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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Microsoft Word - 2902ntu.dot  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

902-NTU (10-2004) Supersedes (6-2000) issue SNL COMPUTER BANNER Banner for all SNL Computing SF 2902-NTU (10-2004) WARNING NOTICE TO USERS This is a Federal computer system and is...

2

forestking@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw apfelpuff@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forestking@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw apfelpuff@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw / weichao.chen@gmail.com robin@ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT shot detection color histogram difference saliency region, deletion, and rearrange- ment while using the screen real-estate effectively. Second, we wish to reduce

Ouhyoung, Ming

3

National Taiwan University NTU's institutional predecessor was Taihoku Imperial University,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

students there; this fact shows that NTU has effectively transformed into a research university, and has National Taiwan University 2008/2009 #12; NTU's institutional predecessor was Taihoku Imperial-diversity Research Center. #12;331715 The total number of students at NTU, including those enrolled at the School

Wu, Yih-Min

4

1 Journey to Lean 2 NTU community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of excellence 13 Diversified culture understanding 14 Sustainable development 15 Student Guidance Administration Committee :_ #12; 1 Student Safety Division 2 Military Training Affairs 3 Traffic Safety for Student Safety 8 Campus safety meetings 9 Campus safety affairs : #12; 1 NTU Career Activity

Wu, Yih-Min

5

Jenn-Nan Wang Professor of Mathematics, NTU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jenn-Nan Wang Position Professor of Mathematics, NTU Research Fields Inverse Problems, Partial estimates. Especially, the Carleman-type estimate is very effective in treating systems of partial

Huang, Su-Yun

6

Chin-Lung Wang Professor in Mathematics, NTU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chin-Lung Wang Position Professor in Mathematics, NTU Research Fields Algebraic Geometry to the non-vanishing conjecture for a pseudo-effective adjoint divisor. I am interested in studying the an

Huang, Su-Yun

7

Speaker: Prof. Fa-Hsuan Lin (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Dr. Yi-Cheng Hsu (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speaker: Prof. Fa-Hsuan Lin (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Dr. Yi-Cheng Hsu (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Title: Magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain: progress, challenges

Wu, Yih-Min

8

Learning with Augmented Features for Heterogeneous Domain Lixin Duan S080003@ntu.edu.sg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning with Augmented Features for Heterogeneous Domain Adaptation Lixin Duan S080003@ntu.edu.sg Dong Xu DongXu@ntu.edu.sg Ivor W. Tsang IvorTsang@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang be readily incorporated with our newly proposed augmented feature representations to effectively utilize

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

9

Prince House-NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Yuan Hall Halcyon House Bldg. No. 1 Agricultural Exhibition Hall New Moon Pavilion NTU Visitor Center Lesyue Classroom Bldg. Gymnasium Dept. of Physics Astronomy - Mathematics Bldg. Shih-Liang Hall Computer's Dorm 8th Women's Dorm Dept. of Psychology (North Hall) Foreign Language Teaching and Resource Center

Hung, Shih-Hao

10

An NTU Cooperative Game Theoretic View of Manipulating Elections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An NTU Cooperative Game Theoretic View of Manipulating Elections Michael Zuckerman1 , Piotr 27708, USA. conitzer@cs.duke.edu Abstract. Social choice theory and cooperative (coalitional) game, we use cooperative game theory tools in order to explore the coali- tion formation process

Rosenschein, Jeff

11

Wen-Hann Sheu Professor of Dept. of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, NTU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wen-Hann Sheu Position Professor of Dept. of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, NTU Research Fields Scientific computing for science and engineering problems Research Interests · Explore

Huang, Su-Yun

12

Quantifying turbidity current interactions with topography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis advances our understanding of how transport properties of turbidity currents are mediated by interactions with seafloor topography, specifically channelized surfaces. Turbidity currents are responsible for ...

Straub, Kyle M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

Evans, Paul

14

SimpleNPKL : Simple Non-Parametric Kernel Learning Jinfeng Zhuang ZHUA0016@NTU.EDU.SG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SimpleNPKL : Simple Non-Parametric Kernel Learning Jinfeng Zhuang ZHUA0016@NTU.EDU.SG Ivor W. Tsang IVORTSANG@NTU.EDU.SG Steven C.H. Hoi CHHOI@NTU.EDU.SG School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological-of-the-art perfor- mance. The choice of an effective kernel plays a crucial role in many kernel based machine

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

15

NTU Wakeboarding Handbook 2013 -14 www.facebook.com/groups/trentwakeboard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NTU Wakeboarding Handbook 2013 - 14 www.facebook.com/groups/trentwakeboard www and let off some steam. Even if you only come to training sessions and you've never been riding, everyone

Evans, Paul

16

Click4BuildingID@NTU: Click for Building Identification with GPS-enabled Camera Cell Phone.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click4BuildingID@NTU: Click for Building Identification with GPS- enabled Camera Cell Phone. Chai, School of Computer Engineering Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 {asckyeo,asltchia,astjcham,asdrajan}@ntu meters or less [3] to improve the effectiveness and reliability of the 911 emergency call services

Chia, Liang-Tien

17

NTU Library User's Guide w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

My L ve Affairwith Library NTU Library User's Guide #12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;C Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro How to find to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

Wu, Yih-Min

18

Reviewed and updated March 2013 NTU Sustainable Construction and Refurbishment Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reviewed and updated March 2013 NTU Sustainable Construction and Refurbishment Policy Environmental sustainability is a central principle of the University as demonstrated by our Environmental Policy. Our built environment contributes heavily towards our direct environmental performance. All stages of construction can

Evans, Paul

19

environment.team@ntu.ac.uk Reviewed and updated March 2014 NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and over 3,000 staff, NTU acknowledges its education and business activities will significantly impact environmental management systems and initiatives to promote environmental and sustainability awareness and education, in accordance with our strategic plan. These build on current policies and will be disseminated

Evans, Paul

20

Page 1 of 4 NTU EcoCampus Environnemental Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach over 3years ­ Jan 2012. Procurement Objective: To limit the environmental impact of NTU an action plan to reduce Estates & Resources vehicle fleet environmental impacts - Aug 2011. · Roll out projects e.g. wind turbines at Brackenhurst/ photovoltaic power generation 10 year plan­ Feb 2012

Evans, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro A wonderful place to stay I want to read books... I want to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

Wu, Yih-Min

22

Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents flowing around bends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents is assumed to be Froude-subcritical, and in the case of a turbidity current a relatively sharp interface between turbid water and clear water above is assumed. The analysis focuses on the processes that maintain

Parker, Gary

23

NTU Health Exam Requirement for Incoming Exchange / Visiting Students In order to understand the general health condition of coming students, and to meet the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.ntu.edu.tw/oia/index.php/doc/view/sn/209/block/85/lang/en and bring it to the hospital. The required items are included in the "NTU: Abdomen: Heart: Oral Cavity: Others: Muscles/Bones/Joints: Visual Acuity: Uncorrected R L

Wu, Yih-Min

24

High-density turbidity currents: Are they sandy debris flows?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventionally, turbidity currents are considered as fluidal flows in which sediment is supported by fluid turbulence, whereas debris flows are plastic flows in which sediment is supported by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The concept of high-density turbidity current refers to high-concentration, commonly non-turbulent, flows of fluids in which sediment is supported mainly by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The conventional wisdom that traction carpets with entrained turbulent clouds on top represent high-density turbidity currents is a misnomer because traction carpets are neither fluidal nor turbulent. Debris flows may also have entrained turbulent clouds on top. The traction carpet/debris flow and the overriding turbulent clouds are two separate entities in terms of flow rheology and sediment-support mechanism. In experimental and theoretical studies, which has linked massive sands and floating clasts to high-density turbidity currents, the term high-density turbidity current has actually been used for laminar flows. In alleviating this conceptual problem, sandy debris flow is suggested as a substitute for high-density turbidity current. Sandy debris flows represent a continuous spectrum of processes between cohesive and cohesionless debris flows. Commonly they are rheologically plastic. They may occur with or without entrained turbulent clouds on top. Their sediment-support mechanisms include matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. They are characterized by laminar flow conditions, a moderate to high grain concentration, and a low to moderate mud content. Although flows evolve and transform during the course of transport in density-stratified flows, the preserved features in a deposit are useful to decipher only the final stages of deposition. At present, there are no established criteria to decipher transport mechanism from the depositional record.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

ATMOSPHERIC TURBIDITY DETERMINATION FROM IRRADIANCE RATIOS Chris Gueymard Frank Vignola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Energy Center Physics Department 1679 Clearlake Rd. University of Oregon Cocoa, FL 32922 and humidity. If precipitable water is too high or too low, a too low or too high turbidity is inevitably pre, are that it is more sensitive to in- strumental error because two radiometers are involved (instead of one

Oregon, University of

26

Estimation of atmospheric turbidity over Ghardaia city , A. Irbahb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to optimize their performances since an increase in turbidity reduces the output current of solar cells (Malik of the solar radiation that reaches the Earth's surface under cloudless sky and describes the optical thickness are obtained from data recorded between 2004 and 2008 at Ghardaia. The results show that both parameters have

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

27

Quantitative evaluation of turbidity in coastal waters from Lansat imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 1977 ABSTRACT Quantitative Evaluation of Turbi. dity in Coastal Waters From Landsat Image y (December 1977) Jon Branson Bright, B. S. , Texas AhII Dniversity Directed by: Dr. Wesley P. James The purpose of this research program... that turbi tlity did not always give the same values of suspended solid' as did other methods. NcCluney (13) found nine definitions of turbidity in a search of the literature and classified them into two & roups& those based on compari. son wi. th si...

Bright, Jon Branson

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Broadband absorption spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadband absorption spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady. Tromberg A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption a and reduced scattering s derived from the FD data

Berger, Andrew J.

29

Measuring large optical reflection matrices of turbid media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the measurement of a large optical reflection matrix (RM) of a highly disordered medium. Incident optical fields onto a turbid sample are controlled by a spatial light modulator, and the corresponding fields reflected from the sample are measured using full-field Michelson interferometry. The number of modes in the measured RM is set to exceed the number of resolvable modes in the scattering media. We successfully study the subtle intrinsic correlations in the RM which agrees with the theoretical prediction by random-matrix theory when the effect of the limited numerical aperture on the eigenvalue distribution of the RM is taken into account. The possibility of the enhanced delivery of incident energy into scattering media is also examined from the eigenvalue distribution which promises efficient light therapeutic applications.

Yu, Hyeonseung; Park, YongKeun

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

Losleben, Tamar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Evolution of a non-cohesive granular bed subject to a succession of erosive turbidity currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment was performed to study the evolution of a non-cohesive granular bed subject to a succession of erosive turbidity currents to evaluate the applicability of a proposed interface model that prescribes a relationship ...

Rangel, Roberto Carlos

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Optical imaging through turbid media is demonstrated using a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate. An apparatus and method for detecting ballistic and/or snake light while rejecting unwanted diffusive light for imaging structures within highly scattering media are described. Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in rhodamine 590 is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore has lost memory of the structures within the scattering medium. Images have been obtained of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye, which demonstrates the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic and/or snake light in optical mammography is discussed.

Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO)

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

33

Discrete-ordinates solution of short-pulsed laser transport in two-dimensional turbid media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the hyperbolic transient radiative-transport equation are not known. Ku- mar et al.4 considered the solution-pulsed laser transport is transient radiative-transfer theory. Complete an- alytical solutionsDiscrete-ordinates solution of short-pulsed laser transport in two-dimensional turbid media

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

34

Trapping of sustained turbidity currents by intraslope MICHAEL P. LAMB1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was separated from the sediment-free water above by a relatively sharp, horizontal settling interface indicating highly Froude- subcritical flow. The very slow moving flow within the ponded zone created conditions on the relative magnitudes of the input discharge of turbid water and the detrainment discharge of water across

35

Polarized light propagation in highly scattering turbid media with a distribution of the particle size: a Monte Carlo study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The light propagation in highly scattering turbid media composed of the particles with different size distribution is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation model implemented in Standard C. Monte Carlo method has been widely utilized to study...

Koh, Wonshill

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

NTU Incoming NTU Incoming Exchange/Visiting Exchange/Visiting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Calculus, Chemistry, Physics, Biochemistry, Biology, Accounting, Organic, Chemistry, Engineering:00~22:30 Sun. 8:00~17:00 · 24hr Study roomy · Library Catalog (TULIPS) i d b k / fil· Find a book / film

Wu, Yih-Min

37

NTU Incoming Exchange/Visiting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Biochemistry, Biology, Accounting, Organic, Chemistry, Engineering, Mathematics. · Group study/ Discussion #12 Hours: Mon-Sat. 8:00~22:30 Sun.~17:00 · 24hr Study room · Library Catalog (TULIPS) · Find a book / film Development · Library B1 · Individual counsel · Economics, Statistics, Calculus, Chemistry, Physics

Wu, Yih-Min

38

Multilayer-weighted transmittance functions for use in broadband irradiance and turbidity calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A physically-modelled method is presented to obtain an accurate transmittance and optical depth for various extinction processes (Rayleigh scattering, aerosol extinction, and absorption by ozone, nitrogen dioxide, uniformly mixed gases, and water vapor) affecting the transfer of shortwave radiation in a cloudless atmosphere. The integration over the shortwave solar spectrum is performed with a more realistic weighting function than the conventional one. The calculation and properties of the aerosol optical depth are discussed in detail, as well as its proper use in atmospheric turbidity studies.

Gueymard, C. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Turbidity current flow over an obstacle and phases of sediment wave generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the flow of particle-laden turbidity currents down a slope and over an obstacle. A high-resolution 2D computer simulation model is used, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. It includes poly-disperse particle grain sizes in the current and substrate. Particular attention is paid to the erosion and deposition of the substrate particles, including application of an active layer model. Multiple flows are modeled from a lock release that can show the development of sediment waves (SW). These are stream-wise waves that are triggered by the increasing slope on the downstream side of the obstacle. The initial obstacle is completely erased by the resuspension after a few flows leading to self consistent and self generated SW that are weakly dependant on the initial obstacle. The growth of these waves is directly related to the turbidity current being self sustaining, that is, the net erosion is more than the net deposition. Four system parameters are found to influence the SW growth: (1) slope, (2) current ...

Strauss, Moshe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

In 2006, the Alliance of Coastal Technology (ACT) evaluated the performance of five commercial-ready, in situ turbidity sensors at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial-ready, in situ turbidity sensors at eight test sites located throughout North America (Fig. 1, and a freshwater lake (Fig. 1) . The sensors used in this study consisted of: A backscatter Turbidity Probe ( =660 A transmissometer ( =660nm) ­ data denoted by cp Both scattering sensors were equipped with integrated copper wipers

Boss, Emmanuel S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediations (SRRs) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a peanut vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A go/no-go decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a go decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a no-go determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the issuance of the initial version of this report but under the scope of the original request for technical assistance, WSE asked for this report to be revised to include the go/no-go CU value corresponding to 0.28 wt% solids. It was this request that led to the preparation of Revision 1 of the report. The results for the 0.28 wt% solids value were developed following the same approach as that utilized for the 0.14 wt% solids value. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a go/no-go CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the go/no-go decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the go/no-go criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from the sludge batch, Sludge Batch 7b, being processed at the time of this testing. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

42

Quantitative broadband absorption and scattering spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady state methodologies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses a combination of frequency-domain and steady-state reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light steady-state measurement, whereas the frequency-domain data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption and reduced scattering derived from the frequency-domain data are used to calibrate the intensity of the steady-state measurements and to determine the reduced scattering coefficient at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. The absorption coefficient spectrum is determined by comparing the steady-state reflectance values with the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. Absorption spectra of a turbid phantom and of human breast tissue in vivo, derived with the combined frequency-domain and steady-state technique, agree well with expected reference values.

Tromberg, Bruce J. (Irvine, CA); Berger, Andrew J. (Rochester, NY); Cerussi, Albert E. (Lake Forest, CA); Bevilacqua, Frederic (Costa Mesa, CA); Jakubowski, Dorota (Irvine, CA)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

43

A high resolution geophysical investigation of spatial sedimentary processes in a paraglacial turbid outwash fjord: Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simpson Bay is a turbid, outwash fjord located in northeastern Prince William Sound, Alaska. A high ratio of watershead:basin surface area combined with high precipitation and an easily erodable catchment create high sediment inputs. Fresh water...

Noll, Christian John, IV

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Annotated bibliography: Marine geologic hazards of the Hawaiian Islands with special focus on submarine slides and turbidity currents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography was compiled to highlight the submarine geology of the Hawaiian Islands and identify known and potential marine geologic hazards with special emphasis on turbidity currents, submarine slides and tsunamis. Some references are included that are not specific to Hawaii but are needed to understand the geologic processes that can affect the integrity of submarine cables and other man-made structures. Entries specific to the Hawaiian Island area are shown in bold type.

Normark, W.R.; Herring, H.H.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Diabat L., Remund J., Wald L., 2003. Linke turbidity factors for several sites in Africa. Solar Energy, 75, 2, 111-119. Copyright UFAE Meteotest -Ecole des Mines de Paris Armines 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a horizontal plan. hal-00361366,version1-13Feb2009 Author manuscript, published in "Solar Energy 75, 2 (2003Diabaté L., Remund J., Wald L., 2003. Linke turbidity factors for several sites in Africa. Solar Energy, 75, 2, 111-119. Copyright UFAE ­ Meteotest - Ecole des Mines de Paris ­ Armines 1 LINKE TURBIDITY

Boyer, Edmond

46

Microsoft Word - 2902ntu.dot  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 - Outline and Description

47

Accepted, subject to re-review, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, ASCE, version of January 2006 Role of Ponded Turbidity Currents in Reservoir Trap Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, because some of this sediment may pass out of the reservoir without settling out. Here a model of trap. The dam causes a sustained turbidity current to reflect and form a muddy pond bounded upstream by a hydraulic jump. If the interface of this muddy pond rises above any vent or overflow point at the dam

Parker, Gary

48

New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers.

Bcklin, Christoph, E-mail: boecklic@ethz.ch; Baumann, Dirk; Frhlich, Jrg [Institute of Electromagnetic Fields, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Prairie iVai. 23(2): 53-60. 1991. Smallmouth Bass Size Structure and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the two gears and assess the potential effects of conductivity and turbidity on catch rates for both g, the effectiveness of both gears was not seriously impaired by conductivities ranging from 470 to 1250 ¢/cm or by turbidities ranging from 2.1 to IS.0 NTU. An a posteriori analysis delineated electrofL~hing catch rates

50

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be obtained. The concentrated energy in the pulsed beam allows for very small camera integration times so operates at roughly 10 m above the sea floor and builds a bathymetric image by taking successive swaths advantage of producing high resolution bathymetric and imaging data provided the pixel position

Jaffe, Jules

51

Angles J., Menard L., Bauer O., Rigollier C., Wald L., 1999. A climatological database of the Linke turbidity factor. In Proceedings of the ISES Solar World Congress 1999, Jerusalem, Israel, July 49, 1999, volume I, pp 432434.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Angles J., Menard L., Bauer O., Rigollier C., Wald L., 1999. A climatological database of the Linke, volume I, pp 432434. A CLIMATOLOGICAL DATABASE OF THE LINKE TURBIDITY FACTOR Joel Angles, Lionel Ménard the period 19811990. Using the abovementioned formula, these values are turned into climatological values

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

52

Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste - 13532  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source. (authors)

Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job [EIC Laboratories, Inc., 111 Downey St., Norwood, MA, 02062 (United States)] [EIC Laboratories, Inc., 111 Downey St., Norwood, MA, 02062 (United States); Bryan, Samuel; Lines, Amanda; Levitskaia, Tatiana [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

This is Your Library! NTU Library User's Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&HCI ORC ID&ResearcherID ORCIDIResearcherID 2 1 1 2 3 3 4 5 26 33 37 41 27 28 29 30 #12; -- NTUR --ESI -- 4 5 6 46 50 52 54 59 71 #12; #12;2 100 30603 [][][] 1 100 60 3 30 30 Core TSSCI #12; Web of Science Core Collection (SCIE, SSCI, A&HCI) ORCID & Researcher ID Journal

Wu, Yih-Min

54

New Moon Pavilion / NTU Visitor Center Sports Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subjects Classroom Building Xiao-Fu Square Liberal Education Classroom Building Gymnasium Swimming Pool-Liang Hall Global Change Research Center Graduate Institute of Oceanography N43 N44 N51 N52 N53 N54 N55 N56 N of Mechanical Engineering Chih-Hung Hall College of Engineering Building 9th Women's Dorm Restaurant 9th Women

Hung, Shih-Hao

55

ICSICSICSICS http://cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw/~thlin/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(duplexer; RF passive device)· SWr GMD44 (duplexer; RF passive device) · Invensense MPU3050 MPU3050 Triple software ICS 15 #12;ICSICS IC d ig h IC design house Start-up company Design service company FoundryFoundry System house ... Pain is inevitable; suffering is optional. 16 #12;

Hung, Shih-Hao

56

Removal of Waterborne Particles by Electrofiltration: Pilot-Scale Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

researchers conducted bench-scale experiments to verify the effectiveness of electrofiltration, few studies plant. Presedimentation basin water was used as the influent with a turbidity ranging from 12 to 37 NTU to be more effective for removal of smaller particles (

Li, Ying

57

Forestry and Water -An Update on Water Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and water quality objectives Comparison of cost effectiveness of different groundwater protection measures, cumecs Case Impact of Crims on flood risk #12;17/11/1110 Timber `minibunds' may be a more cost-effective Turbidity(NTU) Lower Halladale Middle Halladale Bealach Burn Upper Halladale Allt a Bhealaich BBLFperiods

58

N e w E n g l a n d W a t e r T r e a t m e n t Technology Assistance Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extraction wells in New Hampshire. 2. Characterize the treatment effectiveness of the slow sand filter.8-1.97 log Aerobic spore Forming Bacteria (CFU/100mL) 48 >2.4 log 8 2.3 log NA Turbidity (NTU) 48 82.8% 8 82 filtration extraction well water, even after eliminating the dilution effects with groundwater. The male

59

Physico-chemical water quality in Ghana: Prospects for water supply technology implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S/cm and turbidity from 0 to >542 NTU. Many water samples analysed breached the drinking water quality guidelines. High levels of heavy metals were found and also locations high in sulphate and nitrate. In some regions chemical contaminants such as fluoride occur...

Schfer, Andrea; Rossiter, H.M.A.; Owusu, P.A.; Richards, B.S.; Awuah, E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Testing of a hybrid membrane system for groundwater desalination in an Australian national park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in reducing high feedwater turbidity of up to 370 NTU. For the system, designed for a production of about 1000 L/d for remote communities, the specific energy consumption (SEC) was below 5 W.h/L when operated at a pressure above 7 bar. Retention of multivalent...

Schfer, Andrea; Richards, Bryce S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

THE WORDS OF OMEGASTHE WORDS OF OMEGAS http://http://www.math.ntu.edu.tw/~shiehnrwww.math.ntu.edu.tw/~shiehnr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:19)28:19) #12;left: Fortuna( a goddess), right: anleft: Fortuna( a goddess), right: an astragalusastragalus

Huang, Su-Yun

62

DEVELOPMENT OF A LAMINATED DISK FOR THE SPIN TEK ROTARY MICROFILTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Funded by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, EM-31, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) partnered with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to develop a filter disk that would withstand a reverse pressure or flow during operation of the rotary microfilter. The ability to withstand a reverse pressure and flow eliminates a potential accident scenario that could have resulted in damage to the filter membranes. While the original welded filter disks have been shown to withstand and reverse pressure/flow in the static condition, the filter disk design discussed in this report will allow a reverse pressure/flow while the disks are rotating. In addition, the laminated disk increases the flexibility during filter startup and cleaning operations. The new filter disk developed by SRNL and SpinTek is manufactured with a more open structure significantly reducing internal flow restrictions in the disk. The prototype was tested at the University of Maryland and demonstrated to withstand the reverse pressure due to the centrifugal action of the rotary filter. The tested water flux of the disk was demonstrated to be 1.34 gpm in a single disk test. By comparison, the water flux of the current disk was 0.49 gpm per disk during a 25 disk test. The disk also demonstrated rejection of solids by filtering a 5 wt % Strontium Carbonate slurry with a filtrate clarity of less the 1.4 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) throughout the two hour test. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to adapt the rotary microfilter for radioactive service in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. One potential weakness is the loose nature of the membrane on the filter disks. The current disk is constructed by welding the membrane at the outer edge of the disk. The seal for the center of the membrane is accomplished by an o-ring in compression for the assembled stack. The remainder of the membrane is free floating on the disk. This construction requires that a positive pressure be applied to the rotary filter tank to prevent the membrane from rising from the disk structure and potentially contacting the filter turbulence promoter. In addition, one accident scenario is a reverse flow through the filtrate line due to mis-alignment of valves resulting in the membrane rising from the disk structure. The structural integrity of the current disk has been investigated, and shown that the disk can withstand a significant reverse pressure in a static condition. However, the disk will likely incur damage if the filter stack is rotated during a reverse pressure. The development of a laminated disk would have several significant benefits for the operation of the rotary filter including the prevention of a compromise in filter disk integrity during a reverse flow accident, increasing operational flexibility, and increasing the self cleaning ability of the filter. A laminated disk would allow the filter rotor operation prior to a positive pressure in the filter tank. This would prevent the initial dead-head of the filter and prevent the resulting initial filter cake buildup. The laminated disk would allow rotor operation with cleaning fluid, eliminating the need for a recirculation pump. Additionally, a laminated disk would allow a reverse flow of fluid through the membrane pores removing trapped particles.

Herman, D.

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

63

*Corresponding author. Tel: (65) 6790-6235. Email: arbhatnagar@ntu.edu.sg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 3 Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute a simulation- based method to estimate this impact for iid normally distributed demand. We also study for efficient and responsive distribution systems by implementing innovative practices such as cross

Graves, Stephen C.

64

Chien-Cheng Chang Professor, Institute of Applied Mechanics and Department of Math., NTU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy, Solar Energy, Lithium Battery­vibration and fluid me- chanics of wind turbines, solar panel)­ mechanics, heat transfer of microstructures (theory, computation and experiments) · Energy Research in Wind

Huang, Su-Yun

65

Sustainable Food Policy Nottingham Trent University (NTU) recognises that food production and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

where possible, o Minimise waste and pollution through effective recycling and waste disposal systems, o assured meat and poultry; We only use organic eggs and milk in freshly prepared meals and beverages Monitor, record and take the necessary action with regard to plate waste. Reviewed and updated: February

Evans, Paul

66

Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which is the Effectiveness-NTU Method as described byfor each problem. Effectiveness-NTU Method This solutionthe cold side. The Effectiveness-NTU method is employed in

Galvez, Cristhian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Emotion-based Music Visualization using Photos Chin-Han Chen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

90030@csie.ntu.edu.tw,mfueng@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw skjeng@ew.ee.ntu.edu.tw,cyy@csie.ntu.edu.tw Abstract patterns irrelevant to the music content while elaborate ones present visual effects with coordination

Ouhyoung, Ming

68

Commercial Application of Freeze Crystallization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effluent Composition Product Analysis Feed Water Conductivity Micro S 10,000 220 Turbidity NTU >500 20 Density g/l 1.002 1.000 Total Solids % 1.5 0.01 Ash % orTS 55.0 N/A Suspended Solids PPM 1,750 20 C.O.D. PPM 10,000 100 As a result... Figure 3 outlines the overall flowsheet of the Chetwynd installation. Because the freeze system was designed 10 handle all the liquid effluent from the mill, a clarification system was designed to remove any suspended solids which may be present...

Gorgol, R. G.

69

Rapid modeling of diffuse reflectance of light in turbid slabs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The first type starts from the radiative trans- fer equation, and the second uses the Monte Carlo tech- nique. The radiative transfer equation is usually too complex to solve analytically and is often goals in these studies is to un- derstand and simulate light transport in biological tis- sues, which

Wang, Lihong

70

RESEARCH ARTICLE Cichlid species diversity in naturally and anthropogenically turbid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 9750 AC Haren, The Netherlands M. A. Kishe-Machumu Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute, Dar es Salaam Center, P.O. Box 78850, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Aquat Sci DOI 10.1007/s00027-012-0265-4 Aquatic Sciences

71

Remote measurement of turbidity and chlorophyll through aerial photography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Readings Along Transects . . 55-59 A-1 A-2 A-3 A-5 A-6 'A- 7 A-8 A-9 A-10 Analysis of Variance for Film Density Readings Along Transect Line T-test Values for Transect Readings Film Density Readings for Repetitive Flights Airphoto Data, May 3... Data, July 4, 19 73 70-74 76 79-80 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 Table ~Pa e A-11 A-12 A-13 A-14 A-15 B-1 B-2 C-1 C-2 C-3 Airphoto Data, July 5, 1973 Airphoto Data, July 11, 1973 Airphoto Data, July 12, 1973 Airphoto Data...

Schwebel, Martin David

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Field deployable dynamic lighting system for turbid water imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ocean depths provide an ever changing and complex imaging environment. As scientists and researches strive to document and study more remote and optically challenging areas, specifically scatter-limited environments. ...

Gorman, Geoffrey Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (first quarter 1995 is the third of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in wells FAC 3 and 11C. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (second quarter 1995 is the fourth of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and radium-226 exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west at a rate of 1300 feet per year. Groundwater flow in the Barnwell/McBean was to the northeast at a rate of 50 feet per year.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance is due to combined effects of improvement in charge collection and higher optical transmittance, Singapore (e-mail: aung0069@ntu.edu.sg; exwsun@ ntu.edu.sg; zhao0075@ntu.edu.sg; dyoga@ntu.edu.sg). H. V and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore (e-mail: hvdemir@ntu

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

76

Low-dimensional Models for Compression, Compressed Sensing, and Prediction of Large-Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technological University, Singapore, 639798; nikola001@e.ntu.edu.sg, muhammad89@e.ntu.edu.sg, jdauwels@ntu) is commonly deployed to compress large traffic data sets [2], [4]­[6]. PCA provides an effective low

Jaillet, Patrick

77

Efficient Obstacle-Avoiding Rectilinear Steiner Tree Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan enorm@eda.ee.ntu.edu.tw, ywchang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw, yangc@csie.ntu an effective and efficient algorithm for the OARSMT problem to facilitate the IC design flow. Previous methods

Chang, Yao-Wen

78

The Diet-Aware Dining Table: Observing Dietary Behaviors over a Tabletop Surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Department of Electrical Engineeringe , National Taiwan University r93018@csie.ntu.edu.tw, b90701219@ntu.edu.tw, {hchu, yjhsu}@csie.ntu.edu.tw; cheryl.chen@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw, {r94944009, r94054}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu and obesity amounts to $117 billion in 2000. Proper dietary intake and related inter- ventions are effective

Chu, Hao-hua

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - anticuerpos contra virus Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Zoology, University of Cambridge Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 53 NTU Supported Anti-Virus products for NTUanywhere AVG 9 and 10 free edition Summary: NTU...

80

Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a Counter Flow Offset Strip Fin Intermediate Heat Exchanger using an Effective Porous Media Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state temperature distribution using the effectiveness-NTUanalyzed using the effectiveness-NTU (number of transferand the analytical effectiveness-NTU method verifies that

Urquiza, Eugenio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

1 Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Polymeric Biomaterials Laboratory 2 Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratoire de Technologie des Composites et Polymres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

network (sIPN) or an interpenetrating networks (IPN). Hyaluronic acid will be incorporated into a PEG polymers for network synthesis, due to its biocompatibility, ease of photo-polymerisation and tailoring synthetic crosslinks. The synthesis of such a macromolecular network in the form of a hydrogel has

Dalang, Robert C.

82

Instructions of NTU Health Exam for Exchange Students from China In order to understand the general health condition of the new students, and to meet the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hypertension Cervical cancer Gout or hyperuricemia Psychiatric disorders None of the diseases described

Wu, Yih-Min

83

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard (50 NTU) are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS Anshul Singh*, Arindam Basu, Keck-Voon Ling, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore *NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics (ISAID), NTU, Singapore $School of Computer Engineering, NTU, Singapore §School of ECE, Georgia

Mooney, Vincent

85

Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effectiveness Research, Clinical Trial Center, NTU Hospital Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine system regulates directed cell migration Institute of Molecular Medicine, NTU College of Medicine Feng) and Gefitinib NTU Hospital and NTU College of Medicine , Yi-Hsien Shih, Pin-Chun Chen, Chia-Yu Chu IF10

Wu, Yih-Min

86

Connected Vehicle Safety Science, System, and Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yi-Ping Hung Intel-NTU Connected Context Computing Center National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan 1 kuanwenchen@ntu.edu.tw, 2 hsinmu@csie.ntu.edu.tw, 3 hung@csie.ntu.edu.tw Abstract--In this paper, we propose be effectively prevented. In this paper, we present the challenges arise from realizing intelligent transports

Ouhyoung, Ming

87

Fast Bounded Online Gradient Descent Algorithms for Scalable Kernel-Based Online Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zhao zhao0106@ntu.edu.sg Jialei Wang jl.wang@ntu.edu.sg Pengcheng Wu wupe0003@ntu.edu.sg Rong Jin rongjin@cse.msu.edu Steven C.H. Hoi chhoi@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang, they are neither computa- tionally efficient due to their intensive budget maintenance strategy nor effective due

Jin, Rong

88

Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF5%Web of ScienceWoS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Hanna S. Graduate Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, NTU Structural Carbamazepine- Induced Toxic Effects and HLA-B*1502 Screening in Taiwan NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Volume Imaging, NTU Hospital and College of Medicine, NTU Department of Laboratory Medicine, NTU Hospital

Wu, Yih-Min

89

Dietary-Aware Dining Table Tracking What and How Much You Eat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, School and Graduate Institute of Nursing d , National Taiwan University r93018@csie.ntu.edu.tw, b90701219@ntu.edu.tw, {r93045, hchu}@csie.ntu.edu.tw; cheryl.chen@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw Abstract. We are what we eat dietary intake and related interventions have been demonstrated to be effective in ameliorating symptoms

Ouhyoung, Ming

90

Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thrombosuction and Tirofiban Infusion (ITTI) trial Department of Internal Medicine, NTU Hospital Department

Wu, Yih-Min

91

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 61, NO. 14, JULY 15, 2013 3545 Dual-Mode Low-Complexity Codebook Searching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant effect of reducing the number of multiplications by 56% compared with referenced works. Finally Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan, R.O.C (e-mail: yihsuan@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw; zero- bigtree@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw; yagaru@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw; chenjo@ac- cess.ee.ntu.edu.tw; andywu@cc.ee.ntu

Hung, Shih-Hao

92

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS FOR VIDEO TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 22, NO. 1, JANUARY 2012 77 Modeling and Compressing 3-D Facial Expressions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results on real-world datasets demonstrate that GV is very effective for modeling the high-resolution 3-D Technological University, 639798, Singapore (e-mail: xiaj0002@e.ntu.edu.sg; daot0006@e.ntu.edu.sg; yhe@ntu.edu.sg; xmchen@ntu.edu.sg; chhoi@ntu. edu.sg). Color versions of one or more of the figures in this paper

Hoi, Steven Chu-Hong

93

National Taiwan University ADaptable VIsionary System for Earthquake Resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flai@ntu.edu.tw Pei-Chin Wang b89091@csie.ntu.edu.tw Keng-Hao Chang b89029@csie.ntu.edu.tw Yuan-Chung Shen b89040@csie.ntu.edu.tw Che-Hsuan Shu b89058@csie.ntu.edu.tw #12;CSIDC 2004 1 1 Abstract Serious effective way to predict when the earthquake will happen. Here ADVISER, ADaptable VIsionary System

Ouhyoung, Ming

94

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During third quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were sampled for the first time during third quarter. Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in wells FAC 3 and 10C. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

Collin, Clair

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Large River Food Webs: Influence of Nutrients, Turbidity, and Flow, and Implications for Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supporting consumers in rivers with different physicochemical characteristics, and hypotheses of how these factors affect instream productivity (R = respiration, NPP = net primary production). ........................................ 44 Figure 2... CHAPTER I GENERAL INTRODUCTION Humans have historically constructed civilizations along the banks of rivers. In addition to providing vital supplies of water and easy access to nutrient-rich, alluvial soils, rivers filter and remove nutrients...

Roach, Katherine

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Angular domain optical imaging of turbid media using enhanced micro-tunnel filter arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performed in tissue mimicking phantoms using a 2-cm thick optical cell with 0.25% IntralipidTM and a near infrared laser. This paper also presents experimental results of the angular domain imaging system employing novel micro-tunnel arrays with minimal internal reflection which can accept the non- scattered

Chapman, Glenn H.

98

Modeling the diffuse reflectance due to a narrow beam incident on a turbid medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an asymptotic analysis of the radiative transport equation for strong scattering, weak absorption, and a narrow of the radiative transport equation, we show that this diffuse reflectance model gives results that are accurate for the diffuse reflectance from the solution of the radiative transport equation. However, using the solution

Kim, Arnold D.

99

Absorption distribution of an optical beam focused into a turbid medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the radiative transfer equation. The radiative trans- fer equation is usually too complex to solve analyt- ically and is often simplified by a diffusion approximation. The radiative transfer equation or comparable with the transport mean free path. Focusing could significantly increase the peak absorp- tion

Wang, Lihong

100

Analysis of single Monte Carlo methods for prediction of reflectance from turbid media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be derived from the radiative transport equation. While theStarting from the radiative transport equation we derive the

Martinelli, Michele; Gardner, Adam; Cuccia, David; Hayakawa, Carole; Spanier, Jerome; Venugopalan, Vasan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Using polarization to find a source in a turbid Julia Clark,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, fog, and rain, for example. The scalar approximation of the radiative transport equation is used often been some notable works done of inverse problems for the vector radiative transport equation. Siewert of partially polarized light using the theory of radiative transport. In particular, we study the light

Kim, Arnold D.

102

Analytica Chimica Acta 463 (2002) 283293 Determination of total phosphorus and nitrogen in turbid waters by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Bestrecoveriesofphosphorusandnitrogenby microwaveheatingwereobtainedwhensolutionsweredigestedat95 Cfor40 min.Quantitativerecoveriesofphosphorusfrom Chlorella suspensions up to 1000 mg/l were analysis; NEIS no. 3 Chlorella; NEIS no. 2 pond sediment Corresponding author. Tel.: +61-26201-2531; fax

Canberra, University of

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - apple juice turbidity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

70 1 Slice Cornbread 165 12 oz Apple Juice 167 THURSDAY: Total Calorie Count 1446... Ranch Dressing 70 1 Apple 81 1 Chocolate Chip Cookie 200 12 oz Diet Soda 0 MONDAY: Total...

104

Digital optical phase conjugation for delivering two-dimensional images through turbid media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical transmission through complex media such as biological tissue is fundamentally limited by multiple light scattering. Precise control of the optical wavefield potentially holds the key to advancing a broad range of ...

Yamauchi, Toyohiko

105

Measurement of blood analytes in turbid biological tissue using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concentrations of blood constituents provide diagnostic information in clinical procedures. Among the medical community, there is great interest in developing an optical method of concentration measurements that eliminates ...

Koo, Tae-Woong, 1974-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Absorption Properties of Dissolved and Particulate Matter in Turbid Productive Inland Lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solar energy: colored dissolved organic matter (subscript CDOM), suspended non-algal particles of North America (Nebraska, USA). STUDY AREA Data were collected in eastern Nebraska during 2002 and 2003 as freshwater supplies and recreational areas. Optical properties of lakes may provide for example the time

Gitelson, Anatoly

107

File:06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic UtilitiesCABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Jump to: navigation,EnergyMTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdfOpen

108

www.advhealthmat.de www.MaterialsViews.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail: edwinyeow@ntu.edu.sg; Bengang@ntu.edu.sg Here, a set of novel and personalized nanocarriers are presented side effects. Recent advances in multifunctional nanomedicine have shown great potentials to address

Xing, Bengang

109

XU ET AL. VOL. 5 ' NO. 5 ' 36603669 ' 2011 www.acsnano.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as lasers,7 solar cells,8 field emitters and field-effect transistors,9,10 and waveguides.11 Recent reports and transient spectroscopic studies as * Address correspondence to tzechien@ntu.edu.sg, qihua@ntu

Xiong, Qihua

110

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

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Department of Mathematics, NTU PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Computer experiment due to the Maxwell equations, and (iii) effective surrogates (meta-models) based on Gaussian process

Wu, Yih-Min

111

ChBE 3210 Transport Phenomena II (required course) Credit: 3-0-3  

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coefficients b. LMTD c. NTU-effectiveness method 5. Diffusion a. Molecular diffusion b. Knudsen and restricted of number and height of transfer units (NTU & HTU). (Student Outcomes: a, c, k) Topics Covered 1

Sherrill, David

112

Multi-receiver Homomorphic Authentication Codes for Network Coding  

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University, Singapore TANG0209@e.ntu.edu.sg, hoonwei@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. We investigate a new class, the messages are now inevitably susceptible to data modification or corruption. This has a severe effect

113

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

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Engineering, NTU PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Three-dimensional rotational that aneurysm structures were effectively segmented and in good agreement with manual delineation outcomes. #12;

Wu, Yih-Min

114

AN EFFICIENT AUTHENTICATION METHOD for H.264/AVC J. Zhang, Student Member, IEEE, A.T.S. Ho, Fellow. lEE  

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Technological University Singapore 639798 Email: Jingzhang@pmail.ntu.edu.sg;etsho@ntu.edu.sg Keywords: Hard detect the tampering by the sensitive mode change. And the experimental results prove the effectiveness

Doran, Simon J.

115

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering (CQSE) National Center of Theoretical Sciences (NCTS)  

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Engineering, NTU Place: Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Plasma processes have attracted temperature. The effect of the diffusion of the ambient air on the plasma characteristics is assessed

Wu, Yih-Min

116

May 14, 2007 10:6 WSPC/Trim Size: 11in x 8.5in for Proceedings CSB2007 LEARNING POSITION WEIGHT MATRICES FROM SEQUENCE  

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Sciences Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Email: chenxin@ntu.edu.sg, guol0005@ntu-AlignACE is an effective tool for discovering TF binding sites from gene expression or ChIP-chip data and, in particular

Chen, Xin

117

www.advmat.de www.MaterialsViews.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technological University Singapore 637371, Singapore E-mail: qihua@ntu.edu.sg; hdsun@ntu.edu.sg Prof. Q. H in highly efficient light sources (nanola- sers), waveguides, field-effect transistors and photodetectors

Xiong, Qihua

118

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPEAKER Dr. Chyh-Hong Chern Department of Physics, NTU PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU of up to 0.42 $\\hbar$ can be generated. Based on this effect, a novel device consisting of a grating

Wu, Yih-Min

119

Crowdsourcing Multimedia QoE Evaluation: A Trusted Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed framework by a comparison with MOS. Moreover, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (e-mail: bipa@fractal.ee.ntu.edu.tw; congo@fractal.ee.ntu.

Chen, Sheng-Wei

120

Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Large-Scale Traffic Speed Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algorithm. We show the effectiveness of the proposed performance analysis methods by applying them Technological University, Singapore, 639798; muhammad89@e.ntu.edu.sg, jdauwels@ntu.edu.sg. Ali Oran

Jaillet, Patrick

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121

ORIGINAL ARTICLE GETA sandals: a footstep location tracking system  

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not suffer from problems with obstacles, multi- path effects, signal noises, signal interferences, and dead Taiwan University, #1 Roosevelt Road, Section 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan e-mail: hchu@csie.ntu.edu.tw S.-y. Yeh e-mail: r93124@csie.ntu.edu.tw C.-i. Wu e-mail: r92079@csie.ntu.edu.tw J. Y.-j. Hsu e-mail: yjhsu@csie.ntu

Ouhyoung, Ming

122

Synthesis and optical properties of IIVI 1D nanostructures Muhammad Iqbal Bakti Utama,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

size- and structure-dependent material properties where the relevance of quantum confinement effects Technological University, Singapore 637371. E-mail: Qihua@ntu.edu.sg b National Key Laboratory of Photoelectric, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. Before he moved to NTU, he had been working

Xiong, Qihua

123

Subscriber access provided by Nanyang Technological Univ Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute @ NTU (ERI@N), Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 3 Singapore be addressed. Email address: Tzechien@ntu.edu.sg and Qihua@ntu.edu.sg. Page 1 of 21 ACS Paragon Plus to be effectively tackled. Here we demonstrate a new family of planar room-temperature NIR nanolasers based

Xiong, Qihua

124

Thememory: Experiencing Thematic Photos in Daily Practice Kai-Yin Cheng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

keynes@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Ko-Yuan Chou National Taiwan University koyuan@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Bing-Yu Chen National Taiwan University robin@ntu.edu.tw Figure 1. Interaction with the Thememory. (a Effect (template dependent) Photos X Theme Templates Progressive Reminder Preprocessing Theme

Ouhyoung, Ming

125

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh* , Arindam Basu , Keck-Voon Ling* and Vincent J. Mooney III*$§ Email: anshul.singh@research.iiit.ac.in, {arindam.basu, ekvling}@ntu, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore * NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied

Mooney, Vincent

126

SoC Test Scheduling Using the B*-Tree Based Floorplanning Technique * Jen-Yi Wuu1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Taipei, Taiwan jywuu@eda.ee.ntu.edu.tw, tungchieh@ntu.edu.tw, ywchang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Abstract effective and efficient---our method obtains the best results ever reported for SoC test scheduling

Chang, Yao-Wen

127

A Measurement Study of Zigbee-based Indoor Localization Systems Under RF Interference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, MA, USA c Computer Science Department, Stanford University, CA, USA sylau@ntu.edu.tw, thlin@eecs.harvard.edu, huangty@stanford.edu, b91901152@ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT With an expected market value testbed, we are able to ana- lyze the effect of background IEEE 802.11 traffic on local- ization error

Huang, Polly

128

Co-Labeling: A New Multi-view Learning Approach for Ambiguous Problems Wen Li1 Lixin Duan2 Ivor Wai-Hung Tsang1 Dong Xu1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAP Research, SAP AG, Singapore, 117440 wli1@e.ntu.edu.sg lxduan@gmail.com ivortsang@ntu.edu.sg dongxu@ntu classifier as well as find the optimal training labels from a finite label candidate set. To effectively the effectiveness of our proposed co-labeling for both MIL and SSL. Keywords-ambiguous learning; multi

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

129

On the Effects of Haptic Display in Brush and Ink Simulation for Chinese Painting and Calligraphy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Effects of Haptic Display in Brush and Ink Simulation for Chinese Painting and Calligraphy Jeng-sheng Yeh jsyeh@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Ting-yu Lien andie@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Ming Ouhyoung ming@csie.ntu

Ouhyoung, Ming

130

Journal of Machine Learning Research 12 (2011) 1313-1347 Submitted 3/10; Revised 10/10; Published 4/11 A Family of Simple Non-Parametric Kernel Learning Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/11 A Family of Simple Non-Parametric Kernel Learning Algorithms Jinfeng Zhuang ZHUA0016@NTU.EDU.SG Ivor W. Tsang IVORTSANG@NTU.EDU.SG Steven C.H. Hoi CHHOI@NTU.EDU.SG School of Computer Engineering Nanyang results. Therefore, the choice of an effective kernel plays a crucial role in many kernel based machine

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

131

CASIS: A System for Concept-Aware Social Image Search Ba Quan Truong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CASIS: A System for Concept-Aware Social Image Search Ba Quan Truong bqtruong@ntu.edu.sg Aixin Sun axsun@ntu.edu.sg Sourav S. Bhowmick assourav@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang the opportunity of building effective tag-based social image retrieval systems. In contrast to content-based image

Aixin, Sun

132

MEE 452: Example 3-2 ShellShell--andand--Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis:Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties (var. T) corrections UA, NTU & = #12;MathCAD S&T HX analysis 6 of 7 HX effectiveness = Qduty & Th minmaxminmax min ,;; ,min)()( C C NTU C UA NTU TC q q q CCCcmCcmC UA CHCpCHpH #12;Tube arrangement in shell

Kostic, Milivoje M.

133

978-1-4799-5230-4/14/$31.00 c2014 IEEE 1 High Performance Adaptive Routing for Network-on-Chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

99901100@ntu.edu.tw {enjui,yyjasmine,ckcraig}@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw andywu@ntu.edu.tw Abstract--The Network, to overcome the problem of Hotspot traffic, an effective network architecture and packet routing method channel based on network information. Therefore, in this paper, to effectively utilize the proposed

Hung, Shih-Hao

134

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 33, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 113 Path-Congestion-Aware Adaptive Routing with a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems become major performance bottlenecks. An effective adaptive routing algorithm can help minimize and improve the effectiveness of routing path selection. We propose a path- congestion-aware adaptive routing University, Taipei, Taiwan (e-mail: enjui@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw; ck- craig@access.ee.ntu.edu.tw; andywu@cc.ee.ntu

Hung, Shih-Hao

135

Will This #Hashtag Be Popular Tomorrow? Zongyang Ma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Will This #Hashtag Be Popular Tomorrow? Zongyang Ma zma4@e.ntu.edu.sg Aixin Sun axsun@ntu.edu.sg Gao Cong gaocong@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering Nanyang Technological University, Singapore this prediction problem as a classification problem and evaluate the effectiveness of the extracted features

Aixin, Sun

136

Affinity-Driven Prediction and Ranking of Products in Online Product Review Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Affinity-Driven Prediction and Ranking of Products in Online Product Review Sites Hui Li herolee@pmail.ntu.edu.sg Sourav S Bhowmick assourav@ntu.edu.sg Aixin Sun axsun@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering Nanyang applications. In this paper, we identify and ana- lyze an array of features that exert effect on product affin

Aixin, Sun

137

Multimedia Tools and Applications, 26, 191206, 2005 c 2005 Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. Manufactured in The Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Descriptor in Sports Video HAORAN YI pg03763623@ntu.edu.sg DEEPU RAJAN asdrajan@ntu.edu.sg LIANG-TIEN CHIA asltchia@ntu.edu.sg Center for Multimedia and Network Technology, School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang and multimedia database management techniques. The vast amount of content information calls for effective

Chia, Liang-Tien

138

2008 10th Intl. Conf. on Control, Automation, Robotics and Vision Hanoi, Vietnam, 1720 December 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

639798 1 liru0001@ntu.edu.sg, 1 su0001in@ntu.edu.sg, 2 ecszhang@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Current medical filter, named as Nakagami multiplicative adaptive filter (NaMAF), based on these models for effective effect and largest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when tested on phantom and in vivo images and least mean

Gabrieli, John

139

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2009 1295 A Progressive-ILP-Based Routing Algorithm for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of droplets at each time step. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and effective- ness of our University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (e-mail: r91089@csie.ntu.edu.tw; yangc@csie.ntu.edu.tw). S. S. Sapatnekar Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (e-mail: ywchang@cc.ee.ntu

Chang, Yao-Wen

140

Image Pre-conditioning for Out-of-Focus Projector Blur Michael S. Brown Peng Song Tat-Jen Cham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Computer Engineering Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 msbrown@ntu.edu.sg psong@pmail.ntu.edu.sg astjcham@ntu.edu.sg Abstract We present a technique to reduce image blur caused. Results show that using this technique can help ameliorate the vi- sual effects from out

Cham, Tat Jen

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141

Handling Ambiguity via Input-Output Kernel Learning Xinxing Xu Ivor W. Tsang Dong Xu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore xuxi0006@ntu.edu.sg IvorTsang@ntu.edu.sg dongxu@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Data ambiguities exist in many data mining and machine learning applications the effectiveness of our proposed IOKL framework. Keywords-Group Multiple Kernel Learning; Input-Output Kernel

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

142

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 27, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2008 2007 Multilayer Obstacle-Avoiding Rectilinear Steiner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an effective algorithm for the ML-OARSMT problem to facilitate the design flow. However, there is no existing, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (e-mail: enorm@eda.ee.ntu.edu.tw; aaron@eda.ee.ntu.edu.tw; bo27@ eda.ee.ntu.edu.tw). K.-C. Hsu was with the Department of Electrical Engineering, National

Chang, Yao-Wen

143

From Auditory and Visual to Immersive Neurofeedback: Application to Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea elgendi@ntu.edu.sg, jdauwels@ntu.edu.sg, fvialatte@brain.riken.jp, mconstable@ntu.edu.sg, cia@brain.riken.jp, Abstract. In neurofeedback, brain waves immersive activity is enjoyable, stimulating, and can have a healing effect. As an illustration

Cichocki, Andrzej

144

Effective Polynomial Families for Generating More Pairing-Friendly Elliptic Curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Effective Polynomial Families for Generating More Pairing-Friendly Elliptic Curves Pu Duan, Shi University Singapore dp@pmail.ntu.edu.sg cuishi@pmail.ntu.edu.sg ecwchan@ntu.edu.sg Abstract Finding suitable without restrictions on embedding degree k and cofactor h. We propose the idea of effective polynomial

145

PRISM: Concept-preserving Social Image Search Results Summarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRISM: Concept-preserving Social Image Search Results Summarization Boon-Siew Seah seah0097@ntu.edu.sg Sourav S Bhowmick assourav@ntu.edu.sg Aixin Sun axsun@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of prism against state-of- the-art image summarization

Aixin, Sun

146

iCare Project: Adopting Pervasive and Persuasive Computing for Assisted Cognition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University {hchu, yjhsu}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw 1 Introduction The iCare research aspects. In this white paper, we would like to share our experiences in the NTU iCare research projects be an effective means to assist behavior modification, especially for people with cognitive impairments. Not only

Ouhyoung, Ming

147

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL NETWORKS AND LEARNING SYSTEMS, VOL. 24, NO. 5, MAY 2013 749 Soft Margin Multiple Kernel Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improve the effectiveness of MKL, this paper presents a novel soft margin perspective for MKL recognition demonstrate that our proposed algorithms can efficiently achieve an effective yet sparse solution University, 639798, Singapore (e-mail: xuxi0006@ntu.edu.sg; IvorTsang@ntu.edu.sg; dongxu@ntu.edu.sg). Color

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

148

Practical strategies and insights for expanding collaboration, attracting funding and driving research outcomes in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University (NTU), Singapore Dr Kenji Shibuya Professor and Chair, Department of Global Health Policy.45 OPENING KEYNOTE Establishing an effective performance measurement for tertiary research · Measuring Technological University (NTU), Singapore Professor Khor was the Director of Research at NTU (2004- 2008

149

Content is Still King: The Effect of Neighbor Voting Schemes on Tag Relevance for Social Image Retrieval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Content is Still King: The Effect of Neighbor Voting Schemes on Tag Relevance for Social Image Retrieval Ba Quan Truong bqtruong@ntu.edu.sg Aixin Sun axsun@ntu.edu.sg Sourav S. Bhowmick assourav@ntuIR) experiences. One of the key issues in TagIR is to learn the effectiveness of a tag in de- scribing the visual

Aixin, Sun

150

December 15, 2000 / Vol. 25, No. 24 / OPTICS LETTERS 1777 Transport-based image reconstruction in turbid media with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- proximation to the radiative transport equation is then used to reconstruct an image of a 100-mm absorbing been used,4 and most are based on the diffusion approximation to the Boltzmann transport equationDecember 15, 2000 / Vol. 25, No. 24 / OPTICS LETTERS 1777 Transport-based image reconstruction

Boas, David

151

Amplitude and Phase of Tightly Focused Laser Beams in Turbid Media Carole K. Hayakawa and Vasan Venugopalan*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these important changes to the focal volume. Monte Carlo methods can be used to solve the radiative transport equation by simulating light propagation as the transport of photons that undergo scattering at discrete

Potma, Eric Olaf

152

ELSEVIER Analytica Chimica Acta 315 (1995) 123-135 Determination of phosphorus in turbid waters using alkaline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Japan No. 3 Chlorella and No. 2 Pond Sediment. Suspensions were prepared by adding these materials/l Chlorella suspensions were obtained using both autoclave and microwave heating. For the Pond Sediment peroxodisulphate digestion; Autoclave heating; Microwave heating; NIES Chlorella; NIES Pond Sediment; Phosphonates

Canberra, University of

153

Climate-driven chlorophyll-a changes in a turbid estuary: Observations from satellites and implications for management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Coastal ocean eutrophication has been reported). Algal blooms, mostly a typical result of eutrophication, are indicators of degraded water quality, 1999, 2003). In response to eutrophication, various government agencies and environmental groups have

Meyers, Steven D.

154

Nonlinear Neural Network-Based Mixture Model for Estimating the Concentration of Nitrogen Salts in Turbid Inland Waters Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by agricultural and industrial sources. The proposed neural network architecture consists of a modified multi of oceans, rivers, lakes, snow and glaciers. As a result, water pollution represents a major enviromental

Plaza, Antonio J.

155

Submitted to the Journal of Fluid Mechanics, January, 2005 Conditions under which a supercritical turbidity current traverses an abrupt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

slope can be expected to be subcritical. The transition from supercritical to subcritical flow a hydraulic jump to subcritical flow near the canyon-fan break, and then b) accelerate again to critical flow water across the Gibraltar Sill from the Mediterranean Sea into the Atlantic (e.g. Armi & Farmer, 1988

Parker, Gary

156

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-85 AN ATTEMPT TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTS OF AN ANTI-TURBIDITY SYSTEM ON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute for Pollution and Resources Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan Yoshikuni Okayama of such products for publicity or advertising purposes is not authorized. Contribution No. 1060 from NOAA of phytoplankton, adsorb and concentrate some pollutants such as toxic chemicals, promote the consumption of great

157

Automatic Photo Ranking Based on Esthetics Rules of Photography Wai-Seng Ng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ranking is effective. Furthermore, 2000 photos from dpchal- lenge website are used for training (1000 of cap- turing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as films or electronic e-mail: markng@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw e-mail: photo@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw e-mail: chyei@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw §e-mail: ¶e-mail: e

Ouhyoung, Ming

158

Prong Features Detection of a 3D Model Based on the Watershed Algorithm Bing-Yu Chen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detection, the water level decreases iteratively from the maximum value. The decreas- ing level effects is not in the traversed set, it is a new prong feature. The pseudo code is as follows: e-mail:{joyce, liang}@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw e-mail:robin@ntu.edu.tw e-mail:ming@csie.ntu.edu.tw Function watershed algorithm V =sort (S); //if

Ouhyoung, Ming

159

IEICE TRANS. COMMUN., VOL.E91B, NO.5 MAY 2008 INVITED PAPER Special Section on Communication Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as the level of distortion of voice signals, the effects of other factors like loudness and sidetone, can also) E-mail: r95921037@ntu.edu.tw b) E-mail: ktchen@iis.sinica.edu.tw c) E-mail: phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw d) E-mail: lei@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw This work was supported in part by Taiwan Informa- tion Security

Huang, Polly

160

Augmented Lagrangian method for generalized TV-Stokes model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducing stair-case effect. Keyword: TV-Stokes model, Augmented Lagrangian method, Image inpainting, Image and stair-case effect [6­10]. The authors [9] showed that the TV-L2 model never recover the same contrast-010 and MOE (Ministry of Education) Tier II project T207N2202. jyhahn@ntu.edu.sg CLWU@ntu.edu.sg §xctai@ntu

Soatto, Stefano

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161

Optimization Online - The Inexact Spectral Bundle Method for ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 2, 2010 ... e.ntu.edu.sg) ... with matrices of order up to 3000 are performed and the computational results establish the effectiveness of this method.

Lin Huiling

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - affairs division contingency Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Environmental Engineering, San Diego State University Collection: Engineering 57 NTU Incoming ExchangeVisiting Summary: Division R106 Graduate Academic Affairs...

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - ants-johannes martin lle Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Machine Learning for Graphics, Vision and Multimedia, 2006 Communication... @cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw 1. Dimensionality Reduction 2. MDS 3. Isomap 4. LLE 5. Isomap & LLE...

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced oral cavity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: nasopharynx ntu nasal turbinate olb olfactory bulb omt omentum opx oropharynx orc oral cavity orm oral mucosa... Appendix: Site codes Code Site --- all sites abc...

165

Turbidity Measurements: 2 calcium/pDNA and 2 phosphate/ PEG-PAA solutions (1 mL) preincubated at 25 C were directly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L) prepared at poly- mer concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 lg mL±1 were incubated for 24 h at 25 C]. The DLS measurements were carried out using a DLS-7000 instrument (Otsuka Electronics Co.). Vertically to 200 lg mL±1 were added as suspension in the medium to the semicon- fluent cellular monolayer

Lin, Zhiqun

166

Towards Practical Probabilistic Location Inference for Indoor Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Taiwan {b92901134, r97942100}@ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Abstract In this work, we highlight the truncation effect in Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) distributions. The effect is often overlooked of the approach is that the RSSI fingerprint captures not only the shadowing but also the multipath effect

Huang, Polly

167

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MULTIMEDIA 1 Scalable Face Image Retrieval using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effectiveness of different attributes and vital factors essential for face retrieval. Experimenting on two University (e-mail: sirius42@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw). Y.-Y. Chen is with the Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Taiwan University (e-mail: yanying@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw). Y.-H. Kuo

Hsu, Winston H.

168

School of Science and Technology PhD Scholarship in Investigating Dietary/Nutritional Interventions for Bone Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health at Nottingham Trent University. The proposed programme of work will examine the effects of dietary). Applying For informal enquiries about the studentship, please contact Dr Craig Sale ­ craig.sale@ntu.ac.uk or Dr Kevin Currell - kevin.currell@eis2win.co.uk For an application form, please email the NTU Graduate

Evans, Paul

169

410 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 36, NO. 1, JANUARY 2000 Erratum_______________________________________________________________________________________  

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, mutual impedance effect which is important in phased ar- ray coils [2] design and other coil meshes Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (e-mail: chen@me.ee.ntu.edu.tw; skjeng@ew.ee.ntu.edu.tw). W.-P. Kuan

170

Curvature Minimization for Surface Reconstruction with Features  

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Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371. {shij0004,wanm0003}@e.ntu.edu.sg, {xctai,desheng}@ntu indicate the robustness and effectiveness of the method. 1 Introduction Reconstructing a surface from in [35] and its variants prove the effectiveness of this methodology. The most popular regularization #12

Soatto, Stefano

171

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS FOR VIDEO TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 20, NO. 3, MARCH 2010 431 Face and Human Gait Recognition Using  

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demonstrate the effectiveness of our image-to-class distance. Index Terms--Face recognition, human gait are with the School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (e-mail: hu0005yi@ntu.edu.sg, dongxu@ntu.edu.sg). T.-J. Cham is with the Center for Multimedia and Network Technol- ogy, School

Xu, Dong

172

A Microscopic Examination of an RSSI-Signature-Based Indoor Localization System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taiwan University {b90901046, b91901152, sylau, r96944042} @ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT-based localization system, and conduct a detailed measurement study on the effect of antenna orientation, obstacle, and beacon density to RSSI signatures instability. We find that (1) the effect of antenna orientation

Huang, Polly

173

Text detection: Effect of size and eccentricity Chien-Hui Kao and Chien-Chung Chen*  

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Text detection: Effect of size and eccentricity Chien-Hui Kao and Chien-Chung Chen* Psychology. The spatial summation paradigm has been used to * c3chen@ntu.edu.tw; phone 886 2 33664462; fax 886 2 23639909; http://vnl.psy.ntu.edu.tw Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XVI, edited by Bernice E. Rogowitz

Chen, Chein Chung

174

Vice Chancellor's PhD Scholarships School of Science and Technology  

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leading to oxidative damage. The main aim is to study the effects of MPTP and other mitochondria contact Dr Alan Hargreaves ­ alan.hargreaves@ntu.ac.uk Please return completed application forms, with copies of academic certificates, to: gradschool@ntu.ac.uk The closing date for receipt of completed

Evans, Paul

175

School of Science and Technology Investigation of laser processing of thin films for potential plasmonic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, digital storage media, computer chips, and sensors. At NTU we have developed a laser processing technique-263). The PhD programme will utilise this technique to investigate the effect of materials properties vs laser enquiries about the studentship, please contact Dr Demosthenes Koutsogeorgis ­ demosthenes.koutsogeorgis@ntu

Evans, Paul

176

Exploring Aggregate Effect with Weighted Transcoding Graphs for Efficient Cache Replacement in Transcoding Proxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploring Aggregate Effect with Weighted Transcoding Graphs for Efficient Cache Replacement University Taipei, Taiwan, ROC E-mail: {cychang@arbor.ee.ntu.edu.tw; mschen@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw} Abstract This paper explores the aggregate effect when caching multiple versions of the same Web object

Chen, Ming-Syan

177

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY -INVESTING IN EXCELLENCE VICE-CHANCELLOR'S PHD SCHOLARSHIP SCHEME 2014 & SCHOOL PHD SCHOLARSHIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest in establishing effective ways of managing floods that work with, rather than against, natural: Dr Jillian Labadz, tel. 01636 817017 or email jillian.labadz@ntu.ac.uk This project has been selected and the competition are available at: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/research/graduate_school/studentships/index.html #12;For

Evans, Paul

178

A TEST OF EARTHQUAKE EARLY WARNING SYSTEM USING LOW COST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail: drymwu@ntu.edu.tw 2 Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 70101 Tainan, Taiwan Abstract The earthquake early warning (EEW) research group at the National Taiwan University (NTU) and one is available, a cost-effective seismic network dedicated to EEW or rapid re- porting is highly favored

Wu, Yih-Min

179

902 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL NETWORKS AND LEARNING SYSTEMS, VOL. 23, NO. 6, JUNE 2012 Laplacian Embedded Regression for Scalable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and effectively cope with large scale SSL problems. Extensive experiments on both toy and real world data sets show the effectiveness and scalability of the proposed framework. Index Terms--Laplacian embedding Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798, Singapore (e-mail: chen0631@ntu.edu.sg; ivortsang@ntu

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

180

Nottingham Business School A study of senior practitioners' everyday work of appraising `risk' and making  

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services sector, senior management teams and their capability to steer the `organization' effectively has enquiries about the studentship, please contact Professor Dalvir Samra-Fredericks ­ dalvir.samra- fredericks@ntu.ac.uk or the Postgraduate Research Tutor Dr Néstor Valero-Silva ­ nestor.valero.silva@ntu.ac.uk. Application packs can

Evans, Paul

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181

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

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SPEAKER Dr. Derek Larson Postdoctoral researcher, Department of Physics, NTU PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract The study of structural glasses remains a difficult problem in condensed, I show how the phase structure depends on the effective system dimension. We use one

Wu, Yih-Min

182

2006200620062006 Taiwan-Korea Plasma Conference 2006  

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/16-1/18 Place: NTU (1/16) NCHC(1/17 -18) 1/16 PSROC@NTU 10:00-13:00 Registration and Lunch 13:00-19:00 Plasma/NTHU, HsinChu, Taiwan Optical tunneling effect of localized surface plasmon: A simulation study using

Hsu, Jang-Yu

183

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

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. 17, 14:30 ~ 15:30 TITLE Effective Medium Model for Dielectric Metamaterials SPEAKER Dr. Ruey-Lin Chern Institute of Applied Mechanics, NTU PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract to characterize the properties of metamateials is through the effective parameters. The effective medium model

Wu, Yih-Min

184

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY CODE OF PRACTICE ON FREEDOM OF SPEECH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/3 NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY CODE OF PRACTICE ON FREEDOM OF SPEECH Effective from 18 June 2013 1.2. In common with other Higher Education Institutions, Nottingham Trent University (NTU) has certain legal and regulatory obligations to protect freedom of lawful speech and expression. 1.3. NTU is also committed (as

Evans, Paul

185

NEW AND GROWING INEQUALITIES: A CHALLENGE FOR THE SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the question of NTU serves to make more explicit and operational the managerial concern with the effectiveness and effects in terms of non-take-up 1. Socio-economic criteria 2. Behavioural criteria III. Institutional the reasons for no demand. IV. Discussion: How to combat NTU to reduce social inequalities in Europe

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

186

Vice Chancellor's PhD Scholarships School of Science and Technology  

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, over time their effectiveness decreases. There is therefore urgent need to develop strategies that work ­ mark.turner@ntu.ac.uk Please return completed application forms, with copies of academic certificates, to: gradschool@ntu.ac.uk The closing date for receipt of completed application forms is 9 am, Friday

Evans, Paul

187

Research in Psychology The Division of Psychology produces high quality research across the broad range of the discipline. Our work fits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and developmental disorders such as autism or dyslexia. Psychology research at NTU has been funded by prestigious projects. For more complete information you should contact thomas.baguley@ntu.ac.uk. Super-fast perceivers to process very rapidly changing images more effectively than others? The student will use behavioural

Evans, Paul

188

School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment The Influence of Economic Forces, Finance, and Government Policy on  

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to an increase in asset wealth. The market has also been subject to the effects of policy change and financial «Professor Michael White_» (email michael.white@ntu.ac.uk» or telephone «0115 8482069»). To download, with copies of academic certificates, to: gradschool@ntu.ac.uk The closing date for receipt of completed

Evans, Paul

189

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL TITLE: Teacher training for postgraduate research students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTIVE DATE: 1 October 2013 1. INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT 1.1. It is widely recognised that the basis to be considered for participation in teaching activities at NTU. 2.2. Teaching: For the purpose of this policy Framework (D) and access to the Higher Education Academy. 7. POLICY STATEMENTS 7.1. NTU therefore seeks

Evans, Paul

190

School of Science & Technology Protecting pancreatic b-cell function in Type 2 diabetes  

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. The resulting chronic hyperglycaemia can have damaging effects on a number of organs and tissues, including enquiries about the studentship, please contact Dr. Luigi De Girolamo ­ luigi.de-girolamo@ntu completed application forms, with copies of academic certificates to: gradschool@ntu.ac.uk The closing date

Evans, Paul

191

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY -INVESTING IN EXCELLENCE VICE-CHANCELLOR'S PHD SCHOLARSHIP SCHEME 2014 & SCHOOL PHD SCHOLARSHIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& SCHOOL PHD SCHOLARSHIPS (entry in 2015/16) SCHOOL: ARES PROJECT TITLE: The effect of restoration: Dr Ben Clutterbuck; ben.clutterbuck@ntu.ac.uk This project has been selected for consideration: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/research/graduate_school/studentships/index.html For information on entry

Evans, Paul

192

A Semi-Empirical Model for Porous Media Heat Exchanger Design Richard A. Wirtz1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the effectiveness of the porous wall are always maximum when it is operated with the number of transfer units of the porous matrix greater than two (ntu 2). Furthermore, if the porous matrix is composed of a packed bed matrix is minimum when ntu 2. This suggest that for many design requirements, the porous media exchanger

Wirtz, Richard A.

193

Boost Your CV! Training, Volunteering, Careers and Further Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Team at NTU run a number of workshops to support maths and study skills. For example: Time Management: Building Your CV, Managing Projects, Application Forms, Effective Communication, Perfect Presentations and many more ILM accredited modules. NTU Career Development Centre A range of activities are provided

Evans, Paul

194

Surface Reconstruction with Feature Preservation based on Graph-cuts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

features. The effectiveness of the weighted minimal surface model E(S) is examined in the tetrahedral mesh is a very close approximation to the global minimum of EC (S). Various examples show the effectiveness Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371. E-mail: wanm0003@e.ntu.edu.sg, {desheng,xctai}@ntu

Soatto, Stefano

195

Cleopatra: Evolutionary Pattern-based Clustering of Web Usage Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cleopatra: Evolutionary Pattern-based Clustering of Web Usage Data Qiankun Zhao1 Sourav S Bhowmick1 Le Gruenwald2 1 CAIS, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 2 University of Oklahoma, Norman, USA qkzhao@pmail.ntu.edu.sg assourav@ntu.edu.sg ggruenwald@ou.edu Abstract. Existing web usage mining

Bhowmick, Sourav S.

196

HeatProbe: a Thermal-based Power Meter System for Tracking Per-user Power Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeatProbe: a Thermal-based Power Meter System for Tracking Per-user Power Consumption Nan-Chen Chen Technology Innovation, Academic Sinica2 {b97006, b96118, b95701241}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, cwyou@citi.sinica.edu.tw, hchu@csie.ntu.edu.tw, mschen@citi.sinica.edu.tw Abstract. This paper proposes HeatProbe, a per

Chu, Hao-hua

197

TR-IIS-07-004 Point-of-Care Support for  

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and support environment needed to increase the effectiveness of such devices in prevention of medication91004, xx}@csie.ntu.edu.tw. P. H. Tsai and C. Y. Yu are affiliated with Department of Computer Science

Chen, Sheng-Wei

198

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

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, National Taiwan Normal University PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract We study the effect of chemical modifications on electron transport of CNT-based nano-electronics. In the first part

Wu, Yih-Min

199

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2011.09.23.02(T) * Corresponding author  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2011.09.23.02(T) * Corresponding author E-mail: cchan@ntu.edu.tw Terr. Atmos, directivity, high fault strength, a slapdown phase, and hanging wall effect. The Darfield sequence case

Wu, Yih-Min

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - aura poelien stefa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MyAura. The MobiSpace is a virtual space where every entity can express... @csie.ntu.edu.tw 12;Figure 1. The MobiSpace constructed by MyAura of entities in the ......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 14:30 ~ 15:30 TITLE Computational Study of the Substitution Effect on the Mechanism for the Aza Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract The aza-, phospha- and arsa-Wittig reactions HM=PH3

Wu, Yih-Min

202

ORIGINAL PAPER A new procedure to best-fit earthquake magnitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

probability, and its effectiveness is demonstrated in this paper. The result shows that the optimal b value, Taipei, Taiwan e-mail: drymwu@ntu.edu.tw S.-C. Chang Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong

Wu, Yih-Min

203

2004 8th International Conference on Control, Automation, Robotics and Vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Avenue, Singapore 639798. Email: etsho@ntu.edu.sg Abstract In this paper, a fragile watermarking method. Simulation results arc presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed scheme. 1

Doran, Simon J.

204

Differential Privacy via Wavelet Transforms Xiaokui Xiao, Guozhang Wang, and Johannes Gehrke,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

show the effectiveness and efficiency of our solution. Index Terms--Privacy Preserving Data Publishing of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798. E-mail: xkxiao@ntu

Keinan, Alon

205

HIGH-FREQUENCY MAGNETOCAPACITANCE EFFECT IN ORGANIC SPIN VALVE WITH A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGH-FREQUENCY MAGNETOCAPACITANCE EFFECT IN ORGANIC SPIN VALVE WITH A 3,4,9,10-PERYLENE Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan *mtlin@phys.ntu

Lin, Minn-Tsong

206

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.05.30.01(T) * Corresponding author  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.05.30.01(T) * Corresponding author E-mail: drymwu@ntu.edu.tw Terr. Atmos City. The earthquakes occur- ring in southern Taiwan, due to considerable site effects along

Wu, Yih-Min

207

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Ming Lu National Center for High Performance Computing PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU and buckling strains of a single- and multi-walled carbon nanotube and the effect from fixed boundary layers

Wu, Yih-Min

208

A Scenario-Based Distributed Stochastic MPC for Building Temperature Regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

show the effectiveness of our results. I. INTRODUCTION From the United Nations environment programme Technological University, Singapore 639798 {ylong002, lius0025, elhxie}@ntu.edu.sg 2K. H. Johansson

Johansson, Karl Henrik

209

r Human Brain Mapping 30:18771886 (2009) r Dynamic GrangerGeweke Causality Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requires a measure of effective connectivity. Previ- ously, structural equation modeling (SEM) has been, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan. E-mail: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw or fhlin@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu Received

210

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Previous ammonia oxidation studies reported ca. 100 a maximum of 65% at the highest temperature (773 K) and effective oxygen-to-ammonia ratio of 140, whereas

Wu, Yih-Min

211

iReduct: Differential Privacy with Reduced Relative Errors Xiaokui Xiao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

xkxiao@ntu.edu.sg Department of Computer Science Cornell University Ithaca, NY, USA {gbender. Experiments on real data demonstrate the effectiveness of our solution. Categories and Subject Descriptors H.2

Keinan, Alon

212

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building, NTU Abstract We develop the quantum theory for the electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT of the Fermi sea can destroy the EIT effect even at zero temperature. This quantum EIT property is mostly

Wu, Yih-Min

213

Large-Scale Video Summarization Using Web-Image Priors Aditya Khosla  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

}@ebay.com, cjlin@csie.ntu.edu.tw Abstract Given the enormous growth in user-generated videos, it is becoming crowdsourcing. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our evaluation framework by comparing its performance

Oliva, Aude

214

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics Building, NTU Abstract We report on theoretical studies of point mutations effects on charge the tumour-suppressor gene p53. On the basis of effective single-strand or double strand tight-binding models

Wu, Yih-Min

215

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract fields. We have circumvented this limitation by generating an effective vector gauge potential

Wu, Yih-Min

216

856 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 51, NO. 3, MARCH 2003 A Generalized Higher Order Finite-Difference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and effectiveness of proposed scheme. Index Terms--Discrete singular convolution (DSC), finite difference time of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798; (e-mail: ezhshao@ntu

Wei, Guo-Wei

217

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.01.22.01(T) * Corresponding author  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2013.01.22.01(T) * Corresponding author E-mail: cchan@ntu.edu.tw Terr. Atmos the path and site effect using ground motion prediction equations, a proba- bilistic seismic hazard

Wu, Yih-Min

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric boost invariant Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Haar features using statistics in boosting-based face detection Minh... , astjcham@ntu.edu.sg Abstract Training a cascade-based face detector using boosting and Haar...

219

Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SQUID sensors demonstrate the effectiveness of this data consistency constraint and sparsity prior-mail: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw Introduction MRI has become an indispensible resource in clinical medicine because

220

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building, NTU Abstract The local-density approximation (LDA) to the ground-state density functional theory being important to reproduce the excitonic effect. We also present illustrative calculations

Wu, Yih-Min

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Copyright (c) 2013 IEEE. Personal use is permitted. For any other purposes, permission must be obtained from the IEEE by emailing pubs-permissions@ieee.org. This article has been accepted for publication in a future issue of this journal, but has not been  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed SND scheme in conjunction with the RDMA protocol Technological University, 639798, Singapore. Email:rxlu@ntu.edu.sg. · J. Qiao and X. Shen

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

222

Differential Privacy via Wavelet Transforms Xiaokui Xiao Guozhang Wang, Johannes Gehrke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technological University Cornell University Singapore Ithaca, USA xkxiao@ntu.edu.sg {guoz, johannes show the effectiveness and efficiency of our solution. I. INTRODUCTION The boisterous sea of liberty

Keinan, Alon

223

Increasing fMRI Sampling Rate Improves Granger Causality Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials. * Email: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw Introduction measures of effective connectivity [1­3]. Previously, effective connectivity analyses of human PET [4

224

Tailoring the Lasing Modes in Semiconductor Nanowire Cavities Using Intrinsic Self-Absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groundbreaking work on utilizing semiconductor NW cavities to compensate the damping loss and amplify Division of Microelectronics, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N), Nanyang Technological University, 50

Xiong, Qihua

225

Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue gas streams to electricity. The NTU-effectiveness method, exergy, and ...

Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Page 1 of 5 Ngai Yin Yip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hillhouse Ave 306 ­ New Haven, CT, US 06511 Phone: +1 203 432 8110 / +1 203 435 0120 Email: ngaiyin: Professor Darren Sun Delai, NTU Thesis: Removal of indium from semiconductor industrial wastewater using

Elimelech, Menachem

227

TESTING OF A ROTARY MICROFILTER TO SUPPORT HANFORD APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers are investigating and developing a rotary microfilter for solid-liquid separation applications at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the success of that work, the Hanford Site is evaluating the use of the rotary microfilter for its Supplemental Pretreatment process. The authors performed rotary filter testing with a full-scale, 25-disk unit with 0.5 {micro} filter media manufactured by Pall Corporation using a Hanford AN-105 simulant at solids loadings of 0.06, 0.29, and 1.29 wt%. The conclusions from this testing are: (1) The filter flux at 0.06 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.26 gpm/ft{sup 2} (6.25 gpm total). (2) The filter flux at 0.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.17 gpm/ft{sup 2} (4 gpm total). (3) The filter flux at 1.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.10 gpm/ft{sup 2} (2.4 gpm total). (4) Because of differences in solids loadings, a direct comparison between crossflow filter flux and rotary filter flux is not possible. The data show the rotary filter produces a higher flux than the crossflow filter, but the improvement is not as large as seen in previous testing. (5) Filtrate turbidity measured < 4 NTU in all samples collected. (6) During production, the filter should be rinsed with filtrate or dilute caustic and drained prior to an extended shutdown to prevent the formation of a layer of settled solids on top of the filter disks. (7) Inspection of the seal faces after {approx} 140 hours of operation showed an expected amount of initial wear, no passing of process fluid through the seal faces, and very little change in the air channeling grooves on the stationary face. (8) Some polishing was observed at the bottom of the shaft bushing. The authors recommend improving the shaft bushing by holding it in place with a locking ring and incorporated grooves to provide additional cooling. (9) The authors recommend that CH2MHill Hanford test other pore size media to determine the optimum pore size for Hanford waste.

Poirier, M; David Herman, D; David Stefanko, D; Samuel Fink, S

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

TESTING AND EVALUATION OF THE MODIFIED DESIGN OF THE 25-DISK ROTARY MICROFILTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details redesign of a commercially available rotary microfilter to meet the operational and maintenance requirements for radioactive service. Personnel developed the design and coordinated procurement of two filters followed by testing of one unit. System testing examined the ability to rinse soluble material from the system, filtration performance using several insoluble solids loadings, effectiveness in washing sludge, amount of wear to parts and maintenance of the system including the insertion and removal of the filter stack, and the ability to flush solids from the system. The test program examined flushing the filter for soluble material by filling the system with a Rhodamine WT dye solution. Results showed that draining the system and rinsing with 50 gallons of water resulted in grater than 100X reduction of the dye concentration. Personnel determined filter performance using various amounts of insoluble sludge solids ranging from 0.06 to 15 weight percent (wt%) insoluble solids in a 3 molar (M) sodium simulated supernate. Through approximately 120 hours of start-and-stop (i.e., day shift) operation and various insoluble solids loadings, the filter produced filtration rates between 3 and 7 gallons per minute (gpm) (0.12-0.29 gpm/ft{sup 2}) for a 25-disk filter. Personnel washed approximately 80 gallons of simulated sludge using 207 gallons of inhibited water. Washing occurred at constant volume with wash water fed to a well mixed tank at the same rate as filtrate removal. Performance measurement involved collecting and analyzing samples throughout the washing for density and sodium content. Results showed an effective washing, mimicking a predicted dilution calculation for a well mixed tank and reducing the sodium concentration from 3.2 M to less than 0.3 M. Filtration rates during the washing process ranged between 3 and 4.3 gpm for one filter unit. The filter system then concentrated the washed 15 wt% insoluble solids slurry to approximately 20 wt% insoluble solids with no operational problems with the exception of the entrainment of air due to leaking packing in the feed pump. Prior to the air entrainment, the filtration rate was approximately 4.2 gpm for one filter assembly with the process fluid temperature adjusted to 35 C. Personnel measured the turbidity of filtrate samples from all phases of testing. All samples measured were less than 3 NTU, with the majority of samples less than 1 NTU. Thus, all measurements fell below the process acceptance criterion of less than 5 NTU. After slurry operations, personnel rinsed the filter with the equivalent of 250 gallons of water by re-circulating 50 gallons of water. The residual sludge solids remaining on the filter stack weighed approximately 685 grams. This amount of solids corresponds to an equivalent activity of 15.1 curies (Ci) beta and 0.38 Ci gamma radiation dose for Sludge Batch 4. Workers completely disassembled the filter system and examined it for signs of wear and component operation. An evaluation by a John Crane Inc. representative concluded that the wear observed on the mechanical seal resulted primarily from the numerous stops and starts, the abrasive nature of the process fluid and the possibility that the seal faces did not receive enough lubrication from the process fluid. No measurable slurry bypassed the mechanical seal. While it is extremely difficult to predict the life of the seal, the vendor representative indicates a minimum of one year in present service is reasonable. Changing the seal face material from silicon-carbide to a graphite-impregnated silicon-carbide is expected to double the life of the seal. Replacement with an air seal might be expected to increase lifetime to five years. The bottom bushing showed wear due to a misalignment during the manufacture of the filter tank. Minor adjustments to the alignment with shims and replacement of the graphite bushing with a superior material will greatly reduce this wear pattern.

Herman, D; Michael Poirier, M; Samuel Fink, S

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

229

Experimental determination of the boundary condition for diffuse photons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a turbid medium, the light transport is described by the diffusion approxima- tion of the radiative of a turbid medium within a few transport mean free paths, the diffusion equation is no longer satisfied light transport through a turbid (i.e., highly scatter- ing) medium and in imaging objects

Zhu, Xiangdong

230

Vice Chancellor's PhD Scholarships School of Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through a complex interplay of effects. This proposal investigates replacing coffee with "active, category 1, room temperature and bioluminescent. We will experimentally investigate the effect of bacterial enquiries about the scholarship, please contact Dr David Fairhurst ­ david.fairhurst@ntu.ac.uk Please return

Evans, Paul

231

Spectro-Microscopic Study of Laser-Modified Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an integrated device.(10) The types *mtlin@phys.ntu.edu.tw 11 #12;2 Carbon Nanotubes of chemical modification active position for effective hybrid utilization. In terms of the chemical modification in field emission experiments, plasma effect,(12) heat process,(13) and laser effect(14) are found to be effective methods

Lin, Minn-Tsong

232

US-Taiwan Workshop on Smart Structural Technology for Seismic Hazard Mitigation Taipei, Taiwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The experiments also successfully validate the effectiveness of the decentralized output feedback control-active hydraulic dampers. The simulation analysis investigates the effects of communication latencies and degrees Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 6 Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National

Lynch, Jerome P.

233

EUROGRAPHICS 2005 / M. Alexa and J. Marks (Guest Editors)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

features. We compare our algorithm with other marching cubes variants and demonstrate its effectiveness hardware, but it is not an effective representation for time-varying applications and for performing a convenient and efficient way to convert the volumetric data e-mail:{murphyho, joyce}@cmlab.csie.ntu

Ouhyoung, Ming

234

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng 2006; 65:734751  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEY WORDS: surface of Wales Swansea, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, U.K. E-mail: desheng.wang@swansea.ac.uk, desheng@ntu

Wang, Desheng

235

Bounded Randomness Paul Brodhead1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kmng@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. We introduce some new variations of the notions of being Martin-L¨of random effective betting, effective regularities or effective compression. Exactly what we mean here by "effective to calibrate no- tions of randomness by varying the notion of effectivity. For example, classical Martin

Ng, Keng Meng "Selwyn"

236

Impact of Operational Practices on Rail Line Capacity: A Simulation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@illinois.edu, yclai@ntu.edu.tw, cbarkan@illinois.edu ABSTRACT Long-term demand for freight and passenger is critical for cost-effective planning of new capacity. A key aspect of this is the effect of heterogeneous conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various operational changes to reduce delays. The trade

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

237

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 87, 013843 (2013) Noise properties of coherent perfect absorbers and critically coupled resonators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the above "CPA theorem" is rigorously true within classical electromagnetic theory, where the effects effectiveness in this role are determined by quantum and thermal noise, which are the subjects of the present temperature, and there is no direct * yidong@ntu.edu.sg analog of the ST linewidth in a CPA. At zero

Cao, Hui

238

Interaction Design Patterns For Multi-touch Tabletop Collaborative Games  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effectiveness of the proposed interaction designs in trials involving two groups of children with contrasting to be effective in soliciting collaborative play on interactive tabletops. Author Keywords Multi Nanyang Technological University Singapore 639798 aswbgoh@ntu.edu.sg Wei Shou School of Computer

Goh, Wooi Boon

239

RANSAC Matching: Simultaneous Registration and Segmentation Shao-Wen Yang, Chieh-Chih Wang and Chun-Hua Chang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

segmentation errors. By explicitly taking into account the various noise sources degrading the effective- ness. The improved segmentation can also be used as the basis for higher level scene understanding. The effectiveness, 10617 Taiwan any@pal.csie.ntu.edu.tw Chieh-Chih Wang is with Faculty of the Department of Computer

Wang, Chieh-Chih "Bob"

240

Measurement of flow maldistribution in parallel channels and its application to ex-situ and in-situ experiments in PEMFC water management studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to sig- nificant reduction in effectiveness for high NTU heat exchangers [1], about 7% for condensers in the effective operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Presently there are a few theoretically effects, two-phase separation and resultant flow non-uniformity. (b) Uneven flow resistances

Kandlikar, Satish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng 2011; 85:206229  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be handled effectively as well. Furthermore, for the first time, multi-phase surface reconstruction and effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Received 3 December 2009; Revised Technological University, Singapore 637371, Singapore. E-mail: desheng@ntu.edu.sg Copyright 2010 John Wiley

Frey, Pascal

242

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MULTIMEDIA, VOL. 14, NO. 4, AUGUST 2012 1079 Unsupervised Semantic Feature Discovery for Image  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and visual image graphs in an unsupervised manner. We investigate the effectiveness of the framework when, and tag refinement. Experimental results confirm that the proposed framework effectively improves the per-mail: kuonini@cmlab.csie.ntu. edu.tw). W.-H. Cheng is with Research Center for Information Technology Innova

Hsu, Winston H.

243

Proceedingsof the American Control Conference Chicago, Illinois June 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hangzhou, 310027, P. R. China jwu@iipc .zju.edu.cn Gang Li The school of EEE Singapore egli@ntu are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the pro- posed strategy. Index Terms-Finite word length-point arith- metic. The FWL effects have been well studied in digital sig- nal processing, especially

Chen, Sheng

244

Recent developments in biological reporter technology 41 Recent Developments of Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to efficiently report the activation of particular messenger cascades and their effects on gene expression and Genetic Engineering Reviews - Vol. 25, 41-76 (2008) *To whom correspondence may be addressed (Bengang@ntu will make it possible to understand the molecular basis of diseases, track the effectiveness

Xing, Bengang

245

NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY -INVESTING IN EXCELLENCE VICE-CHANCELLOR'S PHD SCHOLARSHIP SCHEME 2014 & SCHOOL PHD SCHOLARSHIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

welfare and performance in the equestrian industry. Recent research carried out at NTU has identified-Harrison has studied personality and associated effects on survival, fitness and movement in a variety of species. Current studies include investigating the effect of personality on group cohesion in reintroduced

Evans, Paul

246

A Distributed MAC Scheme Supporting Voice Services in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Waterloo, Canada Email: hai.jiang@ece.ualberta.ca, wangping@ntu.edu.sg, poor results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. Index Terms ­ medium access control, code-time nature of voice traffic); and 4) adaptive to user mobility. In this paper, we propose an effective MAC

Zhuang, Weihua

247

Vice Chancellor's PhD Scholarships School of Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduced metastasis development and mortality. There is evidence of similar effects in prostate cancer and malignant melanoma. This multidisciplinary project is directed at the discovery of therapeutically effective Wallis ­ john.wallis@ntu.ac.uk Please return completed application forms, with copies of academic

Evans, Paul

248

Effective Cerebral Connectivity during Silent Speech Reading Revealed by Functional Magnetic Resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective Cerebral Connectivity during Silent Speech Reading Revealed by Functional Magnetic Y-H, Lin F-H, Chou Y-J, Tsai KW-K, Kuo W-J, et al. (2013) Effective Cerebral Connectivity during that no competing interests exist. * E-mail: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw . These authors contributed equally to this work

249

Efficient Video Authentication for H.264/AVC School of Electrical and Electronic Engineer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineer Nanyang Technology University 639798 Singapore jingzjang@pmail.ntu.edu.sg Anthony T. S. Ho School the tampering by the sensitive mode change. And the experimental results prove the effectiveness the algorithm the effectiveness the algorithm. The rest of this paper is organized as follows. Sec- tion 2 provides the reader

Doran, Simon J.

250

Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model...

Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A moving-mesh relaxation scheme for one-dimensional barotropic two-phase flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. However, due to the non-monotonic behavior of the mixture sound speed (denoted by c) ver- sus the volume-mail: shyue@math.ntu.edu.tw 1 Introduction Cavitation is commonly defined as a phenomenon in a liquid-flowing system when the pressure of the liquid falls sufficiently low in some re- gion of the flow so that vapor

Shyue, Keh-Ming

252

Complexity of Dependencies in Bounded Domains, Armstrong Codes, and Generalizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complexity of Dependencies in Bounded Domains, Armstrong Codes, and Generalizations Yeow Meng Chee University, Singapore email: {ymchee, huizhang, xiandezhang}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--The study of Armstrong systems, where attributes have bounded domains. A (q, k, n)-Armstrong code is a q-ary code of length n

Chee, Yeow Meng

253

Refactoring MATLAB Soroush Radpour1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refactoring MATLAB Soroush Radpour1,2 , Laurie Hendren2 , and Max Sch¨afer3 1 Google, Inc. soroush of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore schaefer@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. MATLAB and students world-wide. MATLAB programs are often developed incrementally using a mixture of MATLAB scripts

254

Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 703-722, December 2006 Distribution of Gassy Sediments and Mud Volcanoes Offshore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediments and Mud Volcanoes Offshore Southwestern Taiwan Jui-Kun Chiu 1 , Wei-Hao Tseng 1 , and Char@ntu.edu.tw This study presents the results from recent intense marine geophysical surveys conducted offshore: offshore Kaohsiung, adjacent to the Kaoping Submarine Canyon, near the head of the Fangliao Submarine

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

255

Electrically switchable phase-type fractal zone plates and fractal photon sieves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@psu.edu (T. J. H.); exwsun@ntu.edu.sg (X. W. S.) Abstract: Electrically switchable phase-type fractal zoneElectrically switchable phase-type fractal zone plates and fractal photon sieves Yan Jun Liu,1 Hai­1323 (2004). 9. H. T. Dai, J. H. Liu, X. C. Sun, and D. J. Yin, "Programmable fractal zone plates (Fra

256

This article was published in an Elsevier journal. The attached copy is furnished to the author for non-commercial research and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

author. E-mail address: wenshan@ntu.edu.tw (W.-S. Chen). 0012-821X/$ - see front matter. Published , Yen-Chiu Liu c , Yen-Hui Lin c a Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan ROC b

Chen, Wen-Shan

257

30 MEET & GREET bring skills that we truly believe will change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to this project? It was the ability to create revolutionary computing technologies with deep roots in physics that are "nanometres" in size. Is size all that matters? No, the research is an NTU-funded $4 million project to find Asian core. I had many challenging activities at what is now A*STAR [Agency for Science, Technology

Mellor-Crummey, John

258

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development and Benchmark of New Multi-Coefficient Double-Hybrid Density Functional Theory with SCS-MP2 and MP Cheng University PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract We have developed a series. The performance of MC-DFT can be further improved combining energies from ab initio MP2 and SCS-MP2 calculation

Wu, Yih-Min

259

Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flexibility, and light-weight. The BHJ layer featuring a nanoscale interpenetrating network of electron donor, 14:30 ~ 15:30 TITLE Probe Nanoscale Morphologies of Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cell from Sinica PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar

Wu, Yih-Min

260

Motivated Learning for the Development of Autonomous Systems$ Janusz A. Starzyka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated Learning for the Development of Autonomous Systems$ Janusz A. Starzyka , James T. Grahama in part by the Singapore National Re- search Foundation Interactive Digital Media R&D Program, under@ohio.edu (James T. Graham), pawel.raif@polsl.pl (Pawel Raif), asahtan@ntu.edu.sg (Ah-Hwee Tan

Tan, Ah-Hwee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Web Unit Mining Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Centre for Advanced Information Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Web Unit Mining ­ Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Web Pages Aixin Sun Centre for Advanced Technological University Singapore, 639798 aseplim@ntu.edu.sg ABSTRACT In web classification, most researchers assume that the ob- jects to classify are individual web pages from one or more web sites. In practice

Aixin, Sun

262

Stresa, Italy, 25-27 April 2007 DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A DIAPHRAGM MICRO-PUMP WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stresa, Italy, 25-27 April 2007 DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A DIAPHRAGM MICRO-PUMP@ntu.edu.tw, 8862-23629976 ABSTRACT In this study, a new type of thin, compact, and light weighed diaphragm micro-pump-diaphragm pump with two valves is fabricated in an aluminum case by using highly accurate CNC machine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

263

INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS AND BEYOND IN BRAIN IMAGING: EEG, MEG, FMRI, AND PET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS AND BEYOND IN BRAIN IMAGING: EEG, MEG, FMRI, AND PET Jagath C Technological University, Singapore ¾ Laboratory of Advanced Brain Signal Processing, Brain Science Institute@ntu.edu.sg, cia@bsp.brain.riken.go.jp, vdavidsanchez@earthlink.net Abstract There is an increasing interest

Vialatte, François

264

Administration and Service Buildings Instructional Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Swimming Pool Mathematics Research Center Bldg. Dept. of Psychology (South Hall. B Incubation Center Bldg. C Bike Pound Si-Yuan Hall Halcyon House Bldg. No. 1 Agricultural Exhibition Hall New Moon Pavilion NTU Visitor Center Lesyue Bldg. Old Main Library College of Liberal Arts

Hung, Shih-Hao

265

Administration and Service Buildings Instructional Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Yuan Hall Halcyon House Bldg. No. 1 Agricultural Exhibition Hall New Moon Pavilion NTU Visitor Center Lesyue - Mathematics Bldg. Shih-Liang Hall Computer and Information Networking Center Dept. of Mathematics Dept. of Chemistry Freshman Classroom Bldg. 9th Women's Dorm 8th Women's Dorm Dept. of Psychology (North Hall

Hung, Shih-Hao

266

Placement of Digital Microfluidic Biochips Using the T-tree Formulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Placement of Digital Microfluidic Biochips Using the T-tree Formulation Ping-Hung Yuh, chia@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT Droplet-based microfluidic biochips have recently gained much attention and are expected that adopts a topological representation to solve the placement problem of digital microfluidic biochips

Chang, Yao-Wen

267

Green-Aware Workload Scheduling in Geographically Distributed Data Centers Changbing Chen, Bingsheng He, Xueyan Tang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: {chchangb, bshe, asxytang}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Renewable (or green) energy, such as solar or wind, has with renewable energy sources. While green energy supply for a single data center is intermittent due to daily/seasonal effects, our workload scheduling algorithm is aware of different amounts of green energy supply

Tang, Xueyan

268

Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Oldenburg (Core Provider) NTU Athens (Specialisation Provider: Wind Energy) #12; EUREC Module, Lectures, Labs and Seminars Core Oldenburg 1. Semester, Winter Term Module Title Term Titel Solar Energy Titel Wind Energy Winter Wind Energy I Tutorial Wind Energy Systems Wind Tunel (Lab

Habel, Annegret

269

Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Einstein condensates SPEAKER Prof. Shih-Chuan Gou Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Atomic Bose-Einstein condensates conned to a dual a test of the scaling laws for defect formation by quenching a Bose gas to degeneracy in this geometry

Wu, Yih-Min

270

Welcome to Cotton Mills At Cotton Mills, we believe your accommodation should help you make the most of your  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Welcome to Cotton Mills At Cotton Mills, we believe your accommodation should help you make to an amazing £1,200 per annum. Cotton Mills is fully certificated by: Cotton Mills is fully certificated. Cotton Mills is conveniently located on Radford Boulevard, right next to Norton Court (NTU accommodation

Evans, Paul

271

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION WIDEGAP NONNITRIDE FET INTEGRATION ON SI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

material systems. This position will be located at MIT's new research center in Singapore, called SMART, MIT AND SMART, AND KEN LEE, NTU AND SMART You will be part of a team conducting cuttingedge. REQUIREMENTS PhD degree in Electrical/Electronics Engineering or Materials Science

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic charge transport Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. This acoustic turbidity is caused by a layer of subsurface gas, which prohibits the identification of geological... structures below that gas layer. Sound speeds were...

273

alara center experience: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

were dissolved oxygen, turbidity, nitrate-N, phosphateArkansas Water Resources Center Kings River Quality Assurance Project Final Report Marc Nelson, Ph Soerens, Thomas 193...

274

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), and pH to be accomplished in B-150. Other waste methods (turbidity, flash point, and conductivity) are...

275

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste analysis encompasses the following methods: specific gravity (density), turbidity, flash point, conductivity, and pH. Undiluted sample is used for all methods listed. Clean...

276

La Jolla Canyon and Scripps Canyon Bibliography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of five turbidity currents." Sedimentology 37(1): 1-5. Ancoastal geomorphology, and in sedimentology which he alwaysfilm. Developments in Sedimentology. 6th International

Brueggeman, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - angular resolution multiplicity Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

targets placed in various positions in 5 cm optical... Angular domain optical projection tomography in turbid media Fartash ... Source: Chapman, Glenn H. - School of...

278

JOURNAL OF SEDIMENTARY RESEARCH, VOL. 72, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER, 2002, P. 641656 Copyright 2002, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 1527-1404/02/072-641/$03.00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of flow in these beds is indicated by the presence of small- to large- scale hummocky cross bedding reflect liquefaction and gravity-driven movement and hence their orientations indicate-stratification and rare small two-dimensional ripples. Wave-modified turbidity currents differ from deep-sea turbidity cur

Fischer, Woodward

279

Serpentine Thermal Coupling Between a Stream and a Conducting Body  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we document the effect of flow configuration on the heat transfer performance of a serpentine shaped stream embedded in a conducting solid. Several configurations with fixed volume of fluid are considered: U-shaped with varying spacing between the parallel portions of the U, serpentine shapes with three elbows, and conducting soil with several parallelepipedal shapes. We show that the spacing must be greater than a critical value in order for the heat transfer density of the stream-solid configuration to be the highest that it can be. Spacings larger than this critical value do not yield improvements in heat transfer density. We also show that even though the heat transfer is time dependent, the stream-solid configuration has an effective number of heat transfer units Ntu that is nearly constant in time. The larger Ntu values correspond to the configurations with greater heat transfer density.

Kobayashi, H.; Lorente, S.; Anderson, R.; Bejan, A.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Thng 9, 2010 Xut bn bi Office of International Affairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Loan, ã thông báo các chng trình ào to cp bng cht lng cao vi chi phí hp lý (khong t 3200~4500 USD mt nm cht lng. Bên cnh các chng trình cp bng, NTU còn có 2 trung tâm ngoi ng tuyt vi cho nhng ai thích thú.v...) c trao cho các sinh viên t yêu cu cht lng. Bên cnh các chng trình cp bng, NTU còn có 2 trung tâm

Wu, Yih-Min

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the diameter and depth of the wheel, face flow velocity, rotational speed and other operating conditions. Bulk et al. [11] proposed NTU correlations for design calculation of latent and total effectiveness of enthalpy wheels coated with silica gel..., Wr Te1,We1 Space Fig.2. Passive desiccant system Enthalpy wheels normally use an aluminum substrate coated with a molecular sieve material or silica gel. The effectiveness of an enthalpy wheel depends on the load of desiccant materials...

Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Tectonophysics 320 (2000) 6982 www.elsevier.com/locate/tecto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Early Penglai Orogeny, Taiwan, as assessed by fission-track constraints T.-K. Liu a,*, Y.-G. Chen a, W.-S and the continental side.fax: +886-2-2365-7380. E-mail address: liutk@ccms.ntu.edu.tw (T.-K. Liu) The eastern Central reserved. PII: S0040-1951 ( 00 ) 00028-7 #12;70 T.-K. Liu et al. / Tectonophysics 320 (2000) 69­82 #12;71T

Chen, Wen-Shan

283

Impact of ANSI X9.24-1:2009 Key Check Value on ISO/IEC 9797-1:2011 MACs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of ANSI X9.24-1:2009 Key Check Value on ISO/IEC 9797-1:2011 MACs Tetsu Iwata1 and Lei Wang2, wang.lei@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. ANSI X9.24-1:2009 specifies the key check value, which is used to verify check value. As a result, we obtain a complete characterization of the impact of using ANSI X9.24-1 key

284

An Analysis of Efficiency Improvements in Room Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAECA NATIONAL APPLIANCE ENERGY CONSERVATION ACT NBS NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS NECPA NATIONAL ENERGY CONSERVATION POLICY ACT NTU NUMBER OF TRANSFER UNITS OEM ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURER ORNL OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RAC ROOM AIR CONDITIONER.... There are two public domain models that we have considered using for this analysis: the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) heat pump model [1] and the Arthur D. Little (ADL) room air conditioner model [2]. The ORNL model was completed in 1981. Although...

O'Neal, D. L.; Penson, S. B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Special Issue "Underwater Sensor Nodes and Underwater Sensor Networks" A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aquatic environments. Marine surveillance, pollution detection and monitoring, and oceanographic data (salinity, conductivity, turbidity, pH, oxygen, temperature, depth, etc.) - Sediments and pollution sensor nodes - Acoustic sensors - Underwater sensor network architectures - Wired and wireless protocols

Chen, Min

286

attenuates experimental autoimmune: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

More tests with water of different degrees of turbidity, and possibly wave filed at the water surface are in progress and wi... Simpson, A; Cho, H J; Liu, H 2014-01-01 8 Th1 Cells...

287

Ultrasonic measurement of porous medium in an aqueous environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of a medical ultrasonic scanning device was studied as a measuring tool for determining the physical characteristics of soft porous media in an turbid aqueous environment. Three different sponge types were used as the soft objects. A method...

Daubon, Jose C

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Chile, 2009 HYDRAULIC MANAGEMENT OF FILAMENTOUS ALGAE IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 th ISE & 8 th HIC Chile, 2009 HYDRAULIC MANAGEMENT OF FILAMENTOUS ALGAE IN OPEN-CHANNEL NETWORKS mechanical interventions to avoid overflows. Moreover, drifting algae cells increase water turbidity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

289

Modification of a biosand filter in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four local plastic design (LPD) BSFs were constructed in Northern Region, Ghana, to test and evaluate an experimental modification of the LPD BSF for treatment of highly turbid water. Modifications of the LPD BSFs were ...

Kikkawa, Izumi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Southeast Herbicide Applicator Conference October 3-5, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to application Soft Water (low alkalinity) applications may cause low pH resulting in fish Mortality Calcium be applied when there is little or no Wind Turbidity improved in a matter of hours #12;Check pond

Watson, Craig A.

291

Observing ocean changes at the nation's first SWAC system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(conductivity, temperature, pressure) + oxygen, fluorescence and turbidity ADCP: 300kHz Nitrate sensor-2 years operational Items of note and path forward Photo: Christopher Pala, www.onewater.org Mahalo

292

Imazethapyr: red rice control and resistance, and environmental fate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photolysis in paddy water will be affected by turbidity due to its impact on the availability of sunlight to drive direct and indirect photolysis reactions. Imazethapyr was more available and more concentrated in sandy soil. With higher amounts of water...

Avila, Luis Antonio de

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Inter-annual variability in phytoplankton summer blooms in the freshwater tidal reaches of the Schelde estuary (Belgium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Schelde estuary (Belgium) Marie Lionard a,*, Koenraad Muylaert b , Abdel Hanoutti c , Tom Maris d , Miche to be negligible due to the high turbidity of the water (e.g. Uncles and Stephens, 1993). An increase

Vincent, Warwick F.

294

Near-Field Sediment Resuspension Measurement and Modeling for Cutter Suction Dredging Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sediment resuspension and turbidity created during dredging operations is both an economical and environmental issue. The movement of sediment plumes created from dredging operations has been predicted with numerical modeling, however, these far...

Henriksen, John Christopher

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

Experimental nursery pond cultivation of the seagrass Halodule beaudettei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments were conducted from April through July of hics. l 998 to assess the cultivation of Halodule beaudettei (den Hartog) den Hartog (shoal-grass) in experimental nursery ponds. The effects of pond flow-regime, water turbidity, culture media...

Rosen, David J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Disinfection Devices: Field Experiences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Petrasek, et al., 1980). Total suspended solids and turbidity are two wastewater parameters that quantify the presence of particles in wastewater. Both disinfection methods require the removal of large particles that may contain or shield microorganisms...

Weaver, R. W.; Richter, A. Y.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic random medium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

39 Discrete-ordinates solution of short-pulsed laser transport in two-dimensional turbid media Summary: of the medium is L W 10 mm. The medium is anisotropically scattering with...

298

Quantifying channelized submarine depositional systems from bed to basin scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The challenges of directly observing active turbidity currents necessitates the consideration of preserved deposits for deciphering the behavior of these systems. In this thesis, I take advantage 3-D subsurface seismic ...

Lyons, William J., 1965-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

1999 Macmillan Magazines LtdNATURE |VOL 402 |18 NOVEMBER 1999 |www.nature.com 291 letters to nature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daphnia9 , in North American rivers where muddy turbidity limits vision. Instead, paddlesh use.m.s.) of a randomly varying electrical stimulus passed through the water in the swim mill, between plate electrodes

Bahar, Sonya

300

Near-infrared approaches for cell culture monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a laser turbidity sensor was developed. The total cell concentration predicted with optical method was in excellent agreement with off-line cell counting data. The results from the two experiments suggest that such analyte concentration and laser...

Lee, Seung Joon

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Characterization of the 3-D Properties of the Fine-Grained Turbidite 8 Sand Reservoir, Green Canyon 18, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-grained turbidity currents is composed of alternating sand and shale layers, whose extension is assumed to be large. They correspond to levee and overbank deposits that are usually associated to channel systems. The high porosity values, coming from unconsolidated...

Plantevin, Matthieu Francois

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSTRUCTABILITY IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the post construction operations and maintenance plan #12;Design Requirements NEPA/MEPA Watershed Effectiveness Policy Cost Participation Critical Areas Design Standards and Exceptions Energy Analysis Procedure needs Treating turbid waters from dewatering and construction operations Active storm water

Minnesota, University of

303

Depositional environment and facies relationships of the Canyon sandstone, Val Verde Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

units of the Bouma turbi- dit. e sequence. The sequence of sedimentary structures and change in grain size indicate that the Canyon sandstone was deposited from a turbidity current flow. Complete bed sets are present within the cored interval...

Mitchell, Michael Harold

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

CX-002991: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

be installed on the common discharge lines from the turbidity meters on each sandfilter train. The check valves are to prevent the potential for contaminated water from the 10 inch...

305

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

be installed on the common discharge lines from the turbidity meters on each sandfilter train. The check valves are to prevent the potential for contaminated water from the 10 inch...

306

Evaluation of the complementary use of the ceramic (Kosim) filter and Aquatabs in Northern Region, Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kosim filter is a ceramic water filter that is currently used in Northern Ghana. Based on prior MIT research in Northern Ghana, this technology is effective at removing 92% of turbidity, 99.4% of total coliforms, and ...

Swanton, Andrew A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The effects of selected environmental variables on filtration rate of Mytilopsis leucophaeata and evaluation of its potential role in the purification of mariculture effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laivlotte 2020 turbidity meter (Table I). Cuttlefish ink, colloidal carbon suspensions, microalgae cultures and mariculture eIHuent were used to provide measurable suspended particles which could be removed by the mussel filtration apparatus in order... concentration versus filtration rate, including Aquadag?, Sepia ink and cultured Nannoch/orops/s (microalgae). A specific amount of each colloid was suspended in filtered seawater Concentrations were estimated by relative turbidity measurements. Wang (1990...

Rice, Patrick Hays

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A water quality characterization of a tidally influenced flood control canal of Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H), specific conductance, sulfide, total organic carbon (TOC), and turbidity samples were collected at seven stations in HBDC and from the effluent of two municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWTP) discharging into HBDC in order to detect significant... to MWTP outfall. Specific conductance patterns mirrored salinity trends. TOC levels showed a steady bayward decrease. Turbidity levels were consistently highest in bottom waters. No trends were apparent for COD, pH, and sulfide. HBDC water quality...

Polasek, Jeffrey Steven

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Thng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thng tin trong t ri ny u c trn m ng. c thng tin chi ti t v c p nh t, xin vui lng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thng tin trong t ri ny u c trn m ng. c thng tin chi ti t v c p nh t, xin vui lng tra c u t i website c a chng ti : httpThng tin nhanh NTU, tr ng i h c t ng h p l n nh t v lu i nh t i Loan, thng bo cc chng trnh o

Wu, Yih-Min

310

Theoretical and experimental investigation of heat pipe solar collector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat pipe solar collector was designed and constructed at IROST and its performance was measured on an outdoor test facility. The thermal behavior of a gravity assisted heat pipe solar collector was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A theoretical model based on effectiveness-NTU method was developed for evaluating the thermal efficiency of the collector, the inlet, outlet water temperatures and heat pipe temperature. Optimum value of evaporator length to condenser length ratio is also determined. The modelling predictions were validated using experimental data and it shows that there is a good concurrence between measured and predicted results. (author)

Azad, E. [Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology, 71 Forsat Avenue Ferdousi sq., Tehran (Iran)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A multichannel, synchronous laser signal processing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Janice Carter and Mrs. Connie Schilhab, This research was funded by the United States Coast Guard under contract DOT- CG-34017-A. To Roselyn TABLE OF CONTENTS ~hh h ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS DEDICATION TABLE OF CONTENTS. LIST OF FIGURES. LIST... Pe Q Q pe Qe @Qe Qe Qe Qe p? pe p, Qe 100 200 300 400 Turbidity (FTU) 500 600 700 Figure 1-1. Lidar Depolarization Ratio as a Function of Turbidity Chopper Linear Pol Laser Receiving Optics Telephoto Lense Pho odiod s Figure I...

Hulse, William Colbern

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

Eustatic control of turbidites and winnowed turbidites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global changes in sea level, primarily the results of tectonism and glaciation, control deep-sea sedimentation. During periods of low sea level the frequency of turbidity currents is greatly increased. Episodes of low sea level also cause vigorous contour currents, which winnow away the fines of turbidites. In the rock record, the occurrence of most turbidites and winnowed turbidities closely corresponds to global lowstands of paleo-sea level. This observation may be useful in predicting the occurrence of deep-sea reservoir facies in the geologic record.

Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Culture of selected organisms in recirculating and flow-through systems using thermal effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&M University; Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Kirk Strawn Twenty species were cultured in tanks on flow-through and recirculating systems. Water source was the thermal effluent from the discharge can 1 of Houston Lighting a Power Company's Cedar Bayou..., pH and Turbidity Levels for Monitored Tanks Table Al Daily Temperature i Conductivity i Di s- solved Oxygen, pH and Turbidity Levels for Monitored Tanks Figures Al through A72 80 86 vu APPENDIX B ? Summary of Monthly Survival, L ngth...

Berry, Terri Layne

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

MONITORING A TOXIC CYANOBACTERIA BLOOM IN LAKE BOURGET (FRANCE) AND ITS CONSEQUENCES FOR WATER QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the turbidity of the water in treatment units providing drinking water. These central supplies obtain their lake of Feuillade et al. [3]. The samples were taken in the water treatment units, before (water intake in treatment unit) and at the end of the treatment steps (in water reaching the consumers). Intracellular

Jacquet, Stéphan

316

Evidence for Gassy Sediments on the Inner Shelf of SE Korea From Geoacoustic Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Evidence for Gassy Sediments on the Inner Shelf of SE Korea From Geoacoustic Properties (Tuesday is characterized by an up to 40 m thick blanket of soft sediments often characterized by acoustic turbidity structures below that gas layer. Sound speeds were measured directly in these sediments using the Acoustic

317

Fusing ground measurements and satellite-derived products for the construction of climatological maps in atmosphere optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusing ground measurements and satellite-derived products for the construction of climatological turbidity factor, remote sensing, resampling ABSTRACT: Climatological maps (gridded data) of optical). The problem is that such climatological maps only exist at low spatial resolution. A resampling of the maps

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

Determination of refractive indices of porcine skin tissues and Intralipid at eight wavelengths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the presence of coherent and diffuse reflection near the specular reflection angle. An existing method has been biological tissues, however, light scattering dominates from ultraviolet to near-infrared spectral regions system for accurate measurement of coherent reflectance curves of turbid samples and analyzed

319

The Migration of Di use Photon Density Waves through Highly Scattering Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The radiative transport equation is a more accurate model for the migration of photons in general of Turbid Media: Theory and Applications assumptions that reduce the general transport equation to a di to the transport equation. 2.1 Di usion Approximation to the Transport Equation The linear transport equation

320

Data Analysis and Investigation of Self-Similarity in Oceanographic Sediment Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Analysis and Investigation of Self-Similarity in Oceanographic Sediment Data Lam Ling Shum Engineering, University College London Abstract: This paper aims to analyse the oceanographic sediment data are temperature, conductivity, and pressure. Turbidity, a measurement of sediment level is selected in this paper

Haddadi, Hamed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

OVERVIEW OF SELECTED SURROGATE TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH-TEMPORAL RESOLUTION SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OVERVIEW OF SELECTED SURROGATE TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH- TEMPORAL RESOLUTION SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT for characterizing selected properties of suspended sediments in rivers are being augmented and in some cases of quantifiably accurate data for use primarily in sediment-flux computations. Turbidity is the most common

322

Aerial Imaging of Fluorescent Dye in the Near Shore DAVID B. CLARK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerial Imaging of Fluorescent Dye in the Near Shore DAVID B. CLARK Woods Hole Oceanographic) dye in turbid and optically deep water. Tracer releases near the shoreline of an ocean beach and near of upwelling radiance near the Rhodamine WT excitation and emission peaks varies linearly with the in situ dye

Boss, Emmanuel S.

323

Stability and flocculation of nanosilica by conventional organic polymer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, solar panels, sports equipment, cleaning products and dietary supplements. It is by far the most vastly concentrations of different coagulants and flocculants used were determined by electrophoresis and turbidity potential route to treat other types of NPs. The treatment proposed to reach a ratio of average diameters d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

324

Proceedings of HT2009 2009 ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of HT2009 2009 ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference July 19-23, 2009, San Francisco, CA, USA HT2009-88261 SIMULATION OF FOCUSED RADIATION PROPAGATION AND TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER IN TURBID-dependent radiation and conduction bio-heat transfer model. Ultrashort pulsed radiation transport in the cylindrical

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

325

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, COLLEGE OF FAMILY AND CONSUMER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADDITION TO THE CHILLER The USDA-Food Safety Inspection Service recently required companies to demonstrate that redwater being pumped back into chillers from the rechiller is "cleaner" or "hase less bacteria and turbidity" than water coming out of the chillers in the overflow. This regulation has caused some

Navara, Kristen

326

Vector Zonal Operations for Spatiotemporal Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Total Amount of Phosphorous -------------------------28 5.3.3 Statistical Results for Turbidity --------------------------------------------------38 IV 5.4 Procedures to Perform the Spatiotemporal Analysis.... 5.3.2 Statistical Results for Total Amount of Phosphorous Using these spatiotemporal zones, antecedent precipitation values for each water sample in space and time were extracted. Because the antecedent precipitation values could be zero...

Xu, Tingting

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

327

Monitoring Stormwater: Do's, Don'ts, Why's and How's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facility TREE FILTER Watershed Boundary #12;9 #12;10 POROUS ASPHALT TREE FILTER #12;11 TREATMENT STRATEGIES Porous Asphalt Gravel Wetland Sand Filter Bioretention Cell Tree Filter Subsurface Infiltration Unit 13;17 Site Monitoring · Real Time Precipitation Flow pH Temperature Conductivity Dissolved Oxygen Turbidity

328

Imaging of Protein Crystals with Two-Photon Microscopy Pius Padayatti,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unattractive because they can damage precious samples by harmful radiation and lack efficiency in microcrystal, Cleveland, Ohio 44106, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Second-order nonlinear optical in turbid or opaque media with nondamaging infrared light in a single system makes the combination of SHG

Palczewski, Krzysztof

329

Great Lakes CoastWatch Research and Product Development Primary Investigator: George Leshkevich -NOAA/GLERL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

imagery from new satellite sensors such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for ice classification SWA calibration software, the collaboration with researchers at the German Aerospace Center (DLR at the University of Toledo to develop an improved turbidity product and data base: 1. SAR research and field

330

7932004 Estuarine Research Federation Estuaries Vol. 27, No. 5, p. 793806 October 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to high turbidity that reduces the light reaching the plant surface. Because of this reduction assumptions, including that oysters were uniformly distributed rather than aggregated into offshore reefs as a consequence of the growth of epi- phytes on the plant leaves and phytoplankton in the water column (Twilley et

Newell, Roger

331

Vertical transport and dynamic size distribution of New Bedford Harbor sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superfund Site. Samples were analyzed on a Coulter Counter, AVC-80 Suspended Solids machine, and a HACH Model 2100A Turbidimeter. A vertical transport model, which included flocculation and flo breakup, was developed and calibrated with these laboratory... Column. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electronic Particle Counter. . . Suspended Solids and Turbidity . . . Density Meter Experimental Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Data Analysis. 28 31 32 34 35 35 36...

Sanders, Stephanie Carol

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Plant species as a significant factor in wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in microcosms fed rural septic influent. The water parameters studied were water usage, ammonium-nitrogen, phosphorus, coliforms, suspended solids, BOD, pH, and turbidity. The BOD for all plants was reduced below the standard levels but none were significantly...

Varvel, Tracey W

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

333

From: MORMAN David A Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2006 11:21 AM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and forest landowners. Among the 19 indicators are six addressing maintaining and improving water quality.a. Water quality of forest streams (Water quality index) Metrics: · Physical/chemical properties (temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, pH, phosphorus, nitrogen, nitrate, ammonium nitrate, total solids) 1

334

Supporting Information Hydration and Conformational Mechanics of Single  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zauscher Substrate Preparation and ELP Coupling. To minimize unspecific interactions between ELP and a gold are listed. The transition temperature is defined at the maximum in the turbidity gradient while heating at 1 thousand force-extension curves were collected. Only a fraction of the measured curves, however, represent

Schmidler, Scott

335

P.A. Nelson S.M. Kajiura G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV-filtering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.A. Nelson ? S.M. Kajiura ? G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV levels of solar radiation than they had previously experienced in the source habitat in the turbid waters spectrum, but sharks exposed to greater solar radiation showed increased UV blocking in their corneal

Kajiura, Stephen

336

The Influence of Availability Costs on Optimal Heat Exchanger Size  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.62 2272.5 2230.2 2691.5 0.1433 110 3.86 2321. 3 2129.6 2740.3 0.4154 145 4.03 2344.5 2066.2 2763.5 0.7005 165 . 4.29 2371. 0 1960.0 2790.0 1. 3978 195 2385.0 4.67 230 2804.0 1813.8 2.795 2370.7 5.24 270 2789.7 1605.2 5.499 The scheme... clearly affects the optimal NTU hat will result. Thus the effect of the s r roundings and function of a particularlheat exchanger on its irreversibility costs is inherently contained in the curves of iq ure 2. The parameter Thi/Tci ranges ftom 1...

Witte, L. C.

337

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, adionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Chase, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Environmental applications of the particle analysis system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates the applicability of particle counting technology for analysis of various water treatment systems at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Particle Analysis System described in this study determined the water quality of samples from environmental remediation, stormwater treatment, and drinking water treatment operations. Samples were measured in either discrete or on-line mode. This data showed filtration efficiencies, particle counts, particle size distributions, and real-time treatment system performance. Particle counting proved more sensitive than the turbidimetric measurement technique commonly used by the water treatment industry. Particle counting is a two-dimensional measurement of counts and sizes, whereas turbidity is a one-dimensional measurement of water clarity. Samples showing identical turbidities could be distinguished easily with the Particle Analysis System. The Particle Analysis System proved to be an efficient and reliable water quality measurement tool, and it is applicable to a variety of water treatment systems at the Rocky Flats Plant.

Moritz, E.J.; Hoffman, C.R.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the upper Frio sandstones, Willamar field, Willacy County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are fine to very fine grained. Grain size within bedsets fines upward from 0. 12 mm at the hase to 0. 04 mm at the top. The sandstones contain ~pal ~ of monocrystalline quartz, feldspars and rock fza~ encl are classified as lithic arkoses...~cos ichnofacies, and exhibits intense churning of the sediment ~ rapid, intermittent turbidite deposition. Turbidity currents, initiated by tropical storms, brought fine to very fine grained sediment from an up-dip deltaic source, down topographic laws across...

Caram, Hector Luis

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Perception vs. reality in deep-water exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The common perception in exploration is that deep-water sands are predominantly a product of low- and high-density turbidity currents, and that submarine-fan models with channel/levee and lobe elements are the norm. The reality, however, is that deep-water systems are extremely complex and variable in terms of depositional processes and sand-body geometries. For example, the Bourna Sequence, composed of T{sub a}, T{sub b}, T{sub c}, T{sub d}, and T{sub e} divisions, is believed to be the product of a turbidity current. However, recent core and outcrop studies show that the complete and partial Bouma sequences also can be explained by processes other than turbidity currents, such as sandy debris flows (i.e., {open_quotes}T{sub a}{close_quotes}) and bottom-current reworking (i.e., {open_quotes}T{sub b}, T{sub c} and T{sub d}{close_quotes}). Massive sands are interpreted routinely as high-density turbidites, but the reality is that the term {open_quotes}high-density turbidity current{close_quotes} commonly refers to sandy debris flow in terms of flow theology and sediment-support mechanism. Deep-water sequences in the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Offshore Gabon, Offshore Nigeria, Gulf of Mexico, and the Ouachita Mountains are generally considered to be turbidite-rich submarine fans. However, the reality is that these sequences are composed predominantly of sandy slumps and debris flows, not turbidites. Fan models are attractive to explorationists because of their predictable sheet-like geometries; however, these simplistic conceptual models are obsolete because they defy reality. Although the turbidite paradigm is alive and well for now in the minds of many sedimentologists and sequence stratigraphers, the turbidites themselves that form the foundation for fan models are becoming an endangered facies!

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration & Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Perception vs. reality in deep-water exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The common perception in exploration is that deep-water sands are predominantly a product of low- and high-density turbidity currents, and that submarine-fan models with channel/levee and lobe elements are the norm. The reality, however, is that deep-water systems are extremely complex and variable in terms of depositional processes and sand-body geometries. For example, the Bourna Sequence, composed of T[sub a], T[sub b], T[sub c], T[sub d], and T[sub e] divisions, is believed to be the product of a turbidity current. However, recent core and outcrop studies show that the complete and partial Bouma sequences also can be explained by processes other than turbidity currents, such as sandy debris flows (i.e., [open quotes]T[sub a][close quotes]) and bottom-current reworking (i.e., [open quotes]T[sub b], T[sub c] and T[sub d][close quotes]). Massive sands are interpreted routinely as high-density turbidites, but the reality is that the term [open quotes]high-density turbidity current[close quotes] commonly refers to sandy debris flow in terms of flow theology and sediment-support mechanism. Deep-water sequences in the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Offshore Gabon, Offshore Nigeria, Gulf of Mexico, and the Ouachita Mountains are generally considered to be turbidite-rich submarine fans. However, the reality is that these sequences are composed predominantly of sandy slumps and debris flows, not turbidites. Fan models are attractive to explorationists because of their predictable sheet-like geometries; however, these simplistic conceptual models are obsolete because they defy reality. Although the turbidite paradigm is alive and well for now in the minds of many sedimentologists and sequence stratigraphers, the turbidites themselves that form the foundation for fan models are becoming an endangered facies

Shanmugam, G. (Mobil Exploration Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Ion exchange as a tertiary treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that these treatment methods are capable of removing an appreciable amount of objection? able dissolved organic and inorganic materi aJ s from the final effluent. Color and turbidity were greatly reduced and an appreciable amount of the suspended solids were... Demand Re Resin A General Anion mg. /1. MLVSS psi gpm Milligrams per I. iter Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids Pounds per Square Inch Gallons per Minute. mm Mi llimeters kgr meq ml Kilogram Milliequilavent Millimeter S. S. BV...

Westervelt, Ronald David

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Stocking and Management Recommendations for Texas Farm Ponds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For example, what size pond is to be stocked? Generally, ponds less than one acre receive different recommendations than larger ponds. The extent of water surface fluctuations, degree of expected fishing pressure and the muddiness of the water are a few... balance between bass and forage. Spawning devices may be installed to encourage reproduction of catfish. Expect most or all of the reproduction to be removed by bass, particularly in clear ponds. In muddy or turbid ponds, more catfish will avoid bass...

Anonymous,

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the three types of turbidite channels. After Berg (1978) 44 47 49 50 LIST OF FIGURES - Continued Figure Page lg Idealized depositional model for turbi dite constructional channels. After Berg (1978) 51 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Regional... (1962) from turbidity current deposits . Bouma 's complete turbi di te is defined as follows: pelitic shale upper unit of parallel laminae D current ripple unit lower unit of parallel laminae 8 massive graded unit In terms of flow regime...

Reinarts, Mary Susan

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overbank sandstones. Sandstones become thinner and less frequent upward in the section. Thin sand- stones 1n the predominantly shale section are widespread and exhibit sedimentary structures commonly observed in turbidity-current deposits (ABCDE, ABDE... feet of depth. Production in the Upper Wilcox section is from multiple sandstone units within a shale section on a local structural closure (Fig. 2). The properties of these sandstone units and the local stratigraphic variation determine...

DePaul, Gilbert John

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Coastal Microstructure: From Active Overturn to Fossil Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................... 33 Figure 10. Front view of the sensor package installed on MSS profiler including two shear probes, micro-temperature, micro-conductivity, accurate- temperature, accurate-conductivity, acceleration, turbidity, and depth sensors... frequently used in oceanography. A very important characteristic of turbulence is that it produces highly persistent, irreversible effects in a variety of hydro-physical fields. Linear waves come and go without leaving any trace, but turbulence...

Leung, Pak Tao

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

Perception vs. reality in deepwater exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The common perception in exploration is that deepwater sands are predominantly a product of turbidity currents, and that submarine-fan models with channel/levee and lobe elements are the norm. The reality, however, is that in many cases, deepwater sands are deposits of sandy debris flows and bottom currents, not turbidity currents. Submarine-fan models with channels and lobes are designed for turbidite-dominated deepwater systems, and therefore, fan models are obsolete for debris-flow deposits. The subject is described here in a discussion that covers: Deepwater processes. How sediments move downslope from the shelf, definitions, and misunderstood effects of high-density turbidity and bottom currents; Submarine fan models, and sequence stratigraphic implications. Limitations of widely used models, and seismic geometries and log motifs. Better calibrations are needed. In the conclusion, the author states a critical need for developing additional models for debris flows, and that research should also focus on developing reliable methods for using seismic geometry and wireline-log motifs to recognize depositional facies. A comprehensive bibliography of published literature on the subject is liberally referenced. In this paper, the term deep water refers to bathyal water depths, i.e., area seaward of the shelf edge, that existed at the time of deposition of reservoir sands; it does not necessarily refer to present-day water depths in offshore examples.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Reservoir compartmentalization of deep-water Intra Qua Iboe sand (Pliocene), Edop field, offshore Nigeria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integration of 3-D seismic and sedimentological information provides a basis for recognizing and mapping individual flow units within the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Core examination show the following depositional facies: A-Sandy slump/mass flow, B-Muddy slump/mass flow, C. Bottom current reworking. D-Non-channelized turbidity currents, E. Channelized (coalesced) turbidity currents. F-Channelized (isolated) turbidity currents, G-Pelagic/hemipelagic, H-Levee, I-Reworked slope, J-Wave dominated, and K-Tide dominated facies. With the exception of facies J and K, all these facies are of deep-water affinity. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope environment in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated scaward, deposition began with a channel dominated deep-water system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated deep-water system (IQI 3, the principle reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated shallow-water system (IQI 4). Compositional and textural similarities between the deep-water facies result in similar log motifs. Furthermore, these depositional facies are not readily apparent as distinct seismic facies. Deep-water facies A, D, E, and F are reservoir facies, whereas facies B, C, G, H, and I are non-reservoir facies. However, Facies G is useful as a seismically mappable event throughout the study area. Mapping of these non-reservoir events provides the framework for understanding gross reservoir architecture. This study has resulted in seven defined reservoir units within the IQI, which serves as the architectural framework for ongoing reservoir characterization.

Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobile Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria); Shanmugam, G. [Mobile Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Testing sand used in hydraulic fracturing operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recommended practices for testing sand used in hydraulic fracturing operations are outlined as developed by the Task Group on Evaluation of Hydraulic Fracturing Sand under the API Subcommittee on Evaluation of Well Completion Materials. The tests recommended were developed to improve the quality of frac sand delivered to the well site, and are for use in evaluating certain physical properties of sand used in hydraulic fracturing operations. The tests suggested enable users to compare physical characteristics of various sands and to select materials most useful for such applications. Parameters to be tested include turbidity, clay and soft particle content, crush resistance, and mineralogic analysis.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K- Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Properties and potential uses of water treatment sludge from the Neches River of southeast Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sludge due to its huge amount and increasing public concern. However, only a few studies were focused on potential use of WTP sludge. The characteristics and potential use of WTP sludge are still not well understood. Previous studies of WTP alum sludge... plants that coagulate, filter, and oxidize a surface water for removal of turbidity, color, bacteria, algae, organic compounds, and iron or manganese. These plants generally use alum Al~(SO4) or iron FeC13 salts for coagulation and produce alum or iron...

Kan, Weiqun

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Sparta aquifer, northern Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Texas Water Supply Corporation. Chemi- cal tests made on the water from Production Wells No, 1 and 2 (36 and 37) in- dicated that the water produced was turbid but of unusually good chemical quality. A request was made to the United States Goo... limestene (See Table 3, page 2$ . The "Eaton leatel" of Renick and Stensel (1931) Ls included Ln the lower part of the overlying Stone City formation. In accordance with the c), assificatioa of Stexxsel (1935), the upper contact of the surface Sparta has...

Wauters, John F

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

Pauli, Adam T. (Cheyenne, WY); Robertson, Raymond E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Chatham, IL); Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

354

Removal of wax and stickies from OCC by flotation. Progress report No. 3, July 1--September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this quarter we completed low consistency laboratory pulping trials. Pulping results were analyzed in terms of defibering index or yield and the concentration of free wax. The objective of these trials is to identify pulping conditions that will give higher yield and higher concentration of free wax. The yields from low consistency pulping trials ranged from 90 to 99% based on 6-cut laboratory screen rejects. In general, high temperatures (140-150{degree}F) and high pH (9.5-10) conditions resulted in higher yield and the generation of free wax. Factors such as rotor speed and the gap (between the rotor and grate) were not significant in affecting defibering. Generally, the turbidities of filtrates from wax-contaminated pulps increased with increase in temperature and/or pH. The filtrate turbidity indicated the relative concentration of finely dispersed wax that could be removed from pulp dewatered on a 30 {micro}m filter paper. Preliminary experiments were conducted to study flotation conditions necessary for effective removal of wax from pulp. Factors which are important for effective flotation include flotation time, volume of air, surfactant concentration and type, and low temperature. Future plans include additional flotation trials to better optimize conditions. Other contaminant types include pressure sensitive adhesives and hot melts will also be examined. This will be followed by pilot plant and mill trials.

Doshi, M.R.; Dyer, J. [Doshi and Associates, Inc., Appleton, WI (United States); Heise, O.; Cao, B. [Voith Sulzer Papertechnology, Appleton, WI (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Removal of wax and stickies from OCC by flotation. Progress report No. 3, July 1--September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this quarter we completed low consistency laboratory pulping trials. Pulping results were analyzed in terms of defibering index or yield and the concentration of free wax. The objective of these trials is to identify pulping conditions that will give higher yield and higher concentration of free wax. The yields from low consistency pulping trials ranged from 90 to 99% based on 6-cut laboratory screen rejects. In general, high temperatures (140-150{degrees}F) and high pH (9.5-10) conditions resulted in higher yield and the generation of free wax. Factors such as rotor speed and the gap (between the rotor and grate) were not significant in affecting defibering. Generally, the turbidities of filtrates from wax-contaminated pulps increased with increase in temperature and/or pH. The filtrate turbidity indicated the relative concentration of finely dispersed wax that could be removed from pulp dewatered on a 30 {micro}m filter paper. Preliminary experiments were conducted to study flotation conditions necessary for effective removal of wax from pulp. Factors which are important for effective flotation include flotation time, volume of air, surfactant concentration and type, and low temperature. Future plans include additional flotation trials to better optimize conditions. Other contaminant types include pressure sensitive adhesives and hot melts will also be examined. This will be followed by pilot plant and mill trials.

Dosh, M.R.; Dyer, J. [Doshi and Associates, Inc., Appleton, WI (United States); Heise, O.; Cao, B. [Voith Sulzer Papertechnology, Appleton, WI (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements demonstrated that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the first HAB genome (A. anophagefferens) and compared its gene complement to those of six competing phytoplankton species identified via metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on the gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 mbp) and more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen utilization, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

Gobler, C J; Grigoriev, I V; Berry, D L; Dyhrman, S T; Wilhelm, S W; Salamov, A; Lobanov, A V; Zhang, Y; Collier, J L; Wurch, L L; Kustka, A B; Dill, B D; Shah, M; VerBerkomes, N C; Kuo, A; Terry, A; Pangilinan, J; Lindquist, E A; Lucas, S; Paulsen, I; Hattenrath-Lehmann, T K; Talmage, S; Walker, E A; Koch, F; Burson, A M; Marcoval, M A; Tang, Y; LeCleir, G R; Coyne, K J; Berg, G M; Bertrand, E M; Saito, M A; Gladyshev, V N

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

357

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking, because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements showed that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the genome of A. anophagefferens and compared its gene complement with those of six competing phytoplankton species identified through metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 Mbp) and has more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen use, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species, with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus, has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

Grigoriev, Igor; Gobler, Christopher; Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Terry, Astrid; Pangillian, Jasmyn; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Berry, Dianna; Dyhrman, Sonya; Wilhelm, Steven; Lobanov, Alexei; Zhang, Yan; Collier, Jackie; Wurch, Louie; Kusta, Adam; Dill, Brian; Shsh, Manesh; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Paulsen, Ian; Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa; Talmage, Stephanie; Walker, Elyse; Koch, Florian; Burson, Amanda; Marcoval, Maria; Tang, Yin-Zhong; LeCleir, Gary; Coyne, Kathyrn; Berg, Gry; Bertrand, Erin; Saito, Mak; Gladyshev, Vadim

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

358

SLUDGE PARTICLE SEPAPATION EFFICIENCIES DURING SETTLER TANK RETRIEVAL INTO SCS-CON-230  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to release, into the Hanford Document Control System, FA1/0991, Sludge Particle Separation Efficiencies for the Rectangular SCS-CON-230 Container, by M. Epstein and M. G. Plys, Fauske & Associates, LLC, June 2009. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) will retrieve sludge from the 105-K West Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Settler Tanks and transfer it to container SCS-CON-230 using the Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS). The sludge will enter the container through two distributors. The container will have a filtration system that is designed to minimize the overflow of sludge fines from the container to the basin. FAI/09-91 was performed to quantify the effect of the STRS on sludge distribution inside of and overflow out of SCS-CON-230. Selected results of the analysis and a system description are discussed. The principal result of the analysis is that the STRS filtration system reduces the overflow of sludge from SCS-CON-230 to the basin by roughly a factor of 10. Some turbidity can be expected in the center bay where the container is located. The exact amount of overflow and subsequent turbidity is dependent on the density of the sludge (which will vary with location in the Settler Tanks) and the thermal gradient between the SCS-CON-230 and the basin. Attachment A presents the full analytical results. These results are applicable specifically to SCS-CON-230 and the STRS filtration system's expected operating duty cycles.

DEARING JI; EPSTEIN M; PLYS MG

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

Sequence stratigraphy, facies architecture and reservoir distribution, Cretaceous lowstand fan reservoirs, Southern Basin, onshore Trinidad  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thick Albian-Campanian mass-flow sandstones in the Southern Basin Trinidad were deposited within submarine canyons incised into the northern continental slope of South America and as associated down-dip basin-floor lowstand fans. The contemporaneous slope to basin-floor break lay across the Southern Basin area with turbidity current paleoflow being to the northwest. North of this paleo-slope break graded to massive, channelized, high-density turbidite sandstones occur interstratified with shaly overbank and channel abandonment deposits. A progression of depositional sub-environments from proximal through distal lowstand fan can be recognized. All fine and thin upward but can be discriminated by the occurrence of slumps, debris flows and conglomerates, the grain-size and bedding scale of sandstones and the characteristics of low-density turbidites and mudrocks. South of the paleo-slope break mass-flow deposits comprise muddy slumps and debris flows rich in granules and pebbles deposited in slope canyons. During periods of turbidity current by-pass or fan abandonment hemipelagic settling processes predominated. Reservoir distribution maps of these lowstand fans have been constructed utilizing geometric constraints, analogs and paleoslope determinations from oriented core. The interpreted canyon locations and orientations are key to the understanding of reservoir distribution on the basin-floor tract to the north: a vital component in the exploration of the basin.

Sprague, A.R.; Larue, D.K.; Faulkner, B.L. [Exxon Production Research Company, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

David B. Burnett

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, ngstrm's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana [Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, V Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Pop, Nicolina [Department of Physical Foundations of Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara, V Parvan 2, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Calinoiu, Delia [Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University of Timisoara, Mihai Viteazu 1, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

363

Simple solar spectral model for direct and diffuse irradiance on horizontal and tilted planes at the earth's surface for cloudless atmospheres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, simple model for calculating clear-sky direct and diffuse spectral irradiance on horizontal and tilted surfaces is presented. The model is based on previously reported simple algorithms and on comparisons with rigorous radiative transfer calculations and limited outdoor measurements. Equations for direct normal irradiance are outlined; and include: Raleigh scattering; aerosol scattering and absorption; water vapor absorption; and ozone and uniformly mixed gas absorption. Inputs to the model include solar zenith angle, collector tilt angle, atmospheric turbidity, amount of ozone and precipitable water vapor, surface pressure, and ground albedo. The model calculates terrestrial spectra from 0.3 to 4.0 ..mu..m with approximately 10 nm resolution. A major goal of this work is to provide researchers with the capability to calculate spectral irradiance for different atmospheric conditions and different collector geometries using microcomputers. A listing of the computer program is provided.

Bird, R.; Riordan, C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During third quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in four of the six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells (PAC 2, 5, and 6). Radium-228 exceeded Level 2 Flagging Criteria in one well (PAC 2); however this was an estimated value because quantitation in the sample did not meet specifications. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) presented a novel reinterpretation of the Jackfork Group in the DeGray Spillway and Kiamichi Mountain sections, Arkansas and Oklahoma, suggesting that thick-bedded sandstones in these sections, previously interpreted as turbidites, are debris-flow deposits. Careful assessment of this reinterpretation is critical because the Jackfork serves as a classic North American sediment-gravity flow sequence and because the techniques of Shanmugam and Moiola (1995), if applied widely, would lead to reinterpretation, and in my view, misinterpretation, of virtually every sediment-gravity flow sequence in the geologic record. In this discussion, I focus on only three of the many issues raised by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995): (1) their rejection of the concept of high density turbidity currents; (2) their description of the Jackfork Group in DeGray Spillway; and (3) their criteria for distinguishing between turbidites and debris-flow deposits.

Lowe, D.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castao, Gabriel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Birefringence imaging in biological tissue using polarization sensitive optical coherent tomography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Employing a low coherence Michelson interferometer, two dimensional images of optical birefringence in turbid samples as a function of depth are measured. Polarization sensitive detection of the signal formed by interference of backscattered light from the sample and a mirror or reference plane in the reference arm which defines a reference optical path length, give the optical phase delay between light propagating along the fast and slow axes of the birefringence sample. Images showing the change in birefringence in response to irradiation of the sample are produced as an example of the detection apparatus and methodology. The technique allow rapid, noncontact investigation of tissue or sample diagnostic imaging for various medical or materials procedures.

De Boer, Johannes F. (Irvine, CA); Milner, Thomas E. (Austin, TX); Nelson, J. Stuart (Laguna Niguel, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Sludge Settling Rate Observations and Projections at the Savannah River Site - 13238  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 2004, sludge batches have included a high percentage of stored sludge generated from the H- modified (HM) process. The slow-settling nature of HM sludge means that the settling is often the major part of the washing tank quiescent period between required pump runs to maintain flammability control. Reasonable settling projections are needed to wash soluble salts from sludge in an efficient manner, to determine how much sludge can be washed in a batch within flammability limits, and to provide composition projections for batch qualification work done in parallel with field preparation. Challenges to providing reasonably accurate settling projections include (1) large variations in settling behavior from tank-to-tank, (2) accounting for changing initial concentrations, sludge masses, and combinations of different sludge types, (3) changing the settling behavior upon dissolving some sludge compounds, and (4) sludge preparation schedules that do not allow for much data collection for a particular sludge before washing begins. Scaling from laboratory settling tests has provided inconsistent results. Several techniques have been employed to improve settling projections and therefore the overall batch preparation efficiency. Before any observations can be made on a particular sludge mixture, projections can only be made based on historical experience with similar sludge types. However, scaling techniques can be applied to historical settling models to account for different sludge masses, concentrations, and even combinations of types of sludge. After sludge washing/settling cycles begin, the direct measurement of the sludge height, once generally limited to a single turbidity meter measurement per settle period, is now augmented by examining the temperature profile in the settling tank, to help determine the settled sludge height over time. Recently, a settling model examined at PNNL [1,2,3] has been applied to observed thermocouple and turbidity meter readings to quickly provide settling correlations to project settled heights for other conditions. These tools improve the accuracy and adaptability of short and mid-range planning for sludge batch preparation. (authors)

Gillam, Jeffrey M.; Shah, Hasmukh B.; Keefer, Mark T. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Basin-floor fans in the North Sea: Sequence stratigraphic models vs. sedimentary facies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examination of nearly 12,000 feet (3658m) of conventional core from Paleogene and Cretaceous deep-water sandstone reservoirs cored in 50 wells in 10 different areas or fields in the North Sea and adjacent regions reveals that these reservoirs are predominantly composed of mass-transport deposits, mainly sandy slumps and sandy debris flows. Sedimentary features indicating slump and debris-flow origin include sand units with sharp upper contacts; slump folds; discordant, steeply dipping layers (up to 60{degrees}); glide planes; shear zones; brecciated clasts; clastic injections; floating mudstone clasts; planar clast fabric; inverse grading of clasts; and moderate-to-high matrix content (5-30%). This model predicts that basin-floor fans are predominantly composed of sand-rich turbidites with laterally extensive, sheetlike geometries. However, calibration of sedimentary facies in our long (400-700 feet) cores with seismic and wire-line-log signatures through several of these basin-floor fans (including the Gryphon-Forth, Frigg, and Faeroe areas) shows that these features are actually composed almost exclusively of mass-transport deposits consisting mainly of slumps and debris flows. Distinguishing deposits of mass-transport processes, such as debris flows, from those of turbidity currents has important implications for predicting reservoir geometry. Debris flows, which have plastic flow rheology, can form discontinuous, disconnected sand bodies that are harder to delineate and less economical to develop than deposits of fluidal turbidity currents, which potentially produce more laterally continuous, interconnected sand bodies. Process sedimentological interpretation of conventional core is commonly critical for determining the true origin and distribution of reservoir sands.

Shanmugam, G.; Bloch, R.B. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Mitchell, S.M. [Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Beamish, G.W.J.; Shields, K.E. [Mobil North Sea Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Hodgkinson, R.J.; Straume, T.; Syvertsen, S.E. [Mobil Exploration Norway, Inc., Stavanger (Norway); Damuth, J.E. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Core-based evidence for sandy slump and sandy debris flow facies in the Pliocene and Pleistocene of the Gulf of Mexico: Implications for submarine fan models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examination of nearly 3,500 feet of conventional core from Pliocene and Pleistocene deep-water reservoirs cored in 25 wells in 8 different areas covering the eastern, central and western Gulf of Mexico reveals that the reservoirs are predominantly composed of mass-transport deposits, mainly sandy slumps and sandy debris flows (60-100% of cored intervals). Bottom-current reworked sands are common (10-50%). Of importance to existing submarine fan models is that turbidities are extremely rare (<1 % of all cores). Sedimentary features indicative of slump and debris-flow origin include sand units with sharp upper contacts, slump folds, discordant, steeply dipping layers (up to 60[degrees]), glide planes, shear zones, brecciated clasts, rafted mudstone clasts, planar clast fabric, inverse grading of clasts, and moderate-to-high matrix content (5-20 %). These reservoirs have been interpreted by others to represent turbidite-dominated basin-floor fans and slope fans of the often used sequence stratigraphic model. However, our core data do not show a dominance of turbidities. Sandy debris flows exhibit a variety of log motifs (e.g., blocky, fining-up, and coarsening-up) due to changes in concentration of midstone clasts, and a variety of internal seismic facies (e.g., parallel-continuous, irregular-discontinuous, chaotic -discontinuous, and lateral pinch out) perhaps due to changes in stacking patterns of debris flows and slumps. Classic submarine-fan models, commonly advocated for these reservoirs, may not be appropriate. We propose a slump and debris-flow, dominated slope model in which sea-floor topography and depositional freezing (i.e., plastic flows) control sand distribution and geometry. Contrary to popular belief, sandy debris flows can be thick, areally extensive, and excellent reservoirs.

Shanmugam, G. (Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)); Zimbrick, G. (Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S., Dallas, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Core-based evidence for sandy slump and sandy debris flow facies in the Pliocene and Pleistocene of the Gulf of Mexico: Implications for submarine fan models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examination of nearly 3,500 feet of conventional core from Pliocene and Pleistocene deep-water reservoirs cored in 25 wells in 8 different areas covering the eastern, central and western Gulf of Mexico reveals that the reservoirs are predominantly composed of mass-transport deposits, mainly sandy slumps and sandy debris flows (60-100% of cored intervals). Bottom-current reworked sands are common (10-50%). Of importance to existing submarine fan models is that turbidities are extremely rare (<1 % of all cores). Sedimentary features indicative of slump and debris-flow origin include sand units with sharp upper contacts, slump folds, discordant, steeply dipping layers (up to 60{degrees}), glide planes, shear zones, brecciated clasts, rafted mudstone clasts, planar clast fabric, inverse grading of clasts, and moderate-to-high matrix content (5-20 %). These reservoirs have been interpreted by others to represent turbidite-dominated basin-floor fans and slope fans of the often used sequence stratigraphic model. However, our core data do not show a dominance of turbidities. Sandy debris flows exhibit a variety of log motifs (e.g., blocky, fining-up, and coarsening-up) due to changes in concentration of midstone clasts, and a variety of internal seismic facies (e.g., parallel-continuous, irregular-discontinuous, chaotic -discontinuous, and lateral pinch out) perhaps due to changes in stacking patterns of debris flows and slumps. Classic submarine-fan models, commonly advocated for these reservoirs, may not be appropriate. We propose a slump and debris-flow, dominated slope model in which sea-floor topography and depositional freezing (i.e., plastic flows) control sand distribution and geometry. Contrary to popular belief, sandy debris flows can be thick, areally extensive, and excellent reservoirs.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Zimbrick, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Mobilization of colloidal particles by low-frequency dynamic stress stimulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally occurring seismic events and artificially generated low-frequency (1 to 500 Hertz) elastic waves have been observed to alter the production rates of oil and water wells, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing production, and to influence the turbidity of surface and well water. The decreases in production are of particular concern - especially when artificially generated elastic waves are applied as a method for enhanced oil recovery. The exact conditions that result in a decrease in production remain unknown. While the underlying environment is certainly complex, the observed increase in water well turbidity after natural seismic events suggests the existence of a mechanism that can affect both the subsurface flow paths and mobilization of in-situ colloidal particles. This paper explores the macroscopic and microscopic effects of low-frequency dynamic stress stimulations on the release of colloidal particles from an analog core representing an infinitesimal section along the propagation paths of an elastic wave. Experiments on a column packed with 1-mm borosilicate beads and loaded with polystyrene microspheres demonstrate that axial mechanical stress oscillations enhance the mobilization of captured microspheres. Increasing the amplitude of the oscillations increases the number of microspheres released and can also result in cyclical spikes in effluent microsphere concentration during stimulation. Under a prolonged period of stimulation, the cyclical effluent spikes coincided with fluctuations in the column pressure data, and continue at a diminished level after stimulation. This behavior can be attributed to rearrangements of the beads in the column, resulting in possible changes to the void space and/or tortuosity of the packing. Optical microscopy observations of the beads during low frequency oscillations reveal that individual beads rotate, thereby rubbing against each other and scraping away portions of the adsorbed microspheres. These results support the theory that mechanical interactions between porous matrix grains are important mechanisms in flow path alteration and the mobilization of naturally occurring colloidal particles during elastic wave stimulation. These results also point to both continuous and discrete, en masse releases of colloidal particles, perhaps due to circulation cells within the packing material.

Beckham, Richard Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Amr, Abdel - Fattah I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peter, Roberts M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reem, Ibrahim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tarimala, Sowmitri [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

Gorsline, D.S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Deposition and diagenesis of a cratonic Silurian platform reef, Pipe Creek Jr. , Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Pipe Creek Jr. paragenesis record the stratigraphic and burial evolution of the cratonic Silurian platform of Indiana during Late Silurian to Pennsylvanian. A variety of several diagenetic fluids acting over geological time affected the reef. The paragenetic sequence is as follows: (1) precipitation of turbid, fibrous, blotchy cathodoluminescent (CL) cement; (2) dolomitization of mud-rich facies; (3) precipitation of clear, zoned CL equant calcite cements; (4) fracturing and karst formation, partially filled by geopetal silt and sandstone; (5) precipitation of clear, dull CL, ferroan to nonferroan equant calcite cement, ferroan dolomite overgrowth and equant dolomite cement in moldic porosity, caves and fractures; (6) microdissolution and hydrocarbon emplacement; and (7) stylolitization. The New Albany Shale was both the hydrocarbon source and top seal to the fossil Pipe Creek Jr. oil field with original oil in place estimated at 11 million bbl. The level of organic metamorphism of the New Albany Shale, the oil residue, and the two-phase fluid inclusions in the burial cements suggest that sediments accumulated on the platform throughout Mississippian time.

Simo, A.; Lehmann, P.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Deposition and diagenesis of a cratonic Silurian platform reef, Pipe Creek Jr. , Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Pipe Creek Jr. paragenesis record the stratigraphic and burial evolution of the cratonic Silurian platform of Indiana during Late Silurian to Pennsylvanian. A variety of several diagenetic fluids acting over geological time affected the reef. The paragenetic sequence is as follows: (1) precipitation of turbid, fibrous, blotchy cathodoluminescent (CL) cement; (2) dolomitization of mud-rich facies; (3) precipitation of clear, zoned CL equant calcite cements; (4) fracturing and karst formation, partially filled by geopetal silt and sandstone; (5) precipitation of clear, dull CL, ferroan to nonferroan equant calcite cement, ferroan dolomite overgrowth and equant dolomite cement in moldic porosity, caves and fractures; (6) microdissolution and hydrocarbon emplacement; and (7) stylolitization. Carbonate grew and fibrous cements precipitated in an open marine environment. During Late Silurian an increasingly restricted environment stopped reef growth and dolomite replaced mud-rich faces. The reefs were then subaerially exposed and two meteoric cement sequences, non-luminescent to bright luminescent, precipitated prior to Mid-Devonian fracture-controlled karsting. Caves and fractures crosscut former cement stages and were filled by sandstones. Later, the platform was buried by the late Mid-Devonian organic-rich New Albany Shale, and clear, dull CL calcite cement and ferroan dolomite precipitated. Hydrocarbon migration postdates all cements and created minor moldic porosity and predates stylolitization.

Simo, A.; Lehmann, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

An efficient strategy for the inversion of bidirectional reflectance models with satellite remote sensing data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The angular distribution of radiation scattered by the earth surface contains information on the structural and optical properties of the surface. Potentially, this information may be retrieved through the inversion of surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models. This report details the limitations and efficient application of BRDF model inversions using data from ground- and satellite-based sensors. A turbid medium BRDF model, based on the discrete ordinates solution to the transport equation, was used to quantify the sensitivity of top-of-canopy reflectance to vegetation and soil parameters. Results were used to define parameter sets for inversions. Using synthetic reflectance values, the invertibility of the model was investigated for different optimization algorithms, surface and sampling conditions. Inversions were also conducted with field data from a ground-based radiometer. First, a soil BRDF model was inverted for different soil and sampling conditions. A condition-invariant solution was determined and used as the lower boundary condition in canopy model inversions. Finally, a scheme was developed to improve the speed and accuracy of inversions.

Privette, J.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Innovative sludge stabilization method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge is generated in many water and wastewater treatment processes, both biological and physical/chemical. Examples include biological sludges from sanitary and industrial wastewater treatment operations and chemical sludges such as those produced when metals are removed from metal plating wastewater. Even some potable water plants produce sludge, such as when alum is used as a flocculating agent to clarify turbid water. Because sludge is produced from such a variety of operations, different techniques have been developed to remove water from sludges and reduce the sludge volume and mass, thus making the sludge more suitable for recovery or disposal. These techniques include mechanical (e.g., filter presses), solar (sludge drying beds), and thermal. The least expensive of these methods, neglecting land costs, involves sludge drying beds and lagoons. The solar method was widely used in sewage treatment plants for many years, but has fallen in disfavor in the US; mechanical and thermal methods have been preferred. Since environmental remediation often requires managing sludges, this article presents a discussion of a variation of sludge lagoons known as evaporative sludge stabilization. Application of this process to the closure of two 2.5 acre (10117 m{sup 2}) hazardous waste surface impoundments will be discussed. 1 ref., 2 figs.

Riggenbach, J.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Using Advanced Scientific Diving Technologies to Assess the Underwater Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific diving can provide unique information for addressing complex environmental issues in the marine environment and is applied to a variety of increasingly important issues throughout Puget Sound, including habitat degradation, endangered species, biological availability of contaminants, and the effects of overwater structures and shoreline protection features. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory uses trained scientific divers in conjunction with advanced technologies to collect in-situ information best obtained through direct observation and requiring minimal environmental disturbance. For example, advances in underwater communications allow divers to discuss observations and data collection techniques in real time, both with each other and with personnel on the surface. Other examples include the use of Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON), an underwater camera used to capture digital images of benthic structures, fish, and organisms during low light and high turbidity levels; the use of voice-narrated underwater video; and the development of sediment collection methods yielding one-meter cores. The combination of using trained scientific SCUBA divers and advanced underwater technologies is a key element in addressing multifaceted environmental problems, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the underwater environment and more reliable data with which to make resource management decisions.

Southard, John A.; Williams, Greg D.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Blanton, Michael L.

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Reservoir description of a sand-rich submarine fan complex for a steamflood project: upper Miocene Potter sandstone, North Midway Sunset field, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly 650 m of cores from the upper Miocene Potter sandstone in Mobil's Alberta/Shale property, North Midway Sunset field, California, were examined to determine depositional facies, sand-body geometry, and reservoir quality for a proposed steamflood project. The Potter represents a sand-rich submarine fan complex with braided-channel, meandering-channel, levee, and crevasse-splay facies. The braided-channel facies (gravel and coarse sand) is thick (up to 100 m), sheetlike (> 500 m wide), and highly permeable (10,000 + md). The meandering-channel facies (coarse to medium sand) is up to 20 m thick, over 400 m long, lenticular in geometry, and exhibits an upward decrease in permeability (e.g., 9000 to 500 md) related to grain size that fines upward. The levee facies (in bioturbated sand) is up to 21 m thick, shows variable geometry, and is generally low in permeability (100-1500 md). The crevasse splay (medium sand) is up to 12 m thick, sheetlike (> 300 m wide), and shows moderately high permeability (2000-8000 md). The braided-channel facies was a product of density-modified grain flows, and the remaining three facies were deposited by turbidity currents. Steam flooding of the Potter reservoir should perform extremely well because the entire reservoir is composed of relatively clean sand and the reservoir lacks both horizontal and vertical permeability barriers.

Shanmugam, G.; Clayton, C.A.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contribution by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) on the depositional processes of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group (Formation) in Arkansas and Oklahoma highlights a few important processes that are often overlooked. Their work on the fabric of some high-density flow deposits is interesting in light of the debate over the nature of these types of deposits (Lowe, 1982; Hiscott, 1994). However, we disagree with some of the observations and interpretations they use in making their argument for a new depositional model, and submit that (1) turbidity current deposits (turbidites) are a major lithofacies component in the DeGray Spillway cut is not difficult, and (4) because it is not necessary to preserve conventional dogma, a change in nomenclature is more appropriate than a change in depositional models. Finally, their call for application of their debris-flow model to the North Sea, Gulf of Mexico, offshore Nigeria, and elsewhere is disturbing because they would have the petroleum industry relinquish the idea of predictability in deep-water reservoirs.

Bouma, A.H. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); DeVries, M.B. [Exxon Company, Houston, TX (United States); Stone, C.G. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Submarine-fan sedimentation, Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 10,000 m (32,808 ft) of interbedded sandstones and shales comprise the Upper Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian flysch succession (Stanley, Jackfork, Johns Valley, Atoka) in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma. Deposited primarily by turbidity current and hemipelagic processes in bathyal and abyssal water depths, these strata formed major submarine-fan complexes that prograded in a westward direction along the axis of an elongate remnant ocean basin that was associated with the collision and suturing of the North American and African-South American plates. A longitudinal fan system is visualized as the depositional framework for these strata, which were deposited in a setting analogous to the modern Bengal fan of the Indian Ocean. Facies analysis of the Jackfork formation indicates that inner fan deposits are present in the vicinity of Little Rock, Arkansas; middle fan channel and interchannel deposits occur at DeGray Dam and Friendship, Arkansas; and outer fan depositional-lobe deposits are present in southeastern Oklahoma. Boulder-bearing units (olistostromes), many with exotic clasts, were shed laterally into the Ouachita basin. They occur throughout the flysch succession and in all fan environments (i.e., inner, middle, and outer). This relationship may serve as a useful criterion for recognizing analogous longitudinal fan systems in the rock record.

Moiola, R.J.; Shanmugam, G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Sampling and analysis of water from Upper Three Runs and its wetlands near Tank 16 and the Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April and September 1993, sampling was conducted to characterize the Upper Three Runs (UTR) wetland waters near the Mixed Waste Management Facility to determine if contaminants migrating from MWMF are outcropping into the floodplain wetlands. For the spring sampling event, 37 wetlands and five stream water samples were collected. Thirty-six wetland and six stream water samples were collected for the fall sampling event. Background seepline and stream water samples were also collected for both sampling events. All samples were analyzed for RCRA Appendix IX volatiles, inorganics appearing on the Target Analyte List, tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and gross radiological activity. Most of the analytical data for both the spring and fall sampling events were reported as below method detection limits. The primary exceptions were the routine water quality indicators (e.g., turbidity, alkalinity, total suspended solids, etc.), iron, manganese, and tritium. During the spring, cadmium, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, potassium-40, ruthenium-106, and trichloroethylene were also detected above the MCLs from at least one location. A secondary objective of this project was to identify any UTR wetland water quality impacts resulting from leaks from Tank 16 located at the H-Area Tank Farm.

Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Projected Performance of Three- and Four-Junction Devices Using GaAs and GaInP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the efficiencies expected for three- and four-junction devices for both space and terrestrial applications. For space applications, the effects of temperature and low concentration are investigated. For terrestrial applications, a concentration of 500 suns is assumed and the theoretical efficiencies are calculated as a function of spectral variations including the effects of air mass, turbidity, and water-vapor content. INTRODUCTION Ga 0.5 In 0.5 P/GaAs two-terminal, two-junction solar cells, invented and developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, are in production at both TECSTAR and Spectrolab. The immediate market for these devices is in space; a future (potentially larger) market is terrestrial concentrator systems. The next-generation cells will add additional junction(s) in order to increase the efficiency. Work on a three-junction cell using an active Ge junction under the Ga 0.5 In 0.5 P/GaAs dual-junction cell has already been reported [1]. Ho...

Gainp; S. R. Kurtz; Sarah R. Kurtz; D. Myers; D. Myers; J.M. Olson; J. M. Olson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

387

Analytical support for a new, low-level radioactive wastewater treatment plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) located in Aiken, SC, is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company under contract with the US Department of Energy. The mission of SRS is to manufacture radioisotopes for use in national defense and space exploration. The F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) is a wastewater treatment plant supporting SRS for low-level radioactive process waste streams. In order to comply with the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the facility had to become operational by November 8, 1988. The F/H ETF employs pH adjustment, microfiltration, organic removal, reverse osmosis, evaporation, and ion exchange to remove contaminants prior to discharge to the environment via a state-permitted outfall. Concentrated contaminants removed by these processes are diverted to other facilities for further processing. The ETF is supported by a 24 hr/day facility laboratory for process control and characterization of influent feed, treated effluent water, and concentrated waste. Permit compliance analyses reported to the state of SC are performed by an offsite certified contract laboratory. The support laboratory is efficiently organized to provide: metal analyses by ICP-AES, alpha/beta/gamma activity counting, process ions by Ion Selective Electrode (ISE), oil and grease analyses by IR technique, mercury via cold vapor AA, conductivity, turbidity, and pH. All instrumentation is contained in hoods for radioactive sample handling.

Jones, V.D.; Marsh, J.H.; Ingram, L.M.; Melton, W.L.; Magonigal, E.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fate of human viruses in groundwater recharge systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research program was to determine the ability of a well-managed tertiary effluent-recharge system to return virologically acceptable water to the groundwater aquifer. The study assessed the quality of waters renovated by indigenous recharge operations and investigated a number of virus-soil interrelationships. The elucidation of the interactions led to the establishment of basin operating criteria for optimizing virus removal. Raw influents, chlorinated tertiary effluents, and renovated wastewater from the aquifer directly beneath a uniquely designed recharge test basin were assayed on a weekly basis for the presence of human enteroviruses and coliform bacteria. High concentrations of viruses were routinely isolated from influents but were isolated only on four occasions from tertiary-treated sewage effluents. In spite of the high quality effluent being recharged, viruses were isolated from the groundwater observation well, indicating their ability to penetrate the unsaturated zone. Results of poliovirus seeding experiments carried out in the test basin clearly indicated the need to operate recharge basins at low (e.g. 1 cm/h) infiltration rates in areas having soil types similar to those found at the study site. The method selected for reducing the test basin infiltration rate involved clogging the basin surface with settled organic material from highly turbid effluent. Alternative methods for slowing infiltration rates are discussed in the text.

Vaughn, J.M.; Landry, E.F.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) is the main limiting factor in our fisheries.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

392

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

393

An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of Langat River estuary, Selangor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An estuary is an area that has a free connection with the open sea and it is a dynamic semi-enclosed coastal bodies. Ex-mining, aquaculture and industrial areas in Selangor are the sources of pollutants discharged into the estuary water. Radionuclides are considered as pollutants to the estuary water. Gamma radiations emitted by natural radionuclides through their decaying process may give impact to human. The radiological effect of natural radionuclides which are {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, were explored by determining the respective activity concentrations in filtered water along the Langat estuary, Selangor. Meanwhile, in- situ water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolve oxygen (DO), salinity, total suspended solid (TSS), pH and turbidity were measured by using YSI portable multi probes meter. The activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in samples are in the range of 0.17 - 0.67 Bq/L, 0.16 - 0.97 Bq/L and 1.22 - 5.57 Bq/L respectively. On the other hand, the concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 were determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF). The thorium concentrations are between 0.17 ppm to 0.28 ppm and uranium concentrations were 0.25 ppm to 0.31 ppm. The results show activity concentrations of radionuclides are slightly high near the river estuary. The Radium Equivalent, Absorbed Dose Rate, External Hazard Index, and Annual Effective Dose of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K are also studied.

Hamzah, Zaini, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Rosli, Tengku Nurliana Tuan Mohd, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Saat, Ahmad, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Wood, Ab. Khalik, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

394

Particle Restabilization in Silica/PEG/Ethanol Suspensions: How Strongly do Polymers Need To Adsorb To Stabilize Against Aggregation?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the effects of increasing the concentration of a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol on the stability of 44 nm diameter silica nanoparticles suspended in ethanol. Polymer concentration, c{sub p}, is increased from zero to that characterizing the polymer melt. Particle stability is accessed through measurement of the particle second-virial coefficient, B{sub -2}, performed by light scattering and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The results show that at low polymer concentration, c{sub p} < 3 wt %, B{sub -2} values are positive, indicating repulsive interactions between particles. B{sub -2} decreases at intermediate concentrations (3 wt % < c{sub p} < 50 wt %), and particles aggregates are formed. At high concentrations (50 wt % < c{sub p}) B{sub -2} increases and stabilizes at a value expected for hard spheres with a diameter near 44 nm, indicating the particles are thermodynamically stable. At intermediate polymer concentrations, rates of aggregation are determined by measuring time-dependent changes in the suspension turbidity, revealing that aggregation is slowed by the necessity of the particles diffusing over a repulsive barrier in the pair potential. The magnitude of the barrier passes through a minimum at c{sub p} {approx} 12 wt % where it has a value of {approx}12kT. These results are understood in terms of a reduction of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attractions with increasing c{sub p}. Depletion attractions are found to play a minor role in particle stability. A model is presented suggesting displacement of weakly adsorbed polymer leads to slow aggregation at intermediate concentration, and we conclude that a general model of depletion restabilization may involve increased strength of polymer adsorption with increasing polymer concentration.

Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F. (UIUC)

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Slump dominated upper slope reservoir facies, Intra Qua Iboe (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integration of sedimentologic and 3D seismic data provides a basis for unraveling complex depositional processes and sand distribution of the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Nearly 3,000 feet of conventional core was examined in interpreting slump/slide/debris flow, bottom current, turbidity current, pelagic/hemipelagic, wave and tide dominated facies. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated seaward, deposition began with a turbidite channel dominated slope system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated slope system (IQI 3, the principal reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated, collapsed shelf-edge deltaic system (IQI 4). Using seismic time slices and corresponding depositional facies in the core, a sandy {open_quotes}fairway{open_quotes} has been delineated in the IQI 3. Because of differences in stacking patterns of sandy and muddy slump intervals, seismic facies show: (1) both sheet-like and mounded external forms (geometries), and (2) parallel/continuous as well as chaotic/hummocky internal reflections. In wireline logs, slump facies exhibits blocky, coarsening-up, fining-up, and serrated motifs. In the absence of conventional core, slump facies may be misinterpreted and even miscorrelated because seismic facies and log motifs of slumps and debris flows tend to mimic properties of turbidite fan deposits. The slump dominated reservoir facies is composed of unconsolidated fine-grained sand. Thickness of individual units varies from 1 to 34 feet, but amalgamated intervals reach a thickness of up to 70 feet and apparently form connected sand bodies. Porosity commonly ranges from 20 to 35%. Horizontal permeability commonly ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 md.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Slump and debris-flow dominated upper slope facies in the Cretaceous of the Norwegian and northern North Seas (61-67{degrees}N): Implications for sand distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A regional sedimentological study of Cretaceous sequences in the Mid-Norway region (Norwegian Sea) and in the Agat region (Agat field area, northern North Sea) reveals that these sequences were predominantly deposited in an upper continental slope environment by slumps and debris flows. Examination of nearly 500 m of core from 14 wells shows eight distinct lithofacies: facies 1 (contorted conglomerate and pebbly sandstone) represents deposits of sandy slumps and debris flows, possibly in a channel setting; facies 2 (contorted sandstone) is the most widespread and is the product of sandy slumps and debris flows; facies 3 (contorted mudstone) indicates deposition from muddy slumps and debris flow; facies 4 (rippled sandstone) suggests bottom-current reworking; facies 5 (graded sandstone) represents turbidity-current deposits and is very rare; facies 6 (laminated mudstone) is a product of pelagic or hemipelagic deposition; facies 7 (cross-bedded sandstone) is indicative of tidal processes, and facies 8 (laminated sandstone) represents delta-front and shelf deposits. These facies and their association suggest a shelf-edge delta to upper slope environment of deposition. Existing core data document deltaic facies only in the Mid-Norway region. The proposed shelf-edge delta and upper slope model has important implications for sand distribution. (1) This model provides and alternative to the conventional submarine-fan model previously applied to these sequences. (2) Although slump and debris-flow emplaced sands are usually discontinuous and unpredictable, highly amalgamated slump and debris-flow sands may develop thick reservoirs. (3) By using the Eocene Frigg Formation as an analog, it is predicted that externally mounded seismic facies in the study area may be composed of sandy slumps and debris flows.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Lehtonen, L.R. [Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S.Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States); Straume, T.; Syvertsen, S.E.; Hodgkinson, R.J.; Skibeli, M. [Mobil Exploration Norway Inc., Stavanger (Norway)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

An investigation of cathodoluminescence in albite from the A-type Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals red and blue colors within single, non-turbid albite (Ab{sub 98-99}) grains from the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia. A 720 nm X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) peak characterizes red CL regions, while a 280 nm XEOL feature dominates blue CL regions. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence results indicate that red CL and the 720 nm XEOL peak intensities relate to total Fe concentrations. The relationship between red CL and Fe content is confirmed by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The XEOL technique is used to exclude the Fe K-edge as the cause of red CL. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that Fe in both the red and blue CL regions is Fe{sup 3+}, and that red CL activation may relate to the Si-Al order of the feldspar and to the distribution of Fe on tetrahedral sites. The CL textures, combined with EMPA and LA-ICPMS analyses, indicate that blue CL albite (Ab98) regions contain higher concentrations of Ca, Ti, Pb and rare earth elements, and were replaced, in part, by a more Fe-rich, trace element depleted albite (Ab99) which displays red CL. Complex diffraction contrasts and amorphous deposits identified in transmission electron microscope images suggest that aqueous fluids have reacted with both red and blue CL regions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures of up to 430 C provide a lower estimate of the fluid temperature.

Dalby, Kim N.; Anderson, Alan J.; Mariano, Anthony N.; Gordon, Robert A.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Wirth, Richard (Missouri SU); (SFX); (Simon); (GFZ)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Sedimentology, petrology, and gas potential of the Brallier Formation: upper Devonian turbidite facies of the Central and Southern Appalachians  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Upper Devonian Brallier Formation of the central and southern Appalachian basin is a regressive sequence of siltstone turbidites interbedded with mudstones, claystones, and shales. It reaches 1000 meters in thickness and overlies basinal mudrocks and underlies deltaic sandstones and mudrocks. Facies and paleocurrent analyses indicate differences between the depositional system of the Brallier Formation and those of modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences. The Brallier system is of finer grain size and lower flow intensity. In addition, the stratigraphic transition from turbidites to deltaic sediments is gradual and differs in its facies succession from the deposits of the proximal parts of modern submarine fans. Such features as massive and pebbly sandstones, conglomerates, debris flows, and massive slump structures are absent from this transition. Paleocurrents are uniformly to the west at right angles to basin isopach, which is atypical of ancient turbidite systems. This suggests that turbidity currents had multiple point sources. The petrography and paleocurrents of the Brallier Formation indicate an eastern source of sedimentary and low-grade metasedimentary rocks with modern relief and rainfall. The depositional system of the Brallier Formation is interpreted as a series of small ephemeral turbidite lobes of low flow intensity which coalesced in time to produce a laterally extensive wedge. The lobes were fed by deltas rather than submarine canyons or upper fan channel systems. This study shows that the present-day turbidite facies model, based mainly on modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences, does not adequately describe prodeltaic turbidite systems such as the Brallier Formation. Thickly bedded siltstone bundles are common features of the Brallier Formation and are probably its best gas reservoir facies, especially when fracture porosity is well developed.

Lundegard, P.D.; Samuels, N.D.; Pryor, W.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Deltaic sedimentation in saline, alkaline Lake Bogoria, Kenya: Response to environmental change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lake Bogoria is a meromictic, saline (90 g/l TDS), alkaline (pH: 10.3) lake with Na-CO[sub 3]-Cl waters, located in a narrow half-graben in the central Kenya Rift. It is fed by hot springs, direct precipitation, and a series of ephemeral streams that discharge into the lake via small deltas and fan-deltas. Examination of the exposed deltas and >50 short cores from the lake floor, have revealed a wide range of deltaic and prodeltaic sediments, including turbidites and subaqueous debris-flow deposits. Studies of 3 long cores and the exposed delta stratigraphy have shown how the style of deltaic sedimentation has responded to environmental changes during the last 30,000 years. During humid periods when lake level is high the lake waters are fresher and less dense. Theoretically, high sediment yield and more constant discharge may promote underflow (hyperpycnal flow), generating low-density turbidity currents. In contrast, during low stages with dense brine, the less dense, inflowing waters carry fine sediment plumes toward the center of the lake where they settle from suspension (hypopycnal flow). Although applicable as a general model, the sediment record shows that reality is more complex. Variations in meromixis and level of the chemocline, together with local and temporal differences in sediment yield and discharge, may permit density flows even when the lake is under a predominant hypopycnal regime. During periods of aridity when sodium carbonate evaporites were forming, exposed delta plains were subject to desiccation with local development of calcrete and zeolitic paleosols.

Renaut, R.W. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Tiercelin, J.J. (Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Domaines Oceaniques)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ntu nephelometric turbidity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Analysis of the optical design of the NSLS-II Coherent Hard X-ray beamline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the NSLS-II offer excellent opportunities for the development of experimental techniques exploiting x-ray coherence. Coherent light scattered by a heterogeneous sample produces a speckle pattern characteristic for the specific arrangement of the scatterers. This may vary over time, and the resultant intensity fluctuations can be measured and analyzed to provide information about the sample dynamics. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) extends the capability of dynamic light scattering to opaque and turbid samples and extends the measurements of time evolution to nanometer length scales. As a consequence XPCS became crucial in the study of dynamics in systems including, but not being limited to, colloids, polymers, complex fluids, surfaces and interfaces, phase ordering alloys, etc. In this paper we present the conceptual optical design and the theoretical performance of the Coherent Hard X-ray (CHX) beamline at NSLS-II, dedicated to XPCS and other coherent scattering techniques. For the optical design of this beamline, there is a tradeoff between the coherence needed to distinguish individual speckles and the phase acceptance (high intensity) required to measure fast dynamics with an adequate signal-to-noise level. As XPCS is a 'photon hungry' technique, the beamline optimization requires maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured intensity-intensity autocorrelation function. The degree of coherence, as measured by a two-slit (Young) experiment, is used to characterize the speckle pattern visibilities. The beamline optimization strategy consists of maximization of the on-sample intensity while keeping the degree of coherence within the 0.1-0.5 range. The resulted design deviates substantially from an ad-hoc modification of a hard x-ray beamline for XPCS measurements. The CHX beamline will permit studies of complex systems and measurements of bulk dynamics down to the microsecond time scales. In general, the 10-fold increase in brightness of the NSLS-II, compared to other sources, will allow for measurements of dynamics on time-scales that are two orders of magnitude faster than what is currently possible. We also conclude that the common approximations used in evaluating the transverse coherence length would not be sufficiently accurate for the calculation of the coherent properties of an undulator-based beamline, and a thorough beamline optimization at a low-emittance source such as the NSLS-II requires a realistic wave-front propagation analysis.

Fluerasu A.; Chubar, O.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Baltser, J.; Wiegart, Lutz; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Carlucci-Dayton, M.; Berman, L.

2011-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the submarine debris speed can be faster than the tsunami speed. This information can be useful for early warning strategies in the coastal regions. These findings substantially increase our understanding of complex multi-phase systems and multi-physics and flows, and allows for the proper modeling of landslide and debris induced tsunami, the dynamics of turbidity currents and sediment transport, and the associated applications to hazard mitigation, geomorphology and sedimentology.

Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A. [Department of Geodynamics and Geophysics, Steinmann Institute, University of Bonn Nussallee 8, D-53115, Bonn (Germany)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality issues including dissolved oxygen and/or turbidity. Regardless, angler fishing experience was the highest at Lake Billy Shaw. Trout in Mountain View Reservoir were in the best condition of the three reservoirs and anglers reported very good fishing there. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) remain the main limiting factors in the fisheries, particularly in late August to early September.

Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx}20 % to 23%). This trend is explained by a sequence stratigraphic model which predicts progressive increase in sorting by turbidity current along the flow, as well as, quantified by a rock model that heuristically accounts for sorting. The results can be applied to improve quantitative predication of sediment parameters from seismic impedance, away from well locations.

Department of Geophysics

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hopewell Beneficial CO2 Capture for Production of Fuels, Fertilizer and Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For Phase 1 of this project, the Hopewell team developed a detailed design for the Small Scale Pilot-Scale Algal CO2 Sequestration System. This pilot consisted of six (6) x 135 gallon cultivation tanks including systems for CO2 delivery and control, algal cultivation, and algal harvesting. A feed tank supplied Hopewell wastewater to the tanks and a receiver tank collected the effluent from the algal cultivation system. The effect of environmental parameters and nutrient loading on CO2 uptake and sequestration into biomass were determined. Additionally the cost of capturing CO2 from an industrial stack emission at both pilot and full-scale was determined. The engineering estimate evaluated Amine Guard technology for capture of pure CO2 and direct stack gas capture and compression. The study concluded that Amine Guard technology has lower lifecycle cost at commercial scale, although the cost of direct stack gas capture is lower at the pilot scale. Experiments conducted under high concentrations of dissolved CO2 did not demonstrate enhanced algae growth rate. This result suggests that the dissolved CO2 concentration at neutral pH was already above the limiting value. Even though dissolved CO2 did not show a positive effect on biomass growth, controlling its value at a constant set-point during daylight hours can be beneficial in an algae cultivation stage with high algae biomass concentration to maximize the rate of CO2 uptake. The limited enhancement of algal growth by CO2 addition to Hopewell wastewater was due at least in part to the high endogenous CO2 evolution from bacterial degradation of dissolved organic carbon present at high levels in the wastewater. It was found that the high level of bacterial activity was somewhat inhibitory to algal growth in the Hopewell wastewater. The project demonstrated that the Honeywell automation and control system, in combination with the accuracy of the online pH, dissolved O2, dissolved CO2, turbidity, Chlorophyll A and conductivity sensors is suitable for process control of algae cultivation in an open pond systems. This project concluded that the Hopewell wastewater is very suitable for algal cultivation but the potential for significant CO2 sequestration from the plant stack gas emissions was minimal due to the high endogenous CO2 generation in the wastewater from the organic wastewater content. Algae cultivation was found to be promising, however, for nitrogen remediation in the Hopewell wastewater.

UOP; Honeywell Resins & Chemicals; Honeywell Process Solutions; Aquaflow Bionomics Ltd

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Particulate matter chemistry and dynamics in the Twilight Zone at VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding particle dynamics in the 'Twilight Zone' is critical to prediction of the ocean's carbon cycle. As part of the VERTIGO (VERtical Transformations In the Global Ocean) project, this rarely sampled regime extending from the base of the euphotic layer to 1000 m, was characterized by double-paired day/night Multiple Unit Large Volume in-situ Filtration System (MULVFS) deployments and by {approx}100 high-frequency CTD/transmissometer/turbidity sensor profiles. VERTIGO studies lasting three weeks, contrasted oligotrophic station ALOHA (22.75{sup o}N 158{sup o}W), sampled in June-July 2004, with a biologically productive location (47{sup o}N 161{sup o}E) near station K2 in the Oyashio, occupied July-August 2005. Profiles of major and minor particulate components (C{sub org}, N, P, Ca, Si, Sr, Ba, Mn) in <1, 1-51, and >51 {micro}m size fractions, in-water optics, neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) fluxes, and zooplankton data were intercompared. MULVFS total C{sub org} and C-Star particle beam attenuation coefficient (C{sub P}) were consistently related at both sites with a 27 {micro}M m{sup -1} conversion factor. 26 At K2, C{sub P} profiles further showed a multitude of transient spikes throughout the water column and spike abundance profiles closely paralleled the double peaked abundance profiles of zooplankton. Also at K2, copepods contributed {approx}40% and 10%, night and day, respectively to >51 {micro}m C{sub org} of MULVFS samples in the mixed layer, but few copepods were collected in deeper waters; however, non-swimming radiolarians were quantitatively sampled. A recent hypothesis regarding POC differences between pumps and bottles is examined in light of these results. Particulate >51 {micro}m C{sub org}, N, and P at both ALOHA and K2 showed strong attenuation with depth at both sites. Notable at ALOHA were unusually high levels of >51 {micro}m Sr (up to 4 nM) in the mixed layer, a reflection of high abundances of SrSO{sub 4} precipitating Acantharia. Notable at K2 were major changes in water column inventories of many particulate components to 700 m over 10 days. Carbon mass balance, with the consideration of particle inventory changes included, indicated that over 98% and 96% of primary produced C{sub org} was remineralized shallower than 500 m at ALOHA and K2, respectively. Production of CaCO3 was estimated to be {approx}0.06, 0.89 and 0.02 mmols m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at ALOHA and at K2 during two separate week long study periods, respectively. Similarly, Si production was estimated to be {approx}0.08, 10.7, and 4.2 mols m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. An estimated 50% and 65% of produced Si was remineralized by 500m at ALOHA and K2, respectively. Little carbonate dissolution was seen in the upper 500 m at ALOHA, a reflection of 400% super saturation of surface waters and the 700 m deep saturation horizon. Over 92% of produced CaCO{sub 3} was dissolved shallower than 500 m at K2 and biological enhancement of dissolution was readily apparent in waters above the 200 m calcite saturation horizon.

Bishop, James K.B.; Wood, T.J.

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower l/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River in the vicinity of Gibbon, Oregon. In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach, consistent with other basin efforts, and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. During the 1994-95 project period, a one river mile demonstration project was implemented on two privately owned properties on Wildhorse Creek. This was the first watershed improvement project to be implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) off of the Reservation. Four 15 year riparian easements and two right-of-way agreements were secured for enhancement of one river mile on Wildhorse Creek and l/2 river mile on Meacham Creek. Enhancements implemented between river mile (RM) 9.5 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek included: (1) installation of 1.43 miles of smooth wire high tensile fence line and placement of 0.43 miles of fence posts and structures to restrict livestock from the riparian corridor, (2) construction of eighteen sediment retention structures in the stream channel to speed riparian recovery by elevating the stream grade, slowing water velocities and depositing sediments onto streambanks to provide substrate for revegetation, and (3) revegetation of the stream corridor, terraces and adjacent pasture areas with 644 pounds of native grass seed (when commercially available) or close species equivalents and 4,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Three hundred pounds of native grass/legume seed (including other grasses/legumes exhibiting native species characteristics) were broadcast in existing Boston Canyon Creek, Meacham Creek and Umatilla River project areas. The addition of two properties into the project area between RM 4.25 and RM 4.75 Meacham Creek during the 1995-96 work period will provide nearly complete project coverage of lower Meacham Creek corridor areas on the Reservation. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo documentation of riparian recovery within the project areas provided additional baseline data. Physical habitat surveys continued to be conducted to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area. This information will be utilized to assist in identification of habitat deficient areas within the watershed in which to focus habitat restoration efforts. These efforts were coordinated with the CTUIR Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation (UBNPME) Project. Poor land use practices, which have altered natural floodplain dynamics and significantly reduced or eliminated fisheries habitat, continued to be identified in the Mission Creek Subbasin. Complied data is currently being incorporated into a data layer for a Geographic Information System (GIS) data base. This effort is being coordinated with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Community outreach efforts and public education opportunities continued during the reporting period. CTUIR cooperatively sponsored a bioengineering workshop on February 23, 1995 with the Oregon De

Shaw, R. Todd

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Extended Sleeve Products Allow Control and Monitoring of Process Fluid Flows Inside Shielding, Behind Walls and Beneath Floors - 13041  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout power generation, delivery and waste remediation, the ability to control process streams in difficult or impossible locations becomes increasingly necessary as the complexity of processes increases. Example applications include radioactive environments, inside concrete installations, buried in dirt, or inside a shielded or insulated pipe. In these situations, it is necessary to implement innovative solutions to tackle such issues as valve maintenance, valve control from remote locations, equipment cleaning in hazardous environments, and flow stream analysis. The Extended Sleeve family of products provides a scalable solution to tackle some of the most challenging applications in hazardous environments which require flow stream control and monitoring. The Extended Sleeve family of products is defined in three groups: Extended Sleeve (ESV), Extended Bonnet (EBV) and Instrument Enclosure (IE). Each of the products provides a variation on the same requirements: to provide access to the internals of a valve, or to monitor the fluid passing through the pipeline through shielding around the process pipe. The shielding can be as simple as a grout filled pipe covering a process pipe or as complex as a concrete deck protecting a room in which the valves and pipes pass through at varying elevations. Extended Sleeves are available between roughly 30 inches and 18 feet of distance between the pipeline centerline and the top of the surface to which it mounts. The Extended Sleeve provides features such as 1.5 inches of adjustment between the pipeline and deck location, internal flush capabilities, automatic alignment of the internal components during assembly and integrated actuator mounting pads. The Extended Bonnet is a shorter fixed height version of the Extended Sleeve which has a removable deck flange to facilitate installation through walls, and is delivered fully assembled. The Instrument Enclosure utilizes many of the same components as an Extended Sleeve, yet allows the installation of process monitoring instruments, such as a turbidity meter to be placed in the flow stream. The basis of the design is a valve body, which, rather than having a directly mounted bonnet has lengths of concentric pipe added, which move the bonnet away from the valve body. The pipe is conceptually similar to an oil field well, with the various strings of casing, and tubing installed. Each concentric pipe provides a required function, such as the outermost pipes, the valve sleeve and penetration sleeve, which provide structural support to the deck flange. For plug valve based designs, the next inner pipe provides compression on the environmental seals at the top of the body to bonnet joint, followed by the innermost pipe which provides rotation of the plug, in the same manner as an extended stem. Ball valve ESVs have an additional pipe to provide compressive loading on the stem packing. Due to the availability of standard pipe grades and weights, the product can be configured to fit a wide array of valve sizes, and application lengths, with current designs as short as seven inches and as tall as 18 feet. Central to the design is the requirement for no special tools or downhole tools to remove parts or configure the product. Off the shelf wrenches, sockets or other hand tools are all that is required. Compared to other products historically available, this design offers a lightweight option, which, while not as rigidly stiff, can deflect compliantly under extreme seismic loading, rather than break. Application conditions vary widely, as the base product is 316 and 304 stainless steel, but utilizes 17-4PH, and other allows as needed based on the temperature range and mechanical requirements. Existing designs are installed in applications as hot as 1400 deg. F, at low pressure, and separately in highly radioactive environments. The selection of plug versus ball valve, metal versus soft seats, and the material of the seals and seats is all dependent on the application requirements. The design of the Extended Sleeve family of products provid

Abbott, Mark W. [Flowserve Corporation, 1978 Foreman Drive Cookeville, TN 38506 (United States)] [Flowserve Corporation, 1978 Foreman Drive Cookeville, TN 38506 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria, the following constituent list and sampling schedule is proposed: Constituent; Sampling Frequency Site-Specific Parameters; Hexavalent chromium (a); Semiannual Chloride; Semiannual Fluoride; Semiannual Nitrate; Semiannual Nitrite; Semiannual Specific conductance (field)(a); Semiannual Ancillary Parameters; Anions; Annual Alkalinity Annual Metals, (in addition to chromium); Annual pH (field) Semiannual Temperature (field); Semiannual Turbidity (field) Semiannual (a). These constituents will be subject to statistical tests after background is established. It will be necessary to install new monitoring wells and accumulate background data on the groundwater from those wells before statistical comparisons can be made. Until then, the constituents listed above will be evaluated by tracking and trending concentrations in all wells and comparing these results with the corresponding DWS or Hanford Site background concentration for each constituent. If a comparison value (background or DWS) for a constituent is exceeded, DOE will notify Ecology per WAC 173-303-645 (9) (g) requirements (within seven days or a time agreed to between DOE and Ecology).

Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

Chinook Salmon Adult Abundance Monitoring; Hydroacoustic Assessment of Chinook Salmon Escapement to the Secesh River, Idaho, 2002-2004 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate determination of adult salmon spawner abundance is key to the assessment of recovery actions for wild Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Onchorynchus tshawytscha), a species listed as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). As part of the Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Program, the Nez Perce Tribe operates an experimental project in the South Fork of the Salmon River subbasin. The project has involved noninvasive monitoring of Chinook salmon escapement on the Secesh River between 1997 and 2000 and on Lake Creek since 1998. The overall goal of this project is to accurately estimate adult Chinook salmon spawning escapement numbers to the Secesh River and Lake Creek. Using time-lapse underwater video technology in conjunction with their fish counting stations, Nez Perce researchers have successfully collected information on adult Chinook salmon spawner abundance, run timing, and fish-per-redd numbers on Lake Creek since 1998. However, the larger stream environment in the Secesh River prevented successful implementation of the underwater video technique to enumerate adult Chinook salmon abundance. High stream discharge and debris loads in the Secesh caused failure of the temporary fish counting station, preventing coverage of the early migrating portion of the spawning run. Accurate adult abundance information could not be obtained on the Secesh with the underwater video method. Consequently, the Nez Perce Tribe now is evaluating advanced technologies and methodologies for measuring adult Chinook salmon abundance in the Secesh River. In 2003, the use of an acoustic camera for assessing spawner escapement was examined. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in a collaborative arrangement with the Nez Perce Tribe, provided the technical expertise to implement the acoustic camera component of the counting station on the Secesh River. This report documents the first year of a proposed three-year study to determine the efficacy of using an acoustic camera to count adult migrant Chinook salmon as they make their way to the spawning grounds on the Secesh River and Lake Creek. A phased approach to applying the acoustic camera was proposed, starting with testing and evaluation in spring 2003, followed by a full implementation in 2004 and 2005. The goal of this effort is to better assess the early run components when water clarity and night visibility preclude the use of optical techniques. A single acoustic camera was used to test the technology for enumerating adult salmon passage at the Secesh River. The acoustic camera was deployed on the Secesh at a site engineered with an artificial substrate to control the river bottom morphometry and the passage channel. The primary goal of the analysis for this first year of deployment was to validate counts of migrant salmon. The validation plan involved covering the area with optical video cameras so that both optical and acoustic camera images of the same viewing region could be acquired simultaneously. A secondary test was contrived after the fish passage was complete using a controlled setting at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in which we tested the detectability as a function of turbidity levels. Optical and acoustic camera multiplexed video recordings of adult Chinook salmon were made at the Secesh River fish counting station from August 20 through August 29, 2003. The acoustic camera performed as well as or better than the optical camera at detecting adult Chinook salmon over the 10-day test period. However, the acoustic camera was not perfect; the data reflected adult Chinook salmon detections made by the optical camera that were missed by the acoustic camera. The conditions for counting using the optical camera were near ideal, with shallow clear water and good light penetration. The relative performance of the acoustic camera is expected to be even better than the optical camera in early spring when water clarity and light penetration are limited. Results of the laboratory tests at the Pacific North

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Mueller, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Geoscience Perspectives in Carbon Sequestration - Educational Training and Research Through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most effective mechanism to limit CO{sub 2} release from underground Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS) sites over multi-century time scales will be to convert the CO{sub 2} into solid carbonate minerals. This report describes the results from four independent research investigations on carbonate mineralization: 1) Colloidal calcite particles forming in Maramec Spring, Missouri, provide a natural analog to evaluate reactions that may occur in a leaking GCS site. The calcite crystals form as a result of physiochemical changes that occur as the spring water rises from a depth of more than 190'?. The resultant pressure decrease induces a loss of CO{sub 2} from the water, rise in pH, lowering of the solubility of Ca{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and calcite precipitation. Equilibrium modelling of the spring water resulted in a calculated undersaturated state with respect to calcite. The discontinuity between the observed occurrence of calcite and the model result predicting undersaturated conditions can be explained if bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) are directly involved in precipitation process rather than just carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). 2) Sedimentary rocks in the Oronto Group of the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) system contain an abundance of labile Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-silicate minerals that will neutralize carbonic acid and provide alkaline earth ions for carbonate mineralization. One of the challenges in using MCR rocks for GCS results from their low porosity and permeability. Oronto Group samples were reacted with both CO{sub 2}-saturated deionized water at 90C, and a mildly acidic leachant solution in flow-through core-flooding reactor vessels at room temperature. Resulting leachate solutions often exceeded the saturation limit for calcite. Carbonate crystals were also detected in as little as six days of reaction with Oronto Group rocks at 90oC, as well as experiments with forsterite-olivine and augite, both being common minerals this sequence. The Oronto Group samples have poor reservoir rock characteristics, none ever exceeded a permeability value of 2.0 mD even after extensive dissolution of calcite cement during the experiments. The overlying Bayfield Group Jacobsville Formation sandstones averaged 13.4 4.3% porosity and a single sample tested by core-flooding revealed a permeability of ~340 mD. The high porosity-permeability characteristics of these sandstones will allow them to be used for GCS as a continuous aquifer unit with the overlying Mt. Simon Formation. 3) Anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can enhance the conversion rate of CO{sub 2} into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage. SRB accelerated carbonate mineralization reactions between pCO{sub 2} values of 0.0059 and 14.7 psi. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for SRB metabolism. The use of a {sup 13}CO{sub 2} spiked gas source also produced carbonate minerals with ~53% of the carbon being derived from the gas phase. The sulfate reducing activity of the microbial community was limited, however, at 20 psi pCO{sub 2} and carbonate mineralization did not occur. Inhibition of bacterial metabolism may have resulted from the acidic conditions or CO{sub 2} toxicity. 4) Microbialite communities forming in the high turbidity and hypersaline water of Storrs Lake, San Salvador Island, The Bahamas, were investigated for their distribution, mineralogy and microbial diversity. Molecular analysis of the organic mats on the microbialites indicate only a trace amount of cyanobacteria, while anaerobic and photosynthetic non-sulfur bacteria of the phyla Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of class Gammaproteobacteria were abundant.

Wronkiewicz, David; Paul, Varum; Abousif, Alsedik; Ryback, Kyle

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

CROSSFLOW FILTRATION: EM-31, WP-2.3.6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing crossflow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed some of those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Crossflow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate solutions. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Integrated Salt Disposition Process and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the crossflow filter feed flow rate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and crossflow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to evaluate methods to improve filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today. Experiments that use non-radioactive simulants for actual waste always carry the inherent risk of not eliciting prototypic results; however, they will assist in focusing the scope needed to minimize radioactive testing and thus maximize safety. To that end this investigation has determined: (1) Waste simulant SB6 was found to be more challenging to filtration than a SRS Tank 8F simulant; (2) Higher solids concentration presents a greater challenge to filtration; (3) Filter cake is something that should be properly developed in initial filter operation; (4) Backpulsing is not necessary to maintain a good filter flux with salt wastes; (5) Scouring a filter without cleaning will lead to improved filter performance; (6) The presence of a filter cake can improve the solids separation by an order of magnitude as determined by turbidity; (7) A well developed cake with periodic scouring may allow a good filter flux to be maintained for long periods of time; and (8) Filtrate flux decline is reversible when the concentration of the filtering slurry drops and the filter is scoured.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z