National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ntu nephelometric turbidity

  1. Prince House-NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    Prince House- NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms Prince House- NTU Hsiu-Chi House Incubation Center Bldg Dept. of Entomology 5th Men's Dorm 8th Men's Dorm Prince House - NTU Chang-Hsing Dorms Civil

  2. Prince House-NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    Prince House- NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms Prince House- NTU Hsiu-Chi House Incubation Center Bldg-Yuan Hall Halcyon House Bldg. No. 1 Agricultural Exhibition Hall New Moon Pavilion NTU Visitor Center Lesyue's Dorm Fang-Lan Mansion Dept. of Animal Science & Technology Environment Research Bldg. Recycling Center

  3. Microsoft Word - 2902ntu.dot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete and realistic microscopicWednesday,050-P (3-2008)902-NTU

  4. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    Turbid water Clear water pixel position cameraresponsecameraresponse pixel position ABSTRACT: A new underwater laser scanning system, providing microbathymetric information in coastal waters is described the backscatter component resulting in enhanced performance in turbid waters. The system is expected to provide

  5. English Literature Resources of NTU Library National Taiwan University Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    English Literature Resources of NTU Library National Taiwan University Library #12;MLA Inter- national Bibliography Literature Online, Early English Books Online Naxos Spoken Word Library19 7 14 15 Naxos Spoken Word Library Literature Online Literature Resource Center Shakespeare

  6. Speaker: Prof. Fa-Hsuan Lin (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Dr. Yi-Cheng Hsu (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Speaker: Prof. Fa-Hsuan Lin (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Dr. Yi-Cheng Hsu (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Title: Magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain: progress, challenges

  7. 94753007@nccu.edu.tw zmgao@ntu.edu.tw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94753007@nccu.edu.tw zmgao@ntu.edu.tw chaolin@nccu.edu.tw changcy@ntnu.edu.tw (IEA] IEA TIMSS [3] TIMSS (sublanguage) #12;(controlled-language) [4] [1] TIMSS 3 i i. Google Translate[12] [19] Http Connection Interface html html ii. #12; IEA

  8. Quantifying turbidity current interactions with topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straub, Kyle M

    2007-01-01

    This thesis advances our understanding of how transport properties of turbidity currents are mediated by interactions with seafloor topography, specifically channelized surfaces. Turbidity currents are responsible for ...

  9. NTU Library User's Guide w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    My L ve Affairwith Library NTU Library User's Guide #12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;C Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro How to find to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

  10. Page 1 of 4 NTU EcoCampus Environnemental Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    approach over 3years ­ Jan 2012. Procurement Objective: To limit the environmental impact of NTU an action plan to reduce Estates & Resources vehicle fleet environmental impacts - Aug 2011. · Roll out projects e.g. wind turbines at Brackenhurst/ photovoltaic power generation 10 year plan­ Feb 2012

  11. w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    #12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro A wonderful place to stay I want to read books... I want to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

  12. Effect of Canister Movement on Water Turbidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRIMBLE, D.J.

    2000-08-24

    Requirements for evaluating the adherence characteristics of sludge on the fuel stored in the K East Basin and the effect of canister movement on basin water turbidity are documented in Briggs (1996). The results of the sludge adherence testing have been documented (Bergmann 1996). This report documents the results of the canister movement tests. The purpose of the canister movement tests was to characterize water turbidity under controlled canister movements (Briggs 1996). The tests were designed to evaluate methods for minimizing the plumes and controlling water turbidity during fuel movements leading to multi-canister overpack (MCO) loading. It was expected that the test data would provide qualitative visual information for use in the design of the fuel retrieval and water treatment systems. Video recordings of the tests were to be the only information collected.

  13. Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents flowing around bends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    1 Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents Production Research Company Houston, Texas USA ABSTRACT Turbidity currents are sediment-laden bottom flows in lakes and the ocean that derive their momentum from the force of gravity acting on the sediment held

  14. Turbidity study of solar ponds utilizing seawater as salt source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Nan; Sun, Wence; Shi, Yufeng [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Yin, Fang [YLab, 358 South 700 East, Suit B-139, Salt Lake City, UT 84102 (United States); Zhang, Caihong [Dalian Thermoelectric Group Co. Ltd., Dalian 116001 (China)

    2010-02-15

    A series of experiments were conducted to study the turbidity reduction in solar ponds utilizing seawater as salt source. The experiment on the turbidity reduction efficiency with chemicals indicates that alum (KAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O) has a better turbidity control property because of its strongly flocculating and also well depressing the growing of algae and bacteria in the seawater. In comparison with bittern and seawater, our experiment shows that the residual brine after desalination can keep limpidity for a long time even without any chemical in it. Experiments were also conducted on the diffusion of turbidity and salinity, which show that the turbidity did not diffuse upwards in the solution. In the experiment on subsidence of soil in the bittern and saline with the same salinity, it was found that soil subsided quite quickly in the pure saline water, but very slowly in the bittern. In this paper we also proposed an economical method to protect the solar pond from the damage of rain. Finally, thermal performance of a solar pond was simulated in the conditions of different turbidities using a thermal diffusion model. (author)

  15. ATMOSPHERIC TURBIDITY DETERMINATION FROM IRRADIANCE RATIOS Chris Gueymard Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    ATMOSPHERIC TURBIDITY DETERMINATION FROM IRRADIANCE RATIOS Chris Gueymard Frank Vignola Florida irradiance measurements and other atmo- spheric parameters. An error analysis and various tests against cloudless and the diffuse irradiance data are very accurate. Yet, this method is insensitive to errors

  16. Turbidity and Total Suspended Solid Concentration Dynamics in Streamflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sediment transport in California oak woodland watersheds. Introduction California's oak woodland watershedsTurbidity and Total Suspended Solid Concentration Dynamics in Streamflow from California Oak experimental watersheds in the northern Sierra foothills and north coast oak woodlands of California. Rating

  17. Interrelation of surface tension, optical turbidity, and color of operational transformer oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L'vov, S. Yu.; Lyut'ko, E. O.; Lankau, Ya. V.; Komarov, V. B.; Seliverstov, A. F.; Bondareva, V. N.; L'vov, Yu. N.; L'vov, M. Yu.; Ershov, B. G.

    2011-09-15

    Measurements of the acidity, optical turbidity, surface tension, and color of transformer oil from 54 power transformers, autotransformers, and shunt reactors are reported. Changes in surface tension, optical turbidity, and color are found to obey adequate linear correlations, while the acidity has no correlation with any of these properties. Numerical criteria for the maximum permissible state (quality) of the oil with respect to optical turbidity and color are obtained. Recommendations to operating staff are provided for cases in which the criteria for optical turbidity and color are exceeded.

  18. Critical analysis of atmospheric turbidity and precipitable water at five Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.; Gueymard, C.

    1997-12-31

    Global and diffuse radiation and surface meteorological measurements at Edmonton, Montreal, Port Hardy, Toronto and Winnipeg for the years 1977--1984 are analyzed to yield estimates of atmospheric precipitable water and turbidity. Three methods of estimating the precipitable water and two methods of estimating the turbidity are used and compared. Measurements of pyranometer response as a function of zenith angle are used to correct the global radiation measurements. Turbidity is corrected for the effect of circumsolar radiation included in the direct radiation obtained from the global and diffuse radiation measurements. A comparison with earlier precipitable water and turbidity results is included.

  19. L. Srivatsan Larry W. Lake Roger T. Bonnecaze Scaling analysis of deposition from turbidity currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ó Springer-Verlag 2004 Abstract Many oil-bearing sedimentary deposits are formed by the settling of particles from turbidity cur- rents. Modeling sedimentary processes that form these turbidites enables

  20. Statistical detection and imaging of objects hidden in turbid media using ballistic photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistical detection and imaging of objects hidden in turbid media using ballistic photons Sina-resolution imaging through scattering media with ballistic photons. We derive the fundamental limits on the accuracy

  1. Evolution of a non-cohesive granular bed subject to a succession of erosive turbidity currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangel, Roberto Carlos

    2006-01-01

    An experiment was performed to study the evolution of a non-cohesive granular bed subject to a succession of erosive turbidity currents to evaluate the applicability of a proposed interface model that prescribes a relationship ...

  2. Turbidity suppression from the ballistic to the diffusive regime in biological tissues using optical phase conjugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Emily J.

    We describe the amplitude and resolution trends of the signals acquired by turbidity suppression through optical phase conjugation (TSOPC) with samples that span the ballistic and diffusive scattering regimes. In these ...

  3. Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losleben, Tamar

    2008-01-01

    In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

  4. San Joaquin River Up-Stream DO TMDL Project Task 4: Monitoring Study Interim Task Report #3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    feet Orp Turbid+ Chl Chl Battery Flow mV NTU ug/L RFU voltsfeet Orp Turbid+ Chl Chl Battery Flow mV NTU ug/L RFU volts+ Chl Chl Battery mV NTU ug/L RFU volts Flow CFS 1591.84

  5. Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO)

    1998-04-14

    Optical imaging through turbid media is demonstrated using a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate. An apparatus and method for detecting ballistic and/or snake light while rejecting unwanted diffusive light for imaging structures within highly scattering media are described. Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in rhodamine 590 is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore has lost memory of the structures within the scattering medium. Images have been obtained of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye, which demonstrates the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic and/or snake light in optical mammography is discussed.

  6. Nonlinear Neural Network-Based Mixture Model for Estimating the Concentration of Nitrogen Salts in Turbid Inland Waters Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    in Turbid Inland Waters Using Hyperspectral Imagery Javier Plaza, Pablo Martínez, Rosa Pérez, Antonio Plaza@unex.es ABSTRACT The development of hyperspectral imaging instruments designed for water quality assessment are able to infer water quality parameters of turbid inland waters, and to use those parameters

  7. Practical application of the "turbid water" flag in ocean color imagery: Interference with sun-glint contaminated pixels in open ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contaminated by residual sun-glint may lead to a raising of the "turbid flag" in zones where such a turbidity as such) when studying coastal zones influenced by river discharges and sediment resuspension. More

  8. Definition: Cloudiness of the water, caused by suspended materials that can be seen and that scatter the light which passes through the water...(Turbid waters are those in which you cannot see your feet in knee deep water).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    feet in knee deep water). The Secchi Disk Low Turbidity High Turbidity Causes of Turbidity: SoilDefinition: Cloudiness of the water, caused by suspended materials that can be seen and that scatter the light which passes through the water...(Turbid waters are those in which you cannot see your

  9. Polarized light propagation in highly scattering turbid media with a distribution of the particle size: a Monte Carlo study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Wonshill

    2013-02-22

    The light propagation in highly scattering turbid media composed of the particles with different size distribution is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation model implemented in Standard C. Monte Carlo method has been widely utilized to study...

  10. Impacts of Delayed Drawdown on Aquatic Biota and Water Quality in Seasonally Managed Wetlands of the Grasslands Ecological Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2009-01-01

    L) Turbidity (NTU) Solar Radiation (W/m 2 ) Label Date Ave.mg/L-P) Date Phosphate (mg/L-P) Solar Radiation (Ly/day)

  11. Nanoemulsion stability: experimental evaluation of the flocculation rate from turbidity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem Rahn-Chique; Antonio M. Puertas; Manuel S. Romero-Cano; Clara Rojas; German Urbina-Villalba

    2012-05-21

    The coalescence of liquid drops induces a higher level of complexity compared to the classical studies about the aggregation of solid spheres. Yet, it is commonly believed that most findings on solid dispersions are directly applicable to liquid mixtures. Here, the state of the art in the evaluation of the flocculation rate of these two systems is reviewed. Special emphasis is made on the differences between suspensions and emulsions. In the case of suspensions, the stability ratio is commonly evaluated from the initial slope of the absorbance as a function of time under diffusive and reactive conditions. Puertas and de las Nieves (1997) developed a theoretical approach that allows the determination of the flocculation rate from the variation of the turbidity of a sample as a function of time. Here, suitable modifications of the experimental procedure and the referred theoretical approach are implemented in order to calculate the values of the stability ratio and the flocculation rate corresponding to a dodecane-in-water nanoemulsion stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Four analytical expressions of the turbidity are tested, basically differing in the optical cross section of the aggregates formed. The first two models consider the processes of: a) aggregation (as described by Smoluchowski) and b) the instantaneous coalescence upon flocculation. The other two models account for the simultaneous occurrence of flocculation and coalescence. The latter reproduce the temporal variation of the turbidity in all cases studied (380 \\leq [NaCl] \\leq 600 mM), providing a method of appraisal of the flocculation rate in nanoemulsions.

  12. Turbidity current flow over an obstacle and phases of sediment wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    We study the flow of particle-laden turbidity currents down a slope and over an obstacle. A high-resolution 2D computer simulation model is used, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. It includes poly-disperse particle grain sizes in the current and substrate. Particular attention is paid to the erosion and deposition of the substrate particles, including application of an active layer model. Multiple flows are modeled from a lock release that can show the development of sediment waves (SW). These are stream-wise waves that are triggered by the increasing slope on the downstream side of the obstacle. The initial obstacle is completely erased by the resuspension after a few flows leading to self consistent and self generated SW that are weakly dependant on the initial obstacle. The growth of these waves is directly related to the turbidity current being self sustaining, that is, the net erosion is more than the net deposition. Four system parameters are found to influence the SW growth: (1) slope, (2) current ...

  13. In 2006, the Alliance of Coastal Technology (ACT) evaluated the performance of five commercial-ready, in situ turbidity sensors at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    ABSTRACT In 2006, the Alliance of Coastal Technology (ACT) evaluated the performance of five commercial-ready, in situ turbidity sensors at eight test sites located throughout North America (Fig. 1, and a freshwater lake (Fig. 1) . The sensors used in this study consisted of: A backscatter Turbidity Probe ( =660

  14. Assessing the potential of SeaWiFS and MODIS for estimating chlorophyll concentration in turbid productive waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitelson, Anatoly

    purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which near-infrared (NIR) to red reflectance ratios productive waters using red and near-infrared bands Giorgio Dall'Olmoa,b,*, Anatoly A. Gitelsona,b , Donald C estimation of Chl in turbid productive waters has so far not been feasible from satellite sensors. The main

  15. Is it appropriate to model turbidity currents with the Three-Equation Model?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Peng; He, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The Three-Equation Model (TEM) was developed in the 1980s to model turbidity currents (TCs) and has been widely used ever since. However, its physical justification was questioned because self-accelerating TCs simulated with the steady TEM seemed to violate the turbulent kinetic energy balance. This violation was considered as a result of very strong sediment erosion that consumes more turbulent kinetic energy than is produced. To confine bed erosion and thus remedy this issue, the Four-Equation Model (FEM) was introduced by assuming a proportionality between the bed shear stress and the turbulent kinetic energy. Here we analytically proof that self-accelerating TCs simulated with the original steady TEM actually never violate the turbulent kinetic energy balance, provided that the bed drag coefficient is not unrealistically low. We find that stronger bed erosion, surprisingly, leads to more production of turbulent kinetic energy due to conversion of potential energy of eroded material into kinetic energy of ...

  16. Evaluation Of A Turbidity Meter For Use At The Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahannah, R. N.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-01-15

    Savannah River Remediation's (SRR's) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a ''peanut'' vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 wt%. A ''go/no-go'' decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a ''go'' decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a ''no-go'' determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a ''go/no-go'' CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the ''go/no-go'' decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the ''go/no-go'' criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), the sludge batch currently being processed. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

  17. EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

    2013-06-04

    Savannah River Remediation’s (SRR’s) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a “peanut” vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A “go/no-go” decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a “go” decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a “no-go” determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the issuance of the initial version of this report but under the scope of the original request for technical assistance, WSE asked for this report to be revised to include the “go/no-go” CU value corresponding to 0.28 wt% solids. It was this request that led to the preparation of Revision 1 of the report. The results for the 0.28 wt% solids value were developed following the same approach as that utilized for the 0.14 wt% solids value. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards for testing both Optek units and to determine the viability of a “go/no-go” CU response for each of the units. Statistical methods were used by SRNL to develop the critical CU value for the “go/no-go” decision for these standards for each Optek unit. Since only one sludge simulant was available for this testing, the sensitivity of these results to other simulants and to actual sludge material is not known. However, limited testing with samples from the actual DWPF process (both SRAT product samples and SMECT samples) demonstrated that the use of the “go/no-go” criteria developed from the sludge simulant testing was conservative for these samples taken from the sludge batch, Sludge Batch 7b, being processed at the time of this testing. While both of the Optek units performed very reliably during this testing, there were statistically significant differences (although small on a practical scale) between the two units. Thus, testing should be conducted on any new unit of this Optek model to qualify it before it is used to support the DWPF operation.

  18. Quantitative broadband absorption and scattering spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady state methodologies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tromberg, Bruce J. (Irvine, CA); Berger, Andrew J. (Rochester, NY); Cerussi, Albert E. (Lake Forest, CA); Bevilacqua, Frederic (Costa Mesa, CA); Jakubowski, Dorota (Irvine, CA)

    2008-09-23

    A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses a combination of frequency-domain and steady-state reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light steady-state measurement, whereas the frequency-domain data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption and reduced scattering derived from the frequency-domain data are used to calibrate the intensity of the steady-state measurements and to determine the reduced scattering coefficient at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. The absorption coefficient spectrum is determined by comparing the steady-state reflectance values with the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. Absorption spectra of a turbid phantom and of human breast tissue in vivo, derived with the combined frequency-domain and steady-state technique, agree well with expected reference values.

  19. A high resolution geophysical investigation of spatial sedimentary processes in a paraglacial turbid outwash fjord: Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noll, Christian John, IV

    2006-04-12

    Simpson Bay is a turbid, outwash fjord located in northeastern Prince William Sound, Alaska. A high ratio of watershead:basin surface area combined with high precipitation and an easily erodable catchment create high sediment inputs. Fresh water...

  20. Annotated bibliography: Marine geologic hazards of the Hawaiian Islands with special focus on submarine slides and turbidity currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normark, W.R.; Herring, H.H.

    1993-10-01

    This annotated bibliography was compiled to highlight the submarine geology of the Hawaiian Islands and identify known and potential marine geologic hazards with special emphasis on turbidity currents, submarine slides and tsunamis. Some references are included that are not specific to Hawaii but are needed to understand the geologic processes that can affect the integrity of submarine cables and other man-made structures. Entries specific to the Hawaiian Island area are shown in bold type.

  1. Apparatus and method for qualitative and quantitative measurements of optical properties of turbid media using frequency-domain photon migration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tromberg, Bruce J. (Irvine, CA); Tsay, Tsong T. (Orange, CA); Berns, Michael W. (Trabuco Canyon, CA); Svaasand, Lara O. (Rudolf Raedersu, NO); Haskell, Richard C. (Claremont, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Optical measurements of turbid media, that is media characterized by multiple light scattering, is provided through an apparatus and method for exposing a sample to a modulated laser beam. The light beam is modulated at a fundamental frequency and at a plurality of integer harmonics thereof. Modulated light is returned from the sample and preferentially detected at cross frequencies at frequencies slightly higher than the fundamental frequency and at integer harmonics of the same. The received radiance at the beat or cross frequencies is compared against a reference signal to provide a measure of the phase lag of the radiance and modulation ratio relative to a reference beam. The phase and modulation amplitude are then provided as a frequency spectrum by an array processor to which a computer applies a complete curve fit in the case of highly scattering samples or a linear curve fit below a predetermined frequency in the case of highly absorptive samples. The curve fit in any case is determined by the absorption and scattering coefficients together with a concentration of the active substance in the sample. Therefore, the curve fitting to the frequency spectrum can be used both for qualitative and quantitative analysis of substances in the sample even though the sample is highly turbid.

  2. Apparatus and method for qualitative and quantitative measurements of optical properties of turbid media using frequency-domain photon migration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tromberg, B.J.; Tsay, T.T.; Berns, M.W.; Svaasand, L.O.; Haskell, R.C.

    1995-06-13

    Optical measurements of turbid media, that is media characterized by multiple light scattering, is provided through an apparatus and method for exposing a sample to a modulated laser beam. The light beam is modulated at a fundamental frequency and at a plurality of integer harmonics thereof. Modulated light is returned from the sample and preferentially detected at cross frequencies at frequencies slightly higher than the fundamental frequency and at integer harmonics of the same. The received radiance at the beat or cross frequencies is compared against a reference signal to provide a measure of the phase lag of the radiance and modulation ratio relative to a reference beam. The phase and modulation amplitude are then provided as a frequency spectrum by an array processor to which a computer applies a complete curve fit in the case of highly scattering samples or a linear curve fit below a predetermined frequency in the case of highly absorptive samples. The curve fit in any case is determined by the absorption and scattering coefficients together with a concentration of the active substance in the sample. Therefore, the curve fitting to the frequency spectrum can be used both for qualitative and quantitative analysis of substances in the sample even though the sample is highly turbid. 14 figs.

  3. Accepted, subject to re-review, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, ASCE, version of January 2006 Role of Ponded Turbidity Currents in Reservoir Trap Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    by a hydraulic jump. If the interface of this muddy pond rises above any vent or overflow point at the damAccepted, subject to re-review, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, ASCE, version of January 2006 1. The dam causes a sustained turbidity current to reflect and form a muddy pond bounded upstream

  4. {tzshen,cjlin}@nlg.csie.ntu.edu.tw; hh_chen@csie.ntu.edu.tw "Why" "" ""

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    spread all over the hill. "since" "since" patterns patterns patterns 3 pattern pattern #12, and Marcinkiewicz, 1993) "PRP" "" "" Chevron had to shut down a crude-oil pipeline in the Bay area to check for leaks. ((S (NP-SBJ-1 Chevron) (VP had (S (NP-SBJ *-1) (VP to (VP shut (PRT down) (NP (NP a crude-oil

  5. Diabat L., Remund J., Wald L., 2003. Linke turbidity factors for several sites in Africa. Solar Energy, 75, 2, 111-119. Copyright UFAE Meteotest -Ecole des Mines de Paris Armines 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Diabaté L., Remund J., Wald L., 2003. Linke turbidity factors for several sites in Africa. Solar are of importance in Africa and are evidenced by regional policies and international projects (e.g., Agrhymet FACTORS FOR SEVERAL SITES IN AFRICA Diabaté L. (1), Remund J. (2), Wald L. (3) (1) UFAE / GCMI, BP E4018

  6. Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Lines, Amanda M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2013-02-24

    Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source.

  7. Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste - 13532

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job [EIC Laboratories, Inc., 111 Downey St., Norwood, MA, 02062 (United States)] [EIC Laboratories, Inc., 111 Downey St., Norwood, MA, 02062 (United States); Bryan, Samuel; Lines, Amanda; Levitskaia, Tatiana [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source. (authors)

  8. NTU International Conference on Economics, Finance and Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

    of Hong Kong) Kevin C.W. Chen (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) David Easley (Cornell, Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University, Professor of Finance, Johnson Graduate School, Northwestern University, 1979 M.A. (Economics), Northwestern University, 1976 B.S. (Economics), University

  9. 1.0 1928 17 Summary of NTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    .0 522 541 1063 59 International Exchanges 185 162 90 15 2 #12;30 5.0 Association of Pacific Rim and the Pacific, UMAP International Exchanges #12;31 5.0 International Exchanges #12;#12;

  10. New Moon Pavilion / NTU Visitor Center Sports Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Subjects Classroom Building Xiao-Fu Square Liberal Education Classroom Building Gymnasium Swimming Pool Sciences Freshman Classroom Building Mathematics Research Center Building Department of Mathematics Shih and Research Center, College of Management The Odeum 2nd Student Activity Center Building 2, College

  11. An NTU Cooperative Game Theoretic View of Manipulating Elections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Daniel

    voting rule may lead to a situation where some voter(s) are better off by casting votes different from). Formally, in the coalitional manipulation problem, introduced by Conitzer, Sand- holm, and Lang [5

  12. Reviewed and updated March 2013 NTU Sustainable Construction and Refurbishment Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    to energy efficiency and costs in use. Achieve British Research Establishment Environmental Assessment government targets, for example zero carbon new build non domestic buildings by 2019 and at least 80% carbon

  13. *Corresponding author. Tel: (65) 6790-6235. Email: arbhatnagar@ntu.edu.sg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Stephen C.

    ). The company operates a manufacturing factory in Europe and many distribution facilities. Raw materials by the multi-stage distribution system of a computer printer peripherals manufacturer (see Figure 1 and components are manufactured and assembled into bulk products at the factory. These bulk products

  14. Learning with Augmented Features for Heterogeneous Domain Lixin Duan S080003@ntu.edu.sg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Dong

    . Copyright 2012 by the author(s)/owner(s). learning (a.k.a., domain adaptation), as a new machine learning data from the target domain by leveraging a large amount of labeled data from other existing domains (a.k.a

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A LAMINATED DISK FOR THE SPIN TEK ROTARY MICROFILTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.

    2011-06-03

    Funded by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, EM-31, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) partnered with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to develop a filter disk that would withstand a reverse pressure or flow during operation of the rotary microfilter. The ability to withstand a reverse pressure and flow eliminates a potential accident scenario that could have resulted in damage to the filter membranes. While the original welded filter disks have been shown to withstand and reverse pressure/flow in the static condition, the filter disk design discussed in this report will allow a reverse pressure/flow while the disks are rotating. In addition, the laminated disk increases the flexibility during filter startup and cleaning operations. The new filter disk developed by SRNL and SpinTek is manufactured with a more open structure significantly reducing internal flow restrictions in the disk. The prototype was tested at the University of Maryland and demonstrated to withstand the reverse pressure due to the centrifugal action of the rotary filter. The tested water flux of the disk was demonstrated to be 1.34 gpm in a single disk test. By comparison, the water flux of the current disk was 0.49 gpm per disk during a 25 disk test. The disk also demonstrated rejection of solids by filtering a 5 wt % Strontium Carbonate slurry with a filtrate clarity of less the 1.4 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) throughout the two hour test. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to adapt the rotary microfilter for radioactive service in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. One potential weakness is the loose nature of the membrane on the filter disks. The current disk is constructed by welding the membrane at the outer edge of the disk. The seal for the center of the membrane is accomplished by an o-ring in compression for the assembled stack. The remainder of the membrane is free floating on the disk. This construction requires that a positive pressure be applied to the rotary filter tank to prevent the membrane from rising from the disk structure and potentially contacting the filter turbulence promoter. In addition, one accident scenario is a reverse flow through the filtrate line due to mis-alignment of valves resulting in the membrane rising from the disk structure. The structural integrity of the current disk has been investigated, and shown that the disk can withstand a significant reverse pressure in a static condition. However, the disk will likely incur damage if the filter stack is rotated during a reverse pressure. The development of a laminated disk would have several significant benefits for the operation of the rotary filter including the prevention of a compromise in filter disk integrity during a reverse flow accident, increasing operational flexibility, and increasing the self cleaning ability of the filter. A laminated disk would allow the filter rotor operation prior to a positive pressure in the filter tank. This would prevent the initial dead-head of the filter and prevent the resulting initial filter cake buildup. The laminated disk would allow rotor operation with cleaning fluid, eliminating the need for a recirculation pump. Additionally, a laminated disk would allow a reverse flow of fluid through the membrane pores removing trapped particles.

  16. 2015/06/03(new-updates) The 2015 Academia Sinica Shuttle Bus Service Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    NTU Information Building( near to Starbucks on Xinhai Road) NTU Fu Bell NTU Multi-Purpose Classroom Building( near to Starbucks on Xinhai Road) NTU Fu Bell NTU Multi-Purpose Classroom Building ()( 3 ) Bus Kong Monument) NTU Information Building( near to Starbucks on Xinhai Road) A.S. 2. 09:40 A.S. NTU

  17. () 102 10 26 1 () 103 3 22 3 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    ; 103 3 2223 ) () () () () () () ) () 103 3 6 5 () myNTU () https://info2.ntu.edu.tw/register/flex/main.html () 1.- 2.- 3.- () myNTU () 103 3 12 http://ann.cc.ntu.edu.tw/ http://www.pe.ntu.edu.tw/new/sports_event.html; 103 3 1721 () () () 103 3 6 5 () myNTU () myNTU : https://info2.ntu.edu.tw/register/flex/main.html

  18. Quantitative evaluation of turbidity in coastal waters from Lansat imagery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bright, Jon Branson

    1977-01-01

    positions are essenrially identical for. the two dates, February 28 and March 20, 1976. Data were also obtained on July 21, 1976 by FDNR but was of no use for this study due to cloud cover in their sampli. ng TABLE 1 Time and Position Data, Stations 32...-150 Spectral Band Red Blue Creen Sea C011 (uw/cm ) 30. 5 23. 6 12. 1 8. 4 5. 5 1757 2448 1728 1344 893 5181 3840 1707 1141 De"k Cell (uw/cm ) 4425 4425 4425 4425 4425 8064 8352 8064 8352 8352 12880 12512 12696 12190 12880...

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Cichlid species diversity in naturally and anthropogenically turbid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Nile perch introduction, and decreases in water transparency and dissolved oxygen concentrations due-collapse period, spawning occurred year-round in shallow areas with hard substrates and relatively clear water differentiation in feeding techniques as well as year-round spawning, and both may facilitate species coexistence

  20. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Turbidity Sensor 4112 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/Smart BarometricMHKMHKMHKMHK

  1. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Turbidity Sensor 4705 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/Smart BarometricMHKMHKMHKMHKMHK

  2. NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION National Taiwan University Academic Development Foundation was established by NTU alumni to support the advancement of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    GIFT TO NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION National Taiwan University the purpose and/or beneficiary of your gift: University Endowment Library Fund For # __________ journal (Please find the # info on the library website.) General Library Fund Other

  3. Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems for Great Lakes water quality monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lathrop, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The utility of three operational satellite remote sensing systems, namely, the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), the SPOT High Resolution Visible (HRV) sensors and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), were evaluated as a means of estimating water quality and surface temperature. Empirical calibration through linear regression techniques was used to relate near-simultaneously acquired satellite radiance/reflectance data and water quality observations obtained in Green Bay and the nearshore waters of Lake Michigan. Four dates of TM and one date each of SPOT and AVHRR imagery/surface reference data were acquired and analyzed. Highly significant relationships were identified between the TM and SPOT data and secchi disk depth, nephelometric turbidity, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids (TSS), absorbance, and surface temperature (TM only). The AVHRR data were not analyzed independently but were used for comparison with the TM data. Calibrated water quality image maps were input to a PC-based raster GIS package, EPPL7. Pattern interpretation and spatial analysis techniques were used to document the circulation dynamics and model mixing processes in Green Bay. A GIS facilitates the retrieval, query and spatial analysis of mapped information and provides the framework for an integrated operational monitoring system for the Great Lakes.

  4. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Thrombosuction and Tirofiban Infusion (ITTI) trial Department of Internal Medicine, NTU Hospital Department

  5. Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    -Ming Lu National Center for High Performance Computing PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU

  6. At the Intersection of Applied Formal Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, Daniel M.

    of Technology University of Washington Tacoma NTU Graduate Seminar, - 7 January 2011 #12;Outline · Applied

  7. September 2011 Publicado por la O cina de Asuntos Internacionales Toda la informacin contenida en este folleto est disponible en linea. Para informacin ms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    requeridos Hay dos centros de lenguaje en NTU. Por favor contac- tarlos directamente para la solicitud

  8. Measurement of blood analytes in turbid biological tissue using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Tae-Woong, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    Concentrations of blood constituents provide diagnostic information in clinical procedures. Among the medical community, there is great interest in developing an optical method of concentration measurements that eliminates ...

  9. Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collin, Clair

    2009-01-01

    Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

  10. Characterizing point spread functions of two-photon fluorescence microscopy in turbid medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Peter

    - medical imaging. Among its advantages is the enhanced depth pen- etration permitted by fluorescence environment often found in tissue. A full characterization of the two-photon PSFs of a water and oil immersion to depths of about 100 (oil) and 200 m (water), the presence of scatterers (up to 2% Liposyn III) does

  11. Noninvasive measurement of scattering anisotropy in turbid materials by nonnormal incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Henrik Wann

    on thin samples to produce reasonable results. © 2006 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 110.7050, 170.3660, 170.7050, 290.1990, 290.7050, 290.5820. Noninvasive methods for determining the optical properties

  12. Human induced turbidity changes in Poyang Lake between 2000 and 2010: Observations from MODIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    variabil- ity such as El Niño and La Niño transitions have also lead to dramatic variations sediment resuspension and mass transport [Acker et al., 2004; Chen et al., 200

  13. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Turbid Density Currents in Imha Reservoir, South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    ). Alternatively, the construction of solid or permeable obstacles such as submerged weirs or geotextile screens

  14. Large River Food Webs: Influence of Nutrients, Turbidity, and Flow, and Implications for Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roach, Katherine

    2012-10-19

    Humans impact rivers in many ways that modify ecological processes yielding ecosystem services. In order to mitigate anthropogenic impacts, scientists are challenged to understand interactions among physicochemical factors ...

  15. Experimental validation of an undersea free space laser network simulator in high turbidities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardei, Mihaela

    in the subsea environment that can accommodate high bandwidth sensors such as optical imagers have a potentially high impact as enabling technologies for a variety of future subsea operations in the areas be useful in a variety of applications such as environmental monitoring, commercial subsea operations

  16. Turbidity currents and submarine morphodynamics River, Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics: RCEM 2005 Parker & Garca (eds)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajeunesse, Eric

    and the dynamics of submarine erosional channels inception? Are they produced by catastrophic flood events or could blanket are made of a mixture of plastic polymer and titanium oxide, achieving a density of 1080 kg/m3

  17. File:06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1ORDExplorationInjectionPermit (1).pdf Jump to: navigation,source6MTEFloodplainDevelopmentPermit (1).pdf

  18. Effects of Rain Attenuation on Satellite Video Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Stefan

    10 GHz. Raindrops absorb and scatter radio wave energy, which degrades the reliability Technological University (NTU), Singapore 639798, email: eyhlee@ntu.edu.sg Cheetah Technologies, San Jose, CA

  19. Administration and Service Buildings Instructional Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    Dormitories Others Prince House- NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms Prince House- NTU Hsiu-Chi House Incubation Center Bldg-Yuan Hall Halcyon House Bldg. No. 1 Agricultural Exhibition Hall New Moon Pavilion NTU Visitor Center Lesyue Research Center for Biotechnology 7th Men's Dorm Fang-Lan Mansion Dept. of Animal Science & Technology

  20. Spring phytoplankton dynamics in a shallow, turbid coastal salt marsh system undergoing extreme salinity variation, South Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebert, Elizabeth Michele

    2005-08-29

    The contribution of phytoplankton productivity to higher trophic levels in salt marshes is not well understood. My study furthers our understanding of possible mechanisms controlling phytoplankton productivity, abundance, ...

  1. DISTRIBUTION OF BROWN SHRIMP (Penaeus aztecus aztecus IVES) AS RELATED TO TURBID WATER PHOTOGRAPHED FROM SPACE 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Mexico is provided for the first of relief currents to areas of hiih shrimp production time of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, from an altitude of 330 kill. :\\Iatagordn Bay, Tex., is to the lower left and 'White Lake, La., to the upper right. The direction of the wind can oe determine(l from the smoke

  2. Modeling of temperature and turbidity in a natural lake and a reservoir connected by pumped-storage operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    at different altitudes affects their thermal regime and the stratification as well as oxygen and nutrient, reservoirs and downstream rivers involved [Miyanaga, 1986; Bonalumi et al., 2011]. [4] Thermal stratification basin is a much clearer natural lake. Stratification, temperature and particle concentrations in the two

  3. Amplitude and Phase of Tightly Focused Laser Beams in Turbid Media Carole K. Hayakawa and Vasan Venugopalan*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA Vishnu V. Krishnamachari and Eric O. Potma Department of Chemistry, Natural Sciences II, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA (Received 13 January 2009 these important changes to the focal volume. Monte Carlo methods can be used to solve the radiative transport

  4. Di using photons can be used to detect, localize, and characterize optical and dynam-ical spatial inhomogeneities embedded in turbid media. Measurementsof the intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 7 Summary Di using photons can be used to detect, localize, and characterize optical photons reveals information about the optical properties of a system while speckle uctuations carry applications for these techniques. The photon di usion equation has an interesting wave solution when

  5. An Organic Carbon Budget for the Mississippi River Turbidity Plume and Plume Contributions to Air-sea CO2 Fluxes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breed, Greg A.

    are the primary interface between terrestrial and oceanic environments and play a central role in linking terrestrial and marine carbon cycles. Annually, rivers transport 1 Gt total carbon to the world's oceans (e.g., Cai et al. 2003). Despite the known importance of RiOMar, the export pathways of OC

  6. Theoretical analysis of coupled diffuse-photon-density and thermal-wave field depth profiles photothermally generated in layered turbid dental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    -photon-density and thermal-wave model is developed for theoretical analysis of the photothermal field in demineralized teeth. Intact and demineralized layers of enamel, as well as dentin, are described as a layered one

  7. Sustainable Management of Flowback Water during Hydraulic Fracturing of Marcellus Shale for Natural Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vidic, Radisav

    2015-01-24

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using abandoned mine drainage (AMD) as make- up water for the reuse of produced water for hydraulic fracturing. There is an abundance of AMD sources near permitted gas wells as documented in this study that can not only serve as makeup water and reduce the demand on high quality water resources but can also as a source of chemicals to treat produced water prior to reuse. The assessment of AMD availability for this purpose based on proximity and relevant regulations was accompanied by bench- and pilot-scale studies to determine optimal treatment to achieve desired water quality for use in hydraulic fracturing. Sulfate ions that are often present in AMD at elevated levels will react with Ba²? and Sr²? in produced water to form insoluble sulfate compounds. Both membrane microfiltration and gravity separation were evaluated for the removal of solids formed as a result of mixing these two impaired waters. Laboratory studies revealed that neither AMD nor barite formed in solution had significant impact on membrane filtration but that some produced waters contained submicron particles that can cause severe fouling of microfiltration membrane. Coagulation/flocculation was found to be an effective process for the removal of suspended solids and both bench- and pilot-scale studies revealed that optimal process conditions can consistently achieve the turbidity of the finished water below 5 NTU. Adjusting the blending ratio of AMD and produced water can achieve the desired effluent sulfate concentration that can be accurately predicted by chemical thermodynamics. Co-treatment of produced water and AMD will result in elevated levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the solid waste generated in this process due to radium co-precipitation with barium sulfate. Laboratory studies revealed that the mobility of barite that may form in the subsurface due to the presence of sulfate in the fracturing fluid can be controlled by the addition of appropriate antiscalants.

  8. Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    cells. Two kinds of polymer solar cells will be addressed; one is the bulk heterojunction solar cell solar cells Speaker: Prof. Chun-Wei Chen () Department of Materials Science and Engineering, NTU Place: Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Over the past decade, solar cells based on organic

  9. On the Search of Internet AS-level Topology Lung-de Shyu, Seng-Yong Lau and Polly Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    Electrical Engineering Department National Taiwan University r93921029@ntu.edu.tw sylau@ntu.edu.tw phuang to fit better a particular set of graph properties over time, there is a more fundamental need in knowing. For instance, Inet 3.0 [10] and TANG [1] are Internet AS-level graph generators based on the power

  10. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy 2nd Semester for the Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009 NTU Athens Specialisation Provider: Wind Energy #12;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading

  11. November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Carbon Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Carbon Management NTU report our carbon footprint provided. The carbon emissions are calculated using Carbon Trust conversion factors, as used in NTU's EMS.64 2011/2012 18,130 4.20 The recorded changes in emissions are a result of carbon management projects

  12. Brief History 01 Library Organiza on 02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    The National Taiwan University (NTU) was established in March of 1928. The present Main Library was officially & Social Sciences Library Medical Library Organization Chart 2 #12;Library Collections The role of the NTU#12;Brief History 01 Library Organiza on 02 Library Collec ons 03 Electronic Resources Special

  13. US-Taiwan Workshop on Smart Structural Technology for Seismic Hazard Mitigation Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    US-Taiwan Workshop on Smart Structural Technology for Seismic Hazard Mitigation Taipei, Taiwan Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 6 Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, lohc0220@ntu.edu.tw #12;hydraulic dampers (SHD), electrorheological (ER

  14. doi: 10.3319/TAO.2014.03.27.01(T) * Corresponding author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    by National Taiwan University (NTU) with 401 Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) accelerators. The network by the NTU system suggest damage and casualty locations. Equipped with a dense array of MEMS accelerometers direction which is one of the key indices used to estimate possible damage. The low cost MEMS accelerator

  15. ON BUILDING AN INTERNET GATEWAY FOR INTERNET TELEPHONY Cheng-Yue Chang and Ming-Syan Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    ON BUILDING AN INTERNET GATEWAY FOR INTERNET TELEPHONY Cheng-Yue Chang and Ming-Syan Chen@arbor.ee.ntu.edu.tw; mschen@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT In recent years, the Internet has emerged as an important collaborative, it is very important to construct a PSTN/Internet gateway for further experiments and devel- opments

  16. Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    organic matter and turbidity (6), whereas high concentrations of metals have been attributed to maritime paints

  17. Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

    2009-01-01

    An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue gas streams to electricity. The NTU-effectiveness method, exergy, and ...

  18. Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2011-01-01

    specific to the heat exchanger type. Once the NTU iseach heat exchanger, both sizing and rating type of problemsHeat Exchanger parameter variation 8.5 OPTIMIZATION CRITERIA – COOLANT TYPE

  19. Emergency Care Management with Location-Aware Services Shih-wei Lee* , Shao-you Cheng*, Jane Yung-jen Hsu*, Polly Huangt, Chuang-wen You*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    . system proactively to infer event notifications for remind- The statistical data shows that NTU Hospital, location- finding patients, hospital assets (e.g. sickbeds, pumps, or aware services for indoor

  20. Social Status Compensation: Variations on the Sending of Cultural Remittances among Chinese Overseas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Min; Li, Xiangyi

    2014-01-01

    of California, Los Angeles Xiangyi LI Sun Yat-Sen UniversityMin Zhouzhoumin@ntu.edu.sg. Xiangyi Li, PhD. , is assistantOverseas 1 Min Zhou and Xiangyi Li INTRODUCTION Economic

  1. PipeProbe: Mapping Spatial Layout of Indoor Water Yu-Chen Chang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    PipeProbe: Mapping Spatial Layout of Indoor Water Pipelines Yu-Chen Chang1 , Tsung-Te Lai1 , Hao}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Abstract--We propose PipeProbe, a mobile sensor system for mapping water- sule into the source of the water pipelines. As the PipeProbe cap- sule traverses the pipelines

  2. TESTING OF A ROTARY MICROFILTER TO SUPPORT HANFORD APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; David Stefanko, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2008-06-26

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers are investigating and developing a rotary microfilter for solid-liquid separation applications at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the success of that work, the Hanford Site is evaluating the use of the rotary microfilter for its Supplemental Pretreatment process. The authors performed rotary filter testing with a full-scale, 25-disk unit with 0.5 {micro} filter media manufactured by Pall Corporation using a Hanford AN-105 simulant at solids loadings of 0.06, 0.29, and 1.29 wt%. The conclusions from this testing are: (1) The filter flux at 0.06 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.26 gpm/ft{sup 2} (6.25 gpm total). (2) The filter flux at 0.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.17 gpm/ft{sup 2} (4 gpm total). (3) The filter flux at 1.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.10 gpm/ft{sup 2} (2.4 gpm total). (4) Because of differences in solids loadings, a direct comparison between crossflow filter flux and rotary filter flux is not possible. The data show the rotary filter produces a higher flux than the crossflow filter, but the improvement is not as large as seen in previous testing. (5) Filtrate turbidity measured < 4 NTU in all samples collected. (6) During production, the filter should be rinsed with filtrate or dilute caustic and drained prior to an extended shutdown to prevent the formation of a layer of settled solids on top of the filter disks. (7) Inspection of the seal faces after {approx} 140 hours of operation showed an expected amount of initial wear, no passing of process fluid through the seal faces, and very little change in the air channeling grooves on the stationary face. (8) Some polishing was observed at the bottom of the shaft bushing. The authors recommend improving the shaft bushing by holding it in place with a locking ring and incorporated grooves to provide additional cooling. (9) The authors recommend that CH2MHill Hanford test other pore size media to determine the optimum pore size for Hanford waste.

  3. AF3KI.4.pdf ACP/IPOC 2013 OSA 2013 Broadband photon time of flight spectroscopy: advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .6190) Spectrometers; (290.7050) Turbid media; (290.4210) Multiple scattering; (00.6250) Spectroscopy, condensed matter

  4. Performance bounds on synchronous laser line scan systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    for the medium. © 2005 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (110.7050) Turbid Media, (010.4450) Ocean Optics

  5. Focusing polychromatic light through strongly scattering media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1080) Active or adaptive optics; (290.1990) Diffusion; (290.4210) Multiple scattering; (290.7050) Turbid media

  6. Reconstructions for continuous-wave diffuse optical tomography by a globally convergent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    approximation and analysis; (110.6960) Tomography; (110.7050) Turbid media; (170.3880) Medical and biological

  7. Web Unit Mining Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Centre for Advanced Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aixin, Sun

    Web Unit Mining ­ Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Web Pages Aixin Sun Centre for Advanced Technological University Singapore, 639798 aseplim@ntu.edu.sg ABSTRACT In web classification, most researchers assume that the ob- jects to classify are individual web pages from one or more web sites. In practice

  8. JOINT RETREAT ON COSMOLOGY AND LHC PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    (NCKU) Organizing Committee · Chuan-Hung Chen (NCKU) round table discussion. We-Fu Chang (NTHU) Chuan-Hung Chen (NCKU) Je-An Gu(NTU) Yu-Kuo Hsiao (AS) Chuan Hung Chen (NCKU) · Kingman Cheung (NTHU) · Cheng-Wei Chiang

  9. 968 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 23, NO. 6, JUNE 2004 TCG-S: Orthogonal Coupling of -Admissible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Yao-Wen

    968 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 23, NO. 6], and transitive closure graph (TCG) [9]. Unlike the traditional classification of the slicing and nonslicing Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (e-mail: ywchang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw). Digital Obje

  10. What to do with Your Waste All major types of waste are listed below. Click on the item that you want to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    and Freezers G Glass I IT/Computer Equipment H Hazardous Waste L Laboroatory Waste M Mobile Phones O Oil PWhat to do with Your Waste All major types of waste are listed below. Click on the item that you continue to expand and improve waste management at NTU. If you require further information contact a member

  11. CCCeeennnttteeerrr fffooorrr QQQuuuaaannntttuuummm SSSccciiieeennnccceee aaannnddd EEEnnngggiiinnneeeeeerrriiinnnggg WWWooorrrkkkssshhhoooppp ooonnn AAAtttooommmiiiccc,,, MMMooollleeecccuuulllaaarrr,,, aaannnddd OOOppptttiiicccaaalll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    : June 27 (Saturday), 2009 Time: 9:00am ~ 5:00pm PlaceRM312 , CCMS and New Physics Building , NTU Workshop ThemeRecent Advances in AMO Science and Technology OrganizersTsin-Fu JiangInstitute of Physics of plasma-waveguide based soft x-ray lasers 11:2011:50 Controlling the carrier-envelope phase of Raman

  12. Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model...

  13. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Oncology Summit 2013 Department of Internal Medicine, NTU College of Medicine Hepatitis Research Center%IFIF 201421 2 #12;IF IF IF10 BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL Volume: 347 Article Number: f6008 Amplification of HOXD-Harboring Chromosome Region Is Implicated in Mulitiple- Walled Carbon Nanotubes

  14. OFC Review 2013 Software Defined Network (SDN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and transmission rate w/o hardware change Dedicated PCE to scale OpenFlow architectutre #12;Network ArchitectureOFC Review 2013 Software Defined Network (SDN) M. Farhan Habib May 10, 2013 Friday Group Meeting Networks Lab @ UCD #12;NTu3F: SDN in Today's Network #12;SDN: What and Why · Traditional distributed

  15. Sensor-Enhanced Mobility Prediction for Energy-Efficient Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    the mobility estimation error problem by utilizing addi- tional sensors on mobile targets. The result of Electrical Engineeringc National Taiwan University {f91023, b89066, hchu}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, phuang accuracy by developing an en- ergy-aware localization that adapts the sampling rate to target's mobility

  16. Department of Mathematics College of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Bernold

    -Volterra Competition Model Jia-Yuan Dai Advisor: Chun-Hsiung Hsia, Ph.D 99 7 July, 2010 #12;i 7 37 of monotone dynamical systems 1 Lotka-Volterra 2 R97221006@ntu.edu.tw #12;The Effects of Diffusion and Advection on the Evolution of Competing Species: a Survey on the Lotka-Volterra Competition Model Jia Yuan

  17. Microbial Metabolism Microbial nutrients,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    1 Microbial Metabolism Microbial nutrients, growth and cultivation Ching-Tsan Huang () Office: Agronomy Hall, Room 111 Tel: (02) 33664454 E-mail: cthuang@ntu.edu.tw #12;2 Microbial Nutrition Purpose To obtain energy and construct new cellular components Nutrient Requirement The major elements: C, O, H, N

  18. Center for Quantum Science and Engineering (CQSE) National Center of Theoretical Sciences (NCTS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    substrates which leads to a new area of application called flexible electronics. Hydrogenated amorphous) Joint Seminar April 9, 2010 (Friday) Time: April 9, 2:30pm ~ 3:30pm Title: LARGE AREA ELECTRONICS: from silicon to oxide electronics Speaker: Prof. Jian Z. Chen () Graduate Institute of Applied Mechanics, NTU

  19. Administrative Units M50 Administration Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Administrative Units M50 Administration Building M41 Building No. 2 M43 2nd Administration Building S1 School of Professional and Continuing Studies M3 Gallery of NTU History Old Main Library N75 for Psychological Services Instructional Buildings M57 Common Subjects Classroom Building N11 Core Subjects

  20. Web Unit Mining Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Centre for Advanced Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aixin, Sun

    Web Unit Mining ­ Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Web Pages Aixin Sun Centre for Advanced Technological University Singapore, 639798 aseplim@ntu.edu.sg ABSTRACT In web classification, most researchers assume that the ob- jects to classify are individual web pages from one or more web sites. In practice

  1. 2013/1/4 1 / 7 1 Curriculum Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    of undergraduate transfer students 21 Common Subjects Classroom Building 22 Core Subjects Classroom Building 23 Freshman Classroom Building 24 Multi-Purpose Classroom Building 25 Liberal Education Classroom Building CEIBA Course Management System 31 NTU Speech 32 E-Learning and Multimedia Projects 33 Consultation

  2. LIU ET AL. VOL. XXX ' NO. XX ' 000000 ' XXXX www.acsnano.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Qihua

    ), 08010 Barcelona, CAT, Spain, ) Singapore-Berkeley Research Initiative for Sustainable Energy, 1 Create Technological University, Singapore 637371, Singapore, Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N), Nanyang,6,7 Additionally, this kind of layered material would provide us an ideal system to inves- tigate the fundamental

  3. Bilingual Instructions for Asking Directions 1. To ASIAA/National Taiwan University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ming-Jye

    Bilingual Instructions for Asking Directions 1. To ASIAA/National Taiwan University 2. When you for help: 3. To Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport 4. To Taipei Songshan Airport Please show me how.) Please take me to NTU Astronomy-Mathematics Building. Please take me to Taiwan Taoyuan International

  4. 4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan October 12-13, 2006 Paper No, law@stanford.edu 5 Research Assistant, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 6 Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei

  5. US-Taiwan Workshop on Smart Structural Technology for Seismic Hazard Mitigation Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    US-Taiwan Workshop on Smart Structural Technology for Seismic Hazard Mitigation Taipei, Taiwan and the __________________________ 1 Graduate student, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 2 Associate Research Fellow, National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering, Taiwan, ysyang@ncree.org.tw 3

  6. Chang, Tsai-Lin Rm. 205, 2F., No.48, Ln. 245, Sec. 4, Bade Rd., Taipei City 105, Taiwan (R.O.C.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouhyoung, Ming

    Chang, Tsai-Lin Rm. 205, 2F., No.48, Ln. 245, Sec. 4, Bade Rd., Taipei City 105, Taiwan (R.O.C.) tsailing_chang@hotmail.com | +886-912-152-868 EDUCATION 2005 - 2009 NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY (NTU) Taipei, Taiwan Bachelor, Department of Finance · Overall GPA ­ 3.8/4.0; Major GPA ­ 3.9/4.0 · President Award

  7. 4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan October 12-13, 2006 Paper No., USA, law@stanford.edu 5 Research Assistant, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 6 Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei

  8. SICE Annual Conference 2010 August 18-21, 2010, The Grand Hotel, Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Pei-Chun

    SICE Annual Conference 2010 August 18-21, 2010, The Grand Hotel, Taipei, Taiwan ¥400 © 2010 SICE of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan Corresponding email: peichunlin@ntu.edu.tw Chia-Hung Tsai Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan

  9. ENGR 345: Principles and Practices of Global Innovation (An iPodia elective course with Peking University in China and National Taiwan University in Taiwan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    University in China and National Taiwan University in Taiwan) USC/Viterbi iPodiaTM (ViP) Program Page 1 partner universities of this course are: Peking University (PKU) in Beijing, China and National Taiwan University (NTU) in Taipei, Taiwan. #12;ENGR 345: Principles and Practices of Global Innovation (An i

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on cumputational sciences National Taiwan Univ, Taipei, Taiwan, June 1994.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shann, Wei-Chang

    Proceedings of the workshop on cumputational sciences National Taiwan Univ, Taipei, Taiwan, June was supported by the National Science Council in Taiwan; grant #83­0208­M­008­052. 1 Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. E­mail address: chern@math.ntu.edu.tw. 2 Department

  11. Proceedings of the 13th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics, pages 3037, Avignon, France, April 23 -27 2012. c 2012 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . aseschng@ntu.edu.sg Abstract In this paper we evaluate the possibility of improving the performance Retrieval, in this work we study the feasibility of stop word removal in Statistical Machine Translation Linguistics An Empirical Evaluation of Stop Word Removal in Statistical Machine Translation Chong Tze Yuang

  12. Fusion of Metrology Data for Large-Scale High-Volume Manufacturing of Polymer-based Microfluidic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion of Metrology Data for Large-Scale High-Volume Manufacturing of Polymer-based Microfluidic@mit.edu, youcef@mit.edu 2 Singapore Inst. of Manufacturing Technology; email: sgli@ntu.edu.sg, ivanr@SIMTech.a-star multiple data sets from disparate instru- ments. For example, fusion of data from different metrol- ogy

  13. THE I4U SYSTEM IN NIST 2008 SPEAKER RECOGNITION EVALUATION Haizhou Li1,3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, Tanja

    Technological University (NTU), Singapore, 5 Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), USA {hli, mabin}@i2r.a-star, classifier, channel variability, system fusion 1. INTRODUCTION The NIST 2008 Speaker Recognition Evaluation) feature extraction, (ii) a parallel bank of seven classifiers and (iii) system fusion. Two

  14. Green-Aware Workload Scheduling in Geographically Distributed Data Centers Changbing Chen, Bingsheng He, Xueyan Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Xueyan

    : {chchangb, bshe, asxytang}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Renewable (or green) energy, such as solar or wind, has with renewable energy sources. While green energy supply for a single data center is intermittent due to daily/seasonal effects, our workload scheduling algorithm is aware of different amounts of green energy supply

  15. Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    of Oldenburg (Core Provider) NTU Athens (Specialisation Provider: Wind Energy) #12; EUREC Module, Lectures, Labs and Seminars Core Oldenburg 1. Semester, Winter Term Module Title Term Titel Solar Energy Titel Wind Energy Winter Wind Energy I Tutorial Wind Energy Systems Wind Tunel (Lab

  16. Cloud Computing: a Perspective Study Lizhe WANG, Gregor von LASZEWSKI, Younge ANDREW, Xi HE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud Computing: a Perspective Study Lizhe WANG, Gregor von LASZEWSKI, Younge ANDREW, Xi HE Service@ntu.edu.sg Received 1 Dec 2008 Abstract The Cloud computing emerges as a new computing paradigm which aims to provide study the Cloud computing paradigm from various aspects, such as definitions, distinct features

  17. Lloyd, C. E. M., Freer, J. E., Johnes, P. J., & Collins, A. L. (2016). Using hysteresis analysis of high-resolution water quality monitoring data,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    2016-01-01

    hysteresis · Differences in transport mechanisms shown between nitrate and TP in chalk system. · Behaviour transport Storm behaviour Turbidity Rivers Uncertainty Catchment processes A large proportion of nutrients

  18. La Jolla Canyon and Scripps Canyon Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueggeman, Peter

    2009-01-01

    of five turbidity currents." Sedimentology 37(1): 1-5. Ancoastal geomorphology, and in sedimentology which he alwaysfilm. Developments in Sedimentology. 6th International

  19. Late Pleistocene Environmental Change in Eastern Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego A Limnogeological Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    the enor- mous erosional power of the turbidity currents generated by the turbid Rho^ne River when entering laminated sediments. He further pro- posed that long- and short-term responses of glaciers to globally of his doctoral students went to distant areas in the world searching for varved records that could

  20. The Coastal Eutrophication Problem: Its manifestations in Chesapeake Bay and the design and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    degradation · Among other mechanisms, N & P inputs affect hypoxia & light · Hypoxia leads to more nutrients, more algae, & more hypoxia · Turbidity leads to less SAV causing more turbidity, less SAV · Oysters O2 in Deep Water Less Light & Benthic Production Less N & P Uptake, More Resuspension Degraded

  1. Serpentine Thermal Coupling Between a Stream and a Conducting Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, H.; Lorente, S.; Anderson, R.; Bejan, A.

    2012-02-15

    Here we document the effect of flow configuration on the heat transfer performance of a serpentine shaped stream embedded in a conducting solid. Several configurations with fixed volume of fluid are considered: U-shaped with varying spacing between the parallel portions of the U, serpentine shapes with three elbows, and conducting soil with several parallelepipedal shapes. We show that the spacing must be greater than a critical value in order for the heat transfer density of the stream-solid configuration to be the highest that it can be. Spacings larger than this critical value do not yield improvements in heat transfer density. We also show that even though the heat transfer is time dependent, the stream-solid configuration has an effective number of heat transfer units Ntu that is nearly constant in time. The larger Ntu values correspond to the configurations with greater heat transfer density.

  2. Cross-flow versus counter-current flow packed-bed scrubbers: a mathematical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.M.

    1996-02-01

    Little is known about the mass transfer properties of packing media exposed to a crossflow of gas and liquid, whereas there is abundant information related to counter-current scrubbers. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of mass transfer and hydrodynamics in cross- flow packed bed scrubbers and compares those with information available for counter current towers, so that the first can be evaluated and/or designed based on data derived for the second. Mathematical models of mass transfer in cross-flow and counter- current packed bed scrubbers are presented. From those, one can predict the removal effectiveness of a crossflow scrubber from the number of transfer units (NTU) calculated for a similar counterflow operation; alternatively, when the removal effectiveness in counterflow is known, one can predict the corresponding NTU in crossflow.

  3. Introduction to Computer Science Lecture 1: Data Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Introduction to Computer Science Lecture 1: Data Storage Instructor: Tian-Li Yu Taiwan Evolutionary@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Slides made by Tian-Li Yu, Jie-Wei Wu, and Chu-Yu Hsu Instructor: Tian-Li Yu Data Storage 1 / 1 #12 0 1 1 1 1 Instructor: Tian-Li Yu Data Storage 2 / 1 #12;Binary World Logical Gates XOR NOT Output

  4. Impact of ANSI X9.24-1:2009 Key Check Value on ISO/IEC 9797-1:2011 MACs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Impact of ANSI X9.24-1:2009 Key Check Value on ISO/IEC 9797-1:2011 MACs Tetsu Iwata1 and Lei Wang2, wang.lei@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. ANSI X9.24-1:2009 specifies the key check value, which is used to verify check value. As a result, we obtain a complete characterization of the impact of using ANSI X9.24-1 key

  5. Security Analysis of PRINCE Jeremy Jean1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Security Analysis of PRINCE J´er´emy Jean1 , Ivica Nikoli´c2 , Thomas Peyrin2 , Lei Wang2,thomas.peyrin,wang.lei,wushuang}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. In this article, we provide the first third-party security analysis of the PRINCE lightweight the structural linear relations that exist for PRINCE in order to obtain a key recovery attack that slightly

  6. Quantifying channelized submarine depositional systems from bed to basin scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, William J., 1965-

    2004-01-01

    The challenges of directly observing active turbidity currents necessitates the consideration of preserved deposits for deciphering the behavior of these systems. In this thesis, I take advantage 3-D subsurface seismic ...

  7. ChemicalGeology, 111 (1994) 155-175 155 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konhauser, Kurt

    1994-01-01

    - atively infertile rivers characterized by low suspended sediment yields and their "tea-col- ored" (Hedges). Finally, clearwater riv- ers are relatively transparent, green-colored rivers that are neither turbid

  8. The Effect of Unidentified Factor Sources, Antibiotics and D-a-tocopheryl Acetate on the Reproductive Performance of Broad Breasted Bronze and Beltsville Small White Turkeys. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, T. M.; Atkinson, R. L.; Feldman, G. L.; Whiteside, C. H.; Quisenberry, J. H.; Couch, J. R.

    1958-01-01

    along discrete basal shear planes, 3) debris flows which consist of sediment containing larger clasts that are supported in a matrix, 4) liquefaction flows which occur when loosely packed, coarse grained sediment collapses, and 5) turbidity flows...

  9. Evaluation of the complementary use of the ceramic (Kosim) filter and Aquatabs in Northern Region, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanton, Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    The Kosim filter is a ceramic water filter that is currently used in Northern Ghana. Based on prior MIT research in Northern Ghana, this technology is effective at removing 92% of turbidity, 99.4% of total coliforms, and ...

  10. Measurement of the Time-Resolved Reflection Matrix for Enhancing Light Energy Delivery into a Scattering Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Youngwoon

    Multiple scatterings occurring in a turbid medium attenuate the intensity of propagating waves. Here, we propose a method to efficiently deliver light energy to the desired target depth in a scattering medium. We measure ...

  11. Measuring Large Optical Transmission Matrices of Disordered Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hyeonseung

    We report a measurement of the large optical transmission matrix (TM) of a complex turbid medium. The TM is acquired using polarization-sensitive, full-field interferometric microscopy equipped with a rotating galvanometer ...

  12. eschweizerbartxxx Effects of flamingos in Doana marshes 167

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figuerola, Jordi

    rainfall. Key words: Flamingos, macrophytes, turbidity, nutrients, chironomids, sediment resuspension, and preventing resuspension of the sediments (Jeppesen et al. 1998, Scheffer 1998). It is therefore important of submerged plants and enhance sediment resuspension (Scheffer et al. 1993, Scheffer 1998). However

  13. Modification of a biosand filter in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kikkawa, Izumi

    2008-01-01

    Four local plastic design (LPD) BSFs were constructed in Northern Region, Ghana, to test and evaluate an experimental modification of the LPD BSF for treatment of highly turbid water. Modifications of the LPD BSFs were ...

  14. A study of biological contaminants in rainwater collected from rooftops in Bryan and College Station Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasudevan, Lakshmi Narasimhan

    2002-01-01

    in optimizing the design of water treatment units for rainwater harvesting systems. It has been shown that a dry spell has an effect on turbidity levels indicating that the first flush would be more contaminated than other water flows....

  15. Freshwater Community Responses to Mixtures of Agricultural Pesticides: Synergistic Effects of Atrazine and Bifenthrin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoagland, Kyle D.; Drenner, Ray W.

    1991-01-01

    ), however bifenthrin increased rotifers at day 7. Bifenthrin addition also increased colonial green algae and decreased particulate phosphorus in the 20-200 um size fraction on day 7 and decreased turbidity and particulate phosphorus in the >200 um size...

  16. High-resolution simulations of particle-driven gravity currents F. Necker a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meiburg, Eckart H.

    to show that resuspension of sediment back into the particle-driven current is unlikely to occur by differential loading with suspended particles. Turbidity currents in oceans or lakes, which can lead

  17. Chemical Agent Induced Reduction of Skin Light Scattering 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirshburg, Jason M.

    2011-02-22

    Skin turbidity limits light based medical applications while increasing the risk of epidermal thermal injury. Collagen fibers are responsible for the majority of light scattering within skin. Chemicals, known as clearing ...

  18. Analyzing and simulating the variability of solar irradiance and solar PV powerplants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    Distributed PV, American Solar Energy Society, Denver, CO,turbidity coefficient, Solar Energy, 73 (2002) 151-157. [17]at the UC San Diego solar energy testbed, Solar Energy, [19

  19. Journal of Environmental Protection, 2013, 4, 333-343 doi:10.4236/jep.2013.44040 Published Online April 2013 (http://www.scirp.org/journal/jep)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (TDS), true color (TC), pH, iron (Fe), fecal coliform (FC), dissolved oxygen (DO), and turbidity (TUR, agricul- tural, mining and urban development) can be potential sources of pollutants, which impact

  20. Solute dispersion in the coastal boundary layer of southern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of southern Lake Michigan, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 118, 1606­1617, doi:10.1002/jgrc.20136. 1. Introduction [2) with turbid waters contributing to increased survival by limiting sunlight penetration, removal of bacteria

  1. Redistribution ofmulti-phase particulate organic carbon in a marine shelf and canyon system during an exceptional river flood: Effects of Typhoon Morakot on the Gaoping River–Canyon system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparkes, Robert B.; Lin, In-Tian; Hovius, Niels; Galy, Albert; Liu, James T.; Xu, Xiaomei; Yang, Rick

    2015-02-25

    Volumetrically, turbidity currents are the prime suppliers of sediment to the deep sea, and conveyors of organic carbon from the terrestrial biosphere and submarine shelf into marine depositional basins. They result from complex processes of erosion...

  2. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report.

  3. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report.

  4. Comparative analysis of debrites, turbidites, and contourites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pluenneke, Judith Louise

    1976-01-01

    . The mechanics of a turbidity current are often compared to the flow regime concept used in unidirectional channel flow. A brief resume about some of the characteristics of the flow concept will be given before the relationship between the flow regime... and turbidity currents is discussed. The classification of flow into upper and lower regimes with a transition zone between is based on the form of bed configuration, the mode of sediment transport, the process of energy dissipation, and the phase relation...

  5. Engineering faculty forum. Final report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, L.V.

    1994-11-01

    The goal of the project was to develop and broadcast monthly one-hour teleconferences to support the professional development of engineering faculty. The {open_quotes}Engineering Faculty Forum{close_quotes} was available nationwide over the NTU Satellite Network and was also available from a C-Band Satellite. There was no cost to participate in the live teleconferences for the two year period. The programs were developed in response to a questionnaire sent to engineering faculty members across the United States. Copies of the flyers and a print out of each course participation form has been included as a part of this report.

  6. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01

    analysis of above flow resistance and energy cost, we know that the economy flux ratio of transfer heat-transfer means is between 0.54 and 0.85, namely sewage flux is smaller, and minC Cr min wwCVc?= . It is necessary to point out that though depending... efficiency of contranatant two pass thimble: ()213 1 11 21wwNn wz tt Cr tt 1n? ?? ?==?+ ? (1) Fig.1 Reverse-flow heat efficiency of TDHTS Contranatant single pass heat-transfer efficiency: ( ) ()1 1exp (1 ) 1exp (1)n Cr NTU Cr? = ?? ? ? Put...

  7. Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

    2013-09-01

    Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigation of heat pipe solar collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azad, E.

    2008-09-15

    Heat pipe solar collector was designed and constructed at IROST and its performance was measured on an outdoor test facility. The thermal behavior of a gravity assisted heat pipe solar collector was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A theoretical model based on effectiveness-NTU method was developed for evaluating the thermal efficiency of the collector, the inlet, outlet water temperatures and heat pipe temperature. Optimum value of evaporator length to condenser length ratio is also determined. The modelling predictions were validated using experimental data and it shows that there is a good concurrence between measured and predicted results. (author)

  9. Deep Illumination Angular Domain Imaging within Highly Scattering Media Enhanced by Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    Deep Illumination Angular Domain Imaging within Highly Scattering Media Enhanced by Image Science, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6, Canada ABSTRACT Deep the scattered light created by a laser source aimed deep beneath the turbid medium surface. As this source light

  10. An Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters as Sensors to Obtain the Concentration of Suspended Mass in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    An Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters as Sensors to Obtain the Concentration of Suspended, acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) and other acoustic sensors have been used by researchers in the ocean than optical turbidity sensors, and the high-frequency velocity measurements allow for a direct

  11. Comparison of inherent optical properties as a surrogate for particulate matter concentration in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    - ated with each of the sensors participating in the ACT Tech- nology Evaluation. In Table A1, we provide is available and should not be applied to other turbidity sensors. For all sensors, the correlation coefficient. Output of type-II regressions between PM and the measurements of the different scattering sensors. Note

  12. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 131:492497, 2002 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonar, Scott A.

    of cold, swift water from Colorado River dams on flannelmouth sucker populations. We conducted fatigue of hydroelectric dams have transformed the Colorado River from a warm, turbid, and highly dynamic stream into a system dominated by large reservoirs and cold tail- waters. These changes have dramatically affected

  13. Estimated Benefits of Accomplishing Habitat Objectives Lower Snake Prepared by: Mobrand Biometrics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , turbidity, riparian function, LWD, primary pools and bed scour. The specific objectives set, by attribute for LWD (for those reaches in which an increase in pool area was expected). This assumption is based on the well- known correlation between LWD and pool area. 1 Note that two reaches with identical restoration

  14. Water Quality 101 Dr. Mike Mallin and Matthew McIver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Solids A measure of suspended particles in water, similar to turbidity Filter volume of water and weigh1 Water Quality 101 Dr. Mike Mallin and Matthew McIver Aquatic Ecology Laboratory UNCW-Center for Marine Science Common Water Quality Sampling Parameters and Analytical Procedures Water temperature

  15. 2015 Summer Engineering Technology Program Building for Tomorrow: Introduction to Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    can be used to filter water. Feel free to bring some disposable stuff with you. You need to clean 2 g and glue. TUESDAY Environmental Engineering/Water Quality "Clean that Dirty Water"Activity Figure out what of water in 10 minutes or less. Winner is clearest water and least time. Test in lab with turbidity meters

  16. Modeling the Effects of Oyster Reefs and Breakwaters on Seagrass Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Elizabeth W.

    like breakwaters by attenu- ating waves, thus decreasing sediment resuspension. We developed a quasi), a parameter controlled by resuspension-induced turbidity, was calculated in simulations in which wave height influencing SGP, with higher waves increasing sediment resuspension and decreasing SGP. Submerged breakwaters

  17. Water Quality Trends in the Fraser River Basin, 1985-1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consulting Vancouver, B.C. and Patrick Shaw. Environment Canada Pacific and Yukon Region November 1998 DOE conducted by both Environment Canada and the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks-basin monitoring site, the Salmon River at Salmon Arm, identified trends in turbidity and dissolved ions may

  18. Light traps are one of a number of different gears used to sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurements of cur- rent speed and turbidity. Materials and methods Study sites Larval and juvenile fishes were col- lected at five oil and gas platforms (platforms) in the north-central Gulf of Mexico 1999); and Murphy Oil's Viosca Knoll 203 (29°4653N, 88°1959W; May-October 2000). All platforms had

  19. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cameron, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Bliss, David E. (Tijeras, NM); Kimmel, Mark W. (Edgewood, NM); Neal, Daniel R. (Tijeras, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A system for detecting objects in a turbid media utilizes an optical parametric amplifier as an amplifying gate for received light from the media. An optical gating pulse from a second parametric amplifier permits the system to respond to and amplify only ballistic photons from the object in the media.

  20. AN ELECTROFISHING BOAT WITH A VARIABLE VOLTAGE PULSATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and design Equipment operation Safety precautions Literature cited . Figure l.--Boat plan Figure 2 is limited by wind conditions and the turbidity and depth of the water. It proved to be a useful tool-dwelling fishes. Mortality of fish is negligible. Cost of the unit including boat, motor, trailer, generator

  1. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cameron, S.M.; Bliss, D.E.; Kimmel, M.W.; Neal, D.R.

    1999-08-10

    A system for detecting objects in a turbid media utilizes an optical parametric amplifier as an amplifying gate for received light from the media. An optical gating pulse from a second parametric amplifier permits the system to respond to and amplify only ballistic photons from the object in the media. 13 figs.

  2. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 135, 2013 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/13/1/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    and other factors. Cascadia's margin is dominated by glacial cycle constructed pathways which promote turbidity current flows for large dis- tances. Sumatra margin pathways do not inherit these an- tecedent terrestrial sedimentation processes, these sys- tems may principally be driven by seismic cycles (Nelson et al

  3. Influence of the atmosphere on remotely sensed reflection from vegetation surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmer, C.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple scattering of solar radiation in a vegetation canopy is modelled equivalent to absorbing and scattering in a turbid medium with direction-dependent cross sections. Perturbations of plant reflection patterns due to atmospheric effects are computed at different altitudes and compared to the angular reflection characteristics caused by Lambertian surfaces of varying albedoes.

  4. ISSUES IN THE ASSESSMENT OF GRAVITY MASS FLOW HAZARD IN THE STOREGGA AREA OFF THE WESTERN NORWEGIAN COAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of about 10 kPa reproduce this dependence quite well, in contrast to granular-friction models. However and seismically mapped in detail and sediment cores have been collected in addition to drilling. We used turbidity currents. The present paper summarises meth- ods and results obtained in our study

  5. Relationships between El Nino and the westerly winds in the South Pacific Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salva Pando, Antonio Jaime

    1976-01-01

    and similar phenomena in world weather. A modernized view of the Southern Oscillation, by Berlage and Boer (1959), is given in Fig. 4 and 5. Berlage (1966) associates the phenomenon with variations in solar activity and the turbidity of the atmosphere...

  6. Proceedings of HT2009 2009 ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    , USA HT2009-88261 SIMULATION OF FOCUSED RADIATION PROPAGATION AND TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER IN TURBID-dependent radiation and conduction bio-heat transfer model. Ultrashort pulsed radiation transport in the cylindrical dissipation and the heat-affected zone. Two characteristics in ultrafast radiation heat transfer are worth

  7. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksnes, Dag L.

    are a ubiquitous feature of the oceans. The waves are formed by variable wind stress and the actions of tides and currents on the ocean bottoms and continental margins (Garrett & Munk 1979). Several effects of internal in light penetration through the turbid surface layer of the sea. Illustration: Hege Vestheim OPENPEN

  8. Recent transfer of coastal sediments to the Laurentian Channel, Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (Eastern Canada),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St-Ong, Guillaume

    of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (Eastern Canada). The multibeam data were used to generate a high that they were produced by a combination of erosive turbidity flows and retrogressive failures. The two box cores. Introduction Submarine canyons are initiated by failures on depositional oversteepenings of continental slopes

  9. Sedimentation in theTonga forearc is dominated by the redeposition of volcaniclastic sediment from the arc volcanic front by mass flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clift, Peter

    ABSTRACT Sedimentation in theTonga forearc is dominated by the redeposition of volcaniclastic sediment from the arc volcanic front by mass flows and turbidity currents onto the adjacent Tonga Platform, the shallow- est, flattest part of the forearc region.The greatest sediment thicknesses accumulate in debris

  10. P.A. Nelson S.M. Kajiura G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV-filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajiura, Stephen

    P.A. Nelson Æ S.M. Kajiura Æ G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV levels of solar radiation than they had previously experienced in the source habitat in the turbid waters spectrum, but sharks exposed to greater solar radiation showed increased UV blocking in their corneal

  11. Distillation efficiencies of an industrial-scale i-butane/n-butane fractionator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klemola, K.T.; Ilme, J.K.

    1996-12-01

    Rarely published industrial-scale distillation efficiency data are presented. The Murphree tray efficiencies are determined from the i-butane/n-butane fractionator performance data. Point efficiencies, numbers of overall vapor phase transfer units, numbers of vapor and liquid phase transfer units, and liquid phase resistances of mass transfer are backcalculated from the Murphree tray efficiencies. Various efficiency prediction and scale-up methods have been tested against experimental results. A new model for the prediction of the numbers of vapor and liquid phase transfer units has been developed. The model can be applied to hydrocarbon systems at high pressure. The influence of the mass-transfer coefficients, the interfacial area, and the vapor and liquid residence times on mass transfer has been analyzed separately, and as a result the NTU correlations for vapor and liquid phases are obtained. The constants of the model can be obtained by fitting the model to experimental efficiency data from a similar system.

  12. Process and system for treating waste water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olesen, Douglas E. (Kennewick, WA); Shuckrow, Alan J. (Pasco, WA)

    1978-01-01

    A process of treating raw or primary waste water using a powdered, activated carbon/aerated biological treatment system is disclosed. Effluent turbidities less than 2 JTU (Jackson turbidity units), zero TOC (total organic carbon) and in the range of 10 mg/l COD (chemical oxygen demand) can be obtained. An influent stream of raw or primary waste water is contacted with an acidified, powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture. Lime is then added to the slurry to raise the pH to about 7.0. A polyelectrolyte flocculant is added to the slurry followed by a flocculation period -- then sedimentation and filtration. The separated solids (sludge) are aerated in a stabilization sludge basin and a portion thereof recycled to an aerated contact basin for mixing with the influent waste water stream prior to or after contact of the influent stream with the powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture.

  13. Contamination of the transformer oil of power transformers and shunting reactors by metal-containing colloidal particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L'vov, S. Yu. [LLC 'Presselektro' (Russian Federation); Komarov, V. B.; Bondareva, V. N.; Seliverstov, A. F. [A. N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IFCE of RAS) (Russian Federation); Lyut'ko, E. O.; L'vov, Yu. N. [JSC 'R and D Centre for Power Engineering' (Russian Federation); Ershov, B. G. [A. N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IFCE of RAS) (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    The results of a measurement of the contamination of the oil in 66 transformers by metal-containing colloidal particles, formed as a result of the interaction of the oil with the structural materials (the copper of the windings, the iron of the tank and core etc.), and also the results of measurements of the optical turbidity of the oil in 136 transformers when they were examined at the Power Engineering Research and Development Center Company are presented. Methods of determining the concentration of copper and iron in transformer oil are considered. The limiting values of the optical turbidity factors, the copper and iron content are determined. These can serve as a basis for taking decisions on whether to replace the silica gel of the filters for continuously purifying the oil of power transformers and the shunting reactors in addition to the standardized oil contamination factors, namely, the dielectric loss tangent and the acidity number of the oil.

  14. Environmental applications of the particle analysis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moritz, E.J.; Hoffman, C.R.

    1993-09-28

    This study demonstrates the applicability of particle counting technology for analysis of various water treatment systems at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Particle Analysis System described in this study determined the water quality of samples from environmental remediation, stormwater treatment, and drinking water treatment operations. Samples were measured in either discrete or on-line mode. This data showed filtration efficiencies, particle counts, particle size distributions, and real-time treatment system performance. Particle counting proved more sensitive than the turbidimetric measurement technique commonly used by the water treatment industry. Particle counting is a two-dimensional measurement of counts and sizes, whereas turbidity is a one-dimensional measurement of water clarity. Samples showing identical turbidities could be distinguished easily with the Particle Analysis System. The Particle Analysis System proved to be an efficient and reliable water quality measurement tool, and it is applicable to a variety of water treatment systems at the Rocky Flats Plant.

  15. Depositional environment of Oligocene Hackberry sandstones, Hilde brandt Bayou area, Jefferson County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Brian Kennett

    1980-01-01

    interpreted as of turbidity-flow origin. The embayment 1s filled with a dominant shale section wh1ch contains microfauna believed to represent bathyal depths. , Cores retrieved from fields in Jefferson County, southeast Texas, were studied to examine... as arenites and later altered by diagenesis. Microfauna recovered from shale clasts within sandstone packages indicate deposition in an outer nerit1c or upper bathyal environment. Lower Hackberry isopach and net sand maps illustrate major, dip- trend1ng...

  16. Clarification of construction and mining rainfall runoff 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Roberta Davyd

    1982-01-01

    5 ft 0 7ft 3, 5, 7 ft ig 411 depths 35 30 25 20 10 0 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 Settling time (hours) Figure 34. Turbidity removal in column settling of pond 1 sample using 80 mg/1 alum with lime 63 80 70 Legend 0 1ft 0 3 fi' 5 ft p 7ft... Legend 0 1 0 3ft 5 ft D 7 ft 8 5, 7ft ig all depths 140 120 100...

  17. Waterfowl food and habitat utilization on a southern reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouchley, James Kelby

    1976-01-01

    of waterfowl feeding grounds. Low and Bellrose (1944) found that water depth and turbidity were foremost among environmental factors affecting the normal yield of seed 19 and foliage. Peltier and Welch (1970) found reservoir elevation, rain- fall, incident... of that year and this stress came at a criti. cal period in plant development. In addition to the limiting effect of light, seeds and young plants may have been smothered by the deposition of silt (Peltier and Welch 1970). Percival et al. (1970) noted...

  18. Lawrence Residence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    1962-01-01

    interpreted as of turbidity-flow origin. The embayment 1s filled with a dominant shale section wh1ch contains microfauna believed to represent bathyal depths. , Cores retrieved from fields in Jefferson County, southeast Texas, were studied to examine... shale samples Shell Hebert Ranch 1-C and Humble 1 Port Acres Gas Unit 1 48 14 Scanning electron micrographs of characteristic Frio foraminifera from selected wells including Shell Hebert Ranch 1-C and Humble 1 Port Acres Gas Unit 1, Jefferson County...

  19. Evaluacion experimental del factor de estabilidad en nanoemulsiones dodecano/agua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yorlis Mendoza; Kareem Rahn-Chique; German Urbina-Villalba

    2013-05-17

    The turbidity of four different oil/water (o/w) ionic nanoemulsions is studied as a function of time. The emulsions are stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulphate, and are composed of pure dodecane, and mixtures of dodecane, squalene and tetrachloroethylene. For each system plots of the stability factor as a function of the ionic strength of the solution are reported. The results allow establishing the relative importance of buoyancy and Ostwald ripening on the aggregation rates.

  20. An evaluation of water and sediment quality along the Texas Gulf Intracoastal Waterway 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesler, Ralph Steven

    1975-01-01

    and nitrate nutrient concentrations. Data was also obtained for the amount of cadmium, copper, lead and zinc dissolved in the water. In January, bottom samples were obtained to provide information regarding the pH, Eh, and heavy metal concentration... Water PH Values Surface Water Eh Values in (mv) Surface Water Turbidity Middepth Phosphate Values Middepth Ammonia Values Middepth Nitrate Values Middepth Total Suspended Solids Middepth Volatile Suspended Solids Middepth Total Organic Carbon...

  1. Reconstruction-classification method for quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malone, Emma; Cox, Ben T; Arridge, Simon R

    2015-01-01

    We propose a combined reconstruction-classification method for simultaneously recovering absorption and scattering in turbid media from images of absorbed optical energy. This method exploits knowledge that optical parameters are determined by a limited number of classes to iteratively improve their estimate. Numerical experiments show that the proposed approach allows for accurate recovery of absorption and scattering in 2 and 3 dimensions, and delivers superior image quality with respect to traditional reconstruction-only approaches.

  2. Low Grade Heat Recovery- A Unique Approach at Polysar Limited 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyr, S.

    1988-01-01

    to the river condition. High feed water turbidity, resulting from yearly spring run off and turbulent river conditions from stonns, had led to reduced ion exchange train throughput capacity and increased frequency of sand filter backwash. (2) The operating... exchangers in Canada saves energy for Polysar Limited. This unique retrofit proj~t has not only increased the recovery of low grade heat but also Integrated and optimized the operation of two dif~erent .w~ter treatment facilities. The estimated annual...

  3. Abundance and distribution of macro-crustaceans in the intake and discharge areas before and during early operation of the Cedar Bayou Generating Station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Monroe

    1972-01-01

    site to insure that sufficient water could be drawn up the bayou from IBOI 27 15 24 ;*':: 21 RED BAYOU , . 8:; h, ;-, !;, 18 23 12 ";;. 9 17 II *'?'-' 7 8 13 14 18 28 ABBS h2 3 ':. ; TRINITY BAY h SCALE: STATUTE MILES 0 I 2 3 4 5... un- doubtedly had some effects on organisms there. Dredging operations in Tabbs Bay (August 19, 1970 until November 25, 1970) were near both Stations 1 and 2 and often caused high turbidity and other disturbances at the stations. Station 3...

  4. Interim survey report, Wailua River hydropower, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Installation of hydroelectric facilities on the South Fork Wailua River three and five miles upstream of Wailua Falls on the Island of Kauai, Hawaii is proposed. The hydroelectric facilities would provide an additional source of energy for the island, effectively utilizing available waters. Addition of hydropower to the island's power system, which is primarily reliant on fuel and diesel oils, would diversify the system's base. Hydropower diversion would reduce flows downstream of the structures, affecting fishery, recreational, and aesthetic resources. Construction activities would disturb approximately 2.7 acres of cropland and create temporary turbidity downstream of the sites.

  5. Solar spectral measurements and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, R.E.; Hulstrom, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A newly developed spectroradiometer for routine measurement of the solar spectra is described. This instrument measures the solar spectrum between 300 and 2500 nm in less than 2.5 min, with 0.7-nm resolution in the visible and 10-nm resolution in the infrared. Many examples of global, direct, and diffuse spectra are illustrated for Bedford, Mass. and Golden, Colo. The effects of air mass, turbidity, and sun tracking on the spectrum are presented, and radiative transfer modeling capabilities and comparisons between models and between models and experiment are discussed.

  6. Water World and Environmental Resources Conference 2004, Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Salt Lake City, Utah. July 27 June 1, 2004.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    Turbidity 43 55 92 96 Total-P 68 82 89 92 Total-N 30 41 35 23 Nitrate 0 0 12 17 Phosphate 71 78 81 88 COD 48 52 52 47 Ammonia 35 46 54 58 Cadmium 20 22 22 22 Chromium 69 81 82 84 Copper 26 34 34 37 Iron 52 63.3 Lead 78.4 21.6 Copper 77.4 22.6 Cadmium 10 90 #12;3 Figure 2 is an example plot showing the reduction

  7. An investigation of the depolarization of backscattered electromagnetic waves using a lidar polarimeter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelmi, Gary Joe

    1973-01-01

    . P. James for their guidance and assistance throughout this study. The efforts of Dr. J. L. Stone and Dr. L. E. Fite in procuring the vacuum equipment is greatly appreciated. Also, sincere thanks are due Dr. K. J. McCree for use of the Spectral...-2 Values of Q' for Rough Surfaces 91 V-3 C-1 C-2 Values of Volume Reflection Coefficients for Rough Surfaces Turbid Water Data Rough Surface Data 140 141 LIST OF FIGURFS Figure ~pa e II-1 Scattering geometry for the surface scatter...

  8. Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pauli, Adam T. (Cheyenne, WY); Robertson, Raymond E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Chatham, IL); Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-08-07

    A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

  9. Excitation of fountain and entrainment instabilities at the interface between two viscous fluids using a beam of laser light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza Chraibi; Julien Petit; Régis Wunenburger; Jean-Pierre Delville

    2013-07-24

    We report on two instabilities called viscous fountain and viscous entrainment triggered at the interface between two liquids by the action of bulk flows driven by a laser beam. These streaming flows are due to light scattering losses in turbid liquids, and can be directed either toward or forward the interface. We experimentally and numerically investigate these interface instabilities and show that the height and curvature of the interface deformation at the threshold and the jet radius after interface destabilization mainly depend on the waist of the laser beam. Analogies and differences between these two instabilities are characterized.

  10. Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobler, C J; Grigoriev, I V; Berry, D L; Dyhrman, S T; Wilhelm, S W; Salamov, A; Lobanov, A V; Zhang, Y; Collier, J L; Wurch, L L; Kustka, A B; Dill, B D; Shah, M; VerBerkomes, N C; Kuo, A; Terry, A; Pangilinan, J; Lindquist, E A; Lucas, S; Paulsen, I; Hattenrath-Lehmann, T K; Talmage, S; Walker, E A; Koch, F; Burson, A M; Marcoval, M A; Tang, Y; LeCleir, G R; Coyne, K J; Berg, G M; Bertrand, E M; Saito, M A; Gladyshev, V N

    2011-03-02

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements demonstrated that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the first HAB genome (A. anophagefferens) and compared its gene complement to those of six competing phytoplankton species identified via metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on the gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 mbp) and more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen utilization, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

  11. Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor; Gobler, Christopher; Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Terry, Astrid; Pangillian, Jasmyn; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Berry, Dianna; Dyhrman, Sonya; Wilhelm, Steven; Lobanov, Alexei; Zhang, Yan; Collier, Jackie; Wurch, Louie; Kusta, Adam; Dill, Brian; Shsh, Manesh; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Paulsen, Ian; Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa; Talmage, Stephanie; Walker, Elyse; Koch, Florian; Burson, Amanda; Marcoval, Maria; Tang, Yin-Zhong; LeCleir, Gary; Coyne, Kathyrn; Berg, Gry; Bertrand, Erin; Saito, Mak; Gladyshev, Vadim

    2011-02-18

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking, because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements showed that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the genome of A. anophagefferens and compared its gene complement with those of six competing phytoplankton species identified through metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 Mbp) and has more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen use, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species, with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus, has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

  12. Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

  13. Metal ions in water and sediments of the Pom-Atasta Lagoon, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez, G.F.; Enciso, G.; Morales, J.W. [UNAM, Distrito Federal (Mexico). Instituto de Ciencias Del Mar y Limnologia] [UNAM, Distrito Federal (Mexico). Instituto de Ciencias Del Mar y Limnologia; Sharma, V.K. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Nischt, S.L.; Domingo, G.L. [PEMEX, Campeche (Mexico)] [PEMEX, Campeche (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    Temperature, salinity, turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS), pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured in the surface water of the Pom-Atasta Lagoon at 15 stations during 5 sampling events from September 1996--May 1997. Concentrations of Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, Pb, Cr, Ag, Fe, Co, and Ba were also determined in the water and sediments at 15 stations during the study period. The values of salinity, turbidity, and TSS were related to the inputs of river water into the lagoon. Metals in the water and sediments showed no spatial variation. Seasonality in the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Ag, and Ba in the water was found and may be related to the resuspension of sediments in the lagoon. The concentrations of metals in sediments did not give significant seasonal variation. Metals in sediments were not correlated with the iron, suggesting an anthropogenic source of metals in the Pom-Atasta Lagoon. The concentrations of dissolved Pb were above the value recommended by the National Water Commission of Mexico.

  14. Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-08-20

    This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

  15. Spectral solar irradiance before and during a Harmattan dust spell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyefa, Z.D. [Federal Univ. of Technology, Akure (Nigeria)] [Federal Univ. of Technology, Akure (Nigeria); Holmgren, B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of the ground-level spectral distributions of the direct, diffuse and global solar irradiance between 300 and 1100 nm were made at Akure (7.15{degree}N, 5.5{degree}E), Nigeria, in December 1991 before and during a Harmattan dust spell employing a spectroradiometer (LICOR LI-1800) with 6 nm resolution. The direct spectral solar irradiance which was initially reduced before the dust storm was further attenuated by about 50% after the spell. Estimated values of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} indicated an increase of about 146% of this parameter while the Angstrom wavelength-exponent {alpha} decreased by about 65% within the 2-day study period. The spectral diffuse-to-direct and diffuse-to-global ratios suggest that the main cause of the significant reduction in solar irradiance at the surface was the scattering by the aerosol which led to an increase in the diffuse component. The global irradiance though reduced, was less sensitive to changing Harmattan conditions. It is recommended that solar energy devices that use radiation from Sun and sky be used under fluctuating Harmattan conditions. There are some deviations from the Angstrom formula under very turbid Harmattan conditions which could be explained by the relative increase of the particle sizes. 31 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. SLUDGE PARTICLE SEPAPATION EFFICIENCIES DURING SETTLER TANK RETRIEVAL INTO SCS-CON-230

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DEARING JI; EPSTEIN M; PLYS MG

    2009-07-16

    The purpose of this document is to release, into the Hanford Document Control System, FA1/0991, Sludge Particle Separation Efficiencies for the Rectangular SCS-CON-230 Container, by M. Epstein and M. G. Plys, Fauske & Associates, LLC, June 2009. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) will retrieve sludge from the 105-K West Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Settler Tanks and transfer it to container SCS-CON-230 using the Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS). The sludge will enter the container through two distributors. The container will have a filtration system that is designed to minimize the overflow of sludge fines from the container to the basin. FAI/09-91 was performed to quantify the effect of the STRS on sludge distribution inside of and overflow out of SCS-CON-230. Selected results of the analysis and a system description are discussed. The principal result of the analysis is that the STRS filtration system reduces the overflow of sludge from SCS-CON-230 to the basin by roughly a factor of 10. Some turbidity can be expected in the center bay where the container is located. The exact amount of overflow and subsequent turbidity is dependent on the density of the sludge (which will vary with location in the Settler Tanks) and the thermal gradient between the SCS-CON-230 and the basin. Attachment A presents the full analytical results. These results are applicable specifically to SCS-CON-230 and the STRS filtration system's expected operating duty cycles.

  17. Tuning metal–carboxylate coordination in crystalline metal–organic frameworks through surfactant media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Junkuo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ye, Kaiqi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); He, Mi [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Xiong, Wei-Wei; Cao, Wenfang; Lee, Zhi Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wu, Tom [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Huo, Fengwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Xiaogang [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Zhang, Qichun, E-mail: qczhang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2013-10-15

    Although it has been widely demonstrated that surfactants can efficiently control the size, shape and surface properties of micro/nanocrystals of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) due to the strong interactions between surfactants and crystal facets of MOFs, the use of surfactants as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals is unprecedented. In addition, compared with ionic liquids, surfactants are much cheaper and can have multifunctional properties such as acidic, basic, neutral, cationic, anionic, or even block. These factors strongly motivate us to develop a new synthetic strategy: growing crystalline MOFs in surfactants. In this report, eight new two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) MOFs have been successfully synthesized in an industrially-abundant and environmentally-friendly surfactant: polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Eight different coordination modes of carboxylates, ranging from monodentate ?{sup 1} mode to tetra-donor coordination µ{sub 3}-?{sup 1}:?{sup 2}:?{sup 1} mode, have been founded in our research. The magnetic properties of Co-based MOFs were investigated and MOF NTU-Z6b showed a phase transition with a Curie temperature (T{sub c}) at 5 K. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. - Graphical abstract: Surfactants have been used as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals for the first time. Eight new two-dimensional or three-dimensional MOFs were successfully synthesized in surfactant polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Coordination modes of carboxylates up to eight were founded. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Surfactant-thermal synthesis of crystalline metal–organic frameworks. • Eight new 2-D or 3-D metal–organic frameworks. • Eight different metal–carboxylate coordination modes.

  18. TESTING OF THE SPINTEK ROTARY MICROFILTER USING ACTUAL HANFORD WASTE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUBER HJ

    2010-04-13

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter was tested on actual Hanford tank waste. The samples were a composite of archived Tank 241-AN-105 material and a sample representing single-shell tanks (SST). Simulants of the two samples have been used in non-rad test runs at the 222-S laboratory and at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The results of these studies are compared in this report. Two different nominal pore sizes for the sintered steel rotating disk filter were chosen: 0.5 and 0.1 {micro}m. The results suggest that the 0.5-{micro}m disk is preferable for Hanford tank waste for the following reasons: (1) The filtrate clarity is within the same range (<<4 ntu for both disks); (2) The filtrate flux is in general higher for the 0.5-{micro}m disk; and (3) The 0.1-{micro}m disk showed a higher likelihood of fouling. The filtrate flux of the actual tank samples is generally in the range of 20-30% compared to the equivalent non-rad tests. The AN-105 slurries performed at about twice the filtrate flux of the SST slurries. The reason for this difference has not been identified. Particle size distributions in both cases are very similar; comparison of the chemical composition is not conclusive. The sole hint towards what material was stuck in the filter pore holes came from the analysis of the dried flakes from the surface of the fouled 0.1-{micro}m disk. A cleaning approach developed by SRNL personnel to deal with fouled disks has been found adaptable when using actual Hanford samples. The use of 1 M nitric acid improved the filtrate flux by approximately two times; using the same simulants as in the non-rad test runs showed that the filtrate flux was restored to 1/2 of its original amount.

  19. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  20. A plane wave analysis of coherent holographic image reconstruction by phase transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Jeffrey J; Bartels, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging plays a critical role in a myriad of scientific endeavors, particularly in the biological sciences. Three-dimensional imaging of fluorescent intensity often requires serial data acquisition, that is voxel-by-voxel collection of fluorescent light emitted throughout the specimen with a non-imaging single-element detector. While non-imaging fluorescence detection offers some measure of scattering robustness, the rate at which dynamic specimens can be imaged is severely limited. Other fluorescent imaging techniques utilize imaging detection to enhance collection rates. A notable example is light-sheet fluorescence microscopy, also known as selective-plane illumination microscopy (SPIM), which illuminates a large region within the specimen and collects emitted fluorescent light at an angle either perpendicular or oblique to the illumination light sheet. Unfortunately, scattering of the emitted fluorescent light can cause blurring of the collected images in highly turbid biological media. We rec...

  1. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana; Pop, Nicolina; Calinoiu, Delia

    2013-11-13

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  2. Adsorption behavior of iron-cyanide onto {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface: A coagulation approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, W.P.; Huang, C.; Pan, J.R. [National Chiao Tung Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Inst. of Environmental Engineering] [National Chiao Tung Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Inst. of Environmental Engineering

    1999-05-01

    Ferrocyanide and ferricyanide ions have strong coagulation ability in a natural water system due to their high valences. Studies with aluminum oxide turbid waters showed significant differences in coagulation between simple ions (Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3{minus}}, Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4{minus}}) and other species (H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) that interact chemically with the oxide surface. The evidence suggested that the adsorption of ferrocyanide and ferricyanide on aluminum oxide surface is an outer-sphere reaction. The linear relationship between the logarithm of the significant coagulation concentration and Schultz-Hardy ratios indicated that the coagulation obeyed the DLVO rule. Therefore, it is concluded that the coagulation of aluminum oxide by ferrocyanide and ferricyanide is essentially caused by compression of the electric double layer rather than by charge neutralization.

  3. Turbidimetric determination of the total glucozinolate content of rape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kononova, R.V.; Chaika, I.K.; Levitskii, A.P.; Lucashenok, E.V.

    1986-03-01

    The objective of the investigation was to develop a procedure for the determination of the total GZ (glucozinolate--non-nurishing substances found in rapeseed) content from the content of sulfate ion SO/sup 2 -4/which is formed in the fermentative hydrolysis of GZ, based on the degree of turbidity formed by the addition of a barium chloride solution in the presence of the surfactant Tween-80 (poly(20)ethoxysorbitan monooleate.). The supernatant liquid is used to determine the SO/sup 2 -4 -/ion before and after fermentative hydrolysis. The GZ content of the analyzed sample of rapeseed raw material was calculated from an equation. Data show that the precision, reliability, and reproducibility of the results obtained by the proposed method are satisfactory. The procedure can be sued for serial analysis in selection establishments as well as feed production plants.

  4. Compatibility of manufacturing process fluids with R-134a and polyolester lubricant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavestri, R.C.; Schooley, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    This report includes a broad list of processing fluids that are known to be used to manufacture air conditioning and refrigeration products. Sixty-four process fluids from this list were selected for compatibility studies with R-134a and ICI EMKARATE RL32H (32 ISO) polyolester lubricant. Solutions or suspensions of the process fluid residues in polyolester lubricant were heated for 14 days at 175{degrees}C (347{degrees}F) in evacuated sealed glass tubes containing only valve steel coupons. Miscibility tests were performed at 90 wt.% R-134a, 10 wt.% polyolester lubricant with process fluid residue contaminate and were scanned in 10{degrees}C (18{degrees}F) increments over a temperature range of ambient to -40{degrees}C (-40{degrees}F). Any sign of turbidity, haze formation or oil separation was considered the immiscibility point.

  5. Birefringence imaging in biological tissue using polarization sensitive optical coherent tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Boer, Johannes F. (Irvine, CA); Milner, Thomas E. (Austin, TX); Nelson, J. Stuart (Laguna Niguel, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Employing a low coherence Michelson interferometer, two dimensional images of optical birefringence in turbid samples as a function of depth are measured. Polarization sensitive detection of the signal formed by interference of backscattered light from the sample and a mirror or reference plane in the reference arm which defines a reference optical path length, give the optical phase delay between light propagating along the fast and slow axes of the birefringence sample. Images showing the change in birefringence in response to irradiation of the sample are produced as an example of the detection apparatus and methodology. The technique allow rapid, noncontact investigation of tissue or sample diagnostic imaging for various medical or materials procedures.

  6. An evaluation of the effect of volcanic eruption on the solar radiation at Australian and Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yatko, B.R.; Garrison, J.D.

    1996-11-01

    Peak (most probable) and average values of {angstrom}`s turbidity coefficient {beta} and peak (most probable) and average values of the diffuse index k{sub d} are obtained from the solar radiation data from 21 stations in Australia and 5 stations in Canada. These data exhibit clear increases in their values when the volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere increase following volcanic eruptions of sufficient magnitude. The effect of the eruptions of Fuego (1974), El Chichon (1982) and Pinatubo (1991) are seen most clearly in the data. The effect of lesser eruptions is also seen. The store of volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere shifts with the season so that scattering by volcanic aerosols in the spring half of the year is stronger than in the fall.

  7. Low-frequency elastic waves alter pore-scale colloid mobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckham, Richard Edward; Abdel-fattah, Amr I; Roberts, Peter M; Ibrahim, Reem; Tarimala, Sownitri

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring seismic events and artificially generated low-frequency elastic waves have been observed to alter the production rates of oil and water wells, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing production, and to influence the turbidity of water wells. TEe decreases in production are of particular concern - especially when artificially generated elastic waves are applied as a method for enhanced oil recovery. The exact conditions that result in a decrease in production remain unknown. While the underlying environment is certainly complex, the observed increase in water well turbidity after seismic events suggests the existence of a mechanism that can affect both the subsurface flow paths and mobilization of in-situ colloidal particles. This paper explores the macroscopic and microscopic effects of elastic wave stimulations on the release of colloidal particles and investigates the microscopic mechanism of particle release during stimulation. Experiments on a column packed with 1-mm borosilicate beads loaded with polystyrene microspheres demonstrate that low-frequency elastic wave stimulations enhance the mobilization of captured microspheres. Increasing the intensity of the stimulations increases the number of microspheres released and can also result in cyclical variations in effluent microsphere concentration during and after stimulations. Under a prolonged period of stimulation, the cyclical effluent variations coincided with fluctuations in the column pressure data. This behavior can be attributed to flow pathways fouling and/or rearrangements of the beads in the column. Optical microscopy observations of the beads during low frequency oscillations reveal that the individual beads rotate, thereby rubbing against each other and scraping off portions of the adsorbed microspheres. These results support the theory that mechanical interactions between soil grains are important mechanisms in flow path alteration and the mobilization of naturally occurring colloidal particles during elastic wave stimulation. These results also point to both continuous and discrete, en masse releases of colloidal particles.

  8. (Energy related studies utilizing microline thermochronology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    In our first year of the current funding cycle, we have investigated three interrelated aspects of K-feldspar thermochronology; (1) the Ar diffusion properties and microstructures of K-feldspars, (2) the thermal evolution of the Valles Caldera and (3) the continued development of microanalysis. Results of TEM and light microscopy on heated and unheated samples of MH-10 K-feldspar reveal three classes of substructure are present: (1) cross hatched extinction is common and there is almost no albite/pericline twinning, only tweed microstructure; (2) 5--10 vol. % of this K-feldspar are turbid zones with complex twin and tweed structures at the sub-micron scale and numerous dislocation and strain features; (3) about 20% of the K-feldspar is comprised of 0.01 {times} 0.2-1{mu}m albite exsolution lamellae. The network of fractured/turbid zones divides the sample into blocks of approximately 50 {mu}m and the separation between albite exsolution lamellae produce K-feldspar domains of the order 0.1 {mu}m. Independent crushing and diffusion experiments suggest the scale of the largest domain is order ten's of micron whereas the smallest domain size is inferred to be {approximately}0.1 {mu}m. Many, and perhaps most, alkali feldspars contain diffusion domains with activation energies that may vary by as much as 8 kcal/mol. An extraordinary consequence of even relatively small variations in activation energy between domains is that the shape of an age spectrum can change dramatically by varying the laboratory heating schedule. We have performed {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age spectrum experiments on K-feldspar separated from Proterozoic quartz monzonite taken from a depth of 1.76 km down the VC-2B drill hole, Valles Caldera, north-central New Mexcio.

  9. [Energy related studies utilizing microline thermochronology]. Progress report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    In our first year of the current funding cycle, we have investigated three interrelated aspects of K-feldspar thermochronology; (1) the Ar diffusion properties and microstructures of K-feldspars, (2) the thermal evolution of the Valles Caldera and (3) the continued development of microanalysis. Results of TEM and light microscopy on heated and unheated samples of MH-10 K-feldspar reveal three classes of substructure are present: (1) cross hatched extinction is common and there is almost no albite/pericline twinning, only tweed microstructure; (2) 5--10 vol. % of this K-feldspar are turbid zones with complex twin and tweed structures at the sub-micron scale and numerous dislocation and strain features; (3) about 20% of the K-feldspar is comprised of 0.01 {times} 0.2-1{mu}m albite exsolution lamellae. The network of fractured/turbid zones divides the sample into blocks of approximately 50 {mu}m and the separation between albite exsolution lamellae produce K-feldspar domains of the order 0.1 {mu}m. Independent crushing and diffusion experiments suggest the scale of the largest domain is order ten`s of micron whereas the smallest domain size is inferred to be {approximately}0.1 {mu}m. Many, and perhaps most, alkali feldspars contain diffusion domains with activation energies that may vary by as much as 8 kcal/mol. An extraordinary consequence of even relatively small variations in activation energy between domains is that the shape of an age spectrum can change dramatically by varying the laboratory heating schedule. We have performed {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age spectrum experiments on K-feldspar separated from Proterozoic quartz monzonite taken from a depth of 1.76 km down the VC-2B drill hole, Valles Caldera, north-central New Mexcio.

  10. Mobilization of colloidal particles by low-frequency dynamic stress stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckham, Richard Edward; Amr, Abdel - Fattah I; Peter, Roberts M; Reem, Ibrahim; Tarimala, Sowmitri

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring seismic events and artificially generated low-frequency (1 to 500 Hertz) elastic waves have been observed to alter the production rates of oil and water wells, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing production, and to influence the turbidity of surface and well water. The decreases in production are of particular concern - especially when artificially generated elastic waves are applied as a method for enhanced oil recovery. The exact conditions that result in a decrease in production remain unknown. While the underlying environment is certainly complex, the observed increase in water well turbidity after natural seismic events suggests the existence of a mechanism that can affect both the subsurface flow paths and mobilization of in-situ colloidal particles. This paper explores the macroscopic and microscopic effects of low-frequency dynamic stress stimulations on the release of colloidal particles from an analog core representing an infinitesimal section along the propagation paths of an elastic wave. Experiments on a column packed with 1-mm borosilicate beads and loaded with polystyrene microspheres demonstrate that axial mechanical stress oscillations enhance the mobilization of captured microspheres. Increasing the amplitude of the oscillations increases the number of microspheres released and can also result in cyclical spikes in effluent microsphere concentration during stimulation. Under a prolonged period of stimulation, the cyclical effluent spikes coincided with fluctuations in the column pressure data, and continue at a diminished level after stimulation. This behavior can be attributed to rearrangements of the beads in the column, resulting in possible changes to the void space and/or tortuosity of the packing. Optical microscopy observations of the beads during low frequency oscillations reveal that individual beads rotate, thereby rubbing against each other and scraping away portions of the adsorbed microspheres. These results support the theory that mechanical interactions between porous matrix grains are important mechanisms in flow path alteration and the mobilization of naturally occurring colloidal particles during elastic wave stimulation. These results also point to both continuous and discrete, en masse releases of colloidal particles, perhaps due to circulation cells within the packing material.

  11. TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

    2012-05-31

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion (<1200 mg/l). (4) Experimental tests with sludge batch 6 simulant and field turbidity data from a recent Tank 21 mixing evolution suggest the solid particles have higher density and/or larger size than indicated by previous analysis of SRS sludge and sludge simulants. (5) Tank 21 waste characterization, laboratory settling tests, and additional field turbidity measurements during mixing evolutions are recommended to better understand potential risk for extended (> 60 days) settling times in Tank 21.

  12. ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.

    2011-08-03

    SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

  13. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

  14. Characterization of highly scattering media by measurement of diffusely backscattered polarized light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hielscher, Andreas H. (Brooklyn, NY); Mourant, Judith R. (Los Alamos, NM); Bigio, Irving J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for recording spatially dependent intensity patterns of polarized light that is diffusely backscattered from highly scattering media are described. These intensity patterns can be used to differentiate different turbid media, such as polystyrene-sphere and biological-cell suspensions. Polarized light from a He-Ne laser (.lambda.=543 nm) is focused onto the surface of the scattering medium, and a surface area of approximately 4.times.4 cm centered on the light input point is imaged through polarization analysis optics onto a CCD camera. A variety of intensity patterns may be observed by varying the polarization state of the incident laser light and changing the analyzer configuration to detect different polarization components of the backscattered light. Experimental results for polystyrene-sphere and Intralipid suspensions demonstrate that the radial and azimuthal variations of the observed pattern depend on the concentration, size, and anisotropy factor, g, of the particles constituting the scattering medium. Measurements performed on biological cell suspensions show that intensity patterns can be used to differentiate between suspensions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells. Introduction of the Mueller-matrix for diffusely backscattered light, permits the selection of a subset of measurements which comprehensively describes the optical properties of backscattering media.

  15. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

  16. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, west Texas (Delaware Basin). Annual progress report, March 31, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, S.P.; Hovorka, S.D.; Cole, A.G.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based field development. Reservoirs in the Delaware Mountain Group have low producibility (average recovery <14 percent of the original oil in place) because of a high degree of vertical and lateral heterogeneity caused by depositional processes and post-depositional diagenetic modification. Detailed correlations of the Ramsey sandstone reservoirs in Geraldine Ford field suggest that lateral sandstone continuity is less than interpreted by previous studies. The degree of lateral heterogeneity in the reservoir sandstones suggests that they were deposited by eolian-derived turbidites. According to the eolian-derived turbidite model, sand dunes migrated across the exposed shelf to the shelf break during sea-level lowstands and provided well sorted sand for turbidity currents or grain flows into the deep basin.

  17. Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.D.

    1984-04-01

    Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

  18. CFPL installs products pipeline with directional drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    Central Florida Pipeline Company (CFPL), a subsidiary of GATX Terminals Corp., Tampa, FL, has used directional drilling under seven water bodies in Hillsborough, Polk and Osceola Counties in constructing its new pipeline from Tampa to Orlando. Primary reason for using directional drilling is to protect the environment by minimizing water turbidity while the 16-inch diameter, 109-mile refined petroleum products pipeline is being installed. Total cost of the project is pegged at $68.5 million. Directional drilling enabled the pipe to be placed about 20 feet below the bottom of: The Alafia River in Riverview with 999 feet drilled; Port Sutton Channel near the Port of Tampa with 2,756 feet drilled; Reedy Creek Swamp at the intersection of Interstate 4 and Highway 192 which had 1,111 feet drilled; Wetland {number_sign}70 southwest of Lake Wales with 1,575 feet drilled; Peace River south of Bartow had 2,470 feet drilled; Bonnet Creek west of Kissimmee had 693 feet drilled. Shingle Creek near the borders of Osceola and Orange Counties with 1,700 feet drilled. This paper reviews the design plans for construction and the emergency response plans should a rupture occur in the line.

  19. Analysis of clear hour solar irradiation for seven Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.; Sahami, K.

    1995-12-31

    Hourly global and diffuse irradiation and corresponding surface meteorological data have been analyzed for the seven Canadian stations at Edmonton, Goose Bay, Montreal, Port Hardy, Resolute, Toronto, and Winnipeg. The variation of the most probable clear hour values of clearness index k{sub t}, diffuse index k{sub d}, direct beam index k{sub b}, and Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} with solar elevation, atmospheric precipitable water, and snow depth are obtained. Values of these quantities are presented which are consistent with the attenuation and scattering of solar radiation by the atmosphere which is expected. The most probable values of {beta} tend to be lower than the average values of {beta} recently reported by Gueymard. The data indicate a drift in the calibration of the instruments used for measurements of the irradiation data for the stations at Goose Bay and Resolute. The data for the other five stations indicate that the instrument calibration is maintained over the years of the data. 4 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Characteristics of the C Shale and D Shale reservoirs, Monterey Formation, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; McIntyre, J.L. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States); McJannet, G.S. [Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The upper Miocene C Shale and D Shale reservoirs of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation have cumulative oil and gas production much higher than the originally estimated recovery. These San Joaquin basin reservoirs are the lowest of the Stevens producing zones at Elk Hills and currently produce from a 2800-acre area on the 31 S anticline. The C Shale contains lower slope and basin plain deposits of very fine grained, thinly bedded, graded turbidites, pelagic and hemipelagic claystone, and slump deposits. Although all units are oil-bearing, only the lower parts of the graded turbidity intervals have sufficient horizontal permeability to produce oil. The D Shale consists of chart, claystone, carbonates and slump deposits, also originating in a lower slope to basin plain setting. All D Shale rock types contain oil, but the upper chart interval is the most productive. The chart has high matrix porosity, and due to a complex horizontal and vertical microfracture system, produces at a highly effective rate. Core samples indicate more oil-in-place is present in the thin, graded C Shale beds and in the porous D Shale chart than is identifiable from conventional electric logs. High gas recovery rates are attributed mostly to this larger volume of associated oil. Gas also enters the reservoirs from the adjacent 26R reservoir through a leaky normal fault. Significant gas volumes also may desorb from immature organic material common in the rock matrix.

  1. Characteristics of the C Shale and D Shale reservoirs, Monterey Formation, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; McIntyre, J.L. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01

    The upper Miocene C Shale and D Shale reservoirs of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation have cumulative oil and gas production much higher than the originally estimated recovery. These San Joaquin basin reservoirs are the lowest of the Stevens producing zones at Elk Hills and currently produce from a 2800-acre area on the 31 S anticline. The C Shale contains lower slope and basin plain deposits of very fine grained, thinly bedded, graded turbidites, pelagic and hemipelagic claystone, and slump deposits. Although all units are oil-bearing, only the lower parts of the graded turbidity intervals have sufficient horizontal permeability to produce oil. The D Shale consists of chart, claystone, carbonates and slump deposits, also originating in a lower slope to basin plain setting. All D Shale rock types contain oil, but the upper chart interval is the most productive. The chart has high matrix porosity, and due to a complex horizontal and vertical microfracture system, produces at a highly effective rate. Core samples indicate more oil-in-place is present in the thin, graded C Shale beds and in the porous D Shale chart than is identifiable from conventional electric logs. High gas recovery rates are attributed mostly to this larger volume of associated oil. Gas also enters the reservoirs from the adjacent 26R reservoir through a leaky normal fault. Significant gas volumes also may desorb from immature organic material common in the rock matrix.

  2. Modeling and forecasting the distribution of Vibrio vulnificus in Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, John M.; Rhodes, M.; Brown, C. W.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Leight, A.; Long, Wen; Wood, R.

    2014-11-01

    The aim is to construct statistical models to predict the presence, abundance and potential virulence of Vibrio vulnificus in surface waters. A variety of statistical techniques were used in concert to identify water quality parameters associated with V. vulnificus presence, abundance and virulence markers in the interest of developing strong predictive models for use in regional oceanographic modeling systems. A suite of models are provided to represent the best model fit and alternatives using environmental variables that allow them to be put to immediate use in current ecological forecasting efforts. Conclusions: Environmental parameters such as temperature, salinity and turbidity are capable of accurately predicting abundance and distribution of V. vulnificus in Chesapeake Bay. Forcing these empirical models with output from ocean modeling systems allows for spatially explicit forecasts for up to 48 h in the future. This study uses one of the largest data sets compiled to model Vibrio in an estuary, enhances our understanding of environmental correlates with abundance, distribution and presence of potentially virulent strains and offers a method to forecast these pathogens that may be replicated in other regions.

  3. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

    1998-02-24

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

  4. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Geological Hazards (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and open-file reports. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift, and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis). First, overviews of volcanic and earthquake activity, and details of offshore geologic hazards is provided for the Hawaiian Islands. Then, a more detailed discussion of onshore geologic hazards is presented with special emphasis on the southern third of Hawaii and the east rift zone of Kilauea.

  5. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in California Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aghajanzadeh, Arian; Wray, Craig; McKane, Aimee

    2015-08-30

    Previous research over a period of six years has identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response (DR), automated demand response (Auto-­DR), and Energy Efficiency (EE) measures. This report summarizes that work, including the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy used and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and automated demand response opportunities. Furthermore, this report summarizes the DR potential of three wastewater treatment facilities. In particular, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has collected data at these facilities from control systems, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. The collected data were then used to generate a summary of wastewater power demand, factors affecting that demand, and demand response capabilities. These case studies show that facilities that have implemented energy efficiency measures and that have centralized control systems are well suited to shed or shift electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. In summary, municipal wastewater treatment energy demand in California is large, and energy-­intensive equipment offers significant potential for automated demand response. In particular, large load reductions were achieved by targeting effluent pumps and centrifuges. One of the limiting factors to implementing demand response is the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration at an earlier stage of the process. Another limiting factor is that cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities, limit a facility’s potential to participate in other DR activities.

  6. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim

    2009-05-11

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

  7. Microbial dissolved organic phosphorus utilization in the Hudson River Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, J.W. (Texas A M Univ., College Station (United States)); Angel, D.L. (City College of New York, NY (United States))

    1990-01-09

    The Hudson River Estuary has large inputs of phosphorus and other nutrients from sewage discharge. Concentrations of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) reach at least 4 uM during the summer low-flow period. Biological utilization of phosphorus and other nutrients is usually minimal because of the high turbidity and short residence time of the water. Therefore SRP is normally a conservative tracer of salinity, with maximum concentrations found off Manhattan and decreasing to the north. Despite this abundance of SRP, some components of the dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) appear to be rapidly cycled by microbes. The objective of this study was to measure this DIP cycling during both the high- and low-flow periods. We measured the concentrations of SRP and DOP, the SRP turnover rate, algal and bacterial biomass, and the substrate turnover rates of two microbial cell-surface phosphatases, alkaline phosphatase (AP) and 5[prime] - nucleotidase (5PN). SRP concentrations ranged from about 0.5-4 uM, DOP was usually less than 1 uM. SRP and AP turnover were slow (generally < 5%/h), but 5PN substrate turnover was high with a median rate of 100%/h. Furthermore, over 30% of the phosphate hydrolyzed by 5PN was immediately taken up. If the nucleotide-P concentration is conservatively assumed to be 5 nM, than the rate of phosphate utilization from DOP is nearly equal to that from SRP. That is paradoxical considering the large SRP concentration, but suggests that much of this SRP may be biologically unavailable due to complexation with iron or other processes.

  8. The impact of shrimp trawling and associated sediment resuspension in mud dominated, shallow estuaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dellapenna, Timothy M.; Allison, Mead A.; Gill, Gary A.; Lehman, Ronald D.; Warnken, Kent W.

    2006-07-18

    To address the relative importance of shrimp trawling on seabed resuspension and bottom characteristics in shallow estuaries, a series of disturbance and monitoring experiments were conducted at a bay bottom mud site (2.5 m depth) in Galveston Bay, Texas in July 1998 and May 1999. Based on pre- and post-trawl sediment profiles of 7Be; pore water dissolved oxygen and sulfide concentration; and bulk sediment properties, it was estimated that the trawl rig, including the net, trawl doors, and ‘‘tickler chain,’’ excavate the seabed to a maximum depth of approximately 1.5 cm, with most areas displaying considerably less disturbance. Water column profile data in the turbid plume left by the trawl in these underconsolidated muds (85e90% porosity; <0.25 kPa undrained shear strength) demonstrate that suspended sediment inventories of up to 85e90 mg/cm2 are produced immediately behind the trawl net; an order of magnitude higher than pre-trawl inventories and comparable to those observed during a 9e10 m/s wind event at the study site. Plume settling and dispersion caused suspended sediment inventories to return to pre-trawl values about 14 min after trawl passage in two separate experiments, indicating particles re-settle primarily as flocs before they can be widely dispersed by local currents. As a result of the passage of the trawl rig across the seabed, shear strength of the sediment surface showed no significant increase, suggesting that bed armoring is not taking place and the trawled areas will not show an increase in critical shear stress.

  9. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, R.Todd

    1996-05-01

    During the 1995 - 96 project period, four new habitat enhancement projects were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatilla River Basin. A total of 38,644 feet of high tensile smooth wire fencing was constructed along 3.6 miles of riparian corridor in the Meacham Creek, Wildhorse Creek, Greasewood Creek, West Fork of Greasewood Creek and Mission Creek watersheds. Additional enhancements on Wildhorse Creek and the lower Greasewood Creek System included: (1) installation of 0.43 miles of smooth wire between river mile (RM) 10.25 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek (fence posts and structures had been previously placed on this property during the 1994 - 95 project period), (2) construction of 46 sediment retention structures in stream channels and maintenance to 18 existing sediment retention structures between RM 9.5 and RM 10.25 Wildhorse Creek, and (3) revegetation of stream corridor areas and adjacent terraces with 500 pounds of native grass seed or close species equivalents and 5,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funds were cost shared with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, provided under this project, to accomplish habitat enhancements. Water quality monitoring continued and was expanded for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Physical habitat surveys were conducted on the lower 13 river miles of Wildhorse Creek and within the Greasewood Creek Project Area to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area.

  10. Particle Restabilization in Silica/PEG/Ethanol Suspensions: How Strongly do Polymers Need To Adsorb To Stabilize Against Aggregation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2014-09-24

    We study the effects of increasing the concentration of a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol on the stability of 44 nm diameter silica nanoparticles suspended in ethanol. Polymer concentration, c{sub p}, is increased from zero to that characterizing the polymer melt. Particle stability is accessed through measurement of the particle second-virial coefficient, B{sub -2}, performed by light scattering and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The results show that at low polymer concentration, c{sub p} < 3 wt %, B{sub -2} values are positive, indicating repulsive interactions between particles. B{sub -2} decreases at intermediate concentrations (3 wt % < c{sub p} < 50 wt %), and particles aggregates are formed. At high concentrations (50 wt % < c{sub p}) B{sub -2} increases and stabilizes at a value expected for hard spheres with a diameter near 44 nm, indicating the particles are thermodynamically stable. At intermediate polymer concentrations, rates of aggregation are determined by measuring time-dependent changes in the suspension turbidity, revealing that aggregation is slowed by the necessity of the particles diffusing over a repulsive barrier in the pair potential. The magnitude of the barrier passes through a minimum at c{sub p} {approx} 12 wt % where it has a value of {approx}12kT. These results are understood in terms of a reduction of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attractions with increasing c{sub p}. Depletion attractions are found to play a minor role in particle stability. A model is presented suggesting displacement of weakly adsorbed polymer leads to slow aggregation at intermediate concentration, and we conclude that a general model of depletion restabilization may involve increased strength of polymer adsorption with increasing polymer concentration.

  11. Diffusing-Wave Spectroscopy in a Standard Dynamic Light Scattering Setup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahra Fahimi; Frank Aangenendt; Panayiotis Voudouris; Johan Mattson; Hans M. Wyss

    2015-09-11

    Diffusing-Wave Spectroscopy (DWS) treats the transport of photons through turbid samples as a diffusion process, thereby making it possible to extract the dynamics of scatterers from measured correlation functions. The analysis of DWS data requires knowledge of the path length distribution of photons traveling through the sample. While for flat sample cells this path length distribution can be readily expressed in analytical form, no such expression is available for cylindrical sample cells. DWS measurements have therefore typically relied on dedicated setups that use flat sample cells. Here we show how DWS measurements, in particular DWS-based microrheology measurements, can be performed in standard dynamic light scattering setups that use cylindrical sample cells. To do so we perform simple random walk simulations which yield numerical predictions of the path length distribution as a function of both the transport mean free path and the detection angle. This information is used in experiments to extract the mean-square displacement of tracer particles in the material, as well as the resulting frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. An important advantage of our approach is that by measuring at different detection angles, the average photon path length can be varied. Using a single sample cell, this gives access to a wider range of length and time scales than obtained in a conventional DWS setup. Such angle-dependent measurements also offer an important consistency check, as for all detection angles the DWS analysis should yield the same tracer dynamics, even though the respective path length distributions are very different. We validate our approach by performing measurements both on aqueous suspensions of tracer particles and on solid-like gelatin samples, for which we find our DWS-based microrheology data to be in excellent agreement with rheological measurements.

  12. Biomonitoring of fish communities, using the index of Biotic Integrity, as an indicator of the success of soil conservation measures in the Rabbit Creek and Middle Creek watersheds, Macon County, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Fish communities in two upper Little Tennessee River tributaries, Rabbit Creek and Middle Creek, both located in Macon County, North Carolina, were monitored using IBI methods in 1990 and again in 1992. A single site, each on the lower reaches of its respective creek, was chosen to reflect the influence of conditions throughout the watershed and to provide a measure of water quality exiting the watershed. The Rabbit Creek watershed (Holly Springs community) has a long history of settlement and agricultural use. Dominant land uses today are pasture in the bottom lands and residential development at higher elevations. Much of the upper portion of the Middle Creek watershed on the slopes of Scaly Mountain is devoted to cabbage farming, often on steep slopes and highly erodible soils. From the cabbage growing area, the creek drops 400 feet to the lower valley. Other common land uses include residential, livestock, and forest. Both streams are characterized by heavy sedimentation and frequent high turbidity. Both streams showed marked improvement between 1990 and 1992. In 1990, Rabbit Creek`s IBI score was 31.0, for a bioclass rating of ``poor.`` In 1992, the IBI score was 42.1 for a bioclass rating of ``fair.`` For Middle Creek, the corresponding figures and ratings are 42.1 (fair) and 54.5 (good). Examination of the data for Rabbit Creek shows a reduction in the proportion of pollution-tolerant species, a higher proportion of specialized insectivores, a higher catch rate (reflecting higher total numbers of fish), and an additional intolerant species. In both cases, the data (supported by visual observation) suggests the causative factor is reduced sedimentation.

  13. Lower granite GIS data description and collection guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, J.L.; Evans, B.J.; Perry, E.M.

    1995-12-01

    The Lower Granite Geographic Information System (GIS) was developed jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) Walla Walla District and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the project is to use GIS technology to analyze impacts of the drawdown mitigation option on the physical and biological environment of the Lower Granite Reservoir. The drawdown mitigation option is based on the hypothesis that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean would result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios; to accomplish this, reservoir elevations would be lowered to increase channel velocities. Altering the elevation of the reservoirs on the Snake River is expected to have a variety of impacts to the Physical environment including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gases, and turbidity. The GIS was developed to evaluate these changes and the resulting impacts on the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River, as well as other aquatic organisms and terrestrial wildlife residing in the adjacent riparian areas. The Lower Granite GIS was developed using commercial hardware and software and is supported by a commercial relational database. Much of the initial system development involved collecting and incorporating data describing the river channel characteristics, hydrologic properties, and aquatic ecology. Potentially meaningful data for the Lower Granite GIS were identified and an extensive data search was performed. Data were obtained from scientists who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The next six sections of this document describe the bathymetry, fish abundance, substrate, sediment chemistry, and channel hydrology data.

  14. Determination of thermal and cementation histories from [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and ion microprobe stable isotope analyses: A San Joaquin Basin example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahon, K.I.; Harrison, T.M.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M. (UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge of the temperature and cementation histories of sedimentary basins is key to appraisal of their liquid hydrocarbon potential. Understanding the thermal history permits assessment of whether source rocks have experienced conditions appropriate for petroleum formation. The mobility of hydrocarbons and their storage capacity in sandstone reservoirs are directly related to porosity changes during diagenesis. Recent advances in [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating (stripping of Cl-correlated Ar[sub xs] Multi-Diffusion Domain model) and development of ion micro-probe techniques for precise ([+-]0.6[per thousand]) [mu]m-scale oxygen isotopic analysis provide a basis to quantitatively determine thermal and cementation histories. Arkosic sandstones of the Stevens turbidities, San Joaquin basin, are cemented by carbonates with minor amounts of clay and quartz. Detrital K-spars from depths of 4.12 (A4) and 6.61 km (Al) in the Stevens zone at Elk Hills yield thermal histories via the MDD model. These results indicate a broadly linear temperature rise of 9[+-]3[degrees]C/Ma over the past 10 Ma and predict current peak temperatures that are within error ([+-]25[degrees]C) of the measured values of 200[degrees] (Al) and 150[degrees]C (A4). Previous bulk isotopic analyses of cements from Stevens sands at North Coles Levee indicate that diagenetic pore fluids were modified by the introduction of hydrocarbons and CO[sub 2] from maturing source horizons. In situ O isotopic analyses of 10 [mu]m spots in these cements confirms this heterogeneity. A model cementation history can then be calculated by linking the oxygen isotopic composition of the cements (and temperature-dependent fractionation factor) with the thermal history independently established from thermochronometry.

  15. Determination of thermal and cementation histories from {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar and ion microprobe stable isotope analyses: A San Joaquin Basin example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahon, K.I.; Harrison, T.M.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M. [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Knowledge of the temperature and cementation histories of sedimentary basins is key to appraisal of their liquid hydrocarbon potential. Understanding the thermal history permits assessment of whether source rocks have experienced conditions appropriate for petroleum formation. The mobility of hydrocarbons and their storage capacity in sandstone reservoirs are directly related to porosity changes during diagenesis. Recent advances in {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating (stripping of Cl-correlated Ar{sub xs} Multi-Diffusion Domain model) and development of ion micro-probe techniques for precise ({+-}0.6{per_thousand}) {mu}m-scale oxygen isotopic analysis provide a basis to quantitatively determine thermal and cementation histories. Arkosic sandstones of the Stevens turbidities, San Joaquin basin, are cemented by carbonates with minor amounts of clay and quartz. Detrital K-spars from depths of 4.12 (A4) and 6.61 km (Al) in the Stevens zone at Elk Hills yield thermal histories via the MDD model. These results indicate a broadly linear temperature rise of 9{+-}3{degrees}C/Ma over the past 10 Ma and predict current peak temperatures that are within error ({+-}25{degrees}C) of the measured values of 200{degrees} (Al) and 150{degrees}C (A4). Previous bulk isotopic analyses of cements from Stevens sands at North Coles Levee indicate that diagenetic pore fluids were modified by the introduction of hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} from maturing source horizons. In situ O isotopic analyses of 10 {mu}m spots in these cements confirms this heterogeneity. A model cementation history can then be calculated by linking the oxygen isotopic composition of the cements (and temperature-dependent fractionation factor) with the thermal history independently established from thermochronometry.

  16. Stevens and earlier miocene turbidite sandstones, southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, G.W.

    1981-03-01

    A thick marine turbidite succession, dominantly coarse sandstone, underlies the southern part of the San Joaquin Valley. Sands are pebbly to fine grained, commonly poorly sorted, quartzose to arkosic, and are interbedded with dark shales bearing deep-water foraminifers. Graded bedding is common and, with the depths of 2000 to 6000 ft (610 to 1830 m) implied by the fauna, is taken to indicate a turbidity-current origin for most of the sands. The upper, middle, and lower Miocene turbidite section was revealed by extensive coring at Paloma, and is similar to the more widespread and oil and gas productive upper Miocene Stevens sandstone. The central-basin Stevens was deposited as channel sands on deep-sea fans derived from several discrete troughs or canyons on the eastern and southeastern margin of the basin prior to their burial by prograding Santa Margarita sand. Sand channels and lobes in the Bakersfield arch area were controlled locally by compaction structures. The rising Paloma anticline deflected Stevens sands for a time and the very last sands were guided also by incipient folds on the outer Bakersfield arch. Coarse Stevens conglomerates and sands shed from the emergent Temblor Range were deflected by the Buena Vista Hills, Elk Hills, and other anticlinal shoals and were deposited in intervening gaps as thick oil-productive channel sands. They merge with sands from the east side in flowing axially into the distal northwestern basin. Facies recognized in the subsurface include a meander-channel facies developed in the prograded muddy slope area upstream from the massive braided-sand facies.

  17. Application of horizontal drilling in the development of a complex turbidite sandstone reservoir, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (USA)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (USA)); Hart, O.D. (Chevron Inc., Tupman, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Horizontal drilling techniques have been used at the Elk Hills field, to more effectively produce the complex 26R reservoir. This Stevens zone reservoir of the Miocene Monterey Formation contains turbid sediments deposited in a deep-sea fan setting and consists of several distinct sandstone layers averaging 150 ft thick and usually separated by mudstone beds. Layers in the reservoir dip as much as 50{degree} southwest. An expanding gas cap makes many vertical wells less favorable to operate. Horizontal completions were thought ideal for the pool because (1) original oil-water contact is level and believed stable, (2) water production is low, (3) a horizontal well provides for a long production life; and (4) several sandstone layers can be produced through one well. For the first well, the plan was to redrill an idle well to horizontal along an arc with a radius of 350 ft. The horizontal section was to be up to 1,000 ft long and extend northeast slightly oblique to dip just above the average oil-water contact. The well was drilled in September 1988, reached horizontal nearly as planned, was completed after perforating 210 ft of oil sand, and produced a daily average of 1,000 bbl oil and 8 bbl of water. However, structural influence was stronger than expected, causing the horizontal drill path to turn directly updip away from the bottom-hole target area. The well also encountered variable oil-water contacts, with more than half the horizontal section possibly water productive. Geologic and drilling data from the first well were used for planning another well. This well was drilled in October 1989, and was highly successful with over 1,000 ft of productive interval.

  18. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project: 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheeler, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    The Umatilla habitat improvement program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02, and targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Treatment areas included the lower 4 miles of Meacham Creek, the lower {1/4} mile of Boston Canyon Creek, and the Umatilla River between RM 78.5 and 80. The upper {1/2} of the Meacham Creek project area including Boston Canyon Creek, which were initially enhanced during 1989, were reentered for maintenance and continued enhancements. Approximately 2400 cu. yds. of boulders and 1000 cu. yds. of riprap was used in the construction of in-stream, stream bank and flood plain structures and in the anchoring of large organic debris (LOD) placements. In-stream structures were designed to increase instream cover and channel stability and develop of a defined thalweg to focus low summer flows. Flood plain structures were designed to reduce sediment inputs and facilitate deposition on flood plains. Riparian recovery was enhanced through the planting of over 1000 willow cuttings and 400 lbs. of grass seed mix and through the exclusion of livestock from the riparian corridor with 4.5 miles of high tensile smooth wire fence. Photo documentation and elevational transects were used to monitor changes in channel morphology and riparian recovery at permanent standardized points throughout the projects. Water quality (temperature and turbidity) data was collected at locations within the project area and in tributaries programmed for future enhancements.

  19. Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W.; McJannet, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

  20. Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W. ); McJannet, G.S. )

    1996-01-01

    A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

  1. Controlling the self-assembly of binary copolymer mixtures in solution through molecular architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Greenall; P. Schuetz; S. Furzeland; D. Atkins; D. M. A. Buzza; M. F. Butler; T. C. B. McLeish

    2011-04-13

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study on the role of copolymer architecture in the self-assembly of binary PEO-PCL mixtures in water-THF, and show that altering the chain geometry and composition of the copolymers can control the form of the self-assembled structures and lead to the formation of novel aggregates. First, using transmission electron microscopy and turbidity measurements, we study a mixture of sphere-forming and lamella-forming PEO-PCL copolymers, and show that increasing the molecular weight of the lamella-former at a constant ratio of its hydrophilic and hydrophobic components leads to the formation of highly-curved structures even at low sphere-former concentrations. This result is explained using a simple argument based on the effective volumes of the two sections of the diblock and is reproduced in a coarse-grained mean-field model: self-consistent field theory (SCFT). Using further SCFT calculations, we study the distribution of the two copolymer species within the individual aggregates and discuss how this affects the self-assembled structures. We also investigate a binary mixture of lamella-formers of different molecular weights, and find that this system forms vesicles with a wall thickness intermediate to those of the vesicles formed by the two copolymers individually. This result is also reproduced using SCFT. Finally, a mixture of sphere-former and a copolymer with a large hydrophobic block is shown to form a range of structures, including novel elongated vesicles.

  2. Remote Optical Imagery of Obscured Objects in Low-Visibility Environments Using Parametric Amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asher, R.B.; Bliss, D.E.; Cameron, S.M.; Hamil, R.A.

    1998-10-14

    The development of unconventional active optical sensors to remotely detect and spatially resolve suspected threats obscured by low-visibility observation conditions (adverse weather, clouds, dust, smoke, precipitation, etc.) is fundamental to maintaining tactical supremacy in the battlespace. In this report, the authors describe an innovative frequency-agile image intensifier technology based on time-gated optical parametic amplification (OPA) for enhanced light-based remote sensing through pervasive scattering and/or turbulent environments. Improved dynamic range characteristics derived from the amplified passband of the OPA receiver combined with temporal discrimination in the image capture process will offset radiant power extinction losses, while defeating the deugradative effects & multipath dispersion and ,diffuse backscatter noise along the line-of-sight on resultant image contrast and range resolution. Our approach extends the operational utility of the detection channel in existing laser radar systems by increasing sensitivity to low-level target reffectivities, adding ballistic rejection of scatter and clutter in the range coordinate, and introducing multispectral and polarization discrimination capability in a wavelen~h-tunable, high gain nonlinear optical component with strong potential for source miniaturization. A key advantage of integrating amplification and tlequency up-conversion functions within a phasematched three-wave mixing parametric device is the ability to petiorm background-free imaging with eye-safe or longer inilared illumination wavelengths (idler) less susceptible to scatter without sacrificing quantum efficiency in the detection process at the corresponding signal wavelength. We report benchmark laboratory experiments in which the OPA gating process has been successfidly demonstrated in both transillumination and reflection test geometries with extended pathlengths representative of realistic coastal sea water and cumulus cloud scenarios. In these experiments, undistorted range-gated optica[ images tiom specular and diffuse reflectance targets were acquired through scattering attenuations exceeding ten orders cf magnitude which would be undetectable with traditional optical methods. The broadcast and gating pulses were derived ilom both millijoules 10 Hz picosecond (50-100 ps) and 250 KHz microjoule femtosecond (-150 fs) laser configurations to assess signal-to-noise and spatiaI resolution considerations as a fimction of scattering, integration time, and repetition rate. In addition, the technique was combined with a self-referencing Shack-Hartrnann wavetiont sensor to dia=~ose underlying phase signatures of weak refictive index gradients (OPD-M1 00) or persistent convective wakes (exhaust plumes, bubbles), and to perform adaptive optical compensation in visual fields exhibiting both turbulence and turbidity (OD=4). Comparative system anaiysis results relating image quaiity, optimal gate width, detectable range, and broadcast laser size versus operative atmospheric scattering conditions and search/dwell probability of detection criteria will also be presented.

  3. Hopewell Beneficial CO2 Capture for Production of Fuels, Fertilizer and Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    UOP; Honeywell Resins & Chemicals; Honeywell Process Solutions; Aquaflow Bionomics Ltd

    2010-09-30

    For Phase 1 of this project, the Hopewell team developed a detailed design for the Small Scale Pilot-Scale Algal CO2 Sequestration System. This pilot consisted of six (6) x 135 gallon cultivation tanks including systems for CO2 delivery and control, algal cultivation, and algal harvesting. A feed tank supplied Hopewell wastewater to the tanks and a receiver tank collected the effluent from the algal cultivation system. The effect of environmental parameters and nutrient loading on CO2 uptake and sequestration into biomass were determined. Additionally the cost of capturing CO2 from an industrial stack emission at both pilot and full-scale was determined. The engineering estimate evaluated Amine Guard technology for capture of pure CO2 and direct stack gas capture and compression. The study concluded that Amine Guard technology has lower lifecycle cost at commercial scale, although the cost of direct stack gas capture is lower at the pilot scale. Experiments conducted under high concentrations of dissolved CO2 did not demonstrate enhanced algae growth rate. This result suggests that the dissolved CO2 concentration at neutral pH was already above the limiting value. Even though dissolved CO2 did not show a positive effect on biomass growth, controlling its value at a constant set-point during daylight hours can be beneficial in an algae cultivation stage with high algae biomass concentration to maximize the rate of CO2 uptake. The limited enhancement of algal growth by CO2 addition to Hopewell wastewater was due at least in part to the high endogenous CO2 evolution from bacterial degradation of dissolved organic carbon present at high levels in the wastewater. It was found that the high level of bacterial activity was somewhat inhibitory to algal growth in the Hopewell wastewater. The project demonstrated that the Honeywell automation and control system, in combination with the accuracy of the online pH, dissolved O2, dissolved CO2, turbidity, Chlorophyll A and conductivity sensors is suitable for process control of algae cultivation in an open pond systems. This project concluded that the Hopewell wastewater is very suitable for algal cultivation but the potential for significant CO2 sequestration from the plant stack gas emissions was minimal due to the high endogenous CO2 generation in the wastewater from the organic wastewater content. Algae cultivation was found to be promising, however, for nitrogen remediation in the Hopewell wastewater.

  4. Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Department of Geophysics

    2008-06-30

    Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx}20 % to 23%). This trend is explained by a sequence stratigraphic model which predicts progressive increase in sorting by turbidity current along the flow, as well as, quantified by a rock model that heuristically accounts for sorting. The results can be applied to improve quantitative predication of sediment parameters from seismic impedance, away from well locations.

  5. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-02-20

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality issues including dissolved oxygen and/or turbidity. Regardless, angler fishing experience was the highest at Lake Billy Shaw. Trout in Mountain View Reservoir were in the best condition of the three reservoirs and anglers reported very good fishing there. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) remain the main limiting factors in the fisheries, particularly in late August to early September.

  6. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A. [Department of Geodynamics and Geophysics, Steinmann Institute, University of Bonn Nussallee 8, D-53115, Bonn (Germany)

    2012-09-26

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the submarine debris speed can be faster than the tsunami speed. This information can be useful for early warning strategies in the coastal regions. These findings substantially increase our understanding of complex multi-phase systems and multi-physics and flows, and allows for the proper modeling of landslide and debris induced tsunami, the dynamics of turbidity currents and sediment transport, and the associated applications to hazard mitigation, geomorphology and sedimentology.

  7. Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-08-01

    To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

  8. BACKPRESSURE TESTING OF ROTARY MICROFILTER DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowley, M.; Herman, D.

    2011-04-14

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), is modifying and testing the SpinTek{trademark} rotary microfilter (RMF) for radioactive filtration service in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The RMF has been shown to improve filtration throughput when compared to other conventional methods such as cross-flow filtration. A concern with the RMF was that backpressure, or reverse flow through the disk, would damage the filter membranes. Reverse flow might happen as a result of an inadvertent valve alignment during flushing. Testing was completed in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) located in SRNL to study the physical effects of backpressure as well as to determine the maximum allowable back-pressure for RMF disks. The RMF disks tested at the EDL were manufactured by SpinTek{trademark} Filtration and used a Pall Corporation PMM050 filter membrane (0.5 micron nominal pore size) made from 316L stainless steel. Early versions of the RMF disks were made from synthetic materials that were incompatible with caustic solutions and radioactive service as well as being susceptible to delaminating when subjected to backpressure. Figure 1-1 shows the essential components of the RMF; 3 rotating disks and 3 stationary turbulence promoters (or shear elements) are shown. Figure 1-2 show the assembly view of a 25 disk RMF proposed for use at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the Hanford Facility. The purpose of the testing discussed in this report was to determine the allowable backpressure for RMF disks as well as study the physical effects of backpressure on RMF disks made with the Pall PMM050 membrane. This was accomplished by pressurizing the disks in the reverse flow direction (backpressure) until the test limit was reached or until membrane failure occurred. Backpressure was applied to the disks with air while submerged in deionized (DI) water. This method provided a visual representation of membrane integrity via bubble flow patterns. Membrane failure was defined as the inability to filter effectively at the nominal filter pore size. Effective filtration was determined by turbidity measurements of filtrate that was produced by applying forward-pressure to the disks while submerged in a representative simulant. The representative simulant was Tank 8F simulated sludge produced for SRNL by Optima Chemical. Two disks were tested. Disk 1 was tested primarily to determine approximate levels of backpressure where membrane failure occurred. These levels were then used to define the strategy for testing the Disk 2; a strategy that would better define and quantify the mode of failure.

  9. Single event-driven export of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and suspended matter from coal tar-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Totsche, K.U.; Jann, S.; Kogel-Knabner, I. [University of Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Mobile colloidal and suspended matter is likely to affect the mobility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the unsaturated soil zone at contaminated sites. We studied the release of mobile particles and dissolved organic matter as a function of variable climatic boundary conditions, and their effect on the export of PAHs at a coal tar-contaminated site using zero-tension lysimeters. Seepage water samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pH, electrical conductivity, turbidity, and particles larger than 0.7 {mu}m. The 16 Environmental Protection Agency PAHs were analyzed in the filtrate < 0.7 m and in the particle fraction. Our results show that extended no-flow periods that are followed by high-intensity rain events, such as thunderstorms, promote the mobilization of particles in the size 0.7 to 200 m. Mobilization is enforced by extended drying during summer. High particle concentrations are also associated with freezing and thawing cycles followed by either rain or snowmelt events. The export of PAHs is strongly connected to the release of particles in the 0.7- to 200-{mu}m size fraction. During the 2-yr monitoring period, up to 0.418 {mu}g kg{sup -1} PAHs were mobilized in the. ltrate (< 0.7 m) while the eightfold mass, 3.36 {mu}g kg{sup -1}, was exported with the retentate (0.7-200 {mu}m). Equilibrium dissolution of PAHs and transport in the dissolved phase seem to be of minor importance for the materials studied. Extreme singular-release events occurred in January 2003 and January 2004, when up to 55 {mu}g L{sup -1} PAHs per one single seepage event were observed within the retentate. Freezing and thawing cycles affect the PAH source materials, that is, the remnants of the nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). High mechanical strain during freezing results in the formation of particles. At the onset of the thawing and following rain or snowmelt events, PAHs associated with these particles are then exported from the lysimeter.

  10. CROSSFLOW FILTRATION: EM-31, WP-2.3.6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

    2011-02-01

    In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing crossflow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed some of those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Crossflow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate solutions. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Integrated Salt Disposition Process and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the crossflow filter feed flow rate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and crossflow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to evaluate methods to improve filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today. Experiments that use non-radioactive simulants for actual waste always carry the inherent risk of not eliciting prototypic results; however, they will assist in focusing the scope needed to minimize radioactive testing and thus maximize safety. To that end this investigation has determined: (1) Waste simulant SB6 was found to be more challenging to filtration than a SRS Tank 8F simulant; (2) Higher solids concentration presents a greater challenge to filtration; (3) Filter cake is something that should be properly developed in initial filter operation; (4) Backpulsing is not necessary to maintain a good filter flux with salt wastes; (5) Scouring a filter without cleaning will lead to improved filter performance; (6) The presence of a filter cake can improve the solids separation by an order of magnitude as determined by turbidity; (7) A well developed cake with periodic scouring may allow a good filter flux to be maintained for long periods of time; and (8) Filtrate flux decline is reversible when the concentration of the filtering slurry drops and the filter is scoured.

  11. Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-03-17

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria, the following constituent list and sampling schedule is proposed: Constituent; Sampling Frequency Site-Specific Parameters; Hexavalent chromium (a); Semiannual Chloride; Semiannual Fluoride; Semiannual Nitrate; Semiannual Nitrite; Semiannual Specific conductance (field)(a); Semiannual Ancillary Parameters; Anions; Annual Alkalinity Annual Metals, (in addition to chromium); Annual pH (field) Semiannual Temperature (field); Semiannual Turbidity (field) Semiannual (a). These constituents will be subject to statistical tests after background is established. It will be necessary to install new monitoring wells and accumulate background data on the groundwater from those wells before statistical comparisons can be made. Until then, the constituents listed above will be evaluated by tracking and trending concentrations in all wells and comparing these results with the corresponding DWS or Hanford Site background concentration for each constituent. If a comparison value (background or DWS) for a constituent is exceeded, DOE will notify Ecology per WAC 173-303-645 (9) (g) requirements (within seven days or a time agreed to between DOE and Ecology).

  12. Kootenai River Nutrient Dosing System and N-P Consumption: Year 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-02-19

    In early 2006 we designed and built low energy consumption, pump-operated system, for dosing of the liquid nutrient in the summer 2006 season. This operated successfully, and the system was used again during the 2007 and 2008 seasons for dosing. During the early winter period, 2008, laboratory tests were made of the liquid nutrient pump system, and it was noted that small amounts of air were being entrained on the suction side of the pump, during conditions when the inlet pressure was low. It was believed that this was the cause of diurnal fluctuations in the flow supplied, characteristic of the 2007 year flow data. Replacement of '0' rings on the inlet side of the pumps was the solution to this problem, and when tested in the field during the summer season, the flow supplied was found to be stable. A decision was made by the IKERT committee at the meeting of 20th to 21st May 2008 (held in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho) to use an injection flow rate of liquid fertilizer (polyammonium phosphate 10-34-0) to achieve a target phosphorus concentration of 3.0 {micro}g/L, after complete mixing in the river. This target concentration was the same as that used in 2006 and 2007. The proposed starting date was as early as possible in June 2008. Plans were made to measure the dosing flow in three ways. Two of the three methods of flow measurement (1 and 2 below) are inter-dependent. These were: (1) Direct measurement of flow rate by diverting dosing flow into a 1000 mL volume standard flask. The flow rate was computed by dividing the flask volume by the time required to fill the flask. This was done a few times only during the summer period. (2) Adjusting the flow rate reading of the Gamma dosing pump using the 'calibration' function to achieve agreement with the flow rate computed by method 1 above. (3) Direct measurement by electrical signal from conductive fluid passing through a magnetic field (Seametrics meter, as used in previous years). Values were recorded every 4 minutes by a data-logger. This instrument has been shown to be reliable, and in agreement with method 1 to within the expected uncertainty (within 2%). Liquid nutrients were delivered to the site in late May, and system testing was done the same day. High concentrations of suspended sediment in the water column, as indicated by shallow Secchi depth readings, were present in the river in the last part of May, into June. A plan was made to delay the start up of nutrient addition to a date later than 1st June, because the aquatic productivity was almost certainly to be compromised by insufficient light availability. Daily monitoring of Secchi depths was done, showing declining turbidity in early June. A decision was made to start the system on 15th June, by which time conditions were good.

  13. Extended Sleeve Products Allow Control and Monitoring of Process Fluid Flows Inside Shielding, Behind Walls and Beneath Floors - 13041

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Mark W.

    2013-07-01

    Throughout power generation, delivery and waste remediation, the ability to control process streams in difficult or impossible locations becomes increasingly necessary as the complexity of processes increases. Example applications include radioactive environments, inside concrete installations, buried in dirt, or inside a shielded or insulated pipe. In these situations, it is necessary to implement innovative solutions to tackle such issues as valve maintenance, valve control from remote locations, equipment cleaning in hazardous environments, and flow stream analysis. The Extended Sleeve family of products provides a scalable solution to tackle some of the most challenging applications in hazardous environments which require flow stream control and monitoring. The Extended Sleeve family of products is defined in three groups: Extended Sleeve (ESV), Extended Bonnet (EBV) and Instrument Enclosure (IE). Each of the products provides a variation on the same requirements: to provide access to the internals of a valve, or to monitor the fluid passing through the pipeline through shielding around the process pipe. The shielding can be as simple as a grout filled pipe covering a process pipe or as complex as a concrete deck protecting a room in which the valves and pipes pass through at varying elevations. Extended Sleeves are available between roughly 30 inches and 18 feet of distance between the pipeline centerline and the top of the surface to which it mounts. The Extended Sleeve provides features such as ± 1.5 inches of adjustment between the pipeline and deck location, internal flush capabilities, automatic alignment of the internal components during assembly and integrated actuator mounting pads. The Extended Bonnet is a shorter fixed height version of the Extended Sleeve which has a removable deck flange to facilitate installation through walls, and is delivered fully assembled. The Instrument Enclosure utilizes many of the same components as an Extended Sleeve, yet allows the installation of process monitoring instruments, such as a turbidity meter to be placed in the flow stream. The basis of the design is a valve body, which, rather than having a directly mounted bonnet has lengths of concentric pipe added, which move the bonnet away from the valve body. The pipe is conceptually similar to an oil field well, with the various strings of casing, and tubing installed. Each concentric pipe provides a required function, such as the outermost pipes, the valve sleeve and penetration sleeve, which provide structural support to the deck flange. For plug valve based designs, the next inner pipe provides compression on the environmental seals at the top of the body to bonnet joint, followed by the innermost pipe which provides rotation of the plug, in the same manner as an extended stem. Ball valve ESVs have an additional pipe to provide compressive loading on the stem packing. Due to the availability of standard pipe grades and weights, the product can be configured to fit a wide array of valve sizes, and application lengths, with current designs as short as seven inches and as tall as 18 feet. Central to the design is the requirement for no special tools or downhole tools to remove parts or configure the product. Off the shelf wrenches, sockets or other hand tools are all that is required. Compared to other products historically available, this design offers a lightweight option, which, while not as rigidly stiff, can deflect compliantly under extreme seismic loading, rather than break. Application conditions vary widely, as the base product is 316 and 304 stainless steel, but utilizes 17-4PH, and other allows as needed based on the temperature range and mechanical requirements. Existing designs are installed in applications as hot as 1400 deg. F, at low pressure, and separately in highly radioactive environments. The selection of plug versus ball valve, metal versus soft seats, and the material of the seals and seats is all dependent on the application requirements. The design of the Extended Sleeve family of products provid

  14. Geoscience Perspectives in Carbon Sequestration - Educational Training and Research Through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wronkiewicz, David; Paul, Varum; Abousif, Alsedik; Ryback, Kyle

    2013-09-30

    The most effective mechanism to limit CO{sub 2} release from underground Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS) sites over multi-century time scales will be to convert the CO{sub 2} into solid carbonate minerals. This report describes the results from four independent research investigations on carbonate mineralization: 1) Colloidal calcite particles forming in Maramec Spring, Missouri, provide a natural analog to evaluate reactions that may occur in a leaking GCS site. The calcite crystals form as a result of physiochemical changes that occur as the spring water rises from a depth of more than 190'?. The resultant pressure decrease induces a loss of CO{sub 2} from the water, rise in pH, lowering of the solubility of Ca{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and calcite precipitation. Equilibrium modelling of the spring water resulted in a calculated undersaturated state with respect to calcite. The discontinuity between the observed occurrence of calcite and the model result predicting undersaturated conditions can be explained if bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) are directly involved in precipitation process rather than just carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). 2) Sedimentary rocks in the Oronto Group of the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) system contain an abundance of labile Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-silicate minerals that will neutralize carbonic acid and provide alkaline earth ions for carbonate mineralization. One of the challenges in using MCR rocks for GCS results from their low porosity and permeability. Oronto Group samples were reacted with both CO{sub 2}-saturated deionized water at 90°C, and a mildly acidic leachant solution in flow-through core-flooding reactor vessels at room temperature. Resulting leachate solutions often exceeded the saturation limit for calcite. Carbonate crystals were also detected in as little as six days of reaction with Oronto Group rocks at 90oC, as well as experiments with forsterite-olivine and augite, both being common minerals this sequence. The Oronto Group samples have poor reservoir rock characteristics, none ever exceeded a permeability value of 2.0 mD even after extensive dissolution of calcite cement during the experiments. The overlying Bayfield Group – Jacobsville Formation sandstones averaged 13.4 ± 4.3% porosity and a single sample tested by core-flooding revealed a permeability of ~340 mD. The high porosity-permeability characteristics of these sandstones will allow them to be used for GCS as a continuous aquifer unit with the overlying Mt. Simon Formation. 3) Anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can enhance the conversion rate of CO{sub 2} into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage. SRB accelerated carbonate mineralization reactions between pCO{sub 2} values of 0.0059 and 14.7 psi. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for SRB metabolism. The use of a {sup 13}CO{sub 2} spiked gas source also produced carbonate minerals with ~53% of the carbon being derived from the gas phase. The sulfate reducing activity of the microbial community was limited, however, at 20 psi pCO{sub 2} and carbonate mineralization did not occur. Inhibition of bacterial metabolism may have resulted from the acidic conditions or CO{sub 2} toxicity. 4) Microbialite communities forming in the high turbidity and hypersaline water of Storrs’ Lake, San Salvador Island, The Bahamas, were investigated for their distribution, mineralogy and microbial diversity. Molecular analysis of the organic mats on the microbialites indicate only a trace amount of cyanobacteria, while anaerobic and photosynthetic non-sulfur bacteria of the phyla Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of class Gammaproteobacteria were abundant.

  15. Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

    2003-09-01

    This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo trutta) had low densities, and limited distribution throughout the basin. A large return of adult spring chinook to the Touchet River drainage in 2001 produced higher densities of juvenile chinook in 2002 than have been seen in recent years, especially in the Wolf Fork. The adult return in 2002 was substantially less than what was seen in 2001. Due to poor water conditions and trouble getting personnel hired, spawning surveys were limited in 2002. Surveyors found only one redd in four Walla Walla River tributaries (Cottonwood Ck., East Little Walla Walla, West Little Walla Walla, and Mill Ck.), and 59 redds in Touchet River tributaries (10 in the North Fork Touchet, 30 in the South Fork Touchet, and 19 in the Wolf Fork). Bull trout spawning surveys in the upper Touchet River tributaries found a total of 125 redds and 150 live fish (92 redds and 75 fish in the Wolf Fork, 2 redds and 1 fish in the Burnt Fork, 0 redds and 1 fish in the South Fork Touchet, 29 redds and 71 fish in the North Fork Touchet, and 2 redds and 2 fish in Lewis Ck.). A preliminary steelhead genetics analysis was completed as part of this project. Results indicate differences between naturally produced steelhead and those produced in the hatchery. There were also apparent genetic differences among the naturally produced fish from different areas of the basin. Detailed results are reported in Bumgarner et al. 2003. Recommendations for assessment activities in 2003 included: (1) continue to monitor the Walla Walla River (focusing from the stateline to McDonald Rd.), the Mill Ck system, and the Little Walla Walla System. (2) reevaluate Whiskey Ck. for abundance and distribution of salmonids, and Lewis Ck. for bull trout density and distribution. (3) select or develop a habitat survey protocol and begin to conduct habitat inventory and assessment surveys. (4) summarize bull trout data for Mill Ck, South Fork Touchet, and Lewis Ck. (5) begin to evaluate temperature and flow data to assess if the habitat conditions exist for spring chinook in the Touchet River.

  16. Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report November 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

    2008-12-09

    FISH PRODUCTION: Final shocking of eggs was finished in the incubation. Egg enumeration for the 2008 brood was completed and the eggs are being incubated in 38 degree Fahrenheit chilled water. Don Larsen of NOAA made a request of eggs for research purposes and was able to acquire supplemental line eggs 10,555. Estimated density at the time of ponding in Mid-March of 2009 is approximately 43,869 fry per raceway after calculating an average fry loss of 2%. The end of the month totals for the 2007 brood reports 773,807 juveniles on hand with an overall average of 31.4 fish per pound. Tagging continues on the 2007 brood and is on pace to wrap up in early December. FISH CULTURE: Ponds are cleaned as needed and due to the colder water temperatures, the feeding frequency has been changed to three days a week. All ponds are sampled at the end of the month. Growth for production fish are adjusted accordingly as temperature dictates feeding levels. Torrential rain on the 12th turned the Yakima River extremely turbid. Fish tagging operations were halted and the ensuing conditions at the facility intake screens became a concern. Water flow to the wet well became restricted so the decision was made to shut the surface water (river) pumps down and turn on well pumps No.1, No.4 and No.6 to run water to the facility head box. This operation continued for twenty-four hours at which point normal operations were optimal and fish tagging resumed, although the river didn't clear up enough to feed the fish until the 17th. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 14,822 gallons/minute. Well No.2 is pumping water at a rate of 530 gallons per minute. All four river pumps are in operation and pumping 14,292 gallons/minute. ACCLIMATION SITES: Cle Elum staff has been working to prep the acclimation sites for the upcoming fish transfer before the snow falls. Thermographs at each site are changed weekly. AMB Tools performed routine maintenance on the compressor and Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tank at the Jack Creek acclimation site. VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: Snow tires are now on all vehicles and snow blowers were installed on the John Deere tractor and lawn tractor. The snowplow was also installed on the Ford one ton. The four Snowmobiles were serviced by Yamaha Jacks of Ellensburg. MAINTENANCE BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Clean up occurs on Fridays of each week. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Water has been turned on to vertical incubator islands one and two. After eggs were transferred to vertical stacks cleaning of troughs began. WDFW crew inventoried eggs from isolettes and then transferred them to the vertical incubators. RIVER PUMP STATION MAINTENANCE: All four pumps are in operation and supplying the facility with 14,292 gallons/minute of water to rearing ponds. WELL FIELD MAINTENANCE: Well pumps No.1, No.4 and No.6 were turned on to supplement water flow to the facility as mentioned previously. Well No.5 was powered up but a winterizing valve malfunction wouldn't allow operation, we are currently working on it at this time. Well No.2 is pumping 530 gallons per minute and supplies well water to incubation and chiller. The pumps meter is recorded weekly. Test holes are monitored weekly and results are faxed to CH2MHILL afterward. SAFETY AND TRAINING: Ice melt and sand bags are popular items at the facility this month as freezing temperatures cause ground to become slippery and hazardous. GROUNDS: Van Alden's Plumbing installed a new commode in resident house No.411 and also inspected a plumbing problem at resident No.1131. Cle Elum staff along with WDFW staff worked to locate the spawning channel building back to the position it was at to have Greg Wallace of Wallace Electric hook electricity back up to the spawning shed. MEETINGS AND TOURS: Charlie attended a policy meeting at Cle Elum on the 18th. The Internal projects annual review took place at Cle Elum on the 19th and 20th. Bill Bosch continues to visit monthly to incorporate data into the YKFP data base. PERSONNEL: IHS employees traveled to Cle