek, Meacham Creek and Umatilla River project areas. The addition of two properties into the project area between RM 4.25 and RM 4.75 Meacham Creek during the 1995-96 work period will provide nearly complete project coverage of lower Meacham Creek corridor areas on the Reservation. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo documentation of riparian recovery within the project areas provided additional baseline data. Physical habitat surveys continued to be conducted to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area. This information will be utilized to assist in identification of habitat deficient areas within the watershed in which to focus habitat restoration efforts. These efforts were coordinated with the CTUIR Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation (UBNPME) Project. Poor land use practices, which have altered natural floodplain dynamics and significantly reduced or eliminated fisheries habitat, continued to be identified in the Mission Creek Subbasin. Complied data is currently being incorporated into a data layer for a Geographic Information System (GIS) data base. This effort is being coordinated with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Community outreach efforts and public education opportunities continued during the reporting period. CTUIR cooperatively sponsored a bioengineering workshop on February 23, 1995 with the Oregon De

Shaw, R. Todd

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Chinook Salmon Adult Abundance Monitoring; Hydroacoustic Assessment of Chinook Salmon Escapement to the Secesh River, Idaho, 2002-2004 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accurate determination of adult salmon spawner abundance is key to the assessment of recovery actions for wild Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Onchorynchus tshawytscha), a species listed as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). As part of the Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Program, the Nez Perce Tribe operates an experimental project in the South Fork of the Salmon River subbasin. The project has involved noninvasive monitoring of Chinook salmon escapement on the Secesh River between 1997 and 2000 and on Lake Creek since 1998. The overall goal of this project is to accurately estimate adult Chinook salmon spawning escapement numbers to the Secesh River and Lake Creek. Using time-lapse underwater video technology in conjunction with their fish counting stations, Nez Perce researchers have successfully collected information on adult Chinook salmon spawner abundance, run timing, and fish-per-redd numbers on Lake Creek since 1998. However, the larger stream environment in the Secesh River prevented successful implementation of the underwater video technique to enumerate adult Chinook salmon abundance. High stream discharge and debris loads in the Secesh caused failure of the temporary fish counting station, preventing coverage of the early migrating portion of the spawning run. Accurate adult abundance information could not be obtained on the Secesh with the underwater video method. Consequently, the Nez Perce Tribe now is evaluating advanced technologies and methodologies for measuring adult Chinook salmon abundance in the Secesh River. In 2003, the use of an acoustic camera for assessing spawner escapement was examined. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in a collaborative arrangement with the Nez Perce Tribe, provided the technical expertise to implement the acoustic camera component of the counting station on the Secesh River. This report documents the first year of a proposed three-year study to determine the efficacy of using an acoustic camera to count adult migrant Chinook salmon as they make their way to the spawning grounds on the Secesh River and Lake Creek. A phased approach to applying the acoustic camera was proposed, starting with testing and evaluation in spring 2003, followed by a full implementation in 2004 and 2005. The goal of this effort is to better assess the early run components when water clarity and night visibility preclude the use of optical techniques. A single acoustic camera was used to test the technology for enumerating adult salmon passage at the Secesh River. The acoustic camera was deployed on the Secesh at a site engineered with an artificial substrate to control the river bottom morphometry and the passage channel. The primary goal of the analysis for this first year of deployment was to validate counts of migrant salmon. The validation plan involved covering the area with optical video cameras so that both optical and acoustic camera images of the same viewing region could be acquired simultaneously. A secondary test was contrived after the fish passage was complete using a controlled setting at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in which we tested the detectability as a function of turbidity levels. Optical and acoustic camera multiplexed video recordings of adult Chinook salmon were made at the Secesh River fish counting station from August 20 through August 29, 2003. The acoustic camera performed as well as or better than the optical camera at detecting adult Chinook salmon over the 10-day test period. However, the acoustic camera was not perfect; the data reflected adult Chinook salmon detections made by the optical camera that were missed by the acoustic camera. The conditions for counting using the optical camera were near ideal, with shallow clear water and good light penetration. The relative performance of the acoustic camera is expected to be even better than the optical camera in early spring when water clarity and light penetration are limited. Results of the laboratory tests at the Pacific North

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Mueller, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Kootenai River White Sturgeon Recovery Implementation Plan and Schedule; 2005-2010, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kootenai River white sturgeon have been declining for at least 50 years and extinction of the wild population is now imminent (Paragamian et al. 2005). Only 630 adults were estimated to remain in 2002 from a population ten times that size just 20 years ago. Significant recruitment of young sturgeon has not been observed since the early 1970s and consistent annual recruitment has not been seen since the 1950s. The remaining wild population consists of a cohort of large, old fish that is declining by about 9% per year as fish die naturally and are not replaced. At this rate, the wild population will disappear around the year 2040. Numbers have already reached critical low levels where genetic and demographic risks are acute. The Kootenai River White Sturgeon Recovery Team was convened in 1994, provided a draft Recovery Plan in 1996 and the first complete Recovery Plan for Kootenai River white sturgeon in 1999 (USFWS 1996, 1999). The Plan outlined a four part strategy for recovery, including: (1) measures to restore natural recruitment, (2) use of conservation aquaculture to prevent extinction, (3) monitoring survival and recovery, and (4) updating and revising recovery plan criteria and objectives as new information becomes available. Sturgeon recovery efforts are occurring against a backdrop of a broader ecosystem protection and restoration program for the Kootenai River ecosystem. With abundance halving time of approximately 8 years, the Kootenai River white sturgeon population is rapidly dwindling, leaving managers little time to act. Decades of study consistently indicate that recruitment failure occurs between embryo and larval stages. This assertion is based on four key observations. First, almost no recruitment has occurred during the last 30 years. Second, thousands of naturally produced white sturgeon embryos, most viable, have been collected over the past decade, resulting from an estimated 9 to 20 spawning events each year. Third, Kootenai River white sturgeon spawning has been documented during most years from 1990 through 2005. Finally, no larvae and very few wild juveniles have been collected during recent decades despite years of intensive sampling. Concurrently, post-release hatchery reared juveniles (as young as 9 months of age at release) consistently exhibit successful growth and survival (Ireland et al. 2002). Recruitment has failed, in part because fish are currently spawning at sites where or when conditions appear unsuitable for successful incubation and early rearing. Research to date suggests that recruitment failure is caused by egg or larval suffocation, predation and/or other mortality factors associated with these early life stages. A variety of interrelated factors have clearly contributed to the decline of Kootenai white sturgeon; various hypotheses for recruitment failure are not mutually exclusive. Anders et al. (2002) suggested that Kootenai River white sturgeon recruitment failure is likely the result of additive mortality from: (1) increased predation efficiencies due to low turbidity, velocity, and an relative increase in predatory fishes, (2) a reduced number of eggs produced by a dwindling spawning population, and (3) spawning in habitat lacking interstitial space (embryo suffocation). Quite simply, the combined egg and embryo mortality from all biotic and abiotic factors kills more eggs and embryos than the dwindling wild population is currently capable of producing. Thus, natural recruitment failure appears to be caused by some combination of habitat and stock limitation, by the mechanisms mentioned above. Although past research has helped narrow the range of possible causes of natural recruitment failure, the relative significance of each potential impact remains uncertain because multiple ecological, biological, and physical habitat changes occurred simultaneously. This makes it difficult to choose among competing hypotheses and difficult to know where exactly to focus recovery efforts for maximum benefit. In an ideal world, specific recovery measures would be identified and imple

Anders, Paul

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo trutta) had low densities, and limited distribution throughout the basin. A large return of adult spring chinook to the Touchet River drainage in 2001 produced higher densities of juvenile chinook in 2002 than have been seen in recent years, especially in the Wolf Fork. The adult return in 2002 was substantially less than what was seen in 2001. Due to poor water conditions and trouble getting personnel hired, spawning surveys were limited in 2002. Surveyors found only one redd in four Walla Walla River tributaries (Cottonwood Ck., East Little Walla Walla, West Little Walla Walla, and Mill Ck.), and 59 redds in Touchet River tributaries (10 in the North Fork Touchet, 30 in the South Fork Touchet, and 19 in the Wolf Fork). Bull trout spawning surveys in the upper Touchet River tributaries found a total of 125 redds and 150 live fish (92 redds and 75 fish in the Wolf Fork, 2 redds and 1 fish in the Burnt Fork, 0 redds and 1 fish in the South Fork Touchet, 29 redds and 71 fish in the North Fork Touchet, and 2 redds and 2 fish in Lewis Ck.). A preliminary steelhead genetics analysis was completed as part of this project. Results indicate differences between naturally produced steelhead and those produced in the hatchery. There were also apparent genetic differences among the naturally produced fish from different areas of the basin. Detailed results are reported in Bumgarner et al. 2003. Recommendations for assessment activities in 2003 included: (1) continue to monitor the Walla Walla River (focusing from the stateline to McDonald Rd.), the Mill Ck system, and the Little Walla Walla System. (2) reevaluate Whiskey Ck. for abundance and distribution of salmonids, and Lewis Ck. for bull trout density and distribution. (3) select or develop a habitat survey protocol and begin to conduct habitat inventory and assessment surveys. (4) summarize bull trout data for Mill Ck, South Fork Touchet, and Lewis Ck. (5) begin to evaluate temperature and flow data to assess if the habitat conditions exist for spring chinook in the Touchet River.

Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report November 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FISH PRODUCTION: Final shocking of eggs was finished in the incubation. Egg enumeration for the 2008 brood was completed and the eggs are being incubated in 38 degree Fahrenheit chilled water. Don Larsen of NOAA made a request of eggs for research purposes and was able to acquire supplemental line eggs 10,555. Estimated density at the time of ponding in Mid-March of 2009 is approximately 43,869 fry per raceway after calculating an average fry loss of 2%. The end of the month totals for the 2007 brood reports 773,807 juveniles on hand with an overall average of 31.4 fish per pound. Tagging continues on the 2007 brood and is on pace to wrap up in early December. FISH CULTURE: Ponds are cleaned as needed and due to the colder water temperatures, the feeding frequency has been changed to three days a week. All ponds are sampled at the end of the month. Growth for production fish are adjusted accordingly as temperature dictates feeding levels. Torrential rain on the 12th turned the Yakima River extremely turbid. Fish tagging operations were halted and the ensuing conditions at the facility intake screens became a concern. Water flow to the wet well became restricted so the decision was made to shut the surface water (river) pumps down and turn on well pumps No.1, No.4 and No.6 to run water to the facility head box. This operation continued for twenty-four hours at which point normal operations were optimal and fish tagging resumed, although the river didn't clear up enough to feed the fish until the 17th. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 14,822 gallons/minute. Well No.2 is pumping water at a rate of 530 gallons per minute. All four river pumps are in operation and pumping 14,292 gallons/minute. ACCLIMATION SITES: Cle Elum staff has been working to prep the acclimation sites for the upcoming fish transfer before the snow falls. Thermographs at each site are changed weekly. AMB Tools performed routine maintenance on the compressor and Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tank at the Jack Creek acclimation site. VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: Snow tires are now on all vehicles and snow blowers were installed on the John Deere tractor and lawn tractor. The snowplow was also installed on the Ford one ton. The four Snowmobiles were serviced by Yamaha Jacks of Ellensburg. MAINTENANCE BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Clean up occurs on Fridays of each week. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Water has been turned on to vertical incubator islands one and two. After eggs were transferred to vertical stacks cleaning of troughs began. WDFW crew inventoried eggs from isolettes and then transferred them to the vertical incubators. RIVER PUMP STATION MAINTENANCE: All four pumps are in operation and supplying the facility with 14,292 gallons/minute of water to rearing ponds. WELL FIELD MAINTENANCE: Well pumps No.1, No.4 and No.6 were turned on to supplement water flow to the facility as mentioned previously. Well No.5 was powered up but a winterizing valve malfunction wouldn't allow operation, we are currently working on it at this time. Well No.2 is pumping 530 gallons per minute and supplies well water to incubation and chiller. The pumps meter is recorded weekly. Test holes are monitored weekly and results are faxed to CH2MHILL afterward. SAFETY AND TRAINING: Ice melt and sand bags are popular items at the facility this month as freezing temperatures cause ground to become slippery and hazardous. GROUNDS: Van Alden's Plumbing installed a new commode in resident house No.411 and also inspected a plumbing problem at resident No.1131. Cle Elum staff along with WDFW staff worked to locate the spawning channel building back to the position it was at to have Greg Wallace of Wallace Electric hook electricity back up to the spawning shed. MEETINGS AND TOURS: Charlie attended a policy meeting at Cle Elum on the 18th. The Internal projects annual review took place at Cle Elum on the 19th and 20th. Bill Bosch continues to visit monthly to incorporate data into the YKFP data base. PERSONNEL: IHS employees traveled to Cle

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z