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1

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

2

History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project...

3

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2011 Call for Beamline Development Proposals 2011 Call for Beamline Development Proposals National Synchrotron Light Source II February 16, 2011 NSLS-II Rendering Critical Dates Call for proposal issued Thursday, February 17, 2011 Letter of Intent due Monday, March 28, 2011 (submitted LOIs) Beamline development workshops April-June 2011 Beamline proposal due Monday, July 25, 2011 Related Materials Proposal template NSLS-II Beamline Development Policy NSLS-II Source Properties NSLS-II User Access Policy Project Beamlines Background Beamline Information Approved Proposals From 2010 The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), currently under construction at the U.S. Department of Energys Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, NY, is pleased to announce the 2011 Call for Beamline Development Proposals for experimental facilities to be implemented at NSLS-II.

4

THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN: 2013 - 2018 MEETING THE SCIENTIFIC CHALLENGES OF THE FUTURE FEBRUARY 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2 Synchrotron Radiation - A Unique Tool .................................................................................................................. 1 3 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource .......................................................................................................... 3 3.1 Looking into the Future: Building a New User Facility Paradigm at SSRL ....................................................... 4

5

Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

content Skip to search content Skip to search SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE Stanford SLAC SSRL LCLS AD PPA SUNCAT PULSE SIMES Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource An Office of Science User Facility Home About SSRL What is SSRL? Director's Office Organization Advisory Panels History SSRL News SSRL News and Events Science Highlights Press Releases SSRL Newsletter Photon Science Seminars SSRL Presents User Resources User Resources User Portal Schedules Deadlines Forms & Applications Beam Lines Beam Lines Map By Number By Technique Photon Source Parameters SPEAR3 Status Science at SSRL Science at SSRL Science Highlights Photon Science Faculty SSRL Imaging Group SSRL SMB Program Publications Publications & Reports SSRL Headline News SSRL Fact Sheet SSRL Brochure SLAC Discovery Brochure SPEAR3 SPEAR3

6

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sign Overview Synchrotron light is created by bending the path of electrons traveling the speed of light around a storage ring. These extremely bright x-rays are used by scientists...

7

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories In recognition of the nation's expanding need to engage businesses and universities in the areas of commercial and basic science research, the Department of Energy has developed two special types of agreements for use at all DOE National Laboratories with approved designated user facilities, see http://www.gc.doe.gov/1002.htm. User Agreements All user experiments must be run under the terms of a User Agreement executed by the appropriate institutional officer(s) at your institution and their counterpart at Stanford University. A single User Agreement covers all experimenters from that institution (User Institution = "user"). Collaborators who are not coming to SSRL do not require a User Agreement.

8

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structural Basis of Wnt Recognition by Frizzled Structural Basis of Wnt Recognition by Frizzled SSRL Science Summary - September 2012 Figure 1. XWnt8 has an unusual two-domain structure. Wnts are a family of signaling proteins that regulate the development and growth of an organism, as well as tissue regeneration and wound healing. Misregulated Wnt signaling is associated with the development of many types of cancers, including colon cancer, breast cancer and melanoma, and degenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Type 2 diabetes. Understanding of how Wnt proteins bind and activate Frizzled receptors is important for the development of effective anti-Wnt and anti-Frizzled drugs for the treatment of Wnt-related disease. To understand how Wnts function, a team of researchers from Stanford

9

SSRL Director Appointment Announcement | Stanford Synchrotron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), I am very pleased to announce that Kelly Gaffney, a faculty member in the SLAC Photon Science Department and a member of the...

10

National Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

11

NSLS Industrial User Program | Synchrotron Techniques  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synchrotron X-ray Techniques for Industrial Research Synchrotron X-ray Techniques for Industrial Research Techniques http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/synchrotron_techniques/ Spectroscopy Spectroscopy is used to study the energies of particles emitted or absorbed by samples that are exposed to beam to determine the characteristics of chemical bonding and electron energy band structure. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS) X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPES) Scanning X-Ray Microscopy: Micro-XRF, -XAFS, -XRD Soft X-Ray Absorption and Scattering Infrared Vibrational Microspectroscopy Photoemission Electron Microscopy / Low-Energy Electron Microscopy (PEEM/LEEM) Scattering/Diffraction Scattering/diffraction makes use of the patterns of scattered x-rays when

12

Team | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Team Team Research team: John R. Bargar (SLAC), Research manager and co-principle investigator, bargar@slac.stanford.edu Scott Fendorf (Stanford), co-principle investigator, fendorf@stanford.edu Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford), gordon.brown@stanford.edu Sharon Bone (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Noémie Janot (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Morris Jones (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Collaborators: D.S. Alessi (University of Alberta) R. Bernier-Latmani (EPFL) J.A. Davis (LBNL) J. Dynes (Canadian Light Source) P.A. Fox (LBNL) E. Herndon (Kent State) D.E. Giammar (WUStL) D.E. Graham (ORNL) B. Gu (ORNL) E. Ilton (PNNL) L. Liang (ORNL) P.E. Long (LBNL) B. Mann (ORNL) P.S. Nico (LBNL) L. Pasa-Tolic (EMSL) P. Persson (University of Lund) T. Regier (Canadian Light Source) J.O. Sharp (School of Mines)

13

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Planning for Life Sciences at NSLS-II: A Chronology Planning for Life Sciences at NSLS-II: A Chronology Since 2007, through workshops, trips to Washington, white papers, and other activities, NSLS-II planners have been steadily mapping out what promises to be a rich life sciences research program at the new facility. July 17-18, 2007 - Brookhaven Lab hosts the first NSLS-II user workshop, which was attended by over 450 participants, including many members of the life sciences user community and representatives from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER). January 15-16, 2008 - A scientific strategic planning workshop at Brookhaven Lab marked the beginning of plans for life sciences research and beamlines at NSLS-II. The goal of this workshop was to generate a detailed white paper that presented a vision of Life Sciences research, beamlines, and facilities at NSLS-II and describes the path forward and timeline toward achieving this goal.

14

NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al since the 40s for that matter. Conclusion: what's elementary in the latter is considered 'advanced', if at all, in the former. It is little surprise then that published measurements typically contains neither error bars (for the random errors) nor estimates for the systematic in the former discipline. We have also showed how to estimate the state space by turn-by-turn data from two adjacent BPMs. And how to improve the resolution of the nonlinear resonance spectrum by Fourier analyzing the linear action variables instead of the betatron motion. In fact, the state estimator could be further improved by adding a Kalman filter. For transparency, we have also summarized on how these techniques provide a framework- and method for a TQM (Total Quality Management) approach for the main ring. Of course, to make the ($2.5M) turn-by-turn data acquisition system that is being implemented (for all the BPMs) useful, a means ({approx}10% contingency for the BPM system) to drive the beam is obviously required.

Bengtsson, J.

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

15

2007 NSLS Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

07 NSLS Publications 07 NSLS Publications Brookhaven National Laboratory * National Synchrotron Light Source * P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973 * http://www.nsls.bnl.gov/ VUV-IR Beamlines ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 2 X-Ray Beamlines .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 8 NSLS Users NSLS Staff ............................................................................................................................................................................................................

16

SPEAR History | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SPEAR History SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the colliding-beam technique. Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring The next in the succession of Stanford colliders was the SPEAR (Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring) machine at SLAC, completed in 1972. SPEAR consists of a single ring some 80 meters in diameter, in which counter-rotating beams of electrons

17

SSRLUO 2015 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los Alamos, NM (SSRL UEC Chair) Jordi Cabana, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL Kelly Chacn, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR Justin Chartron, Stanford...

18

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SPEAR History SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the colliding-beam technique. Linac map showing SPEAR The next in the succession of Stanford colliders was the SPEAR (Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring) machine at SLAC, completed in 1972. SPEAR consists of a single ring some 80 meters in diameter, in which counter-rotating beams of electrons and positrons were circulated at

19

SSRL Meetings, Workshops & Training Archive | Stanford Synchrotron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8-11 October 2014 SSRLLCLS Users' Conference and Workshops 7-8 October 2014 High Power Laser Workshop 3-5 June 2014 7th SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering in Materials...

20

Proprietary Research | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proprietary Research Proprietary Research Proprietary Research is defined as that for which users request confidentiality of proposal, data and results for a certain period of time. This research follows the guidelines for implementation by the Stanford University Faculty Senate and is executed through a Proprietary User Agreement. Proprietary Research is subject to the Department of Energy's full-cost recovery requirement for facility charges for the use of user facilities and advance payment of those charges. The facility charges are established as a dollar rate for each shift of beam time. Experimenters interested in conducting Proprietary Research should contact the User Research Administration Manager well in advance of the anticipated need for beam time as the legal and financial procedures involved may take

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

User Facility Access Policy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Access Policy Facility Access Policy 1. Summary The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science national user facility that provides synchrotron radiation to researchers in many fields of science and technology, including biology, catalysis, chemistry, energy, engineering, forensics, geoscience, materials science, medicine, molecular environmental science, and physics. With a pioneering start in 1974, the facility was upgraded to a state-of-the-art third generation lightsource in 2004, providing major improvements in emittance, ring current and new or upgraded beam lines. SSRL's research programs include both the x-ray and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. SSRL is primarily supported by the DOE Offices of Basic Energy Sciences

22

National Synchrotron Light Source  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Dale E. Sayers Fellowship | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dale E. Sayers Fellowship Dale E. Sayers Fellowship North Carolina State University Physical and Mathematical Sciences Foundation A dear colleague, Dale E. Sayers, one of the three pioneers of the analytical technique Extended X- ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), died in November 2004 at age 60. The key EXAFS developments in which Dale participated (now about 30 years ago) opened a new field of research that is extensively useat almost all synchrotron radiation facilities worldwide. Dale was an extraordinary man - generous and witty, as well as a great scientist. Dale was a highly visible synchrotron radiation user for over 20 years. He touched the lives of many in this world-wide scientific community. You or some of your colleagues might have even known Dale personally. Of Dale's many qualities, his colleagues and friends would like to single

24

Radioactive Materials at SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials at SSRL Radioactive Materials at SSRL Contact Information SSRL Safety Officer (650) 926-3861 SSRL Radiation Protection Group (650) 926-4299 SSRLRadMat@SLAC.STANFORD.EDU Throughout the course of an SSRL Experimental Run, there are requests from users to transport and use small amounts of radioactive material in their experiments, either as stand alone samples or in a matrix of other materials. There is no minimum quantity for declaring the use of radioactive samples at SSRL. The purpose of this procedure is to enable Users, SSRL and SLAC staff to know what radiological controls will be implemented for these materials, based on the isotope, its toxicity risk and radiological controls. Radioactive materials at SSRL are classified into 4 classification Groups based on the radiotoxicity tables, see below.

25

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Top-Off Injection and Higher Currents at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a 234 m circumference storage ring for 3 GeV electrons with its synchrotron radiation serving currently 13 beamlines with about 27 experimental stations. It operated for long time with 100 mA peak current provided by usually three injections per day. In July 2009, the maximum beam current was raised to 200 mA. Over the period from June 2009 to March 2010, Top-Off operation started at every beamline. Top-Off, i.e., the injection of electrons into the storage ring with injection stoppers open, is necessary for SSRL to reach its design current of 500 mA. In the future, the maximal power of the injection current will also soon be raised from currently 1.5 W to 5 W. The Radiation Protection Department at SLAC worked with SSRL on the specifications for the safety systems for operation with Top-Off injection and higher beam currents.

Bauer, Johannes M.; Liu, James C.; Prinz, Alyssa A.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; ,

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

None

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

31

NSLS Utilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

32

NSLS 2009 Activity Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2009 was an incredibly exciting year for light sources at Brookhaven. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) hosted more than 2,200 visiting researchers, who, along with the about 50 members of our scientific staff, produced a total of 957 publications - about 20 percent of which appeared in premier journals. Covering topics ranging from Alzheimer's disease detection to ethanol-powered fuel cells, a sampling of these findings can be found in this Activity Report. We've also seen the resurfacing of some of our long-time users hard work. I was very proud to hear that two of the three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry have ties to the NSLS. Venki Ramakrishnan, a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department and long-time user of the NSLS, now at Cambridge University, and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University, also a long-time NSLS user, shared the prize with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science for their work on the structure and function of the ribosome. In the late 1990s, Ramakrishnan and Steitz used protein crystallography at the NSLS to gather atomic-level images of two ribosome subunits: 30S (Ramakrishnan) and 50S (Steitz). Both laureates solved the high-resolution structures for these subunits based on this data. After struggling with a rough budget for several years, we received excellent funding, and then some, this year. In addition to NSLS operations funding, we received $3 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). We used that additional money for two exciting projects: construction of a full-field x-ray microscope and acquisition of several advanced x-ray detectors. The x-ray microscope will be able to image objects with a targeted spatial resolution of 30 nanometers. This capability will be particularly important for new initiatives in energy research and will prepare our users for the projected 1-nanometer resolution benchmark at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The detectors project is expected to increase the throughput of several high-demand beamlines by an order of magnitude as well as enable new classes of experiments. In addition, a huge chunk of ARRA money - $150 million - was put toward accelerating the construction of NSLS-II, which is now taking shape across the street. Now physically much more than just a pile of dirt, NSLS-II was granted Critical Decision 3 status by the Department of Energy (DOE) early last year, giving the official go-ahead for construction. In July, construction began, marked by a groundbreaking ceremony that attracted elected officials, media, and DOE, Battelle, and Stony Brook University representatives from across the state and the country. As progress on NSLS-II continues, we're working with Stony Brook University to identify ways to capitalize on the facility's unique capabilities through the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). Included in this effort is a series of workshops to encourage the development and application of the photon sciences with collaborative research between industries, universities, and national laboratories. We helped host three of these workshops this year, focusing on microelectronics, energy storage, and materials in next-generation energy systems. The conversation and ideas generated at these meetings has been fresh and valuable and we hope to use this model to organize research opportunities in other scientific fields. Also this year: Brookhaven was deemed the lead institution for one of DOE's 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, focused on understanding the underlying nature of superconductivity in complex materials by using techniques at the NSLS and CFN; DOE awarded a $100,000 supplemental grant to our detector program to continue the development of a new generation of x-ray detectors that use germanium sensors, which, at high energies, are much more efficient than equivalent ones based on silicon; and funding for one of our largest consortia, Case Western Reserve University's Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB), was renewed through the National Inst

Nasta K.; Mona R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Photon Sciences | NSLS-II Beamlines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Beamlines NSLS-II Beamlines beamlines Current NSLS-II Beamline Diagram The National Synchrotron Light Source II will accommodate more than 60 beamlines using 27 straight sections for insertion-device sources and 31 bending-magnet or three-pole-wiggler sources, with additional beamlines possible through canted insertion devices and multiple branches. Six beamlines were selected in 2008 and are now funded within the NSLS-II project. These project beamlines encompass research programs in inelastic x-ray scattering, hard x-ray nanoprobe, coherent hard x-ray scattering, coherent soft x-ray scattering and polarization, submicron resolution x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray powder diffraction. For each beamline, a beamline advisory team, or BAT, has been established to represent the broader scientific community in a specific area of

34

NSLS Industrial User Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jun Wang Physicist, Industrial Program Coordinator Phone: 344-2661 Email: junwang@bnl.gov Jun Wang is an Industrial Program Coordinator in the Photon Science Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory. She is working closely with industrial researchers as well as beamline staff to identify and explore new opportunities in industrial applications using synchrotron radiation. She has been leading the industrial research program including consultation, collaboration and outreach to the industrial user groups. Before joining BNL in 2008, Jun Wang was a Lead Scientist for a high-resolution high throughput powder diffraction program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). As a Physicist at BNL, her research focuses on materials structure determination and evolution. Her expertise covers wide range x-ray techniques such as thin film x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, powder diffraction, small angle x-ray scattering, protein solution scattering and protein crystallography, as well as x-ray imaging. Currently she is the project leader of a multi-million dollar project on transmission x-ray microscopy recently funded by the U.S. DOE and the spokesperson for this new imaging beamline at the NSLS. She has also been collaborating with universities and industries for several projects on energy research at the NSLS.

35

National Synchrotron Light Source  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

BNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NSLS-II Transport Line Progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

NSLS Vacuum  

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Vacuum Vacuum Safe Guards X-Ray Feedthroughs VUV Feedthroughs R&D "Much ado about nothing", a popular title from English literature, has been quoted often to vacuum technologists relative to our work. In the real world there is much to do to obtain the nothingness of a good vacuum! There is even more to achieving the good ultra-high vacuum (UHV) needed for the NSLS storage rings. Today's vacuum technologist must be familiar with a large variety of pumps, gauges, chambers, materials, processes, valves, controls, diagnostics, etc., related to vacuum. A practical example would be to measure, find, and fix a system vacuum leak - a task easily compared to finding a needle in a haystack. A good knowledge of vacuum systems and skill with mass spectrometers is required for success. The vacuum

38

Structural Studies of Al:ZnO Powders and Thin Films | Stanford Synchrotron  

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Structural Studies of Al:ZnO Powders and Thin Films Structural Studies of Al:ZnO Powders and Thin Films Monday, June 18, 2012 - 2:00pm SSRL Main Conference Room 137-322 Dr. Bridget Ingham, Associate Investigator, MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials & Nanotechnology Al-doped ZnO (Al:ZnO) is a promising transparent conducting oxide. We have used complementary synchrotron and laboratory techniques to study the incorporation of Al within the ZnO lattice, and measure its effect on the crystallinity of thin films prepared by sol-gel techniques, with an aim to understand how these properties affect the film conductivity. I will present recent results from Al:ZnO powders and thin films, prepared with varying Al concentrations and calcination temperatures. Solid state 27Al NMR and ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed on Al:ZnO

39

NSLS Industrial User Enhancement Plan The overall goal of this plan for enhancing the NSLS Industrial Users' Program is to encourage greater  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial User Enhancement Plan Industrial User Enhancement Plan The overall goal of this plan for enhancing the NSLS Industrial Users' Program is to encourage greater use of synchrotron tools by industry researchers, improve access to NSLS beamlines by industrial researchers, and facilitate research collaborations between industrial researchers and NSLS staff, as well as researchers from university and government laboratories. The implementation of this plan will also involve modifications of the existing user access policy. The plan includes the following major elements: Improve the NSLS proposal review system:  Proposal rating review criteria has been modified to reflect the importance of technology

40

Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:  

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Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: An Evaluation of the State of the Field in 2002 A BioSync Report. Issued by the Structural Biology Synchrotron users Organization, October, 2002. 2 Table of Contents: Introduction .................................................................................................... 3 Abbreviations .................................................................................................. 5 Executive Summary ......................................................................................... 6 General Concerns ............................................................................................ 9 Synchrotron operations and maintenance ............................................... 9 NSLS, CHESS and the geographical distribution of beam lines

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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41

Beam line X-11A at the NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source): A unique facility for x-ray absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and operation of beam line X-11A at the NSLS is described. It employs a unique optical design using a two/four crystal monochromator and a SiC collimating mirror. In either two or four crystal mode a sagittal focusing crystal allows collection of up to 5 mrad of horizontal divergence. Two techniques for rapid scanning of a sagitally focusing crystal will be described and compared. These are dynamically bending the crystal during the scan or translating a fixed radius bent crystal in a manner to maintain a fixed focus on the sample. The flexibility of this two/four crystal design allows the intensity and/or resolution of the beam line to be optimized for particular experiments. 4 refs., 6 figs.

Heald, S.M.; Sayers, D.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Beam line instrumentation proposed by an ORAU/ORNL consortium for the VUV ring at NSLS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The beam line configuration and monochromators proposed jointly by a consortium of universities organized through Oak Ridge Associated Universities and by workers at Oak Ridge National Labs for installation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven are described. The proposed system is an adaptation of designs developed at Brookhaven for the VUV storage ring of NSLS.

T.A. Callcott; P.A. Carlson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

SciTech Connect: 1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

POLICY; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; NSLS; PROGRESS REPORT; COORDINATED RESEARCH PROGRAMS; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY; ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; USES Word Cloud More Like...

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieving nsls ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chapter 4: Sustainable Design 4-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 4... design decisions. 4.2.1 Project Goals The National Synchrotron Light Source II ... Source: Ohta,...

45

BNL/SBU NSLS-II Workshop, May 18, 2011  

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BNL Hosts Internal Workshop on Future of NSLS-II BNL Hosts Internal Workshop on Future of NSLS-II About 125 Brookhaven Laboratory and Stony Brook University scientists and staff participated in an internal workshop to learn about the status and plans for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) on Wednesday, May 18, 2011, at BNL. The workshop's purpose was to help us identify strategies for developing and enhancing research programs in the different areas of science at BNL and SBU that will benefit from NSLS-II's capabilities. Attendees heard overview talks on the Laboratory's general vision and strategy, including the role of NSLS-II, a summary of NSLS-II status and plans, and a summary of the current state of the Lab's and SBU's science and technology (S&T) research interests (and collaborations) in using NSLS-II. During subsequent breakout sessions, workshop leaders solicited input for inclusion in the emerging strategies for developing, evolving, and positioning research programs to take maximum advantage of NSLS-II. Development of these strategies is being facilitated by a working group drawn from across BNL and SBU, including Allen Orville (ELS), Lisa Miller (PSD), Ron Pindak (PSD), Qun Shen (PSD), John Hill (BES), Jason Graetz (ST), Jose Rodriguez (BES), Lynne Ecker (GARS), Jeff Fitts (ELS), Ben Hsiao (SBU), Bob Haltiwanger (SBU), John Parise (SBU) and Doon Gibbs. The working group subsequently gathered the input from the breakout sessions and developed strategies for the further refinement of the developing NSLS-II based research programs as a part of the Laboratory's strategy for achieving its S&T missions. The results are presented here.

46

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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SSRL Discoveries Point to Better Batteries SSRL Discoveries Point to Better Batteries SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure A single reconstructed slice and a volume rendering of the tomography sequence. Energy storage materials, such as batteries, are of increasing importance in the modern world. They support the storage and distribution of electricity generated by different mechanisms, enabling the use of green power sources when the resource itself is unavailable (for example, solar energy at night or wind energy on a calm day). Such devices also provide energy portability for consumer electronics and zero-emission options for transportation, in either hybrid or fully-electric vehicles. Many impressive battery technologies exist today, but the understanding of their operation is somewhat limited, which makes it very challenging to improve

47

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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X-rays Illuminate Frustrated Materials X-rays Illuminate Frustrated Materials SSRL Science Summary - August 2012 Figure 1. Two sets of Cu spin orientations on a hexagon from the honeycomb lattice; either the "green" or "blue" set of spins describe the magnetic arrangement at a given time, illustrating that there is no preferred spin orientation; i.e the spins are "frustrated". Credit: Satoru Nakatsuji, University of Tokyo The electronic, spin, and ionic structures of closely packed atoms in solids are strongly co-dependent and interactions of these three lattices, whether innate or due to subtle manipulation, can cause exotic properties to emerge. The strong coupling among these lattices can also suppress a physical property through "frustration," the term for an incompatibility of

48

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Botulinum Neurotoxin is Bio-shielded by NTNHA in a Handshake Complex Botulinum Neurotoxin is Bio-shielded by NTNHA in a Handshake Complex SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure A single reconstructed slice and a volume rendering of the tomography sequence. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) invade motor neurons at their junctions with muscular tissue, where the toxins disable the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and subsequently paralyze the affected muscles. Accidental BoNT poisoning primarily occurs through ingestion of food products contaminated by Clostridium botulinum, the bacterium that produces BoNTs. However, BoNTs by themselves are fragile and sensitive to low pH environments and digestive proteases. So how do they survive the harsh environment of the host's gastrointestinal tract? Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Research Institute and the Medical School of

49

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Illuminating the Multiconfigurational Ground State of Elemental and Illuminating the Multiconfigurational Ground State of Elemental and Intermetallic Compounds of Uranium and Plutonium SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure Resonant x-ray emission spectra of actinide metals: Spectra show the emitted photon intensity as a function of the incident photon beam energy, EI, and the transfer energy, ET. Upper panel shows a sharp resonance dominated by a single uranium valence configuration. Bottom panel shows the broader resonance for the ground-state phase of elemental plutonium that is made up of differing amounts of three resonances = three valences. The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of U and Pu elements and intermetallics remain poorly understood despite decades of effort, and currently represent an important scientific frontier toward understanding

50

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Using X-rays to Find an Evolutionary Step in the Origin of Oxygenic Using X-rays to Find an Evolutionary Step in the Origin of Oxygenic Photosynthesis July 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications Figure The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis approximately 2.3 to 2.4 billion years ago revolutionized life on Earth. For most modern-day terrestrial life, oxygen has become indispensable. At the heart of oxygenic photosynthesis is the production of oxygen from water - a process mediated by the water-splitting manganese cluster of Photosystem II. Little is known about how oxygenic photosynthesis originally evolved, although some have hypothesized a manganese-oxidizing photosystem as a precursor step. Researchers from the California Institute of Technology, SSRL, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have now found geological

51

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Element-Specific and Real-Time Observation of CO-Ru Chemisorption Bond Element-Specific and Real-Time Observation of CO-Ru Chemisorption Bond Breaking with Soft X-ray Spectroscopy March 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure An international collaboration of scientists, including several from SSRL, has taken advantage of the broad range of photon science capabilities available at the lab to investigate a proposal that adsorption and desorption of a molecule to a surface - both fundamental processes of interfacial chemistry - proceed through a transient "precursor" state in which the molecule is weakly bound to the surface. Their research focused on carbon monoxide adsorption/desorption on metal surfaces; although a large number of spectroscopic studies have been devoted to this reaction,

52

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Watching Ions Hop in Superionic Nanomaterials Watching Ions Hop in Superionic Nanomaterials March 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure For the first time, ultrafast x-ray scattering and spectroscopic measurements carried out at SSRL, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) captured the atomic-level dynamics of a superionic nanocrystal as it transformed. Superionic materials are multi-component solids which can simultaneously display characteristics of both a solid and a liquid: Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one atomic species in the material exhibits liquid-like ionic conductivities and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Applications such as electrochemical storage materials and resistive

53

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Long-sought Structure of α-Catenin Defines Its Functions for Cell-cell The Long-sought Structure of α-Catenin Defines Its Functions for Cell-cell Interactions June 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Full-length α-catenin crystal structure reveals its dimeric asymmetric arrangement. The individual domains are colored individually (dimerization domain in yellow, vinculin binding domain in green, M-fragment in cyan, and the F-actin binding domain in magenta). A: View onto the vinculin binding domains. B: View onto the dimerization domains. Cell-cell interactions play an important role in the development, architecture, maintenance, and function of tissues in all higher organisms. Cells use specialized protein complexes to bind each other. These complexes define the attachment sites known as adherens junctions and consist of

54

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Examination of Microdamage in Sheep Cortical Bone Nanoscale Examination of Microdamage in Sheep Cortical Bone April 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Lead-uranyl acetate staining of damage morphologies in notched bone samples. (A, B) Staining of lacunae and canaliculi in the compressive region seen in 20 of the 23 samples; (C, D) Cross hatching damage around notch tip in the tensile region observed in 10 of 23 samples; (E, F) Crack propagating from notch tip in the tensile region in a single sample. Staining appears white due to high attenuation of lead-uranyl acetate, with bone tissue appearing grey and voids black. Scale bar: A,C,E = 50 μm; B,D,F = 5 μm. Sample created in the longitudinal plane of the bone.] An important factor contributing to bone fractures is the accumulation of

55

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Read Self-Assembled Nanoparticle Superlattices X-ray Reflectivity X-ray reflectometry is a technique for investigating the near-surface structure of many materials. It probes the electron density with a depth resolution of less than one nm for depths of up to several hundred nm. The method involves measuring the reflected X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray incidence angle (typically small angles are used). The method is used for studies of thin films and multilayers of metals, semiconductors and polymers. It can accurately determine films thickness, density, average roughness, and the roughness correlation function. Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering and Diffraction on Thin Films Grazing incidence X-ray scattering or diffraction (GIXS) refers to a method

56

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Quantification of the Mercury Adsorption Mechanism on Brominated Activated Carbon August 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida Figure Emissions from coal-fired power plants are...

57

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the replication process of Lassa virus as compared to other negative-strand viruses as Ebola and measles, which also encode some or all of their genes in the negative direction....

58

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CeO2 ENPs can reach the food chain and the next soybean plant generation, with potential health implications. Primary Citation J. A. Hernandez-Viezcas, H. Castillo-Michel, J. C....

59

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

scientific models, this research will lead to more efficient, less costly methods for uranium cleanup and mining. Their research hinged on the fundamental subject of electron...

60

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure of the DUF2233 Domain in Bacteria and the Stuttering-associated UCE Glycoprotein July 2013 SSRL Science Summary (adapted from SLAC News Feature by Glennda Chui) Figure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Elements of Stroke SSRL Science Summary - September 2012 Figure 1. Correlation between XRF iron maps and MR imaging. Ischemic lesions are outlined. Rapid diagnosis and...

62

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

," or PETE, could reduce the costs of solar energy production enough for it to compete with oil as an energy and molecular level. As one of five light sources funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, SSRL enables research that benefits every sector of the American economy and leads to major advances

Kay, Mark A.

63

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Lisa E. Mayhew, University of Colorado - Boulder Figure Hydrogen gas is produced in chemical reactions between anoxic water and iron-rich rocks at temperatures...

64

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Competing Phases Found in High-Temperature Superconductor December 2012 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure larger image Although the...

65

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of recent user developments and experimental results as well as future plans. Users elect members to serve on the Executive Committee to carry out the business of the SSRLUO....

66

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

such as solid uraninite, UO2, and its low solubility reduces the environmental risk. Naturally-occurring iron sulfide (FeS) is known to be an important electron source for the...

67

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Click on images to see sample screen shots. Complete rows beginning with row 24 with your radionuclide data. Context sensitive help is available in cells located in row 23. Step 3:...

68

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Configuration Options: Vortex detector, Si(111) Analyzer CrystalPhoto Multiplier Tube, Si(111) Data Collection Mode: Transmission Reflection Have you had previous experience...

69

NSLS Booster & Linac Ring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Booster & Linac Ring Booster & Linac Ring Booster Operating Parameters (pdf) Lattice Information (pdf) Mechanical Drawing (pdf) Standard Operating Mode Electrons are injected into the NSLS storage rings from a 750 MeV booster synchrotron fed by a 120 MeV linac. The electrons are first produced in a 100 KeV triode electron gun. The gun is pulsed at the booster revolution period, 94.6 nsec, seven times per booster cycle. Each pulse is 5 nsec long and supplies about 17 microbunches in the linac. After acceleration in the linac, the beam is injected into the booster on seven successive turns. Multi-turn injection in the booster is accomplished in the following way: The beam is deflected into the booster by a septum magnet. The first linac pulse goes around the booster and returns to the injection point just as

70

National Synchrotron Light Source  

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Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York This Environmental Assessment addresses the proposed action by the U.S. Department of Energy to upgrade the facilities of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex, namely the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the Accelerator Test Facility and the Source Development Laboratory. The environmental effects of a No-Action Alternative as well as a Proposed Action are evaluated in the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet” link below leads to a one-page summary of the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment” link below leads to the whole 41-page

71

NSLS-II | NEXT Integrated Project Team | Home  

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NEXT Integrated Project Team NEXT Integrated Project Team NEXT stands for NSLS-II Experimental Tools, a set of six beamlines being developed for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). DOE uses an integrated project teaming approach for managing the NEXT Project. This Integrated Project Team (IPT) is organized and led by the NSLS-II Federal Project Director. It is an essential element in DOE's acquisition process and is being used during all phases of the project's life cycle. This team consists of professionals representing diverse disciplines with the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities to support the Federal Project Director in successfully executing the project. The IPT for the NEXT Project will consist of members from both DOE and the

72

NSLS Electrical Equipment Inspection  

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Electrical Equipment Inspection Information Electrical Equipment Inspection Information A note to vendors visiting NSLS A note to users visiting NSLS Proteus Electrical Conformity Remediation Currently Certified Electrical Equipment Inspectors: First Line Contacts Email Extension Poshka, Dennis poshka@bnl.gov 2825 Alternate Contacts Boerner Jr, Albert aboerner@bnl.gov 5990 Buda, Scott buda@bnl.gov 3914 Caruso, Michael caruso@bnl.gov 4100 Chmiel, Robert chmiel@bnl.gov 8141 Church, Randolph church@bnl.gov 2736 Clay, Barret clay@bnl.gov 7284 D'Alsace, Roy dalsace@bnl.gov 3973 Danneil, Christopher cdanneil@bnl.gov 8609 Davila, Peter davila@bnl.gov 7625 De Toll, Peter detoll@bnl.gov 4100 Durfee, Douglas ddurfee@bnl.gov 7625 Fulkerson, Michael fulkerso@bnl.gov 5194 Gallagher, John jgallagher@bnl.gov 5770 Harder, David dharder@bnl.gov 4978

73

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

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Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

74

NSLS Services | Postal Services  

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Postal Services Postal Services U.S. Postal Service BNL has a full-service U.S. Postal Service Office (Upton branch) located in Staff Services, Building 179, x2539. BNL Mail Service Mail is delivered and picked up twice a day from each building on site. Users should leave internal lab mail (brown envelopes, no stamps needed) and U.S. Mail (regular envelopes, stamps required) in the outgoing mail boxes at NSLS mail stop 725A, located in the lobby by the elevator. Receiving Mail During regular working hours, packages and other special deliveries are brought to the Stockroom while regular mail is taken to the mailstops around the building. Each beam port is assigned a mail slot at NSLS mail stop 725A near the elevator in the lobby. The beamline number should be on all mail addressed to users. Mail to users should be addressed as follows

75

NSLS Mechanical Tech  

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Mechanical Tech Mechanical Tech The Mechanical Technician group is supervised by Robert Scheuerer and consists of Mechanical Technicians with fabrication/machining, assembly, installation, and alignment/surveying skills. This group also serves as an interface to Central Fabrication Services when more complex or larger fabrication efforts are needed. The Mechanical Tech group is responsible for fabricating, installing, aligning, and troubleshooting the mechanical hardware used on NSLS and SDL accelerators, front ends, and User beamlines, often starting solely from Mechanical Design group drawings or CAD files. The Mechanical Tech Group is responsible for the fabrication, assembly and installation of components at the NSLS. These components include all mechanical assemblies and RF cavities. Another part of their job is to

76

Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford  

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Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Using r-Space Phase Information in EXAFS to Characterize Possible Off-center Displacements in PbTe Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Structure of Chinese Herbal-based Medicine Captured by ATP on a Human tRNA Synthetase Previous Pause Next Supporting the User Community ginter Register Submit Proposals Request Beam Time Check-In Visiting scientists ("users") from universities, industries and laboratories around the world use SSRL experimental facilities to conduct experiments across a broad range of scientific, engineering, and environmental disciplines. Our Experimental Facilities SPEAR Plot Click for Full Status Beam Lines Labs Schedules

77

National Synchrotron Light Source  

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All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and will be updated as needed. Photon Sciences ESH Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) SOP No. Standard Operating Procedure for: LS-ES-0002 Procedure for Acid Etching of Silicon and Germanium Crystals LS-ESH-0004 NSLS Operations Group Chemical Spill and Gas Release Response LS-ESH-0010 VUV Injection Shutter LOTO LS-ESH-0012 LINAC LOTO LS-ESH-0013 Controlled Access to the VUV Ring LS-ESH-0014 Radiation Safety Interlocks at the National Synchrotron Light Source LS-ESH-0019 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements LS-ESH-0020 Biosafety Requirements at the NSLS LS-ESH-0021 Biosafety Level 2 work at the NSLS/ A Technical Basis LS-ESH-0022 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements

78

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 34105 Stanford Geothermal, California SGP-TR-72 A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING ANALYSIS OF A VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELD BY John Forrest Dee June 1983 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department

Stanford University

79

Hazards analysis for the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory x-ray absorption experiments to be performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this experiment is to determine the oxidation state(s) of neptunium (Np) in mouse skeleton and in soft tissue by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). If Np is present in sufficient concentration, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data will be obtained in order to further identify the Np species present. These data will be crucial in understanding the metabolic pathway of Np in mammals which will help in the design of reagents which can eliminate Np from mammals in the event of accidental exposure. It is proposed to run these experiments at the Standard Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). This laboratory is a DOE national user facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The {sup 237}Np nucleus decays by the emission of an alpha particle and this particle emission is the principal hazard in handling Np samples. This hazard is mitigated by physical containment of the sample which stops the alpha particles within the containment. The total amount of Np material that will be shipped to and be at SSRL at any one time will be less than 1 gram. This limit on the amount of Np will ensure that SLAC remains a low hazard, non-nuclear facility. The Np samples will be solids or Np ions in aqueous solution. The Np samples will be shipped to SSRL/SLAC OHP. SLAC OHP will inventory the samples and swipe the containers holding the triply contained samples, and then bring them to the SSRL Actinide trailer located outside building 131. The QA counting records from the samples, as measured at LBNL, will be provided to SSRL and SLAC OHP prior to the arrival of the samples at SLAC OHP. In addition, strict monitoring of the storage and experimental areas will be performed in accordance with SLAC/OHP radiation protection procedures to ensure against the release of contamination.

Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NSLS Endstations | Center for Functional Nanomaterials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UV and X-ray Probes UV and X-ray Probes The CFN operates three end-stations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) for nanomaterials characterization. The station located at the X9 beamline performs simultaneous small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments for nano-scale structural characterization of a variety of materials. The Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (AP-XPS) station located at beamline X1A1 is capable of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for quantitative surface chemical analysis of a range of materials at gas pressures up to about 1 Torr. The undulator beamline U5UA hosts a station operating in ultra-high vacuum with a low-energy electron microscope (LEEM) and X-ray photo-emission electron microscope (XPEEM). The LEEM-XPEEM system can be used to study static and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Photon Sciences | About the National Synchrotron Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source Source NSLS One of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is host each year to 2,400 researchers from more than 400 universities, laboratories, and companies. Research conducted at the NSLS has yielded advances in biology, physics, chemistry, geophysics, medicine, and materials science. Synchrotron light is produced by electrons when they are forced to move in a curved path at nearly the speed of light. At the NSLS, beams of light in the x-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared wavelengths are produced by two synchrotrons for use in experiments. Powerful Light, Diverse Research Since the intensity of synchrotron light can be 10,000 times greater than conventional beams generated in a laboratory, scientists can use these

82

NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes

Dierker, S.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NSLS Services | User Accounts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Accounts User Accounts Operating Accounts (81000 accounts) General Users who are allocated beam time and Participating Research Teams (PRTs) or Contributing Users (CUs) who operate beamlines should establish a BNL operating account to cover the costs of materials while running an experiment, shipping, and/or miscellaneous BNL services (telephone & fax codes), if these needs are anticipated. The term of the purchase order must be specified and names of persons having signature authorization for charges against this account must be listed. Brookhaven's Fiscal Division will bill the user for any charges the user makes to the account. Users are obligated to pay outstanding debts promptly. All users should set up a $1,000 operating account to cover operating expenses while at the NSLS, such as charges for use of trades, shops, and

84

NSLS User Access | Training  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Training Training Training for New Users and Users with Expired Training and/or Badges: All new users and users with expired badges must complete or update the training modules shown below prior to access to the experimental floor. The training can be completed online prior to arrival at the NSLS and is strongly recommended to save considerable time during check-in at the Guest, User, Visitor (GUV) Center in Building 400. Please note each training module is followed by an exam which asks for your name and guest number. If you do not already have a guest number, leave this entry blank. All new users and users with expired badges MUST arrive on a weekday (no weekends or holidays) and check in at the GUV Center so that your training can be verified and to receive a photo ID badge (new or updated). The GUV

85

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Proceedings that stand as one of the prominent literature sources in the field of geothermal energySTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94105 SGP-TR- 61 GEOTHERMAL APPENDIX A: PARTICIPANTS IN THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM '81/'82 . 60 APPENDIX B: PAPERS PRESENTED

Stanford University

86

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 heat sweep model for estimating energy recovery from fractured geothermal reservoirs based on earlySTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary

Stanford University

87

Theses | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theses Theses 2013 Elizabeth L. Baxter, "Uncovering Allostery in a Uniquely Folded Metalloprotein", University of California San Diego, 2013; Advisor: P. A. Jennings Martja A. Beckwith, "X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of Manganese Complexes Relevant to Photosystem II", Cornell University, 2013; Advisor: S. DeBeer Beate Fulda, "Changes in Copper and Cadmium Solubility and Speciation Induced by Soil Redox Dynamics - Competitive Metal Sulfide Formation and Interactions with Natural Organic Matter", ETH Zurich, 2013; Advisor: R. Kretzschmar Thomas D. Grant, "Understanding the Structure of Eukaryotic Glutaminyl-TRNA Synthetase: Combining X-ray Crystallography with Statistical Evaluations of Small Angle Scattering Data", State University of New York Buffalo, 2013;

88

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

this within 7.5 months with beam turn in the followin g month--2 months ahead of the completion milestone. Richard Boyce, responsible for the magnet and supports acquisition,...

89

Achieving Vibration Stability of the NSLS-II Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hard x-ray nanoprobe (HXN) beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) requires high levels of stability in order to achieve the desired instrument resolution. To ensure that the design of the endstation helps meet the stringent criteria and that natural and cultural vibration is mitigated both passively and actively, a comprehensive study complimentary to the design process has been undertaken. Vibration sources that have the potential to disrupt sensitive experiments such as wind, traffic, and NSLS II operating systems have been studied using state-of-the-art simulations and an array of field data. Further, final stage vibration isolation principles have been explored.

Simos, N.; Chu, Y. S.; Broadbent, A.; Nazaretski, E.; Margulies, L.; Dyling, O.; Shen, Q.; Fallier, M. [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

90

STANFORD DINING --Jane Lathrop Stanford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADISICHREGGIE FUTCH ERICA BARRAGAN VACANT VACANT ANU CHOWDHARY #12;3 MEAL PLAN DOLLARS Dining Halls Stanford

Quake, Stephen R.

91

2004 NSLS Activity Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NatioNal NatioNal SyNchrotroN light Source activity report 2004 BNL 73577 National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2004 BNL-73577-2005 UC400 (General Energy Research) DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commerical product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

92

NSLS annual report 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first comprehensive Annual Report of the National Synchrotron Light Source comes at a time of great activity and forward motion for the facility. In the following pages we outline the management changes that have taken place in the past year, the progress that has been made in the commissioning of the x-ray ring and in the enhanced utilization of the uv ring, together with an extensive discussion of the interesting scientific experiments that have been carried out.

Klaffky, R.; Thomlinson, W. (eds.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

National Synchrotron Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Authorization Documents Authorization Documents Environmental Assessment for NSLS, ATF & SDL NSLS Safety Assessment Document Accelerator Safety Envelope Fire Hazard Analysis Conduct of Operations NSLS-II Environmental Assessment (2006) Finding of No Significant Impact (2006) Comparison of NSLS-II Environmental Assessment with NSLS-II Title II Design Specifications (2008) "NEXT" Beamlines Environmental Evaluation Notification Form and Approval Memo (2011) Linac Commissioning Safety Assessment Document (2011) NSLS-II USI Determination #1 NSLS-II USI Determination #2 NSLS-II USI Determination #3 NSLS-II USI Determination #4 NSLS-II USI Determination #5 Linac Commissioning Accelerator Safety Envelope (2011) Linac Commissioning Plan (2011) Booster Commissioning Safety Assessment Document (2011)

94

Energy Secretary Moniz Dedicates the Worlds Brightest Synchrotron Light Source  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Ernest Moniz today dedicated the worlds most advanced light source, the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

95

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial Collaborators Industrial Collaborators The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and its future successor, NSLS-II, can help companies large and small solve research and manufacturing problems, generate new technologies and products, and stay competitive. The Photon Sciences Directorate would like to encourage greater use of its facilities by industrial researchers and facilitate collaborations between industry and NSLS staff, as well as government and academic institutions. Synchrotron Use by Industry What is a synchrotron? A synchrotron light source is a large machine that produces intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for the study of substances at very small scales, from looking at the molecular structure of proteins to probing the electronic properties of the next generation of computer-chip

96

NSLS-II Project Schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Project Schedule NSLS-II Project Schedule Major Milestone Event Major Milestone Event Preliminary Schedule CD-0 (approve Mission Need) 4th quarter, FY2005 CD-1 (approve Alternative Selection and Cost Range) 4th quarter, FY2007 CD-2 (approve Performance Baseline) 1st quarter, FY2008 CD-3 (approve Start of Construction) 2nd quarter, FY2009 CD-4 (approve Start of Operations) FY2015 Critical Decisions The five Critical Decisions are major milestones approved by the Secretarial Acquisition Executive or Acquisition Executive that establish the mission need, recommended alternative, Acquisition Strategy, the Performance Baseline, and other essential elements required to ensure that the project meets applicable mission, design, security, and safety requirements. Each Critical Decision marks an increase in commitment of

97

NSLS VUV Storage Ring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

VUV Storage Ring VUV Storage Ring VUV Normal Operations Operating Parameters (pdf) Insertion Devices Flux & Brightness Orbit Stability Lattice Information (pdf) Lattice : MAD Dataset Mechanical Drawing (pdf) VUV Operating Schedule Introduction & History The VUV Ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source was one of the first of the 2nd generation light sources to operate in the world. Initially designed in 1976 the final lattice design was completed in 1978 shortly after funding was approved. Construction started at the beginning of FY 1979 and installation of the magnets was well underway by the end of FY 1980. The first stored beam was achieved in December of 1981 at 600 MeV and the first photons were delivered to beamlines in May 1982, with routine beam line operations underway by the start of FY 1983. The number of beam

98

NSLS Computer Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Systems Computer Systems Micro Systems WorkStation Applications Network Configuration Documents The National Synchrotron Light Source facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, consists of two storage rings, one for VUV operating at 800 Mev and one for XRAY at 2.8 Gev and a common injection system comprised of a linear accelerator and a Booster ring. Hardware Architecture The hardware architecture of the present control system follows the current trend seen in many accelerator facilities. It is a two-level distributed system consisting of HP/900 series workstations connected by the standard ethernet to VME-based microprocessor subsystems. All the workstations have local disk and sufficient memory for fast response. Workstations are used as file server, back-up file server and for program development and other

99

STANFORD DINING --Jane Lathrop Stanford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Acterra Award for Sustainability and PG&E award for Leadership in Applying Green Building Design and have and Leland Stanford. We take the time and effort to source the most sustainable ingredients while building contribute to the prestige of Stanford · Community building opportunities · Enhanced quality of life

Ford, James

100

NSLS-II Integrated Project Team (IPT)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Integrated Project Team NSLS-II Integrated Project Team DOE uses an integrated project teaming approach for managing the NSLS-II Project. This Integrated Project Team (IPT), organized and led by the NSLS-II Federal Project Director, is an essential element in DOE's acquisition process and is being used during all phases of the project's life cycle. This team consists of professionals representing diverse disciplines with the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities to support the Federal Project Director in successfully executing the project. The IPT for the NSLS-II Project will consist of members from both DOE and the contractor, Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The team membership will change as the project progresses from initiation to closeout to ensure the necessary skills are always represented to meet the project's needs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA. Taube Center for Jewish Studies, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA. 2 Taube Center for Jewish Studies, Stanford University, Stanford, CA. *Correspondence to: Noah A. Rosenberg, Department of Biology, 371 Serra Mall, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA. E-mail: noahr@stanford.edu. KEY WORDS

Rosenberg, Noah

102

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout April 12, 2010 Contents Basic Storage Ring Parameters Basic and Advanced Source Parameters Brightness Flux Photon Source Size and Divergence Power Infrared Sources Distribution of Sources Available for User Beamlines Floor Layout This document provides a summary of the current NSLS-II source and floor layout parameters. For a more complete description of the NSLS-II accelerator properties planned for NSLS-II, see the NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report Basic NSLS-II Storage Ring Parameters at NSLS-II website. We note that this document summarizes the present status of the design, but that the design continues to be refined and that these parameters may change as part of this process. NSLS-II is designed to deliver photons with high average spectral brightness in the 2 keV to 10 keV

103

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accessing NSLS Accessing NSLS NSLS strongly advises industrial users to first consult with the Industrial Program Coordinator, Jun Wang (junwang@bnl.gov or 631-344-2661), before beginning the beam time application process. She will discuss your proposed research with you, guiding you to the most appropriate beamline and synchrotron research technique. From there, you will be contacted by the beamline staff at your target beamline. They will work with you to develop the best possible beam time proposal, which you will need to formally apply for beam time. For new users, it is often beneficial to start your NSLS experience by collaborating with seasoned users. Dr. Wang can help establish these collaborations. Whether you decide to consult with the Industrial Program Coordinator or

104

NSLS-II | ABBIX Integrated Project Team | Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ABBIX Integrated Project Team ABBIX Integrated Project Team ABBIX stands for Advanced Beamlines for Biological Investigations with X-rays, a set of three beamlines being developed for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), with funding from the National Institutes of Health. ABBIX uses DOE project management practices and systems, including an integrated project teaming management approach. This Integrated Project Team (IPT), organized and led by the ABBIX Project Manager, is being used during all phases of the project's life cycle. This team consists of professionals representing diverse disciplines with the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities to support the ABBIX Project Manager in successfully executing the project. The IPT for the ABBIX Project will consist of

105

National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J. [eds.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Achieving Vibration Stability of the NSLS-II Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) Beamline of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-lI) requires high levels of stability in order to achieve the desired instrument resolution. To ensure that the design of the endstation helps meet the stringent criteria and that natural and cultural vibration is mitigated both passively and actively, a comprehensive study complimentary to the design process has been undertaken. Vibration sources that have the potential to disrupt sensitive experiments such as wind, traffic and NSLS II operating systems have been studied using state of the art simulations and an array of field data. Further, final stage vibration isolation principles have been explored in order to be utilized in supporting endstation instruments. This paper presents results of the various study aspects and their influence on the HXN design optimization.

Simos, N.; Chu, Y. N.; Broadbent, A.; Nazaretski, E.; Margulies, L.; Dyling, O.; Shen, Q.; Fallier, M.

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Advanced Light Source (ALS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

108

Advanced Photon Source (APS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

109

Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

110

X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

111

PHOTOINJECTED ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC UPGRADE FOR THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHOTOINJECTED ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC UPGRADE FOR THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE * Ilan Ben of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This upgrade will be based on the Photoinjected Energy Recovering limitations. First, the emittance of a storage ring based light source is proportional to the energy

Brookhaven National Laboratory

112

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source | 2010 Beamline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010 Beamline Development Proposals - Approved Proposals 2010 Beamline Development Proposals - Approved Proposals Proposal Results Announcement Acronym Title Spokesperson Type Information 4DE 4-Dimensional Studies in Extreme Environments Donald J. Weidner, Stony Brook University 1 Slide ABS A Highly Automated Instrument for Static X-ray Scattering Measurements of Biological Molecules in Solution Lin Yang, BNL 1 Slide AIM Advanced Infrared Microspectroscopy Lisa Miller, BNL 1 Slide AMX Flexible Access Macromolecular Crystallography at an Undulator Beamline Dieter Schneider, BNL 1 Slide | Proposal BMM Hard X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Diffraction - Beamline for Materials Measurements Daniel Fischer, NIST 2 Slide | Proposal CDI Coherent X-ray Diffraction Ian Robinson, University College London 1 Slide | Proposal

113

Ground Motion Studies at NSLS II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, an array of vibration measurements at the undisturbed NSLS II site has been performed in order to establish the 'green-field' vibration environment and its spectral characteristics. The interaction of the green-field vibration environment with the NSLS II accelerator structure and the quantification of the storage ring vibration, both in terms of amplitude and spectral content have been assessed through a state-of-the-art wave propagation and scattering analysis. This paper focuses on the wave propagation and scattering aspect as well as on the filtering effects of accelerator structural parameters.

Simos,N.; Fallier, M.; Amick, H.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

114

PROGRESS ON INSERTION DEVICE RELATED ACTIVITIES AT THE NSLS-II AND ITS FUTURE PLANS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is now in the construction stage. A new insertion device (ID) magnetic measurement facility (MMF) is being set up at Brookhaven National Laboratory in order to satisfy the stringent requirement on the magnetic field measurement of IDs. ISO-Class7 temperature stabilized clean room is being constructed for this purpose. A state-of-the-art Hall probe bench and integrated field measurement system will be installed therein. IDs in the project baseline scope include six damping wigglers, two elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs), three 3.0m long in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) and one 1.5m long IVU. Three-pole wigglers with peak field over 1 Tesla will be utilized to accommodate the users of bending magnet radiation at the NSLS. Future plans includes: (1) an in-vacuum magnetic measurement system, (2) use of PrFeB magnet for improved cryo undulator, (3) development of advanced optimization program for sorting and shimming of IDs, (4) development of a closed loop He gas refrigerator, (5) switchable quasi-periodic EPU. Design features of the baseline devices, IDMMF and the future plans for NSLS-II ID activities are described.

Tanabe, T.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Harder, D. A.; He, P.; Rank, J.; Rakowsky, G.; Spataro, C.

2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

115

*Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manchoso@cs.stanford.edu. ?Department of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, Electrical Engineering, Stanford Uni- versity, Stanford, CA...

116

The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov National Synchrotron Light Source II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory · P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 · 631 344-2345 · www.bnl.gov FACTS (04-14) National Synchrotron Light Source II NSLS-II by the Numbers World's Premier SynchrotronWill Light theWay to New Discoveries Like all synchrotrons, the National

Ohta, Shigemi

117

Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Floor Support Floor Support Service Responsible Person BLDG Extension (650) 926-XXXX Beam Status Duty Operator 120 926-2326 (BEAM) Duty Operator Cell Duty Operator 120 926-4040 Scheduling X-ray/VUV Macromolecular Crystallography Cathy Knotts Lisa Dunn 120 120 3191 2087 User Check-In/Badging Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 User Financial Accounts Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 Beam Lines/ VUV Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Mechanical Chuck Troxel, Jr. 120 2700 Beam Lines/ X-ray-VUV Electronics Alex Garachtchenko 120 3440 Beam Lines/ Macromolecular Crystallography Mike Soltis 277 3050 SMB XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer Erik Nelson 274 274 4944 3938 MEIS XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer

118

SSRL SMB Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SMB Program SMB Program SSRL Structural Molecular Biology program The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology program operates as a integrated resource and has three primary areas (or cores) of technological research and development and scientific focus: macromolecular crystallography (MC), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and small angle x-ray scattering/diffraction (SAXS). Central to the core technological developments in all three of these areas is the development and utilization of improved detectors and instrumentation, especially to be able to take maximum advantage of the increasingly high brightness of SSRL's storage ring (SPEAR3). There is also research and development in new methods - in techniques and instrumentation development and deployment. Included is the use of enhanced computing and data

119

Proposal Review Panel | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Review Panel Proposal Review Panel Submitting a proposal is the first step to access beam time at SSRL. Proposals are peer reviewed and rated by the SSRL Proposal Review Panel (PRP) on a scale from 1 (highest) to 5 (lowest). Successful proposals are eligble to request and may be awarded beam time on SSRL beam lines, with priority given to the highest rated proposals and those which demonstrate efficient and productive use of beam time. We have three proposal calls per year with one on-site PRP meeting at SSRL annually. Access Policy The work of the PRP is accomplished with four subpanels: BIO - The biology panel reviews proposals requesting beam time for imaging, X-ray spectroscopic studies, small-angle scattering experiments, and crystallography of biologically important samples.

120

Press Releases | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases 2012 Press Releases December 10, 2012 Experiment Finds Ulcer Bug's Achilles' Heel (see Press Release) June 6, 2012 New secrets from "Bay of the Pirates" warship that sunk 2,300 years ago (see Press Release) March 5, 2012 X-rays Reveal How Soil Bacteria Carry Out Surprising Chemistry (see Press Release) 2011 Press Releases July 3, 2011 Researchers Decipher Protein Structure of Key Molecule in DNA Transcription System (see Press Release) June 30, 2011 X-rays Reveal Patterns in the Plumage of the First Birds (see Press Release) March 24, 2011 High-temperature Superconductor Spills Secret: A New Phase of Matter (see Press Release) March 23, 2011 First Image of Protein Residue in 50 Million Year Old Reptile Skin (see Press Release) 2010 Press Releases

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Computer Networking Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Networking Group Networking Group Do you need help? For assistance please submit a CNG Help Request ticket. CNG Logo Chris Ramirez SSRL Computer and Networking Group Manager (650) 926-2901 | email Jerry Camuso SSRL Computer and Networking (650) 926-2994 | email Networking Support The Networking group provides connectivity and communications services for SSRL. The services provided by the Networking Support Group include: Local Area Network support for cable and wireless connectivity. Installation and maintenance of network printers and queues. Telephony installations and support. Printing Support The Networking group provides printer maintenance and support for SSRL Beamline Printers and plotters. The following models are supported: HP - Designjet large format plotters HP - Color and B/W Laserjet, Inkjet, Deskjet, Officejet

122

Photon Source Parameters | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Photon Source Parameters SSRL Beam Line Map | Beam Lines by Techniques | Beam Lines by Number Beam Energy 3 GeV Injection Energy 3 GeV Current 300-500 mA Fill Pattern 270 bunches distributed in six groups of 45 with 17 bunch gaps in between Circumferenc 234.137 Radio Frequency 476.315 MHz Bunch Spacing 2.1 n Horizontal Emittance 10 nm*rad Vertical Emittance 14 pm*rad Critical Energy 7.6 keV Energy Spread 0.097 Lifetime 12 hours @ 350 mA e- size (x,y) Dipole: 140, 14 µm rms Standard ID: 310, 8 µm rms Chicane ID: 300, 5 µm rms e- divergence (x,y) Dipole: 180, 2.9 µrad rms Standard ID: 33, 1.7 µrad rms Chicane ID: 34, 2.9 µrad rms Bunch Length 20 psec rms (6.0 mm rms) Straight sections for IDs (available ID length) 9 x 2.3 m 4 x 3.7 m 2 x 1.5 m (Chicane)

123

2012 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Publications 2 Publications Journal Papers L. A. Abriata, D. Alvarez-Paggi, G. N. Ledesma, N. J. Blackburn, A. J. Vila and D. H. Murgida, "Alternative Ground States Enable Pathway Switching in Biological Electron Transfer", Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17348 (2012) doi: 10.1073/pnas.1204251109 H. B. Akkerman, A. C. Chang, E. Verploegen, C. J. Bettinger, M. F. Toney and Z. Bao, "Fabrication of Organic Semiconductor Crystalline Thin Films and Crystals from Solution by Confined Crystallization", Org. Electron. 13, 235 (2012) doi: 10.1016/j.orgel.2011.11.005 A. E. Aleshin, R. G. DiScipio, B. Stec and R. C. Liddington, "Crystal Structure of C5b-6 Suggests Structural Basis for Priming Assembly of the Membrane Attack Complex", J. Biol. Chem. 287, 19642 (2012) doi:

124

The Research Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Research Program The Research Program What is the chemical and physical form of uranium in reduced aquifers? Uranium behavior in the Rifle, CO, aquifer. In order to directly interrogate the chemical and physical form of reduced uranium (U(IV)) in bioremediated sediments within the contaminated aquifer at the Rifle site, a novel technique was developed based on reactors installed in wells (center right). U(IV) was found to be bound to biomass (structural model shown in upper left-hand) within thin (microns) sulfide-rich coatings on mineral grains (bottom left). Uranium in its oxidized (U(VI)) form, is one of the most common, abundant, and problematic subsurface contaminants at legacy nuclear sites. In contrast, the tetravalent form of uranium (U(IV) ) is relatively insoluble

125

Staff Resources | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Staff Resources Staff Resources General Online Time and Effort System (online form) SSRL Weekly Reports Beam Line Coordination Minutes SLAC BIS Home Page SLAC only (forms, property purchasing, and more) Administrative Contacts SSRL General Phonelist SSRL Organizational Chart BL Ops Staff Support Website (VMS log in) Mailing List Management (SSRL only) - Login SLAC Budget Office SLAC only (petty cash info) SLAC Conference Rooms SLAC Staff Resources SLAC/SSRL Tours - contact SSRL Building Manager, Administration and SLAC Security. Requisitions & Property SLAC Shipper Request PeopleSoft Procurement Requisitions (training required) Offsite Property Use Form New Vendor Request Computing SLAC e-mail on the Web SLAC Unix password SSRL Computer Network Group SSRL Computing Help Request Form

126

SSRL Deadlines | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deadlines Deadlines Beam Time Requests - See How to Request Beam Time Due Dates X-ray / VUV (Submit in User Portal) November - February scheduling August 15 February - May scheduling November 15 May - July scheduling February 20 Macromolecular Crystallography (MC) (Submit in User Portal) November - February scheduling September 15 March - May scheduling January 22 June - July scheduling April 20 New Proposals & Extension Requests - See Proposal & Scheduling Guidelines Due Dates X-ray / VUV (Submit in User Portal) Beam time eligibility beginning in November June 1 Beam time eligibility beginning in February September 3 Beam time eligibility beginning in May December 1 Macromolecular Crystallography (Submit in User Portal) Beam time eligibility beginning November July 1

127

2005 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Publications 5 Publications Journal Papers E. C. Abresch, H. L. A. Axelrod, J. T. Beatty, J. A. Johnson, R. Nechushtai and M. L. Paddock, "Characterization of a Highly Purified, Fully Active, Crystallizable RC-LH1-PufX Core Complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides", Photosynth. Res. 86, 61 (2005) E. J. Adams, Y.-H. Chien and K. C. Garcia, "Structure of a gdT Cell Receptor in Complex with the Nonclassical MHC T22", Science 308, 5719 (2005) H. Adhikari, P. C. McIntyre, S. Sun, P. Pianetta and C. E. D. Chidsey, "Photoemission Studies of Passivation of Germanium Nanowires", Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 263109 (2005) M. Adler, J. Bryant, B. Buckman, I. Islam, B. Larsen, S. Finster, L. Kent, K. May, R. Mohan, S. Yuan and M. Whitlow, "Crystal Structures of

128

2010 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 Publications 10 Publications Journal Papers J. B. Aitken, E. A. Carter, H. Eastgate, M. J. Hackett, H. H. Harris, A. Levina, Y.-C. Lee, C.-l. Chen, B. Lai, S. Vogt and P. A. Lay, "Biomedical Applications of X-ray Absorption and Vibrational Spectroscopic Microscopies in Obtaining Structural Information from Complex Systems", Radiat. Phys. Chem. 79, 176 (2010) doi: 10.1016/j.radphyschem.2009.03.068 F. Aksoy, G. Akgul, Y. Ufuktepe and D. Nordlund, "Thickness Dependence of the L2,3 Branching Ratio of Cr Thin Films", J. Alloys Compd. 508, 233 (2010) doi: 10.1016/j.jallcom.2010.07.100 H. M. Alvarez, Y. Yue, C. D. Robinson, M. A. Canalizo-Hernández, R. A. Marvin, R. A. Kelly, A. Mondragón, J. E. Penner-Hahn and T. V. O'Halloran, "Tetrathiomolybdate Inhibits Copper Trafficking Proteins

129

Forms & Applications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forms & Applications Forms & Applications Forms: Before You Arrive User Information Log in to the User Portal to Register or Update Contact Informatioin Proposals Submit Proposals via User Portal (including Rapid Access and Letters of Intent) Proposal Extension Requests X-ray/VUV/SMB Macromolecular Crystallography (MC) User Agreements Non-Proprietary User Agreement Proprietary Research User Agreement Beam Time & Support Requests Log in to User Portal to Submit Beam Time or User Support Requests Computer Account X-ray/VUV/SMB Macromolecular Crystallography Use of SLAC Information Resources (submit with account request) User Financial Account User Financial Account Gas & Cryogenics Liquid Helium & Standard/Specialty Shipping & Receiving Hazardous Materials Shipper Non-Hazardous Materials Shipper

130

Experimental Equipment | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Equipment Equipment SSRL plans the distribution of its limited equipment on the basis of the information supplied on the Beam Time Request Form and the User Support Requirements Form. Please make sure to state all of your needs. Standard X-Ray Station Equipment Standard equipment to be found on an x-ray station includes: (1 ea.) Small and large ionization chambers (1) Exit slits (1) X-Y sample positioner (3) Keithly 427 current-to-voltage amplifier TEK 2215 60 MHZ 2 channel scope Voltage-to-frequency converter (3 channels) (1) Fluke high voltage power supply (1) Kinetic Systems hex scaler (1) Kinetic Systems up-down presettable counter (1) Ortec real-time clock (2) Joerger stepping motor controller DSP Micro VAX or Kinetic Systems G.I./CAMAC crate controller (1) Standard Engineering Corporation CAMAC power supply

131

Scientific Advisory Committee | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientific Advisory Committee Scientific Advisory Committee » SAC DOCUMENTS 2013 Role and Charter of the SSRL SAC Scope The SSRL Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) reports to and advises the SSRL Director on issues related to: Operation of SSRL as a scientific user facility Planning, construction and operation of new SSRL facilities Long-term scientific directions of SSRL Membership and Officers SAC consists of 12 external members, and representatives from the following SSRL committees serve on the SAC in an Ex Officio capacity Co-Chairs of the SSRL Proposal Review Panel (PRP) Chair of the Structural Molecular Biology Advisory Committee (SMBAC) Chair of the SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee (SSRLUOEC SAC members are appointed by the SSRL Director for 3-year terms, with one third of the members rotating off and being replaced every year

132

User Agreements | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agreements Agreements Institutional Agreements Required to Access DOE National User Facilities In recognition of the nation's expanding need to engage businesses and universities in the areas of commercial and basic science research, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed two special types of agreements for use at all DOE National Laboratories with approved designated user facilities, see http://www.gc.doe.gov/1002.htm. Non-Proprietary User Agreement (PDF) (General User Agreement; no cost for general users) Proprietary User Agreement (PDF) (For Confidential or Proprietary Research; also requires advance payment) A User Agreement is required for all users and must be executed by the appropriate institutional officer(s) at the user's institution. A single User Agreement covers all experimenters from that institution (User

133

User Financial Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Financial Accounts Financial Accounts Why Have a User Financial Account? Each user group should establish a user financial account to procure gases, chemicals, supplies or services to support your experiment at SLAC's user facilities and to send samples, dewars, or other equipment between SLAC and your institution. Establishing/Renewing a User Financial Account The most common method of establishing or renewing a user financial account is by providing a purchase order (PO) (or a letter from the financial officer of the user institution). The PO should be made to SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the amount of estimated expenditures (the suggested minimum is $1,000). The PO should include the expiration date, user names, funding agency, grant/contract number and whether expenditures

134

Emergency Exit Maps | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emergency Exit Maps SSRL Exit Maps Exit map 219 exit map trailer 274 exit map 450 trailers exit map trailer 271 exit map trailer 270 exit map trailer 294 exit maps 118 & 117 exit...

135

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics and Technology Development Workshop on Photocathode Experiments at the SLAC Gun Test Facililty Friday, December 3, 2010 A workshop was held on Friday, December 3, 2010...

136

SLAC Access Update | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have an appropriate visa before entering the US (for business purposes and not for tourism). * Bring identification to verify citizenship (US driver's license for US citizens,...

137

Computer Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accounts Each user group must have a computer account. Additionally, all persons using these accounts are responsible for understanding and complying with the terms outlined in the...

138

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of any merchandise shipped or consigned by or to the FPPI and to receive or ship any merchandise on the FPPI's behalf. I hereby certify that all statements and...

139

2014 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R. A. Mulvenna, J. L. Weidman, B. Jing, J. A. Pople, Y. Zhu, B. W. Boudouris and W. A. Phillip, "Tunable Nanoporous Membranes with Chemically-Tailored Pore Walls from Triblock...

140

Director's Office | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Director's Office Kelly Gaffney, SSRL Director Chi-Chang Kao, Associate Laboratory Director Kelly Gaffney, SSRL Director Email: Kelly Gaffney, SLAC Associate Laboratory Director...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Contact SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hill Road, MS 99 Menlo Park, CA 94025 Tel: 650-926-4000 Fax: 650-926-4100 SSRL Director Kelly Gaffney, SSRL Director Tel. 650-926-2382 Piero Pianetta, SSRL Deputy Director Tel:...

142

Foreign Users | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at Customs) Passport Legal Permanent Residents (LPR) (Also known as Permanent Resident Aliens, PRA's, andor "green card" holders) Or Conditional Permanent Residents (CPR)...

143

UF Access List | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NL Alaverdashvili Mariam 522740 010915-011215 011515-012015 3614 3614 U SASKATCHEWAN Albert Felicie 458988 072515-072915 LG84 LLNL Aleshin Alexander 280950 1128...

144

2011 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Uranium Chemical Species Electrodeposited for Alpha Spectrometry Sources", Rev. Mex. Fis. 57, 21 (2011) M. T. Burger, S. Pecchi, A. Wagman, Z.-J. Ni, M. Knapp, T. Hendrickson,...

145

SSRL Users' Organization | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

concerned with representing the interests of the SSRL users (see Charter). Users elect members to serve on the Users' Executive Committee (UEC) to carry out the business of...

146

Advisory Panels | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is broadly concerned with representing the interests of the SSRL user community. Users elect members to serve a formal organizational unit, the SSRL Users Executive Committee...

147

SSRL Imaging Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a wider range with full resolution. The incoming beam is focused using a capillary condenser, forming hollow cone illumination. It is capable of Zernike phase contrast at both...

148

SSRL Presents Series | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Presents Series Presents Series Date Seminar Title 11/20/2013 Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity 11/20/2013 Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity 10/24/2013 Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of Bimetallic Nanocatalysts by Fast Electrons 10/09/2013 New developments with SDD detectors 09/25/2013 X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the complex compounds 09/09/2013 Dopant Site Determination in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Utilizing X-ray Absorption Techniques 08/21/2013 Correlating Spatial Heterogeneities in Porosity and Permeability with Metal Poisoning within an Individual Catalyst Particle using X-ray Microscopy 08/12/2013 Lensless Imaging of Atomic Surface Structures via Ptychography 08/09/2013 The Best of Both Worlds: Bulk Diamond Properties Realized at the Nanoscale

149

2009 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

09 Publications 09 Publications Journal Papers J. Abendroth, A. C. Kreger and W. G. J. Hol, "The Dimer Formed by the Periplasmic Domain of EpsL from the Type 2 Secretion System of Vibrio parahaemolyticus", J. Struct. Biol. 168, 313 (2009) doi: 10.1016/j.jsb.2009.07.022 J. Abendroth, D. D. Mitchell, K. V. Korotkov, T. L. Johnson, A. Kreger, M. Sandkvist and W. G. J. Hol, "The Three-dimensional Structure of the Cytoplasmic Domains of EpsF from the Type 2 Secretion System of Vibrio cholerae", J. Struct. Biol. 166, 303 (2009) doi: 10.1016/j.jsb.2009.03.009 V. Aguilar-Guerrero, R. J. Lobo-Lapidus and B. C. Gates, "Genesis of a Cerium Oxide Supported Gold Catalyst for CO Oxidation: Transformation of Mononuclear Gold Complexes into Clusters as Characterized by X-ray

150

National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general description is given of the NSLS. Topics covered include: storage ring characteristics; experimental facilities; experimental research; general user proposals; expansion of the NSLS; and transportation to the facility. (GHT)

Klaffky, R.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A description of the upgraded beamline X25 at the NSLS, operated by the PXRR and the Photon Sciences Directorate serving the Macromolecular Crystallography community, is presented.

H?roux, A.

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Environmental Assessment for the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II (NSLS-II) BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK U. S. Department Of Energy Brookhaven Site Office September 2006 DOE/EA-1558 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PREFACE....................................................................................................................1 2.0 SUMMARY .................................................................................................................2 3.0 PURPOSE AND NEED ............................................................................................10 4.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES, INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION.....................................................................................................................11

153

Analysis of the optical design of the NSLS-II Coherent Hard X-ray beamline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the NSLS-II offer excellent opportunities for the development of experimental techniques exploiting x-ray coherence. Coherent light scattered by a heterogeneous sample produces a speckle pattern characteristic for the specific arrangement of the scatterers. This may vary over time, and the resultant intensity fluctuations can be measured and analyzed to provide information about the sample dynamics. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) extends the capability of dynamic light scattering to opaque and turbid samples and extends the measurements of time evolution to nanometer length scales. As a consequence XPCS became crucial in the study of dynamics in systems including, but not being limited to, colloids, polymers, complex fluids, surfaces and interfaces, phase ordering alloys, etc. In this paper we present the conceptual optical design and the theoretical performance of the Coherent Hard X-ray (CHX) beamline at NSLS-II, dedicated to XPCS and other coherent scattering techniques. For the optical design of this beamline, there is a tradeoff between the coherence needed to distinguish individual speckles and the phase acceptance (high intensity) required to measure fast dynamics with an adequate signal-to-noise level. As XPCS is a 'photon hungry' technique, the beamline optimization requires maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured intensity-intensity autocorrelation function. The degree of coherence, as measured by a two-slit (Young) experiment, is used to characterize the speckle pattern visibilities. The beamline optimization strategy consists of maximization of the on-sample intensity while keeping the degree of coherence within the 0.1-0.5 range. The resulted design deviates substantially from an ad-hoc modification of a hard x-ray beamline for XPCS measurements. The CHX beamline will permit studies of complex systems and measurements of bulk dynamics down to the microsecond time scales. In general, the 10-fold increase in brightness of the NSLS-II, compared to other sources, will allow for measurements of dynamics on time-scales that are two orders of magnitude faster than what is currently possible. We also conclude that the common approximations used in evaluating the transverse coherence length would not be sufficiently accurate for the calculation of the coherent properties of an undulator-based beamline, and a thorough beamline optimization at a low-emittance source such as the NSLS-II requires a realistic wave-front propagation analysis.

Fluerasu A.; Chubar, O.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Baltser, J.; Wiegart, Lutz; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Carlucci-Dayton, M.; Berman, L.

2011-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

154

BNL | CFN Strategic Plan | NSLS-II Synergy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

expertise accumulated through the years at BNL by the Relativistic High Ion Collider facility and the ATLAS project in high-energy physics. The CFN and NSLS-II will be the...

155

Achieving Stability Requirements for Nanoprobe and Long Beam Lines at NSLS II. A Comprehensive Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Driven by beam stability requirements at the NSLS II synchrotron, such that the desired small beam sizes and high brightness are both realized and stable, a comprehensive study has been launched seeking to provide assurances that stability at the nanometer level at critical x-ray beam-lines, is achievable, given the natural and cultural vibration environment at the selected site. The study consists of (a) an extensive investigation of the site to evaluate the existing ground vibration, in terms of amplitude, frequency content and coherence, and (b) of a numerical study of wave propagation and interaction with the infrastructure of the sensitive lines. The paper presents results from both aspects of the study.

Simos,N.; Fallier, M.; Hill, J.; Berman, L.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Broadbent, A.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

156

NSLS Services | Repair & Equipment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Repair & Equipment Services Repair & Equipment Services Cleaning Facility (BNL Central Shops) Solvent cleaning of vacuum parts and leak checking service is also available. Work is billed to each user via a BNL ILR. Contact the NSLS Building Manager to arrange for any of these services. Electronics Repair Limited repairs for electronic equipment are available from an outside contractor through the Control Room. Contact Control Room Supervisor Randy Church (x2550 or x2736, pager 5310). Shipping memos are filled out on the web, and pick ups are on Fridays. Come to the Control Room for assistance. The user should call the contractor on the day before scheduled pickups to alert the contractor of the pickup. Items to be repaired should be left in the Control Room with the completed shipping memo. Costs are charged to the

157

Stanford London 2005 Slide 1 Technology Entrepreneurship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford London 2005 Slide 1 Technology Entrepreneurship: A Personal Top 10 List Stanford Club;Stanford London 2005 Slide 2 "Don't Hate Me `Cause I'm a Weenie!" Then... Now... #12;Stanford London 2005 Slide 3 A Stanford University Legacy #12;Stanford London 2005 Slide 4 Stanford and Silicon Valley

Prinz, Friedrich B.

158

Application of synchrotron radiation to x-ray fluorescence analysis of trace elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of synchrotron radiation x-ray sources has provided the means to greatly extend the capabilities of x-ray fluorescence analysis for determinations of trace element concentrations. A brief description of synchrotron radiation properties provides a background for a discussion of the improved detection limits compared to existing x-ray fluorescence techniques. Calculated detection limits for x-ray microprobes with micrometer spatial resolutions are described and compared with experimental results beginning to appear from a number of laboratories. The current activities and future plans for a dedicated x-ray microprobe beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented.

Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD February 1 9 8 5 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department

Stanford University

160

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL QUARTERLY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT OCTOBER 1 ­ DECEMBER 31, 1996 #12;1 1 AN EXPERIMENTAL that in the vertical case. 1.2 INTRODUCTION The process of boiling in porous media is of significance in geothermal

Stanford University

162

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL QUARTERLY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT JANUARY 1 - MARCH 31, 1997 #12;2 1 AN EXPERIMENTAL in geothermal systems as well as in many other applications such as porous heat pipes, drying and nuclear waste

Stanford University

163

Requirements and guidelines for NSLS experimental beam line vacuum systems: Revision A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Requirements are provided for NSLS beam line front ends and vacuum interlocks. Guidelines are provided for UHV beam line vacuum systems, including materials, vacuum hardware (pumps, valves, and flanges), acoustic delay lines and beam line fast valves, instrumentation, fabrication and testing, and the NSLS cleaning facility. Also discussed are the design review for experimenters' equipment that would be connected to the NSLS and acceptance tests for any beam line to be connected with the ring vacuum. Also appended are a description of the acoustic delay line as well as the NSLS vacuum standards and NSLS procedures. (LEW)

Foerster, C.; Halama, H.; Thomlinson, W.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

NSLS prototype small-gap undulator (PSGU)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NSLS Prototype Small-Gap Undulator (PSGU) will serve as a tool to study lifetime degradation and the onset of beam instabilities as the beam duct aperture is decreased. The device will consist of variable-gap vacuum vessel had a permanent magnet undulator, with independent magnet-gap control. The vacuum vessel design attempts to minimize both residual gas pressures and beam impedances. The undulator will be 320 mm long and utilizes a pure-permanent-magnet structure with 6 blocks per 16 mm period. For a nominal operating aperture of 4 mm, PSGU will produce a peak brightness in the fundamental and third harmonic of 7 {times} 10{sup 16} and 1 {times} 10{sup 16} photons{sm bullet}sec{sup {minus}1}{sm bullet}mrad{sup {minus}2}mm{sup {minus}2}{sm bullet}(0.1% BW){sup {minus}1} at photon energies of 2.5 keV and 7.5 keV, respectively. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Stefan, P.M.; Solomon, L.; Krinsky, S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Rakowsky, G. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop General overview of Geothermal...

166

Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- Geothermal Technologies Office Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office Presentation by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford...

167

HEAR2T and the Stanford Heart Network Stanford's Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intervention pro- gram could reduce the incidence of cardiac events (heart attack, bypass, etc.) by 40 their cardiovascular health and take action to reduce their risk for a heart attack or stroke. The Stanford HEART modelHEAR2T and the Stanford Heart Network Stanford's Approach SPRCHeart Healthy Communities (continued

Ford, James

168

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy since 1975. research i n geothermal r e s e r v o i r engineering techniques t h a t w iSTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD,CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-5 1 GEOTHERMAL Implications of Adsorption and Formation Fluid Composition on Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation . . 40 TASK 5

Stanford University

169

National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS.

Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Design of NSLS-II High Order Multipole Correctors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Feasibility studies for two families of corrector magnets for NSLS-II are presented. The first family of magnets are generalizations of figure eight quadrupoles using rotationally symmetric breaks in the return yoke to fit in available space. Properties specific to figure eight magnet are identified. The second type of magnet is a combined sextupole/dipole trim.

Rehak,M.; Danby, G.; Bengtsson, Jo; Jackson, J.; Skaritka, J.; Spataro, C.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

171

An adaptive crystal bender for high power synchrotron radiation beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perfect crystal monochromators cannot diffract x-rays efficiently, nor transmit the high source brightness available at synchrotron radiation facilities, unless surface strains within the beam footprint are maintained within a few arcseconds. Insertion devices at existing synchrotron sources already produce x-ray power density levels that can induce surface slope errors of several arcseconds on silicon monochromator crystals at room temperature, no matter how well the crystal is cooled. The power density levels that will be produced by insertion devices at the third-generation sources will be as much as a factor of 100 higher still. One method of restoring ideal x-ray diffraction behavior, while coping with high power levels, involves adaptive compensation of the induced thermal strain field. The design and performance, using the X25 hybrid wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), of a silicon crystal bender constructed for this purpose are described.

Berman, L.E.; Hastings, J.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

An adaptive crystal bender for high power synchrotron radiation beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perfect crystal monochromators cannot diffract x-rays efficiently, nor transmit the high source brightness available at synchrotron radiation facilities, unless surface strains within the beam footprint are maintained within a few arcseconds. Insertion devices at existing synchrotron sources already produce x-ray power density levels that can induce surface slope errors of several arcseconds on silicon monochromator crystals at room temperature, no matter how well the crystal is cooled. The power density levels that will be produced by insertion devices at the third-generation sources will be as much as a factor of 100 higher still. One method of restoring ideal x-ray diffraction behavior, while coping with high power levels, involves adaptive compensation of the induced thermal strain field. The design and performance, using the X25 hybrid wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), of a silicon crystal bender constructed for this purpose are described.

Berman, L.E.; Hastings, J.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences Stanford University Stanford, California A LABORATORY MODEL OF STWLATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS by A. Hunsbedt P. Kruger created by artificial stimulation of geothermal reservoirs has been con- structed. The model has been used

Stanford University

174

National Synchrotron Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Document Index Document Index A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Assessment Tracking System (ATS) Institutional ATS NSLS Family ATS NSLS Family ATS Instructions B Beamline Safety Review Beamline Safety Checklist C Calibration Calibration procedure NSLS Controlled Measuring Test Equipment Calibration List Caution Tags Coaxial cables & connectors Conduct of Operations Manual Cryogenic safety Cryogenic Liquids: Storage, Usage and Handling D Design (see engineering design) Document Control drawings (also refer to Engineer Design) procedures, & policies Approving, Distributing; List of NSLS Active Controlled Documents Periodic Review; Preparing; Reviewing; specification (distribution) specification (preparation) Document list - Active Controlled Documents

175

PHILOSOPHY FOR NSLS-II DESIGN WITH SUB-NANOMETER HORIZONTAL EMITTANCE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NSLS-II at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a new third-generation storage ring light source, whose construction is on the verge of being approved by DOE. When completed, NSLS-II with its ability to provide users with a wide range of spectrum, ranging from IR to ultra-high brightness hard x-ray beams will replace the existing two (20+ years old) NSLS light sources. While presenting an overview of the NSLS-II accelerator system, this paper focuses on the strategy and development of a novel <1 nm emittance light source.

OZAKI,S.; BENGTSSON, J.; KRAMER, S.L.; KRINSKY, S.; LITVINENKO, V.N.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since last year, we have had three 3-week blocks of beamtime, in April and November 1991 and February 1992, on the Ames/Montana beamline at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). These runs continued our program on high temperature superconductors, heavy Fermion and related uranium and rare earth materials, and started some work on transition metal oxides. We have also had beamtime at the Brookhaven NSLS, 5 days of beamtime on the Dragon monochromator, beamline U4B, studying resonant photoemission of transition metal oxides using photon energies around the transition metal 2p edges. Data from past runs has been analyzed, and in some cases combined with photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) data taken in the home U-M lab. 1 fig.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

StanfordStanfordStanfordStanford PhysicsPhysicsPhysicsPhysics Graduate Student HandbookGraduate Student HandbookGraduate Student HandbookGraduate Student Handbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

StanfordStanfordStanfordStanford PhysicsPhysicsPhysicsPhysics Graduate Student Handbook----2012201220122012 Comics courtesy of http://www.xkcd.com/ #12;Stanford Physics Department Graduate Student Handbook 2011 Physics Department Graduate Student Handbook 2011-2012 9/19/2011 3 of 29 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page

Wechsler, Risa H.

178

1500 MHZ Passive SRF Cavity for Bunch Lengthening in the NSLS-II Storage Ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3 GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. Ion clearing gaps are required to suppress ion effects on the beam. The natural bunch length of 3mm is planned to be lengthened by means of a third harmonic cavity in order to increase the Touschek limited lifetime. After an extensive investigation of different cavity geometries, a passive, superconducting two-cell cavity has been selected for prototyping. The cavity is HOM damped with ferrite absorbers on the beam pipes. The two-cell cavity simplifies the tuner design, compared to having two independent cells. Tradeoffs between the damping of the higher order modes, thermal isolation associated with the large beam tubes, and overall cavity length are described. A copper prototype has been constructed, and measurements of fundamental and higher order modes will be compared to calculated values.

Yanagisawa,T.; Rose, J.; Grimm, T.; Bogle, A.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

179

Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in user friendly'' aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year the full 242 operational days were utilized. Beam line test and evaluation consumed 21 days with eight MATRIX groups combining to use 170 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and three groups were provided 51 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1990 the MATRIX group published nine articles. To data for 1991 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation twelve articles. Among the milestones achieved last year on MATRIX member obtained the first data from a new ultra high vacuum chamber with low temperature capability. This is a unique capability at NSLS. Another member demonstrated grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering capability for kinetic studies of film growth.

Liedl, G.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in ``user friendly`` aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year the full 242 operational days were utilized. Beam line test and evaluation consumed 21 days with eight MATRIX groups combining to use 170 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and three groups were provided 51 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1990 the MATRIX group published nine articles. To data for 1991 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation twelve articles. Among the milestones achieved last year on MATRIX member obtained the first data from a new ultra high vacuum chamber with low temperature capability. This is a unique capability at NSLS. Another member demonstrated grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering capability for kinetic studies of film growth.

Liedl, G.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Chapter 13: Conventional Facilities 13-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and operation Sustainable design Section of the Ring Building available for accelerator installation by July-II Conceptual Design Report Brookhaven National Laboratory Table 13.1.1 NSLS-II Gross Area. Building Component: Conventional Facilities 13-5 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report 13.2 SITE ANALYSIS 13.2.1 Building Site

Ohta, Shigemi

182

Stanford University Engineering Informatics Group (http://eil.stanford.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineering Web Services David Liu Department of Electrical Engineering Jim Cheng Department of Civil Engineering Service and Integration Mediators (Content and Access) Information Exchange (DBMS, PSL, IFC, XML) Service Integration (FICAS) Engineering Application Services #12;Stanford UniversityStanford University66

Stanford University

183

SERVER DEVELOPMENT FOR NSLS-II PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. The server software under development is available via an open source sourceforge project named epics-pvdata, which consists of modules pvData, pvAccess, pvIOC, and pvService. Examples of two services that already exist in the pvService module are itemFinder, and gather. Each service uses pvData to store in-memory transient data, pvService to transfer data over the network, and pvIOC as the service engine. The performance benchmarking for pvAccess and both gather service and item finder service are presented in this paper. The performance comparison between pvAccess and Channel Access are presented also. For an ultra low emittance synchrotron radiation light source like NSLS II, the control system requirements, especially for beam control are tight. To control and manipulate the beam effectively, a use case study has been performed to satisfy the requirement and theoretical evaluation has been performed. The analysis shows that model based control is indispensable for beam commissioning and routine operation. However, there are many challenges such as how to re-use a design model for on-line model based control, and how to combine the numerical methods for modeling of a realistic lattice with the analytical techniques for analysis of its properties. To satisfy the requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture for the software framework for beam commissioning and operation is critical. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating and plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology, and client interface is undergoing. The design and implementation adopted a new EPICS implementation, namely epics-pvdata [9], which is under active development. The implementation of this project under Java is close to stable, and binding to other language such as C++ and/or Python is undergoing. In this paper, we focus on the performance benchmarking and comparison for pvAccess and Channel Access, the performance evaluation for 2 services, gather and item finder respectively.

Shen, G.; Kraimer, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

184

NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

185

Opportunities in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation Tuesday 10/8/02 Chair: Lars Pettersson 1:30-1:40 Anders Nilsson Welcome 1:40-2:30 Gabor Somorjai University of California, Berkeley and LBLN Need for New Directions of Research at the Frontiers of Catalysis Science 2:30-3:00 Geoff Thornton University of Manchester Influence of defects on the reactivity of ZnO 3:00-3:30 Anders Nilsson Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Surfaces and Reactions 3:30-3:45 Break Chair: Anders Nilsson 3:45-4:15 Lars Pettersson Stockholm University Adsorbate-Substrate Bonding: An Experimental and Theoretical MO Picture 4:15-4:45 Miquel Salmeron Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Photoelectron Spectroscopy studies of surfaces in high pressure gas

186

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Science STANFORD staff who have helped me finish this project. Financial support was provided by the Geothermal

Stanford University

187

Stanford Geothermal Workshop 2012 Annual Meeting | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2012 Annual Meeting Stanford Geothermal Workshop 2012 Annual Meeting Presentation slides for the Stanford Geothermal Workshop Annual Meeting presentation by Doug Hollett,...

188

Independent Oversight Inspection, Stanford Linear Accelerator...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - January 2007 January 2007 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center This report...

189

FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A. [Spectra-Tech, Inc., Shelton, CT (United States); Williams, G.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy under grant number DE-FG07-95ID13370 Stanford Geothermal Program Department of PetroleumStanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1996 - June 1999 Funded by the U.S. Department ....................................................................................................................6 2. THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

Stanford University

191

Data Management at SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management at SSRL Management at SSRL SSRL Users are responsible for meeting the Data Management obligations of their home institutions and granting agencies. In general, SSRL provides data acquisition systems (computers/software) and short term data storage on all of its beam lines. The beam line computers are connected to central servers via a high speed network, and data are transferred to these servers for backup and short-term storage. SSRL does not provide long term storage or archiving of data; users must generally transfer their data to their home institutions over the network or to their own portable storage devices. Individual beam lines may have specific resources and data management practices to help users meet their data management needs and obligations. Users should consult beam line staff when formulating data management plans

192

How to Request & Access Beam Time | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How to Request & Access Beam Time How to Request & Access Beam Time Step 1: Submit a proposal that summarizes proposed research plans. Step 2: Submit beam time requests. Step 3: Review & accept beam time allocations. Instructions for users allocated beam time on SSRL X-ray/VUV beam lines. Accept Beam Time & Submit Support Request Registration & Assistance User Agreements User Financial Accounts, Supplies, Gases, Domestic & International Shipments User Computer Accounts User Safety Preparing for Arrival/Lodging/Check-In Acknowledgements, Publications, Science Highlights & News Feedback Step 1: Submit a proposal that summarizes proposed research plans. Review the guidelines for proposals and scheduling procedures. Standard proposals can be submitted through the user portal three times each year:

193

Phone Numbers for Beam Lines and Other Services | Stanford Synchrotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Phone Numbers for Beam Lines and Other Services Phone Numbers for Beam Lines and Other Services The local area code for SSRL is 650. All numbers listed below should be dialed as 650-926-xxxx from other area codes. When calling an onsite location from within SSRL simply dial the 4-digit extension. When calling an offsite number within the 650 area code dial, dial 9 plus the 7-digit number. To call a number in another area code dial 9-1-area code - phone number. Beam Lines Beam Line Extension 1-4 5214 1-5 5215 2-1 5221 2-2 5222 2-3 5223 3-3 5233 3-4 5234 4-1 5241 4-2 5242 4-3 5243 5-2 5252 5-3 5253 5-4 5254 6-2 5262 7-1 5271 7-2 5272 7-3 5273 8-1 5281 8-2 5282 9-1 5291 9-2 5292 9-3 5293 10-1 5101 10-2 5102 11-1 8648 11-2 8650 11-3 8656 12-2 5212 13-1 5131 13-2 5132 13-3 5133 User Labs/Services Building Lab/Service Extension

194

BL1-4 Cheat Sheet | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BL1-4 Cheat Sheet BL1-4 Cheat Sheet Last updated 30 April 2012 This is a guide to help you operate SAXS Beamline 1-4 a beamline primarily dedicated to the SAXS Materials Science technique. Computer Control of Beamline 1-4 MARCCD PC runs on a LINUX OS. MARCCD runs the Mar (Rayonix) detector acquisition software, also called marccd (invoked with the command "marccd"). The Rayonix software is extremely unstable and bug-ridden and will crash even if simple interactions are attempted (e.g. inverting the intensity output display). Best to leave this PC well alone. The good news is that the functions that are necessary for data collection are all stable and can all be invoked remotely from BL14LX. MARCCD has been taken off the network so it is not perturbed by crosstalk.

195

Shining Light on Catalysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shining Light on Catalysis Shining Light on Catalysis Tuesday, July 19, 2011 - 4:38pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Jeroen A. van Bokhoven, Professor for Heterogeneous Catalysis Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering ETH Zurich Head of Laboratory for Catalysis and Sustainable Chemistry (LSK) Swiss Light Source Paul Scherrer Institute Understanding a functioning catalyst requires understanding at the atomic scales in a time-resolved manner. X-rays can be readily used to accomplish that task, because of the large penetration depth of hard X-rays, in situ or operando experiments are possible. In addition, complementary techniques, such as the vibrational spectroscopies can be simultaneously applied. Recent development in instrumentation to perform quick EXAFS and secondary emission spectroscopy has provided exciting new opportunities to

196

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed | Stanford Synchrotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Wednesday, November 27, 2013 The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix (much as water percolates through porous rock, or even coffee grinds) has been proposed as a possible model for core formation (Figure 1). Many previous experimental results have ruled out percolation as a major core formation mechanism for Earth at the relatively lower pressure conditions in the upper mantle, but until now experimental

197

SSRL Beam Lines by Number | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Number Number SSRL Beam Line Map | Beam Lines by Techniques | SPEAR3 Parameters BL Type Source Supported Technique(s) Energy Range Status Contacts 1-4 X-ray Bend Small angle x-ray scattering 7100-9000 eV Limited Chris Tassone Mike Toney 1-5 X-ray Bend Thin film diffraction 6000-14500 eV Limited Chad Miller 2-1 X-ray Bend Powder diffraction Thin film diffraction 4000-15800 eV Open Chad Miller Apurva Mehta 2-2 X-ray Bend White light station Instrumentation Development 1000-40000 eV Limited Bart Johnson 2-3 X-ray Bend X-ray absorption spectroscopy imaging 4500-24000 eV Open Sam Webb Ben Kocar 4-1 X-ray Wiggler X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy 6500-30000 eV Open John Bargar Matthew Latimer Ryan Davis 4-2 X-ray Wiggler Biological solution small angle x-ray scattering

198

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, BL6-2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory TXM Overview | TXM Imaging | Researchers | Publications TXM SRL null Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy Capabilities The transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) on beam line 6-2c at SSRL is capable of 2D imaging and tomography of many materials including biological and environmental samples, and complex hierarchical systems such as fuel cells and battery electrodes, with chemical information, at 30 nm resolution. The field of view (FOV) is 30 microns, but samples can be raster scanned to increase the FOV while maintaining the same resolution. Because the microscope is equipped with optics that can be used from ~5 to 14 keV, it is useful for characterizing metal distribution and chemical states by imaging at X-ray absorption edges for many metals involved in energy materials. 3D elemental mapping is accomplished via acquisition of tomography above and below the X-ray absorption edge. 2D mapping of chemical states is accomplished with XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) imaging, in which many images are acquired along the X-ray absorption edge of a metal, and constructed spectra can be compared to those for model compounds of known structure. It is also possible to acquire 3D XANES tomography, in which chemical states can be mapped in 3D.

199

SSRL Beam Lines by Technique | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technique Technique SSRL Beam Line Map | Beam Lines by Number | SPEAR3 Parameters Supported Technique(s) Beam Line X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Biological x-ray absorption spectroscopy 4-3, 7-3, 9-3, 14-3 Materials / catalysis / chemistry x-ray absorption spectroscopy 4-1, 4-3, 11-2, 14-3 MEIS x-ray absorption spectroscopy 4-1, 4-3, 11-2, 14-3 X-ray absorption spectroscopy imaging 2-3, 6-2a, 10-2a,14-3 Single crystal x-ray absorption spectroscopy 9-3 Grazing incidence x-ray absorption spectroscopy 11-2 Tender x-ray absorption spectroscopy 4-3, 14-3 Tender x-ray absorption spectroscopy imaging 14-3 Photoemission spectroscopy 8-1a, 8-1b, 8-2, 10-1, 13-2 X-ray absorption spectroscopy, near edge, soft energy 8-2, 10-1, 13-2 Elliptic polarization, soft energy photoemission spectroscopy 13-2

200

SSRL Experimental Run Schedule | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experimental Run Schedule Experimental Run Schedule SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be closed for the winter holidays, December 21, 2013 through January 5, 2014. SSRL generally operates November through August, using the shutdown period for upgrades and maintenance projects. SSRL operates at 500mA and employs a frequent fill schedule to maintain the SPEAR3 current approximately constant. Automatic injections will be conducted every 5 minutes. Automatic injections will only occur at the designated 5 minute intervals (i.e., on the hour and every 5 minutes thereafter). If the injector is not functional at the designated fill time, then the fill will be skipped. The current will be replenished at the next scheduled fill time after the injector is repaired and normal injection intervals will resume. The operator will give

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Water an Unusual Liquid; LCLS Provides New Insights | Stanford Synchrotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water an Unusual Liquid; LCLS Provides New Insights Water an Unusual Liquid; LCLS Provides New Insights Wednesday, November 13, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Anders Nilsson, SUNCAT The anomalous physical properties of water are responsible for sustaining much of life on earth; for example, water displays a higher heat capacity than common liquids and expands upon freezing. Some of these anomalous physical properties become dramatically enhanced upon supercooling below the freezing point. In particular, extrapolations of the thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal compressibility, heat capacity and correlation length can all be fitted with a power law divergence with the same apparent singularity temperature of about 228 K. Experiments on pure bulk water below about ~240 K have so far been difficult: water crystallization occurs

202

SSRL Safety Guidelines & Resources | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safety Guidelines & Resources Safety Guidelines & Resources The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) is committed to conducting research in a manner that ensures protection of the workers, the public and the environment, and it is a direct and individual responsibility of all BES managers and BES supported researchers and their staff. Funds provided by BES for research will be applied as necessary to ensure that all BES research activities are conducted safely and in an environmentally conscientious manner. Only research conducted in this way will be supported. Safety and Security Overview Each person who works at SSRL is required to be familiar with and identify in advance the hazards associated with his/her work, the hazards associated with work areas, and to properly implement all necessary procedures and

203

While You Are Here | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

While You Are Here While You Are Here To Enter the Site After Hours You Must Have a Picture I.D and Your Safety Training Must Be Current. You should plan to arrive at SSRL between 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Holidays. A knowledgeable person from your group should be available for consultation by the SSRL staff readying the beam line for your group the morning you are scheduled to go on line. A Safety Checklist (SCL) must be completed by the Operations staff before your experiment will be put on line. This cannot be done if your spokesperson has not signed the Safety Review Summary form (see Section 2, Safety Review of Scheduled Experiments). If you arrive after hours and are listed on the User Support Form you will be allowed entry after providing proof of identification (usually a drivers

204

Integrated Safety & Environmental Management System | Stanford Synchrotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Safety & Environmental Management System Integrated Safety & Environmental Management System How do you plan for SAFETY in your job? In an effort to provide a formal and organized process to manage all aspects of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) issues at its laboratories, the DOE developed the Integrated Safety and Environmental Management System (ISEMS). In short, it's a process that allows people (such as staff and Users) at all levels to plan, perform, assess and improve their implementation of ES&H at work. The system puts the responsibility for safety on each person. Fundamental to the process are the Guiding Principles that can be viewed as "best management practices" or "how we do business", which are the policies that integrate ISMS at all levels; the Core Functions, which provide the

205

SSRL End of Run Party - 2014 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Party - 2014 August 8, 2014 (Friday) starts at 4:00PM Location - SLAC's Arrillaga Recreation Center Field, Bldg. 55. Please RSVP for Non-SLAC Employees (Your Guests). We must...

206

Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries | Stanford Synchrotron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Li-ion Batteries Monday, February 13, 2012 - 1:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Stephen J. Harris, General Motors R&D While battery performance is well predicted by the...

207

Experimental Station 13-3 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(limited angle chiphi angle) Janis Liq-He cryostat Detector: Hamamatsu GaAsP photodiode, SJUTS channeltron - CXI - in vacuum x,y,z sample translator Janis Liq-He cryostat...

208

Experimental Station 4-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Detectors: Rayonix MX225HE, Dectris Pilatus 300k (for fast TR-SAXS), photodiode for transmitted intensity, APD for incident intensity, Vortex detector Slits:...

209

Experimental Station 13-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with a STXM microscope that provides 30 nm spatial resolution and a fast Avalanche photodiode that allows for time resolved pump probe experiments with 50 ps temporal resolution....

210

Experimental Station 14-3a | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsourc...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BL14-3 is the only beamline at SSRL capable of obtaining spectroscopy data at the phosphorous edge. In this configuration the beam is unfocused over a size of 1 mm x 6 mm to...

211

SSRLUO 2013-2014 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

months has used SSRL to determine structures of molecular machines involved in protein folding. His research focuses on the mechanisms discriminating alternative nascent...

212

New Glass Vial Procedure | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

use. The rubber septa may become brittle at low temperatures, thus compromising the air-tight seal. If it becomes necessary to transport samples in crimp vials at low...

213

SLAC Science Focus Area | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

along active river margins as a result of alluvial channel migration and overbank flood events. We predict that NRZs are common in floodplains throughout the upper Colorado...

214

Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity Wednesday, November 20, 2013 - 2:00pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Pablo Esquinazi, University of Leipzig We review different experimental results that indicate the existence of granular superconductivity at high temperatures at graphite interfaces. In particular we will discuss the following experimental results: The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the electrical resistance of bulk and thin graphite samples and its relation with the existence of two-dimensional (2D) interfaces. The anomalous hysteresis in the magnetoresistance observed in graphite thin samples as well as its enhancement restricting the current path within the sample. The Josephson behavior of the current-voltage characteristics with

215

Stanford Social Innovation Review 518 Memorial Way, Stanford, CA 94305-5015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Social Innovation Review 518 Memorial Way, Stanford, CA 94305-5015 Ph: 650-725-5399. Fax Stanford Social Innovation Review Spring 2009 Copyright © 2009 by Leland Stanford Jr. University All Rights Reserved #12;40 STANFORD SOCIAL INNOVATION REVIEW · Spring 2009 ( ) On April 22, 1990,an estimated 200

Hoffman, Andrew J.

216

STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center 450 that the new Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center opened on January 6, 2014. This new state previously received infusion treatments in the Infusion Treatment Area (ITA) at the Stanford Cancer Center

Bejerano, Gill

217

Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD Stanford University Lucile Radiology LPCH Thank you Par Lab Briefer, lighter, safer anesthesia for pediatric MRI #12; practice #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH Current Solution INVASIVE LIMITS ACCESS

California at Berkeley, University of

218

. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR- 80 DEPLETION MODELING OF LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS BY Gudmund 01sen June 1984 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under

Stanford University

219

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORTI UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR-85 ANALYSIS OF THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR MODEL EXPERIMENTS

Stanford University

220

Insertion Devices for NSLS-II Baseline and Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NSLS-II is going to employ Damping Wigglers (DWs) not only for emittance reduction but also as broad band hard X-ray source. In-Vacuum Undulators (IVUs) with the minimum RMS phase error (< 2 degree) and possible cryo-capability are planned for X-ray planar device. Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) are envisioned for polarization controls. Due to the lack of hard X-ray flux from weak dipole magnet field (0.4 Tesla), three pole wigglers (3PWs) of the peak field over 1 Tesla will be mainly used by NSLS bending magnet beam line users. Magnetic designs and kick maps for dynamic aperture surveys were created using the latest version of Radia [1] for Mathematica 6 which we supported the development. There are other devices planned for the later stage of the project, such as quasi-periodic EPU, superconducting wiggler/undulator, and Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU) with Praseodymium Iron Boron (PrFeB) magnets and textured Dysprosium poles. For R&D, Hybrid PrFeB arrays were planned to be assembled and field-measured at room temperature, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperature using our vertical test facility. We have also developed a specialized power supply for pulsed wire measurement.

Tanabe,T.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in ``user friendly`` aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year all 232 operational days were fully utilized. Beam line tests coupled with MATRIX members combined to use 284 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and four groups were provided 48 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1992 the MATRIX group published six articles. To date, for 1993 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation nine articles. Recent research milestones include: the first quantitative structural information on the as-quenched and early stages of decomposition of supersaturated Al-Li alloys; the first quantitative diffuse scattering measurements on a complex system (Co substitute for Cu YBCO superconductor); demonstration of capabilities of a new UHV surface diffraction chamber with in-situ characterization and temperature control (30-1300K); feasibility of phasing structure factors in a quasicrystal using multiple Bragg scattering.

Liedl, G.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

DOE Solar Decathlon: Stanford University  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stanford University Stanford University Start.Home solardecathlon.stanford.edu For the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013, Stanford University designed the Start.Home to provide energy efficiency at the push of a button to a new generation of environmentally conscious occupants. With modular architecture and advanced controls to optimize each component, the house aims to spark a revolution by lowering the entry barrier for an ultra-efficient house and making sustainability trendy, social, and affordable. Design Philosophy The Start.Home is built on a simple, three-by-three modular grid and integrates core, public, and private modules as well as multiple technologies to optimize value and energy efficiency. These spaces can be added or subtracted to allow the house to grow with the family by filling

223

STANFORD UNIVERSITY MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20062007 Mechanical Engineering Student Services Building 530, Room 125 (650) 7257695 FAX (650) 7234882STANFORD UNIVERSITY MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Academic Year Revised 9/06 #12;MECHANICAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK 20062007 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Clickable

Prinz, Friedrich B.

224

NSLS IN-VACUUM UNDULATORS AND MINI-BETA STRAIGHTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the work carried out in the X13 R&D Straight Section of the NSLS X-Ray Ring on small gap in-vacuum undulators (IVUNs). Then we discuss: (1) plans to replace the pure permanent magnet undulator in X13 by a hybrid design providing stronger magnetic fields, enhancing the tunability of the device; (2) plans to install hybrid IVUNs in the two RF straights of the X-Ray Ring, increasing the number of insertion devices in the XRay Ring to eight; (3) the possibility of reducing the vertical beta function in the X13 straight from 0.33 m down to 0.16 m. This reduction in beta function would allow us to decrease the usable undulator gap from 3mm down to 2mm, further increasing the tuning range.

RAKOWSKY,G.; LYNCH,D.; BLUM,E.B.; KRINSKY,S.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

225

Stanford Social Innovation Review 518 Memorial Way, Stanford, CA 94305-5015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Social Innovation Review 518 Memorial Way, Stanford, CA 94305-5015 Ph: 650-725-5399. Fax: 650-723-0516 Email: info@ssireview.com, www.ssireview.com Design Thinking for Social Innovation By Tim Brown & Jocelyn Wyatt Stanford Social Innovation Review Winter 2010 Copyright 2007 by Leland Stanford Jr

Ramanujam, Nimmi

226

National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

Gmuer, N.F. [ed.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Stanford Geothermal Workshop- Geothermal Technologies Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford Geothermal Workshop on February 11-13, 2013.

228

Stanford University Committee on Health and Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to ensuring safety is a consideration in what is done in all activities at Stanford (Safety Culture) #12Stanford University Committee on Health and Safety 2011 Public Meeting June 27, 2010 5:00-6:30 Stanford Environmental Safety Facility #12;University Committee on Health & Safety June 27, 2011 Public

229

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Science STANFORD the Stanford Geothermal Program, Department of Energy contract DE-AT03-80SFl1459 for their financial report Geothermal Program, Department of Energy contract DE-AT03-80SF11459 for their financial report. Also we would

Stanford University

230

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the Departnent Geothermal Energy Extraction Scheme .............................................. 2 3.1 Experimental SetupStanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD

Stanford University

231

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the DepartmentStanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR-81 TRACER TEST ANALYSIS OF THE KLAMATH FALLS GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE

Stanford University

232

Optimization of a coherent soft x-ray beamline for coherent scattering experiments at NSLS-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coherent soft x-ray and full polarization control (CSX) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source - II (NSLS-II) will deliver 1013 coherent photons per second in the energy range of 0.2-2 keV with a resolving power of 2000. The source, a dual elliptically polarizing undulator (EPU), and beamline optics should be optimized to deliver the highest possible coherent flux in a 10-30 {micro}m spot for use in coherent scattering experiments. Using the computer code Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW), we simulate the photon source and focusing optics in order to investigate the conditions which provide the highest usable coherent intensity on the sample. In particular, we find that an intermediate phasing magnet is needed to correct for the relative phase between the two EPUs and that the optimum phase setting produces a spectrum in which the desired wavelength is slightly red-shifted thus requiring a larger aperture than originally anticipated. This setting is distinct from that which produces an on-axis spectrum similar to a single long undulator. Furthermore, partial coherence calculations, utilizing a multiple electron approach, indicate that a high degree of spatial coherence is still obtained at the sample location when such an aperture is used. The aperture size which maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of a double-slit experiment is explored. This combination of high coherence and intensity is ideally suited for x-ray ptychography experiments which reconstruct the scattering density from micro-diffraction patterns. This technique is briefly reviewed and the effects on the image quality of proximity to the beamline focus are explored.

Shapiro D.; Chubar, O.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Reininger, R.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Wang, S.

2011-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

233

First Structural Steel Erected at NSLS-II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ten steel columns were incorporated into the ever-growing framework for the National Synchrotron Light Source II last week, the first structural steel erected for the future 400,000-square-foot facility.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or 143 Operating Systems or Compilers 4 EE 109 Digital Systems Design Lab 4 EE 271 VLSI Systems 3 Plus 240E Embedded Wireless Systems 3 CS 244A Introduction to Networking 4 CS 244E Low-Power WirelessSTANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 2007-08 Computer Systems Engineering Name: Local Phone

Pratt, Vaughan

235

Stanford University Mercury Thermometer Replacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford University Mercury Thermometer Replacement Program Instructions for Reuniting Separated Fluid Column of Non-Mercury Thermometer Heating Method Heat the thermometers bulb in an upright position of the thermometer. Note that over filling the expansion chamber will break the thermometer. Tap the thermometer

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator center stanford Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

e Stanford University, Stanford, CA (092010 - present) Ph. D. in Applied Physics Advisor: Prof... . Zhi-Xun Shen Stanford University, Stanford, CA (092007 - ... Source:...

237

Photon Sciences Directorate | 2010 Annual Report | Close-Up: NSLS Users  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Close-Up: NSLS Users Close-Up: NSLS Users From Alabama to Australia, more than 2,200 visiting scientists from over 400 institutions came to NSLS to conduct their research in FY10, exactly 700 of which were new to the facility. These scientists, known as "users," primarily are awarded beam time by submitting a general user proposal through a peer-reviewed, web-based system. The proposal is rated based on various scientific criteria and can remain active for up to six cycles of operation (about two years). In FY10, about 1,000 requests for beam time were submitted, with about one-third of those requests on new proposals. Beam time is given without charge, as long as the research results are published in open literature. Work that is proprietary in nature is charged on a full-cost recovery basis

238

Workshop on atomic physics at the National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop emphasis was to acquaint the atomic physics community with the range of experimental capabilities of the NSLS. (GHT)

Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Gregory, D.C. (eds.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Flexibility in the Design of the NSLS-II Lattice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NSLS-II light source is a proposed 3 GeV storage ring, with the potential for ultra-low emittance [1]. The lattice design uses a 30 cell DBA structure with a periodicity of 15, with alternating long and short straight sections. All cells are tuned achromatic to maximize the emittance reduction achieved as damping wigglers are added to the ring. Recent optimization of the lattice consisted of increasing the number of possible hard X-ray beam ports using three pole wigglers, reducing the number of magnets (quadrupoles and sextupoles) and shifting the magnets to allow easier extraction of the photon beams. The impact of the reduction of magnets on the lattice flexibility will be presented in terms of the tuning range possible for the lattice parameters: tune, emittance, chromaticity, and beta function matching to user insertion devices (IDs). This flexibility is important for optimizing the lattice linear and nonlinear properties, the dynamic aperture, and its impact on beam lifetime, as well as matching the user source requirements and for value engineering of magnets and power supplies.

Kramer,S.L.; Guo, W.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Beamline for Fast Polarization Switching at NSLS-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first XUV beamline (200-2000 eV) at NSLS-II will have two branches, one optimized for photon hungry experiments requiring high coherent flux and one optimized for studies of polarization sensitive materials and interfaces based on fast polarization switching. We describe here the branch designed for fast polarization switching with frequencies up to 1 kHz, high photon flux, and good energy resolution. The beamline will be served by two canted undulators and is based on the focusing variable line spacing grating monochromator. The two beams will be focused at the same spot of approximately 80x10 {mu}m (hor.xver.). The expected circular polarized flux at the sample from each device up to 1.4 keV will be higher than 10{sup 12} photons/s at a resolving power better than 10{sup 4}. An additional KB focusing system will deliver the two beams to a spot in the {mu}m range.

Reininger, R.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Hulbert, S. L. [NSLS and NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Application of Partially coherent Wavefront Propagation Calculations for Design of Coherence-Preserving Synchrotron Radiation Beamlines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, such as NSLS-II and MAX-IV, will offer excellent opportunities for further development of experimental techniques exploiting X-ray coherence. However, even in these new SR sources, the radiation produced by relativistic electrons (in undulators, wigglers and bending magnets) will remain only partially coherent in the X-ray spectral range. 'Extraction' of 'coherent portion' of the radiation flux and its transport to sample without loss of coherence must be performed by dedicated SR beamlines, optimized for particular types of experiments. Detailed quantitative prediction of partially coherent X-ray beam properties at propagation through optical elements, which is required for the optimization of such beamlines, can only be obtained from accurate and efficient physical-optics based numerical simulations. Examples of such simulations, made for NSLS-II beamlines, using 'Synchrotron Radiation Workshop' (SRW) computer code, are presented. Special attention is paid to the numerical analysis of the basic properties of partially coherent undulator radiation beam and its distinctions from the Gaussian beam. Performance characteristics of importance for particular beamlines, such as radiation spot size and flux at sample vs size of secondary source aperture for high-resolution microscopy beamlines, are predicted by the simulations.

O Chubar; Y Chu; K Kaznatcheev; h Yan

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

Ma,H.; Rose, J.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

STANFORD UNIVERSITY DIVING SAFETY MANUAL Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANFORD UNIVERSITY DIVING SAFETY MANUAL 2002 Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University Pacific DIVING 35 9.50 CLOSED AND SEMI-CLOSED CIRCUIT SCUBA (REBREATHERS) 36 9.60 MIXED GAS DIVING 36 9.70 BLUE

244

MELISSA KEMP Stanford University, Department of Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIENCE Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA Fall 2010 - Present Department of Biology, Advisor: Dr Senior Thesis Previews. Williamstown, Massachusetts . August 2009. #12; 3 Population genetics

Hadly, Elizabeth

245

STANFORD UNIVERSITY CHILD CARE SUBSIDY GRANT PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANFORD UNIVERSITY CHILD CARE SUBSIDY GRANT PROGRAM GUIDELINES Table of Contents OVERVIEW................................................................................................3 Amended Grants .........................................................................................................3 How to apply for an amended grant

Bogyo, Matthew

246

Stanford Geothermal Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stanford Geothermal Workshop is one of the world's longest running technical meetings on geothermal energy. The conference brings together engineers, scientists and managers...

247

Chapter 14: ESH&QA 14-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to protect worker safety and health 2. Implementing a QA program that follows DOE Order 414.1-2A, "Quality Program that implements the DOE Policy, DOE P 450.4, "Safety Management System Policy," the BNL SubjectChapter 14: ESH&QA 14-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report 14 ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, & HEALTH

Ohta, Shigemi

248

Evaluation of Pinhole Camera Resolution for NSLS-II Storage Ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NSLS-II Storage Ring provides ultrabright radiation sources with extra-small sizes of the circulating electron beam. The beam dimensions will be monitored with a pinhole camera. In this paper they discuss the possible design and ultimate achievable resolution of the system. Modeling is based on the SRW code as well as numerical calculations using MATLAB.

Pinayev,I.

2008-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Conventional Facilities Chapter 8: Fire Protection 8-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional Facilities Chapter 8: Fire Protection 8-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 8 FIRE of New York State National Institute of Standards and Technology National Fire Protection Association, corresponding to the ring pentants. 8.2.2 Fire Protection System #12;8-2 Part 3: Conventional Facilities Scope

Ohta, Shigemi

250

Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC Systems 6-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC Systems 6-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 6 MECHANICAL ­ HVAC SYSTEMS 6.1 Design Criteria 6.1.1 Codes and Standards The latest edition of the codes, standards have adequate capacity and head, no chilled water pumps #12;Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC

Ohta, Shigemi

251

Conventional Facilities Chapter 3: Architecture 3-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(ADAAG) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) 2.2 LEED for Labs 3.2 Architecture 3Conventional Facilities Chapter 3: Architecture 3-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 3 ARCHITECTURE 3.1 Design Criteria 3.1.1 Codes and Standards The latest edition of the codes, standards, orders

Ohta, Shigemi

252

X-Ray Diamond Anvil Cell Facility at NSLS: 2010 Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Diamond Anvil Cell Facility at NSLS: 2010 Progress Report Zhiqiang ChenZhiqiang Chen Stony) Powder X-ray Diffraction, Total Scattering Pair-Distributiony , g Function (PDF) under high P and high, yield strength, amorphization, texturing, compressibility Hydrothermal DAC (Bassett) Angle Dispersive X-ray

Duffy, Thomas S.

253

Doug Hollett Gives Keynote Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Program Manager of the Geothermal Technologies Program, Doug Hollett gave a keynote address at the 37th Stanford Geothermal Workshop in Stanford, California.

254

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Leland Stanford University...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Leland Stanford University - CA 0-04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Leland Stanford University (CA.0-04 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site...

255

Stanford University | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

through to the future? DOE awards 25 million to UC Berkeley, Stanford to lower cost of solar power Stanford's 2010 Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Fellows...

256

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Stanford University Sustainable Design & Construction Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 14, 2014 Y2E2 Building, Room 292E 473 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 #12;Sustainable DesignStanford University Sustainable Design & Construction Program 2014-2015 Admitted Student Open House for sophisticated structural/construction engineers " Support Design-Build Firms, Design Firms, Construction Firms

Prinz, Friedrich B.

258

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the Department and by the Geothermal & Hydrology Technologies Division of the U.S. Dept. of Energy, project No.: DE-AT03-80SF11459. -iv

Stanford University

259

Tayo Oguntebi tayo@stanford.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with transactional memory. Member of the Pervasive Parallelism Laboratory, a broad effort across several research prototypes Expected Graduation date: 2012 M.S. ­ Stanford University, Stanford, California ElectricalView, MATLAB; Systems/Controls Proficient in French: Studied in Metz, France - Summer 2005 INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE

Olukotun, Kunle

260

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Independent Oversight Inspection, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stanford Linear Accelerator Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - January 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - January 2007 January 2007 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) during October and November 2006. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Since the 2004 Type A electrical accident, SSO and SLAC have made improvements in many aspects of ES&H programs. However, the deficiencies in

262

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

263

National Synchrotron Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Directions to Training Office Directions to Training Office The Photon Sciences Training Manager is located in the NSLS facility, Building 725D, Room 2-160. Directions (from the Main Entrance) From the Main (front) entrance, take the stairs or elevator to the second floor. Turn right into the hallway and proceed past the lobby balcony. Continue past the seminar room on the right and through the hallway to make a 90 degree left turn. Continue through this next hallway past the Design Room on the left. Turn left at the overhead sign for "Training" and continue straight through to Room 2-160 on your left. Directions (from the North Entrance) From the North (back) entrance, take the stairs or elevator to the second floor. Turn left into the hallway. Turn right at the doorway marked Room

264

National Synchrotron Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

49 49 Hand Safety Date: January 7, 2011 Editor: Lori Stiegler It's not unusual for experiment needs to change, and beam time to be limited while conducting research at the NSLS. Unfortunately, these factors, and several other contributing factors, converged recently and adversely affected an experimenter. The result was a hand injury that required a trip to the hospital, and sutures. In the case of this injury, the user was trying to fashion a new sample holder because of difficulty with the equipment he had brought from his home institution. The idea for the substitute sample holder had been previously discussed with his work group, but never tried. Using the alternate tools and holders he had brought, he tried to cut a slot out of a hard plastic tube with a razor

265

School of Engineering; Stanford University 12/9/08 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Packard gave it a shot Audio oscillator used in Fantasia. #12;School of Engineering; Stanford UniversitySchool of Engineering; Stanford University 12/9/08 1 John Hennessy School of Engineering Stanford University #12;School of Engineering; Stanford University 12/9/08 2 Terman as Dean and Provost ­a new vision

Straight, Aaron

266

electronic reprint Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electronic reprint Journal of Synchrotron Radiation ISSN 0909-0495 Editor: G. Ice Accurate dose required to produce a defined outcome, following the Grotthuss­Draper law (King & Laidler, 1984

Hitchcock, Adam P.

267

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition » Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen.

268

Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since last year, we have had three 3-week blocks of beamtime, in April and November 1991 and February 1992, on the Ames/Montana beamline at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). These runs continued our program on high temperature superconductors, heavy Fermion and related uranium and rare earth materials, and started some work on transition metal oxides. We have also had beamtime at the Brookhaven NSLS, 5 days of beamtime on the Dragon monochromator, beamline U4B, studying resonant photoemission of transition metal oxides using photon energies around the transition metal 2p edges. Data from past runs has been analyzed, and in some cases combined with photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) data taken in the home U-M lab. 1 fig.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Simple Tools for Characterization of Synchrotron Beam Flux, Energy Resolution and Stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flux is a simple yet key indicator of overall beamline alignment. For many synchrotron measurements, the energy resolution and reproducibility are important characteristics as well. However, many beamlines do not have diffractometers capable of measuring the energy resolution in the experimental hutches. For absolute flux measurements, we have found that thickness calibrated Si photodiodes make very convenient, robust detectors capable of handling a wide flux range. For measuring the energy resolution, we have developed a simple, portable instrument analyzer applicable to any beamline with a scanning monochromator. This same instrument is capable of measuring the energy stability and reproducibility as well. We have used these to characterize many of the beamlines on the NSLS X-ray ring, and will present the methods and our experience to date to demonstrate their usefulness.

Dvorak, J.; Berman, L.; Hulbert, S.L.; Siddons, D.P.; Wallwork, K.

2009-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

270

July 2012 for revisions contact rbedgar@stanford.edu USP List Members  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for revisions contact rbedgar@stanford.edu Lance Lougee SLAC [lancel@slac.stanford.edu] Lance Phillips EHS [lagwagon@stanford.edu] Merry Weeks Sch Engineering [mweeks@stanford.edu] Michele Armstrong EHS [michelea

271

RHIC | Booster Synchrotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Booster Synchrotron Booster Synchrotron Construction of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) Booster was begun in 1986 and completed in 1991. The Booster is less than one quarter the size of the AGS. It is used to preaccelerate particles entering the AGS ring, increasing the intensity of the proton beams generated by the AGS. The Booster also plays an important role in the operation of the Relatavistic Heavy Ion Collider by accepting heavy ions from EBIS or protons from the 200-million electron volt (MeV) Linac. It then feeds them to the AGS for further acceleration and delivery to RHIC. After the installation of the heavy-ion transfer line in 1986, the AGS was capable of accelerating ions up to silicon with its atomic mass of 28. However, due to its superior vacuum, the Booster makes it possible for the AGS to

272

Stanford, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford, California: Energy Resources Stanford, California: Energy Resources (Redirected from Stanford, CA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.424106°, -122.1660756° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.424106,"lon":-122.1660756,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

273

stanford hci group / cs376 http://cs376.stanford.eduScott Klemmer 19 October 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 stanford hci group / cs376 http://cs376.stanford.eduScott Klemmer · 19 October 2006 Distributed with Ed Hutchins in the spring of 05... #12;3 Integration of Thinking and Doing Clearboard's tech

Klemmer, Scott

274

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 THE SUPPRESSION OF SONIC SHOCKS IN GEOTHERMAL WELLS

Stanford University

275

IMPEDANCE OF ELECTRON BEAM VACUUM CHAMBERS FOR THE NSLS-II STORAGE RING.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss computation of the coupling impedance of the vacuum chambers for the NSLS-II storage ring using the electromagnetic simulator GdfidL [1]. The impedance of the vacuum chambers depends on the geometric dimensions of the cross-section and height of the slot in the chamber wall. Of particular concern is the complex geometry of the infrared extraction chambers to be installed in special large-gap dipole magnets. In this case, wakefields are generated due to tapered transitions and large vertical-aperture ports with mirrors near the electron beam.

BLEDNYKH,A.; KRINSKY, S.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

Stanford University September 2011 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

other major sectors of the U.S. economy? Many of the core ideas advocated by health care reformers:http://siepr.stanford.edu SIEPRpolicy brief Will information technology transform the health care sector the way it has transformed are premised on patients, physicians, and health care organizations having access to complete electronic

Li, Fei-Fei

277

SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmental  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Home Agenda Location Visitor Information Transportation Tourism & Dining SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmental and Materials Sciences: Theory and Application June 2-5, 2009 Group photo of the attendees at the SSRL School on X-ray Spectropscopy Techniques in Environmental and Materials Sciences: Theory and Application held June 2-5, 2009 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. » View photos from XAS 2009 Overview: Modern synchrotron radiation based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS) techniques offer the ability to probe local molecular scale physical and electronic structures that govern key properties of technological and environmental materials and molecular complexes. The high collimation, intensity, and tunability of SR allow the investigation of a wide range of materials, including thin films and interfaces, nanoparticles, amorphous materials, solutions, hydrated and disordered bacteriogenic minerals, soils, interfaces, and dissolved species.

278

National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses the following topics: NSLS operations organization and administration; shift routines and operating practices; NSLS control room activities; communications; control of on-shift training; investigation of abnormal events; notifications; control of equipment and system status; lock-out tagout; independent verification; logkeeping; shift turnover; required reading; shift orders; equipment operations guides; operator aid postings; and equipment labeling.

Fewell, N.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. (eds.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Rok Sosic, Jure Leskovec Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

available by Stack Overflow https://archive.org/download/stackexchange/stackoverflow.com-Posts.7z 5.2GB and Jure Leskovec, Stanford University 3 #12; Task: Find top Java experts on Stack Overflow Possible approaches for finding experts: Use Stack Overflow reputation score: Not Java specific No control Count

Pratt, Vaughan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Stanford Center for Position, Navigation and Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inertial Sensors Frank van Diggelen--Who's Your Daddy? Why GPS rules GNSS Christophe Salomon & Associates, LLC "A Practical Guide to MEMS Inertial Sensors." noon 60 6 1:00pm 30 Marks, Edward Entrepreneur 3:00pm 30 Scherrer, Phil Stanford Physics "Solar Dynamics Observatory: Observing the Sources

Straight, Aaron

282

Stanford UniverSity Postdoctoral Scholars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford UniverSity Postdoctoral Scholars Health Care Reform and Your Health Insurance Options Effective January 1, 2014, the Affordable Care Act -- also known as "health care reform" -- will require the impact of health care reform and to feel confident about your personal coverage decisions

Kay, Mark A.

283

SGP-TR-32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SGP- TR- 32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT NO. 7 t o U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Recent Radon Transient Experiments Energy Recovery from Fracture-Stimulated Geothermal Reservoirs 1 2 October 1, 1978 through December 31, 1978. Research is performed under t h e Department of Energy Contract

Stanford University

284

National Synchrotron Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Report 2001 Report 2001 National Synchrotron Light Source For the period October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001 Introduction Science Highlights Year in Review Operations Publications Abstracts Nancye Wright & Lydia Rogers The National Synchrotron Light Source Department is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences United States Department of Energy Washington, D.C. Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven Science Associates, Inc. Upton, New York 11973 Under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 Mary Anne Corwin Steven N. Ehrlich & Lisa M. Miller Managing Editor Science Editors Production Assistants Cover images (clockwise from top left) 1. from Science Highlight by K.R. Rajashankar, M.R. Chance, S.K. Burley, J. Jiang, S.C. Almo, A. Bresnick, T. Dodatko, R. Huang, G. He,

285

THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Presentation: Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources delivered by Patricia Dehmer, U.S. Department of Energy

287

Biophysics and synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book, contains contributions to the conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation held in July 1986 at Frascati. It is devoted to advances in the resolution of biological molecule structure obtainable through synchroton radiation studies. The use of synchroton radiation has firmly established x-ray spectroscopy of biological molecules. More detailed knowledge on the local structure of active sites of metalloproteins, as well as a number of studies on the interaction of metal ions with other important biological macromolecular systems are presented. This new method for protein structure analysis is a major improvement for the rapidly expanding field of protein engineering.

Bianconi, A.; Castellano, C.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Stanford University Solar Decathlon 2011 Construction Drawings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONSULTANTS CONSULTANTS NONE: PROJECT IS PUBLIC DOMAIN 01 10/11/2012 80% DOE/NREL DD SUBMISSION 02 11/20/2012 80% DOE/NREL RE-SUBMISSION 03 02/14/2013 100% DOE/NREL CD SUBMISSION 04 04/05/2013 100% DOE/NREL CD RE-SUBMISSION 05 08/22/2013 100% AS-BUILT SUBMISSION 8/22/2013 12:23:07 PM G-001 COVER PAGE 104 DEREK OUYANG ANRAN LI STANFORD UNIVERSITY Y2E2 BUILDING RM 254 273 VIA ORTEGA STANFORD, CA 94305 STANFORDSD@GMAIL.COM SOLARDECATHLON.STANFORD.EDU 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C D E 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C D E SHEET TITLE LOT NUMBER: DRAWN BY: CHECKED BY: COPYRIGHT: CLIENT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2013 WWW.SOLARDECATHLON.GOV TEAM NAME: ADDRESS: CONTACT: CONSULTANTS NONE: PROJECT IS PUBLIC DOMAIN 01 10/11/2012 80% DOE/NREL DD SUBMISSION 02 11/20/2012 80% DOE/NREL RE-SUBMISSION

289

User 'To Do' List as Soon as Beam Time is Assigned | Stanford Synchrotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

'To Do' List as Soon as Beam Time is Assigned 'To Do' List as Soon as Beam Time is Assigned Safety Review of Scheduled Experiments Identify potential safety issues on proposals and beam time requests. If there are any potential hazards with your samples, materials you are using, or overall set up you may be contacted by the safety office depending on the degree of the hazard indicated. If you want to bring hazardous equipment or substances to SSRL and have not previously indicated this on either your proposal or beam time request (BTR), contact the safety office immediately. Additionally, any changes you may wish to make to your proposal or BTR must be reviewed and approved by the safety office in advance. Late changes that involve potential hazards may not be possible. The experiment information provided by users is used to generate a Safety

290

Welcome to SSRL: User Check-In Procedures | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL: User Check-In Procedures SSRL: User Check-In Procedures Note: SLAC will be closed for the holidays from December 21-January 5. SLAC has installed RFID proximity card readers which facilitate 24/7 access during normal operations - at the main entrance off Sand Hill Road, at the Alpine Road Gate, and at Security Gates 17 and Sector 30. Register and complete safety training before arrival. Scheduled users will obtain a SLAC ID badge with 30-90 days proximity access after completing training and check-in at the URA office in Building 120. If you have a proximity ID badge, contact URA to re-activate your proximity access before subsequent scheduled user experiments. If you do not yet have a proximity activated ID badge, enter SLAC from Sand Hill Road, turn right at the main entrance and visit the Security Office.

291

Two-Color Self-Seeding at LCLS | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Two-Color Self-Seeding at LCLS Two-Color Self-Seeding at LCLS Wednesday, September 18, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Franz-Josef Decker, Accelerator Directorate The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) produces typically SASE FEL pulses with intensities of up to 5 mJ and at high photon energy an FEL bandwidth 0.2% (FWHM). Self-seeding with a diamond crystal reduces the bandwidth by a factor of 10 to 40. The range depends on which Bragg reflection is used, or the special setup of the electron beam like over-compression. The peak intensity level is lower by a factor of only five, giving the seeded beam an advantage of about 2.5 in average intensity over the use of a monochromator with SASE. At certain energies and crystal angles different Bragg lines cross which allows seeding at two or even three different colors inside the bandwidth

292

Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BL6-2c / Transmission X-ray Microscopy BL6-2c / Transmission X-ray Microscopy Home Researchers Publications Science Highlights Department of Energy Office of Science Search form Search Search TXM Search Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy Capabilities Full-field TXM is an excellent method to examine nanoscale heterogeneties in many materials, including complex hierarchical systems such as catalysts, fuel cells and battery electrodes, and biological and environmental samples, at 30 nm resolution.The transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) on beam line 6-2c at SSRL is capable of 2D imaging and tomography, as well as spectroscopic imaging for 2D and 3D elemental mapping and chemical mapping over tens of microns (up to mm in 2D). The field of view (FOV) is 30 microns, but mosaic images can be collected to

293

Materials Small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) | Stanford Synchrotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Materials Small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Materials Science Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a well-established characterization method for microstructure investigations in various materials. It probes electron density differences to give information about structural inhomogeneities from the near atomic scale (1 nm) to the micron scale (1 000 nm). The method involves measuring the scattered X-ray intensity as a function of (typically small) scattering angles and is generally performed in transmission. SAXS is used to characterize the size scale of inhomogeneities (e.g. pores, inclusions, second phase regions) in polymer blends, micro-emulsions, geological materials, bones, cements and ceramics. Instrumentation

294

Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

Orville, A.M.; Buono, R.; Cowan, M.; Heroux, A.; Shea-McCarthy, G.; Schneider, D. K.; Skinner, J. M.; Skinner, M. J.; Stoner-Ma, D.; Sweet, R. M.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Correlated Single-Crystal Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Crystallography at NSLS Beamline X26-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

A Orville; R Buono; M Cowan; A Heroux; G Shea-McCarthy; D Schneider; J Skinner; M Skinner; D Stoner-Ma; R Sweet

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Comparative Study of Vibration Stability at Operating Light Source Facilities and Lessons Learned in Achieving NSLS II Stability Goals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to ensure that the stability goals of the NSLS II will be met once the accelerator structure is set on the selected BNL site a comprehensive evaluation of the ground vibration observed at existing light source facilities has been undertaken. The study has relied on measurement data collected and reported by the operating facilities as well as on new data collected in the course of this study. The primary goal of this comprehensive effort is to compare the green-field conditions that exist in the various sites both in terms of amplitude as well as frequency content and quantify the effect of the interaction of these accelerator facilities with the green-field vibration. The latter represents the ultimate goal of this effort where the anticipated motion of the NSLS II ring is estimated prior to its construction and compared with the required stability criteria.

Simos,N.; Fallier, M.; Amick, H.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

297

Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator...

298

Optimisation of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimisation of blade type x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, con and #64257;guration and operation principle was analysed in order to improve XBPM performance. Optimisation is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission type XBPM a Diamond Detector Blades (DDB) were analysed as blades for XBPMs. DDB XBPMs can help to overcome drawbacks of the photoemission blade XBPMs.

ILINSKI P.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains abstracts from research conducted at the national synchrotron light source. (LSP)

Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.N. (eds.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Woods Institute for the Environment Name Stanford- Woods Institute for the Environment Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

302

Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Name Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

303

Material science: Academy backs synchrotron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... gruelling effort to reach a consensus, gave its strongest endorsement to a new 6 GeV synchroton radiation facility, estimated to cost $160 million. This new generation synchrotron would, according ...

Stephen Budiansky

1984-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

304

APPLYING CASCADED PARAMETER SCAN TO STUDY TOP-OFF SAFETY IN NSLS-II STORAGE RING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce a new algorithm, the cascaded parameter scan method, to efficiently carry out the scan over magnet parameters in the safety analysis for storage ring top-off injection. In top-off safety analysis, one must track particles populating phase space through a beamline containing magnets and apertures and clearly demonstrate that for all possible magnet settings and errors, all particles are lost on scrapers within the properly shielded region. In the usual approach, the number of tracking runs increases exponentially with the number of magnet settings. In the cascaded parameter scan method, the number of tracking runs only increases linearly. This reduction of exponential to linear dependence on the number of set-points, greatly reduces the required computation time and allows one to more densely populate phase space and to increase the number of set-points scanned for each magnet. An example of applying this approach to analyze an NSLS-II beamline, the damping wiggler beamline, is also given.

Li, Y.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

X-25 Cryo-ready In-vacuum Undulator at the NSLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing 15-year-old hybrid wiggler at the NSLS has been replaced by a state-of-the-art, cryo-ready in-vacuum undulator optimized for a dedicated macromolecular crystallography program. The device is a 1m long, 18mm period, hybrid PM-type with a minimum operating gap of 5.6mm, and has provision for cryo-cooling to 150K. Unlike the original SPring-8 cryo-PM undulator proposal, we use a new high-remanence, high-temperature grade of NdFeB (NEOMAX 42AH with Br=1.3T and Hcj=24 kOe) that can be baked to 100 deg. C to be UHV-ready in case of cooling system failure. A novel optical gap measurement system using a LED-based product ensures gap accuracy of {+-}2 micro meter. A friction stir welding technique is used for the first time in an accelerator UHV device to minimize stress and deformation of the magnet arrays due to temperature gradients. This paper describes design issues of the device and other considerations such as magnetic measurement at low temperature.

Tanabe, Toshiya; Ablett, James; Berman, Lonny; Harder, David A.; Hulbert, Steve; Lehecka, Mike; Rakowsky, George; Skaritka, John [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Deyhim, Alex; Johnson, Eric; Kulesza, Joe; Waterman, Dave [Advanced Design Consulting, U.S.A, Inc., 126 Ridge Rd, PO Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

306

First operation of the Rocketdyne/Stanford free electron laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A near infrared free electron laser (FEL) has been built and installed by Rocketdyne in the Stanford Photon Research Laboratory. The Rocketdyne/Stanford FEL utilizes a very high quality, 2 m long, permanent magnet planar wiggler whose gap may be continuously tuned, and magnetic field axially tapered by varying the gap at one end relative to the other. The laser is operated with an e-beam supplied by the Stanford Mark-III accelerator. A stable resonator with a broadband, dielectric coated element permits transmissive outcoupling over the 2.73.7 ?m wavelength range. Results from initial operation of this laser are presented.

Anup Bhowmik; Mark S. Curtin; Wayne A. McMullin; Stephen V. Benson; John M.J. Madey; Bruce A. Richman; Louis Vintro

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Stanford University Occupational Health Center Protecting Your Health and Safety at Work Central to supporting and promoting a culture of safety at Stanford is the Stanford University Occupational Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to supporting and promoting a culture of safety at Stanford is the Stanford University OccupationalStanford University Occupational Health Center Protecting Your Health and Safety at Work Central Health Center (SUOHC). The SUOHC is part of the Office of Environmental Health & Safety and has two

Kay, Mark A.

308

Benefits Department 320 Panama Street, Bambi Modular Stanford, CA 94305-4160 650.736.2985 http://benefits.stanford.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benefits Department 320 Panama Street, Bambi Modular Stanford, CA 94305-4160 650.736.2985 http. In the lobby of the Human Resources /Stanford Benefits office in the Bambi Modular (320 Panama Street). If you

Wechsler, Risa H.

309

Stanford University HRPP Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/13 Research Compliance Office STANFORD measures and improves, when necessary, compliance with organizational measures and improves, when necessary, the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of the Human Research to assess compliance with organizational policies and procedures and applicable laws, regulations, codes

Puglisi, Joseph

310

Stanford University Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the development of a sustainable built environment, including buildings, infrastructure, renewable energy systems Sustainability and the Built Environment The Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Stanford the CEE Department's strategic goal of Engineering for Sustainability and engage with colleagues

Prinz, Friedrich B.

311

K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to utilize dual energy, monochromatic X-rays produced from synchrotrons radiation in order to obtain noninvasive medical imaging. The application of synchrotrons radiation to medical imaging is based on the principle of iodine dichromography, first described by Bertil Jacobson of the Karolinska Institute in 1953. Medical imaging using synchrotrons radiation and K-edge dichromography was pioneered at Stanford University under the leadership of Dr. Ed Rubenstein, and the late Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dr. Robert Hofstadter. With progressive refinements in hardware, clinical-quality images were obtained of human coronary arteries utilizing peripheral injections of iodinated contrast agent. These images even now are far superior to those being presented by investigators using MRI as an imaging tool for coronary arteries. However, new supplies and instruments in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have served to transform coronary angiography into an outpatient procedure, with relatively little morbidity. We extended the principles learned with coronary angiography to noninvasive imaging of the human bronchial tree. For these images, we utilized xenon as the contrast agent, as it has a K-edge very similar to that of iodine. In this case, there is no true competing diagnostic test, and pulmonary neoplasm is an enormous public health concern. In early experiments, we demonstrated remarkably clear images of the human bronchial tree. These images have been shown internationally; however, funding difficulties primarily with the Department of Energy have not allowed for progression of this promising avenue of research. One potential criticism of the project is that in order to obtain these images, we utilized national laboratories. Some have questioned whether this would lead to a practical imaging modality. However, we have shown that the technology exists to allow for construction of a miniature storage ring, with a superconducting wiggler magnet, which would occupy minimal space, and would be of a cost comparable with that of a clinical cardiac catheterization laboratory. Much of the focus of this research is now shifting to Europe, where individual whom we have trained or with whom we have worked are now heading up extensive efforts in medical imaging and K-edge dichromography. This work is occurring mostly at DESY in Hamburg, and at the European Synchrotrons Research Laboratory (ESRF) in Grenoble. (B204)

Giacomini, John C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY Interne Verffentlichung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY Interne Veröffentlichung DESY-Rundschreiben Nr.: 45/2006 DESY- Gemeinschaft, unterzeichnet wurde, unterstützt das Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron die Open- Access research organizations, the Helmholtz Association among them, the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron supports

313

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. Existing geochemical reactive transport reservoir characterization and present example analyses of the pore systems of representative rocks fromPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

314

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, 94720, USA ABSTRACT Interactions between hydrothermal fluids and rock alter mineralogy, leading permeability reduction in fractured and intact Westerly granite due to high-temperature fluid flow through core

Stanford University

315

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, proppant will need to withstand high temperatures, acidified fluids, acid treatments, and cleanouts while in equilibrium with fluids of varying composition. TOUGHREACT was used to model one dimensional flow

Stanford University

316

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transition Topics Transition Topics The Photon Sciences Directorate intends to run a full schedule (~5000 hours per year) of NSLS operations to the end of fiscal year 2014 (September 30, 2014). NSLS-II will be ramped up as rapidly as possible to serve our large and productive user community. The tabs below provide information related to various transition topics. If you have comments, suggestions or questions, please contact the Photon Sciences User Administrator, at gcisco@bnl.gov. News & Updates FAQs Techniques Across DOE DOE Partner Facilities Contact Us User Transition Forum, May 2012 The User Transition Planning Forum was held on May 21, 2012, as part of the annual NSLS/CFN Users' Meeting. Below are copies of slide presentations and notes taken during the Forum. Johnson Presentation

317

Medical applications of synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-00T23:59:59.000Z

319

Synchrotron Mesodiffraction: A Tool for Understanding Turbine Engine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 B. L. Boyce,1 A. Mehta,2 J. O. Peters,3 and R. O. Ritchie4 1Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS: 0889, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0889 blboyce@sandia.gov 2Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Lufthansa Technik AG, HAM WR 124, Weg Beim Jäger 193, 22335 Hamburg, Germany janoke.peters@lht.dlh.de 4Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS: 62-203, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720 roritchie@lbl.gov Aircraft turbine engines routinely experience the ingestion of debris resulting in "foreign object damage" or FOD. Failures associated with foreign object damage have been estimated to cost the aerospace industry $4 billion per year. Often, FOD does not lead to sudden catastrophic failure, yet such damage can dramatically reduce the lifetime of components subjected to cyclic fatigue stresses. Turbine blades, for example, are susceptible to debris strikes and also experience significant fatigue loading. The current study seeks to develop insight into the driving forces and predictability of fatigue failures induced by foreign object damage. Such insight can be used to improve existing design methodologies for turbine engine components and inspection regimens.

320

Department of Energy Cites Stanford University for Worker Safety and Health Violations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Stanford University (Stanford) for four violations of the Department's worker safety and health regulations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

REQUIREMENTS AND GUIDELINES FOR NSLS EXPERIMENTAL BEAM LINE VACUUM SYSTEMS-REVISION B.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Typical beam lines are comprised of an assembly of vacuum valves and shutters referred to as a ''front end'', optical elements to monochromatize, focus and split the photon beam, and an experimental area where a target sample is placed into the photon beam and data from the interaction is detected and recorded. Windows are used to separate sections of beam lines that are not compatible with storage ring ultra high vacuum. Some experimental beam lines share a common vacuum with storage rings. Sections of beam lines are only allowed to vent up to atmospheric pressure using pure nitrogen gas after a vacuum barrier is established to protect ring vacuum. The front end may only be bled up when there is no current in the machine. This is especially true on the VUV storage ring where for most experiments, windows are not used. For the shorter wavelength, more energetic photons of the x-ray ring, beryllium windows are used at various beam line locations so that the monochromator, mirror box or sample chamber may be used in a helium atmosphere or rough vacuum. The window separates ring vacuum from the environment of the downstream beam line components. The stored beam lifetime in the storage rings and the maintenance of desirable reflection properties of optical surfaces depend upon hydrocarbon-free, ultra-high vacuum systems. Storage ring vacuum systems will operate at pressures of {approximately} 1 x 10{sup {minus}10} Torr without beam and {approximately} 1 x 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with beam. Systems are free of hydrocarbons in the sense that no pumps, valves, etc. containing organics are used. Components are all-metal, chemically cleaned and bakeable. To the extent that beam lines share a common vacuum with the storage ring, the same criteria will hold for beam line components. The design philosophy for NSLS beam lines is to use all-metal, hydrocarbon-free front end components and recommend that experimenters use this approach for common vacuum hardware downstream of front ends. O-ring-sealed valves, if used, are not permitted upstream of the monochromator exit aperture. It will be the responsibility of users to demonstrate that their experiment will not degrade the pressure or quality of the storage ring vacuum. As a matter of operating policy, all beam lines will be monitored for prescribed pressure and the contribution of high mass gases to this pressure each time a beam line has been opened to ring vacuum.

FOERSTER,C.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Name Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

323

Martin Dohlus Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron rissen dec 2002 Martin Dohlus Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron rissen dec 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Seite 1 Martin Dohlus Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron rissen dec 2002 Martin Dohlus Deutsches.1 W monopole single passage losses #12;2 Seite 2 Martin Dohlus Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron rissen T > 70K >70K Martin Dohlus Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron rissen dec 2002 3.3.2 foreseen in tdr #12

324

Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve Annual Report 2000 -01 Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve Annual Report 2000 - 01 · Stanford University #12;The mission of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve is to contribute to the understanding of the Earth's natural sys- tems previously unmet Jasper Ridge needs, but also represents our ef- fort to lighten the load we place

325

Computer Replacement Guidelines Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Replacement Guidelines Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford University 17 November 2005 This document describes the guidelines for replacing laptop and desktop computers at Environmental Health and Safety. PC laptop and desktop computers will be replaced a) on an ongoing basis where

326

stanford hci group / cs376 Scott Klemmer 17 October 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 stanford hci group / cs376 Scott Klemmer · 17 October 2006 Remote Collaboration Paul Badger is highly culturally dependent e.g., Southern Europe has closer boundaries for personal space than America (tables) The Papier-Mâché toolkit (vision, rfid, barcode) iROS and the PatchPanel (interactive rooms

Klemmer, Scott

327

STANFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

horse on Stanford's Palo Alto Stock Farm, commemorate pre-university days. Samuel Morris, dean. The Palo Alto Stock Farm was still much in evidence, not only its former racetracks and paddocks, but also streets now gone, foreshortened, or redirected, the book reveals changes fostered by population growth

Straight, Aaron

328

Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research Session 6: Tissue Use Makeup Cases Please choose one case and write a 3-5 page paper that answers the questions that accompany many years gathering tissue samples from women with breast cancer. All donors gave permission

329

Operation of the Australian Store.Synchrotron for macromolecular crystallography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described.

Meyer, G.R.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a mismatch between rough surfaces that will enhance reservoir porosity and permeability. In the early daysPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University the performance of EGS reservoirs. Geothermal injection wells are often drilled into formations containing

Stanford University

331

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In addition on volcanic rocks collumnar and sheet joints occured caused the rocks have a good porosityPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University area underneath cause the densities difference between rocks and its surrounding. The difference

Stanford University

332

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the derived porosity-permeability relationship. This first step will be applied to every single wellPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University and the resulting probability distributions of permeability, net-to-gross ratio and temperature are combined

Stanford University

333

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not to the permeability but to the porosity of the medium, the contribution of the drag current through the matrix regionPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University TO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING: CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS Tsuneo Ishido1 , Yuji Nishi2

Stanford University

334

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation with evolving porosity and permeability for each element that depends on the local structure of the discretePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

335

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Geothermal Wayang Windu Ltd., 2. Geothermal Laboratory ITB, Bandung. mulyadiPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-DOMINATED TWO-PHASE ZONE OF THE WAYANG WINDU GEOTHERMAL FIELD, JAVA, INDONESIA Mulyadi1 and Ali Ashat2 1. Star

Stanford University

336

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation project in Desert Peak (Nevada) geothermal field. As partPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM K.M. Kovac1 , Susan J. Lutz2 , Peter S. Drakos3 , Joel Byersdorfer4 , and Ann Robertson

Stanford University

337

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and lithologies. This method promises to lower the cost of geothermal energy production in several ways. Knowledge is funded by the Department of Energy, Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Development program. The DOEPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

338

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their untapped geothermal resources) for cost effective power production and direct-use applications. As part for further study). INTRODUCTION Geothermal energy is an under exploited resource throughout the world, yetPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

339

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University plants, a pipe system is used to gather fluids from production wells and transport them to a power plant, or to steam separators. In the case of hydrothermal systems, where the geothermal fluid is a mixture of steam

Stanford University

340

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, which produces fluid at temperatures in the range of 100-130 °C. Since 1979, the geothermal resource has the fluids from the entire region into distinctive units. This characterization provided valuable clues

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University MWe. A geochemical assessment of the field is made based on analytical data of fluids sampled in the initial aquifer fluids were modeled. Results indicate that "excess enthalpy" discharged by some wells

Stanford University

342

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University (the better the fluid flow, the lower the calcite content). This suggests that the fracture zones acting as flow pathways for the circulation of deep and hot fluids. These are crucial conditions

Stanford University

343

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the generation of electrical energy at the Los Azufres geothermal system, Mexico (Ruíz et al., 2010). The projectPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University IN A PIPELINE NETWORK OF GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM Mahendra P. Verma Geotermia, Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas

Stanford University

344

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal resource in the US Gulf of Mexico region. In particular, geopressured sandstones near salt domesPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University INJECTION IN STIMULATION OF GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS Tatyana Plaksina,1 Christopher White,1

Stanford University

345

Application of synchrotron radiation to elemental analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of a synchrotron storage ring as a high brightness source for production of monoergic, variable energy, and highly polarized x-ray beams promises to revolutionize the field of elemental analysis. The results of exploratory work using the Cornell synchrotron facility, CHESS, will be described. Design considerations and features of the new X-Ray Microprobe Facility now under construction at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source will be presented. This facility will be used for bulk analysis and for microanalysis with an initial spatial resolution of the order of 30 ..mu..m.

Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Hastings, J.B.; Howells, M.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Chen, J.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Sure, a textbook can tell you about Bragg's Law and the x-ray absorption energies for any element in the periodic table, but it can't tell you how to plan and carry out an x-ray scattering experiment at one of the 50 or so synchrotron radiation facilitie  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Report Report SSRL 6 th Annual School on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Techniques in Materials and Environmental Sciences: Theory and Application SSRL SR-XRS participants. Synchrotron-based X-ray scattering (SR-XRS) techniques offer the ability to probe nano- and atomic-scale structure that dictates the properties of advanced technological and environmental materials. Important materials studied at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) include organic and inorganic thin films and interfaces, nanoparticles, complex oxides, solutions, polymers, minerals and poorly crystalline materials. Good planning and a good working knowledge of beam lines and techniques are required to successfully conduct SR-XRS measurements. This sixth annual School at SSRL on Synchrotron X-ray

347

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department January 3, 2012 - 2:28pm Addthis Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Kate Bannan Communications and Outreach Specialist For over 100 years, Stanford University has advanced knowledge and transformed lives through innovative academic programs, research and outreach. The school is recognized internationally as a top research

348

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department January 3, 2012 - 2:28pm Addthis Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Kate Bannan Communications and Outreach Specialist For over 100 years, Stanford University has advanced knowledge and transformed lives through innovative academic programs, research and outreach. The school is recognized internationally as a top research

349

Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 A cold sulfur spring in Germany is the only place where archaea are known to dominate bacteria in a microbial community. How this unique community thrives and the lessons it may hold for understanding global carbon and sulfur cycles are beginning to emerge from research by the University of Regensburg's Christine Moissl-Eichinger and her colleagues, including Advanced Light Source guest Alex Probst. Crucial microbial biochemistry was done at Berkeley Lab by Hoi-Ying Holman, director of the Berkeley Synchrotron Infrared Structural Biology facility, and her staff at the ALS, and by Phylochip inventors Todd DeSantis and Gary Anderson.

350

Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking.

Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Synchrotron radiation studies of the  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two questions thought to have a significant effect on SiC-MOS device characteristics are treated. The existence of carbon clusters or carbon containing by-products and the existence of sub-oxides at the SiO2/SiC interface. Results of photoemission studies using synchrotron radiation of the interface of the Si-terminated surface of n-type SiC(0001) crystals are presented. The results show that no carbon clusters or carbon containing by-product can be detected at the interface of insitu or ex situ grown samples with an oxide layer thickness larger than . The presence of sub-oxides at the SiO2/SiC interface was predicted in a theoretical calculation and has been revealed in Si 2p core level data by several groups. These results were not unanimous; significant differences in the number of sub-oxide and shifts were reported. A study also including the Si 1s core level and Si KLL Auger transitions was therefore made. These data show the presence of only one sub-oxide at the interface, assigned to Si1+ oxidation states. The SiO2 chemical shift is shown to exhibit a dependence on oxide thickness, similar to but smaller in magnitude than the thickness dependence earlier revealed for SiO2/Si.

L I Johansson; C Virojanadara

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Relationship between standardized test improvement instruction and Stanford Nine Achievement Test scores.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study examined the relationship between standardized test instruction programs and Stanford Achievement Test Edition Nine scores. To examine this relationship, total basic skills scores (more)

Marsh, Teresa R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC SO) (See also Science).

355

Computer simulations of the Rocketdyne/Stanford FEL experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocketdyne-Stanford FEL experiment is analyzed using Rocketdyne's three-dimensional steady-state wave-optics FEL code FELOPT and the one- and two-dimensional time-dependent codes RAFEL and TWOFEL. The results of simulations based on experimental parameters are presented. The oscillator is a stable near-concentric resonator with an optical waist radius of about 0.07 cm in the center of the 2-m wiggler; the peak current is 25 A, the energy spread is less than 0.5 percent, and the micropulse length is 3 ps. 11 references.

Cover, R.A.; Stone, J.P.; Bhowmik, A.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

ENN http://ehs.stanford.edu/aboutus/news.htmlEH&S News & Notes Edition: December 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Heather Perry at hperry@stanford.edu or 3-1308. PERSONAL RADIATION MONITORING UPDATES Health Physics Group training plan. All Stanford employees should complete this form upon hiring, and upon changing job func HEALTH & SAFETY #12;U.S. HOTEL FIRES University Fire Marshal's Office The National Fire Protection

357

Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations April 3, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued Preliminary Notices of Violation (PNOVs) to three contractors - Stanford University, Pacific Underground Construction, Inc., and Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - for violations in September 2007 of the Department's worker safety and health regulations. Stanford University is the managing and operating contractor for DOE's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), located in Menlo Park, California. At the time the violations occurred, Pacific Underground Construction was performing work at SLAC under subcontract to

359

Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

360

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Ein: Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin (w/m) in Teilzeit (27,3 Std./W.) DESY Das Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY ist E-Mail: Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY Personalabteilung | Kennziffer: EM124/2014 Notkestra?e

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Ein Engineer (w/m) DESY Das Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY ist eines der weltweit führenden Zentren Angabe der Kennziffer, auch per E-Mail: Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY Personalabteilung

362

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Ein Beamline Ingenieurin (w/m) DESY Das Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY ist eines der weltweit führenden mit Angabe der Kennziffer, auch per E-Mail: Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY Personalabteilung

363

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Ein/m) NanoLab (SEM/Mikroskopie) DESY Das Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY ist eines der weltweit Angabe der Kennziffer, auch per E-Mail: Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY Personalabteilung

364

SUPRI (Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute) heavy oil research program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the work performed under Department of Energy contract FG19-87BC14126 during the period February 22, 1987 to February 21, 1990. During that period the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute has published twenty-two technical reports and professional papers. This report presents in general terms the scope of work of SUPRI which is divided in five main projects: reservoir properties, in-situ combustion, improvement of steam injection by additives, well-to-well formation evaluation, and field support services. The results obtained during the period of performance of the contract are then presented in the form of abstracts from the technical reports and papers written during the period of performance.

Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Aziz, K.; Castanier, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 1, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

04: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear 04: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 Electronic mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov Documents Available for Download March 7, 2012 EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA

367

EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear 4: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 Electronic mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov Documents Available for Download March 7, 2012 EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA

368

STANFORD HCI GROUP & AIM LAB Dynamic Checklists for Operating Room Crises  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-time synchronization between input devices. Stanford HCI / Kristen Leach, Jesse Cirimele, Leslie Wu, Justin Lee, Tonya current prototype of a dynamic checklist for Asystole. Our current EHR and condensed vitals section

Klemmer, Scott

369

DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Stanford Geothermal Program had a noteworthy result this week, having achieved a proof of concept in the use of tiny particles called nanoparticles as tracers to characterize fractured rocks.

370

STANFORD AMATEUR RADIO STATION W6YX PRESS RELEASE June 19, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as the loss of electricity. "We want the community to know that in the event of an emergency, ham radio the 1920s, the Stanford Amateur Radio Club has been a home to wireless and electronics pioneers, including

Straight, Aaron

371

Scientists Pass Solid Particles Through Rock in DOE-Sponsored Research at Stanford University  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE-sponsored research at Stanford University under the direction of Dr. Roland Horne is advancing the application of nanotechnology in determining fluid flow through enhanced geothermal system reservoirs at depth.

372

The Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 12.5 billion electron volt (BeV) particle accelerator the Zero Gradient Synchrotron was constructed and put into operation at the Argonne National Laboratory in August 1963. The ZGS will form the center for high energy physics research in the Midwestern part of this country. In this paper a brief description of the ZGS is given together with a discussion of the aims methods and equipment of experimental high energy physics research.

L. C. Teng

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Synchrotron-radiation experiments with recoil ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of atoms, ions and molecules with synchrotron radiation have generally focused on measurements of properties of the electrons ejected during, or after, the photoionization process. Much can also be learned, however, about the atomic or molecular relaxation process by studies of the residual ions or molecular fragments following inner-shell photoionization. Measurements are reported of mean kinetic energies of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon recoil ions produced by vacancy cascades following inner-shell photoionization using white and monochromatic synchrotron x radiation. Energies are much lower than for the same charge-state ions produced by charged-particle impact. The results may be applicable to design of future angle-resolved ion-atom collision experiments. Photoion charge distributions are presented and compared with other measurements and calculations. Related experiments with synchrotron-radiation produced recoil ion, including photoionization of stored ions and measurement of shakeoff in near-threshold excitation, are briefly discussed. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Levin, J.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Photodiode-Based X-Ray Beam-Position Monitor With High Spatial-Resolution for the NSLS-II Beamlines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a photodiode-based monochromatic X-ray beam-position monitor (X-BPM) with high spatial resolution for the project beamlines of the NSLS-II. A ring array of 32 Si PIN-junction photodiodes were designed for use as a position sensor, and a low-noise HERMES4 ASIC chip was integrated into the electronic readout system. A series of precision measurements to characterize electrically the Si-photodiode sensor and the ASIC chip demonstrated that the inherent noise is sufficiently below tolerance levels. Following up modeling of detector's performance, including geometrical optimization using a Gaussian beam, we fabricated and assembled a first prototype. In this paper, we describe the development of this new state-of-the-art X-ray BPM along the beamline, in particular, downstream from the monochromator.

Yoon, P.S.; Siddons, D. P.

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

1:30 - 1:45  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future Tuesday (10/8/02) J. Miao - Chair 1:30 - 1:45 K. Hodgson, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Welcome Remarks 1:45 - 2:15 J. Stöhr, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Real Space Imaging by Means of X-Ray Photoemission Electron Microscopy 2:15 - 2:45 J. Kirz, State University of New York at Stony Brook STXM and diffraction-imaging - the view from the NSLS 2:45 - 3:15 C. Fadley, University of California, Davis & Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Holographic Imaging of Local Atomic Structure: Where Is It and Where Can It Go? 3:15 - 3: 30 Break K. Hodgson - Chair 3:30 - 4:00 I. Robinson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Phasing of Three Dimensional Diffraction Patterns from Finite-Sized

376

Three Dimensional Structure of the MqsR:MqsA Complex: A Novel TA Pair Comprised of a Toxin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was collected at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X6A beamline, funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, under agreement GM-0080. The NSLS

Wood, Thomas K.

377

Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The room-temperature structure of lysozyme is determined using 40000 individual diffraction patterns from micro-crystals flowing in liquid suspension across a synchrotron microfocus beamline.

Stellato, F.

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 such as dioxins and furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). *Work

Brookhaven National Laboratory

379

Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Research | Stanford  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Research Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Research New Proposals Standard GU Proposals Instructions for New Standard Proposals (Not LOI or Rapid Access) Tips for How to Wow Rapid Access Letter of Intent (LOI) Proposal Extension Requests X-ray/VUV Macromolecular Crystallography Beam Time Allocation/Scheduling How to Request Beam Time SSRL Access Policy SSRL Schedules New Proposals SSRL operates as a dedicated synchrotron radiation source for approximately nine months per year (usually from early November through early August). Submitting a proposal is the first step to access beam time at SSRL. SSRL scientists are available to help answer questions about the accelerator (SPEAR3), beam lines, capabilities, science or techniques to help users plan their experiments and their SSRL proposals.

380

Performance of new infrared beamline U12IR at the National Synchrotron Light Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequency limit of 2 cm 1 i.e., 60 GHz or a photon energy of 250 eV . The infrared light from infrared beamline at the NSLS and, with increasing demand for measurement time, has been followed by a series of new infrared ports presently under construction and com- missioning. This also allowed for some

Tanner, David B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

382

Synchrotron-Radiation-Based Moessbauer Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a new method that yields Moessbauer absorption spectra using synchrotron radiation (SR); this method is applicable for almost all Moessbauer nuclides including those that cannot be measured by previous methods using radioisotope (RI) sources. The Moessbauer spectrum of the 68.752 keV excited state of {sup 73}Ge, which cannot be measured using a RI source, was measured using SR. Our results show that this method can be used to perform advanced Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements owing to the excellent features of SR.

Seto, Makoto [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-04 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Masuda, Ryo; Mitsui, Takaya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Higashitaniguchi, Satoshi; Kitao, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-04 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Inaba, Chika [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-04 (Japan); Yoda, Yoshitaka [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

383

NSLS Services | Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computing Services Computing Services Individual Computer Scanning To run a Nessus scan on your system or get existing Nessus Scan data go to http://scanner.bnl.gov/myresults.html General Desktop Support Please contact: itdhelp@bnl.gov or (631) 344-5522 Cybersecurity Requirements The following information contains links viewable only from BNL's internal network. You should review this information once you are on site. ALL COMPUTERS OR OTHER NETWORK DEVICES MUST BE REGISTERED WITH BNL IF THEY ARE TO BE USED ON THE BNL NETWORK. Please read "A visitors guide to BNL networks" regarding policies and procedures: http://intranet.bnl.gov/itd/networking/NWdns.asp "Cyber Security Unclassified" as defined by The Standards-Based Management System (SBMS), https://sbms.bnl.gov/standard/2j/2j00i011.htm

384

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure and Dynamics in Solutions and Membranes Structure and Dynamics in Solutions and Membranes Overview Macromolecular crystallography has been enormously successful in elucidating the structures of proteins and other biomolecules. These data are being combined with emerging genetic and biochemical information on pathways to suggest temporal, spatial, and functional relations controlling cellular function. However, the central question in biophysics still remains: What is the connection between the structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, polysaccharides, and their complexes? Answering this question requires understanding the dynamics of macromolecular structures in their natural environment, where flexibility of the molecules and water, pH, and ion concentration play determinant roles. Examples include protein and nucleic acid folding and unfolding, polymer collapse upon change of solvent, electron transfer, and large-scale fluctuations in macromolecules.

385

NSLS Activity Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Activity Report Activity Report 2009 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2009 Periodic Table Dust Jacket 2008 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008 2007 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2006 - September 30, 2007 Science Highlights PDF Publications PDF 2006 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006 2005 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2004 - September 30, 2005 2004 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004 2003 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2002 - September 30, 2003 2002 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2001 - September 30, 2002 2001 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2000 - September 30, 2001 2000 Activity Report Covering October 1, 1999 - September 30, 2000 1999 Activity Report Covering October 1, 1998 - September 30, 1999

386

SSRL ETS Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Engineering & Technical Services Groups: Mechanical Services Group Mechanical Services Group Sharepoint...

387

Optical Synchrotron Precursors of Radio Hypernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some hypernova (HN) explosions accompany much brighter radio afterglows than those of ordinary core-collapse supernovae (SNe), which we here term radio HNe. Due to their association with low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (llGRBs), and with implied relativistic ejecta velocities, previous studies suggested that the enhanced radio emissions are essentially energized by relativistic jets. By re-examining some observed radio HNe based on the refreshed shock model, we find, however, that they can be consistently explained by afterglow emissions from spherical HN explosions without jet component. In this model, a sequence of shock breakout shells interacts with the circumstellar wind medium and induces multi-band synchrotron emission. Our model can be confirmed by optical synchrotron precursors from ~ 1000 s to 1 day after shock breakouts, which are detectable by current and future high-cadence wide-field surveys. They can be also associated with ordinary HNe with an event rate of ~ 0.32/yr from <~ 40 Mpc. Most of...

Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nagakura, Hiroki; Suwa, Yudai; Nakamura, Takashi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Ein: Ingenieurin (w/m) der Elektrotechnik für die Leitung der Elektronikfertigung DESY Das Deutsche Elektronen mit Angabe der Kennziffer, auch per E-Mail: Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY Personalabteilung

389

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Ein Produktdesignerin (w/m) DESY Das Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY ist eines der weltweit führenden uns auf Ihre Bewerbung mit Angabe der Kennziffer, auch per E-Mail: Deutsches Elektronen

390

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Ein: Studentische IT-Hilfskräfte (w/m) 1st-Level-Support DESY Das Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY ist eines der uns auf Ihre Bewerbung mit Angabe der Kennziffer, auch per E-Mail: Deutsches Elektronen

391

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beschleuniger | Forschung mit Photonen | Teilchenphysik Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron Ein: Sachbearbeiterin Kreditoren (w/m) DESY Das Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY ist eines der weltweit führenden Kindergarten. Wir freuen uns auf Ihre Bewerbung mit Angabe der Kennziffer, auch per E-Mail: Deutsches

392

The First International Workshop on Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The First International Workshop on Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) Spectroscopy and biochemists and has been operational for about a year. Drs. Kunihiko Gekko (HiSOR, Japan) and Ye Tao (BSRF REPORTS SYNCHROTRON RADIATION NEWS, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2002 33 1st International Workshop on SRCD

Wallace, Bonnie Ann

393

Parton energy loss due to synchrotron-like gluon emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a quasiclassical theory of the synchrotron-like gluon radiation. Our calculations show that the parton energy loss due to the synchrotron gluon emission may be important in the jet quenching phenomenon if the plasma instabilities generate a sufficiently strong chromomagnetic field. Our gluon spectrum disagrees with that obtained by Shuryak and Zahed within the Schwinger's proper time method.

B. G. Zakharov

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

Synchrotron Production of Photons by a Two-body System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The power spectrum of the synchrotron radiation generated by the motion of a two-body charged system in an accelerator is derived in the framework of the Schwinger source theory. The final formula can be used to verify the Lorentz length contraction of the two-body system moving in the synchrotron.

Miroslav Pardy

2000-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty- Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9- 11, 2009. Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms Bruce R. Julian, U. S

Foulger, G. R.

396

Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide /...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces...

397

http://www.slac.stanford.edu/~quarkpt/slaconly/lcc0121.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 August 2003 Sensitivity to Interaction Region Solenoid Horizontal Motion Peter Tenenbaum and Tor Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford University Stanford, CA Abstract: Horizontal motion of a linear collider's Interaction Region solenoid magnet will cause vertical motion of the beam at the collision point. An expression relating the two effects is derived, and a tolerance on the solenoid's position is estimated. Sensitivity to Interaction Region Solenoid Horizontal Motion P. Tenenbaum, T.O. Raubenheimer LCC-Note-0121 August 13, 2003 Abstract Horizontal motion of a linear collider's Interatction Region solenoid magnet will cause vertical motion of the beam at the collision point. An expression relating the two effects is derived, and a tolerance

398

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Order R2-2005-0022, May 18, 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CALIFORNIA REGIONAL WATER QUALITY CONTROL BOARD CALIFORNIA REGIONAL WATER QUALITY CONTROL BOARD SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION ORDER No. R2-2005-0022 RESCISSION of: ORDER No. 85-88, WASTE DISCHARGE REQUIREMENTS and ADOPTION of: SITE CLEANUP REQUIREMENTS for: STANFORD UNIVERSITY and the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY for the property located at the: STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER 2575 SAND HILL ROAD MENLO PARK, SAN MATEO COUNTY FINDINGS: The California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region (Water Board) finds that: 1. Purpose of Order This Order establishes Site Cleanup Requirements for the investigation and remediation of impacted soil and groundwater resulting from historical spills and leaks that have occurred during the course of operations of the Stanford Linear

399

NREL: News - NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

313 313 NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells Devices could charge battery-powered products in the future January 10, 2013 It may be possible soon to charge cell phones, change the tint on windows, or power small toys with peel-and-stick versions of solar cells, thanks to a partnership between Stanford University and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A scientific paper, "Peel and Stick: Fabricating Thin Film Solar Cells on Universal Substrates," appears in the online version of Scientific Reports, a subsidiary of the British scientific journal Nature. Peel-and-stick, or water-assisted transfer printing (WTP), technologies were developed by the Stanford group and have been used before for nanowire

400

EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the 7: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed project to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 8, 1995 EA-1107: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center September 8, 1995 EA-1107: Final Environmental Assessment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ARPA-E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use ARPA-E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use May 25, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis Members of Girl Scout Troop #61373 from Santa Clara, CA create an instructional video for home energy use. | Photo courtesy of Troop Leader Sylvia Kennedy Members of Girl Scout Troop #61373 from Santa Clara, CA create an instructional video for home energy use. | Photo courtesy of Troop Leader Sylvia Kennedy Kristina Pflanz Writer & Contractor, Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy What does this project do? Researchers are seeking a breakthrough on the human behavioral side of energy use. They have made a long-term goal of reducing average residential energy use by over 20 percent.

402

Created by the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP) Department of Management Science and Engineering in the School of Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering in the School of Engineering Stanford University Global Innovation Tournament Organizer Toolkit and Engineering in the School of Engineering Stanford University OVERVIEW & BACKGROUND Organizing and running of these challenges requires creativity, teamwork, execution, and value creation. ORGANIZING & RUNNING A TOURNAMENT

Prinz, Friedrich B.

403

Subscriber access provided by STANFORD UNIV GREEN LIBR Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy conversion efficiency. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), which has many important of Chemistry, Stanford UniVersity, Stanford, California 94305, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 that in single crystalline Si. However the minority carrier diffusion length is typically only 300 nm.2

Cui, Yi

404

High-Tc Superconductor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 High-temperature superconductors (HTSC's), following their remarkable discovery in 1986,...

405

Introduction to nuclear resonant scattering with synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, the use of synchrotron radiation has enjoyed increasing interest in applications to topics of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The development was initiated by the pioneering experimental work of Gerdau et al. following the original proposal of Ruby to use synchrotron radiation for the excitation of low energy nuclear resonances. From the early experiments it was clear that synchrotron radiation experiments with nuclear resonances would only succeed if familiar energy resolved measurements were replaced with a new time resolved technique. During the last decade, the authors experienced the refinement of this novel method for obtaining hyperfine parameters. This exciting development-materialized because of more intense synchrotron radiation sources at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), powerful new avalanche photo diode detectors, and improved high energy resolution monochromators. Simultaneously the tools for evaluation of the novel time spectra were created, e.g., Sturhahn and Gerdau developed extensive computer codes based on the theoretical descriptions of Hannon and Trammel. Many beautiful demonstrations of the basic features of the coherent elastic scattering channel using Bragg- and Laue-reflections from single crystals deepened the understanding of nuclear resonant scattering. The concepts leading to the application of synchrotron radiation to elastic and inelastic nuclear resonant scattering are discussed. The resulting new experimental techniques are compared to conventional Moessbauer spectroscopy. A survey of situations that favor experiments with synchrotron radiation is offered.

Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E.E.; Toellner, T.S.; Hession, P.; Hu, M.; Sutter, J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

Wiedemann, Helmut

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

Proceedings of the workshop on LAMPF II synchrotron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics covered at the workshop include: considerations for a staged approach to synchrotron construction; consideration of energy and cost for a kaon and/or antiproton factory; changing the transition energy in the main ring for the Fermilab antiproton beam; a lattice with 50% undispersed straight sections; bunch width considerations in a stretcher ring; a self-consistent longitudinal distribution; rapid-cycling tuned rf cavity for synchrotron use; considerations on a high-shunt impedance tunable RF cavity; rotating condensers; low extraction from the stretcher ring; an antiproton source for LAMPF II; synchrotron magnet circuit; power supply and ring magnet options; and notes for a kaon factory design. (GHT)

Cooper, R.K. (comp.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fluorescence-type Monochromatic X-ray Beam-position Monitor with High-spatial Resolution for the NSLS-II Beamlines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a fluorescence-type monochromatic X-ray beam-position monitor (X-BPM) with high-spatial resolution for end-station experiments at the initial project beamlines of the NSLS-II. We designed a ring array of multi-segmented Si PIN-junction photodiodes to use as a position sensor. Further, we integrated a low-noise charge-preamplification HERMES4 ASIC chip into an electronic readout system for photon-counting application. A series of precision measurements to characterize electronically the Si-photodiode sensor and the ASIC chip demonstrated that the inherent noise from the detector system is sufficiently low to meet our stringent requirements. Using a Gaussian beam, we parametrically modeled the optimum working distance to ensure the detector's best performance. Based upon the results from the parametric modeling, prototypes of the next versions of the X-BPM are being developed. In this paper, we describe the methodology for developing the new compact monochromatic X-ray BPM, including its instrumentation, detector modeling, and future plan.

Yoon, Phil S. [Experimental Facility Division, NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Siddons, D. Peter [Experimental Systems, NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

409

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 2, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains abstracts from research conducted at the national synchrotron light source. (LSP)

Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.N. [eds.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve Annual Report 2002-03 Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve Annual Report 2002-03 · Stanford University #12;The most basic into new opportunities. Jasper Ridge is faced with limits to growth and is susceptible to the strains Sedgwick, and Irene Brown; Nona Chiariello (Jasper Ridge Research Coordinator), as well as myself

411

Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve Annual Report 2003-04 Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve Annual Report 2003-04 · Stanford University #12;The mission of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve is to contribute to the understanding of the Earth's natural systems. For Jasper Ridge, that means understanding the urban presence of humans as an integral dimension

412

UCSB--HEP--95--08 Stanford--HEP--95--01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics and Heavy Quark Effective Theory 8 C. Plan of the Review 10 II. Theory of Leptonic, CA 94305 pat@picasso.slac.stanford.edu Abstract We review the experimental measurements the magnitudes of two fundamental parameters of the standard model, the Cabibbo­Kobayashi­Maskawa matrix elements

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

413

ICORR '99: International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, Stanford, CA AUTONOMY AND LEARNING IN MOBILE ROBOTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - ICORR '99: International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, Stanford, CA AUTONOMY AND LEARNING IN MOBILE ROBOTS George A. Bekey Computer Science Department University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089-0781 bekey@robotics.usc.edu http://www-robotics.usc.edu/ Abstract Recent trends

Duckett, Tom

414

STANFORD PEER-TO-PEER MULTICAST (SPPM) OVERVIEW AND RECENT EXTENSIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., Palo Alto, CA Work performed while on leave from Ericsson Eurolab, Herzogenrath, Germany 2. STANFORD to its scalability and its potentially lower cost for delivering media streams to a large population population of fixed and mobile devices with different decoding and display capabilities. Now with Dyyno, Inc

Girod, Bernd

415

ME346A Introduction to Statistical Mechanics Wei Cai Stanford University Win 2011 Handout 3. Probability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assignment of probability in statistical mechanics is subjectively based (e.g. uniform distributionME346A Introduction to Statistical Mechanics ­ Wei Cai ­ Stanford University ­ Win 2011 Handout 3. Probability January 7, 2011 Contents 1 Definitions 2 2 Interpretations of probability 3 3 Probability rules 5

Cai, Wei

416

Ionospheric Threat Model Methodology for Juan Blanch, Todd Walter, Per Enge. Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ionospheric Threat Model Methodology for WAAS Juan Blanch, Todd Walter, Per Enge. Stanford of a threat model. The threat model is used to restrict the expected ionospheric behavior. It must not be too driving the ionosphere are not entirely known, a decision has been made to base the threat model

Stanford University

417

Self-Assembling Tile Systems that Heal from Small Fragments Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-Assembling Tile Systems that Heal from Small Fragments Holin Chen Stanford University holin systems have proved to be a useful model for understanding self-assembly at the nano scale. Self-healing tile systems, introduced by Winfree, have the property that the self-assembled shape can recover from

Goel, Ashish

418

Stanford Geothermal Program Interd is c i p l inary Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.E geothermal energy from artificially stimu- lated systems by in-place flashing was studied experimentally. Although improved geothermal energy recovery from stimulated reservoirs by in-place flashing appears promStanford Geothermal Program Interd is c i p l inary Research i n Engineering and Earth Sciences

Stanford University

419

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model Kevin and physical processes to test our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and to predict ecosystem biomass and carbon fluxes. We combine the photosynthesis and biophysical calculations in the Simple

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

420

PowerNet: Energy Use & Energy Waste powernet.stanford.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PowerNet: Energy Use & Energy Waste powernet.stanford.edu 345,281 kWh $ 36,255 Device Type Measured lights, etc. Current Energy Use of Computing Systems Monday: Holiday What About Waste? Network Traffic on Core Switches Label Switch Type Active Ports (gigabit each) Data trace (# days) a HP 5412zl 120 150 b

Levis, Philip

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SXST 2014 - 7th SSRL School on Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Techniques  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

process of obtaining a visa soon. General SLAC Visitor Information SLAC visitor site Tourism and Dining Information Local Restaurant Guides Visitor Information Events at Stanford...

422

Photo of the Week: The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Photo of the Week: The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron March 11, 2013 - 6:00pm Addthis Since 1960, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) has been one of the world's premiere particle accelerators, well known for the three Nobel Prizes won as a result of research performed there. The AGS name is derived from the concept of alternating gradient focusing, in which the field gradients of the accelerator's 240 magnets are successively alternated inward and outward, permitting particles to be propelled and focused in both the horizontal and vertical plane at the same time. In this 1958 photo, giant magnets await installation into the AGS accelerator ring tunnel at Brookhaven National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

423

Photo of the Week: The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Photo of the Week: The Alternating Gradient Synchrotron March 11, 2013 - 6:00pm Addthis Since 1960, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) has been one of the world's premiere particle accelerators, well known for the three Nobel Prizes won as a result of research performed there. The AGS name is derived from the concept of alternating gradient focusing, in which the field gradients of the accelerator's 240 magnets are successively alternated inward and outward, permitting particles to be propelled and focused in both the horizontal and vertical plane at the same time. In this 1958 photo, giant magnets await installation into the AGS accelerator ring tunnel at Brookhaven National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

424

The Synchrotron Boiler a Thermalizer in Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are difficulties in understanding what keeps the plasma thermalized in compact sources, especially during rapid variations of the emitted flux. Particle-particle collisions are too inefficient in hot rarefied plasmas, and a faster process is called for. Synchrotron absorption is such a process. We show that relativistic electrons can thermalize in a few synchrotron cooling times by emitting and absorbing cyclo-synchrotron photons. The resulting equilibrium distribution is a Maxwellian at low energies, with a high energy power law tail when Compton cooling is important. Assuming that the particles emit completely self absorbed synchrotron radiation while they at the same time Compton scatter ambient UV photons, we calculate the time dependent behavior of the distribution function, and the final high energy spectra.

Ghisellini, G; Svensson, R; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Haardt, Francesco; Svensson, Roland

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Synchrotron Boiler: a Thermalizer in Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are difficulties in understanding what keeps the plasma thermalized in compact sources, especially during rapid variations of the emitted flux. Particle-particle collisions are too inefficient in hot rarefied plasmas, and a faster process is called for. Synchrotron absorption is such a process. We show that relativistic electrons can thermalize in a few synchrotron cooling times by emitting and absorbing cyclo-synchrotron photons. The resulting equilibrium distribution is a Maxwellian at low energies, with a high energy power law tail when Compton cooling is important. Assuming that the particles emit completely self absorbed synchrotron radiation while they at the same time Compton scatter ambient UV photons, we calculate the time dependent behavior of the distribution function, and the final high energy spectra.

Gabriele Ghisellini; Francesco Haardt; Roland Svensson

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

426

Characterization of New Cathode Materials using Synchrotron-based...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Techniques and the Studies of Li-Air Batteries Characterization of New Cathode Materials using Synchrotron-based X-ray Techniques and the Studies of Li-Air Batteries 2009 DOE...

427

Serial crystallography on in vivo grown microcrystals using synchrotron radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure solution of T. brucei cathepsin B from 80 in vivo grown crystals with an average volume of 9 ?m3 obtained by serial synchrotron crystallography at a microfocus beamline is reported.

Gati, C.

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, power supply procurement, BPM electronics testing, and controls system design. With details of technical'S ASSESSMENT FEBRUARY 2010 OVERALL ASSESSMENT The National Synchrotron Light Source II project maintained excellent technical progress and satisfactory cost and schedule performance. The DOE Independent Project

Ohta, Shigemi

429

Noninvasive emittance and energy spread monitor using optical synchrotron radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a design for a minimally perturbing diagnostic minichicane, which utilizes optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) generated from magnetic bends in the chicane, to measure the rms horizontal and vertical beam sizes, ...

Fiorito, R.

430

Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Materials For Energy: In Situ Synchrotron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 15, 2011 4:00 pm Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Materials For Energy: In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Studies for Materials Design and Discovery Stephen K. Streiffer Deputy...

431

Type B Accident Investigation of the January 28, 2003, Fall and Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by John S. Muhlestein, Director, Stanford Site Office (DOE/SC), U.S. Department of Energy.

432

Geothermal-reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Second annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the following tasks is discussed: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs, noncondensable gas reservoir engineering, well test analysis and bench-scale experiments, DOE-ENEL Cooperative Research, Stanford-IIE Cooperative Research, and workshop and seminars. (MHR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Better Buildings Case Competition 2014 Stanford participated for the first time this year to The Better Buildings Case Competition's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Better Buildings Case Competition 2014 Stanford participated for the first time this year to The Better Buildings Case Competition's third edition sustainability issues faced by the industry. One of six topics ranging from how

Prinz, Friedrich B.

434

SUSTAINABILITY OPPORTUNITY Waste audits from campus buildings reveal that 30% of the trash Stanford sends to the landfill is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How To... SUSTAINABILITY OPPORTUNITY Waste audits from campus buildings reveal that 30 on campus have active composting programs. Interested buildings and departments can start a voluntary office;MORE INFORMATION SUSTAINABLE STANFORD'S WASTE REDUCTION EFFORTS http://sustainable

Straight, Aaron

435

Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of {sup 57}Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2{plus_minus}0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1{1/2} natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

Brown, D.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Rubenstein Workshop March 2002  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recent Advances in Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation Recent Advances in Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory March 4-5, 2002 Program Director: Edward Rubenstein PDF of all abstracts Scientists from ALS, APS, Ben-Gurion, BNL, Elletra, ESRF, HASYLAB, KEK, LLNL, NSLS, SPring-8, SSRL, the Stanford Medical Center, the UCSF Medical Center and the University of Oregon met at SLAC on March 4-5 to discuss the results of their current research on medical uses of synchrotron radiation. A number of themes emerged. First, it is apparent that as medicine is becoming molecular, researchers in this discipline are focusing on ever more detailed use of information to understand disease and design drugs to intervene. The initial medical use of synchrotron radiation in coronary angiography studies continues to evolve and the images have reached exceedingly high quality. Capillary perfusion of the myocardium is now being quantified. Striking images of the interior of the ossicles were presented, and new approaches to the study of pulmonary airways, the lung parenchyma, the cerebral vasculature and the choroid plexus were discussed. Novel approaches have resulted in substantial improvements in breast imaging.

437

NEPA CX Determination SS-SC-12-03 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF) 3 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination A. SSO NEPA Control #: SS-SC-12-03 AN12038 B. Brief Description of Proposed Action: The project scope includes the construction of a new computer facility (21,500 square feet) capable of providing 3 MW of data center potential. The new two-story facility will provide infrastructure for a multitude of server racks. There are three fenced service yards outside the building, one for chillers, one for new electrical substation equipment, and one for emergency generators. The ground floor will be utilized for electrical and receiving area; the second floor will have a server room, mechanical room, conference

438

Project X with Rapid Cycling and Dual Storage Superconducting Synchrotrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of neutrino oscillations and rare meson decays are main physics goals of Project X. The successful physics outcome relies on the feasibility of high-intensity neutrino and meson (K+ and \\mu) beams. In order to meet this goal we propose accelerator system dominated by the synchrotrons (Option A) as a technologically easier and significantly more cost-effective alternative to the accelerator system dominated by the linear accelerators (Option B). The synchrotron-based accelerator system and its main components are outlined and the expected proton beam power for the neutrino and meson beams production is presented and discussed.

Piekarz, Henryk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Synchrotron radiation as a light source in confocal microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optical properties of a confocal scanning microscope that was designed to utilize a synchrotron as light source are presented. The usable spectral range is from 200 nm up to 700 nm. Using 325?nm laser light it is shown that the lateral resolution is about 125 nm and the axial resolution better than 250 nm. After transport of the microscope from Utrecht to the Daresbury Synchrotron Source 200?nm excitation can be applied and the lateral resolution will drop to below 100 nm.

C. J. R. van der Oord; H. C. Gerritsen; Y. K. Levine; W. J. Myring; G. R. Jones; I. H. Munro

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Synchrotron x-ray reflectivity study of oxidation/passivation of copper and silicon.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron x-ray-scattering technique studies of copper and silicon electrochemical interfaces are reported. These two examples illustrate the application of synchrotron x-ray techniques for oxidation, passivation, and dissolution of metals and semiconductors.

Chu, Y.; Nagy, Z.; Parkhutik, V.; You, H.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

Jones, Keith W.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

A perspective view of the medical applications of synchrotron radiation in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this review article, the medical applications of synchrotron radiation in Japan are briefly described, principally on angiography and...

Yuji Itai

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Studies of magnetism and exchange scattering in solids using synchroton radiation and spin-polarized photoemission. Progress report, June 1, 1982-May 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the experiments necessary for proving the existence of Spin Polarized EXAFS (SPEXAFS) and for establishing it as a useful techncique for studying magnetism in solids have been carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Transmission EXAFS, which does not depend on electron spin, has been measured in several manganese compounds. The 3s photopeaks of Mn/sup 2 +/ in MnF/sub 2/ have been shown to display EXAFS-like oscillations. The pin dependence of these oscillations will next be studied. Observations of the 3p photopeaks of iron metal on a palladium substrate have shown anomalous intensity variations with varying photon energy. This phenomenon will also be studied further. The existence of Cooper minima in the iron 3s and 3p photoabsorption cross sections has been sought, and this investigation will continue.

Rothberg, G.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Macromolecular crystallography at synchrotron radiation sources: current status and future developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF...SPring8, Harima, Japan; 1997). SPring8...National Synchrotron Radiation Research Centre...Factory (Tsukuba, Japan) SR: 2.5; AR...SPring8 (Hyogo, Japan) 8 100 1436 12...Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy recovery linacs as synchrotron radiation sources ,,invited... Sol M. Grunera)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 Don Bilderback Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source York 14853 Ken Finkelstein Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, Ithaca, New York 14853 Qun Shen Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source and Department of Materials

Shen, Qun

446

THE INSTITUTE FOR SOLID STATE PHYSICS 2013 Laser and Synchrotron Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coherent light sources based on laser and synchrotron technology over a wide spectrum range from X-ray67 THE INSTITUTE FOR SOLID STATE PHYSICS 2013 Laser and Synchrotron Research Center LASOR X X LASOR D X E SPring-8 BL07 X Laser and Synchrotron Research (LASOR) Center

Katsumoto, Shingo

447

Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy T.K. Raab a,*, J.P. Vogel b factors to the fungus Erysiphe cichoracearum, a causative agent of powdery mildew disease. Three genes to pro- liferate when environmental conditions and re- sources are optimum. Cellulose, an abundant

448

LEFT The electron gun at the Diamond Synchrotron in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEFT The electron gun at the Diamond Synchrotron in Didcot, Oxfordshire WWW.HOWITWORKSDAILY.COM026" Electron guns are a very versatile electrical component. They are essential to a number of devices, from 3D currents. When installed in an electrical device's vacuum tube, the gun turns electrons and ions

Crowther, Paul

449

Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research Centre of the Helmholtz Association ACCELERATOR RESEARCH· DESY, Hamburg location, is seeking: Senior Scientist (f/m) Accelerator Research DESY DESY is one of the world's leading research centres for photon science, particle

450

Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research Centre of the Helmholtz Association ACCELERATOR RESEARCH· DESY, Hamburg location, is seeking: Scientist (f/m) Tenure Track physics as well as accelerator physics. Accelerator research at DESY in Hamburg, Germany, is being

451

Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron A Research Centre and astroparticle physics as well as accelerator physics. The Photo Injector Test Facility PITZ in Zeuthen (near XFEL. As part of the accelerator R&D program of the Helmholtz Association the focus of the research

452

Image processing pipeline for synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A software environment has been developed for processing and reconstructing online the large amount of data generated at TOMCAT, a synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy beamline of the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. It has been designed to minimize user interaction and maximize the reconstruction speed and therefore optimize beam time usage.

Hintermller, C.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

Synchrotron radiation identified human chemical fingerprints a novel forensic approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synchrotron radiation identified human chemical fingerprints ­ a novel forensic approach T with the goal of developing an advanced forensic technique to identify complicated partial latent prints a forensic analysis of the fingerprint chemistry, or to identify the latent prints of pre-pubescent children

454

Introduction to the Proceedings of the Sixth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop, Stanford Geothermal Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on thenumerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed i n these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented . Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey ( U.S.G.S.) , Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would l i k e t o thank Jean Cook and Joanne Hartford (Petroleum Engineering Department, Stanford University) without whom there may never have been a Sixth Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Ian G. Donaldson Stanford University December 31, 1980

Ramey, Henry J. Jr.; Kruger, Paul; Donaldson, Ian G.

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

455

Gauge-Higgs-fermion spin-spin effects at the Stanford Linear Collider (and CERN LEP)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the various spin-spin effects in the processes e+e-???i0??j0 and e+e-???i+??j- at Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) energies, where ??j0 and ??j are gauge-Higgs fermions associated with the (minimal) supersymmetric extension of the standard SU3cSU2LU1 model and are understood to decay in model-dependent ways. We argue that such effects may very well be visible at SLC (and CERN LEP) energies. We give a general theoretical apparatus for discussing these effects and assessing their various manifestations. We work out some illustrative examples of such manifestations.

B. F. L. Ward

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Photon Sciences Directorate | 2010 Annual Report | Beamline & Optics R&D:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beamline & Optics R&D: Enhancing Tools at NSLS, NSLS-II Beamline & Optics R&D: Enhancing Tools at NSLS, NSLS-II Qun Shen "Synchrotron sources have quickly become an essential tool for a wide spectrum of research. All the action takes place at beamlines, each one consisting of a suite of sophisticated scientific instruments. The robust beamlines at NSLS produce remarkable science, and we made excellent progress on developing NSLS-II beamlines and associated science programs." - Qun Shen Director, Photon Division While keeping the existing ring and beamline mechanical systems running, Photon Sciences staff completed a number of R&D projects this year that will improve the tools of researchers at NSLS and, in the near future, NSLS-II. One of the major accomplishments was the installation and commissioning of

457

FRONTIER SYNCHROTRON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY BEAMLINE UNDER EXTREME CONDITIONS (FIS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FRONTIER SYNCHROTRON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY FRONTIER SYNCHROTRON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY BEAMLINE UNDER EXTREME CONDITIONS (FIS) Proposal Team: L. Carr 1 , D. Dolan 2 , R. Hemley 3 , S. Jacobson 4 , S. Karato 5 , Z. Liu 3 , W. Panero 6 , M. Pravica 7 , and T. Zhou 8 1 Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2 Sandia National Laboratories, 3 Carnegie Institution of Washington, 4 Northwestern University, 5 Yale University, 6 Ohio State University, 7 University of Nevada, 8 New Jersey Institute of Technology TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES APPLICATIONS SPECIFIC PROJECTS / ADDITIONAL INFORMATION * TECHNIQUE(S): Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; Raman and visible spectroscopy; Diamond anvil cell techniques for static high pressure; Gas-gun launchers for dynamic compression; Cryogenic techniques combined with DACs;

458

Pixel and Microstrip detectors for current and future synchrotron light  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pixel and Microstrip detectors for current and future synchrotron light Pixel and Microstrip detectors for current and future synchrotron light sources Friday, July 1, 2011 - 1:00pm SLAC, Kavli Auditorium Dr. Christian Brönnimann, CEO, DECTRIS Ltd., CH-5400 Baden, Switzerland The PILATUS pixel detectors, large area modular two-dimensional hybrid pixel array detectors, have revolutionized protein crystallography and biological small- and wide-angle scattering by combining noise-free counter properties with highest data acquisition rates. These features enable optimized data acquisition modes and new experimental techniques. The PILATUS 6M detector was developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut specifically for protein crystallography. DECTRIS has successfully commercialized the PILATUS technology. Currently eight 6M-systems are in

459

Nuclear Resonant Scattering on Earth Materials using Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NRS2005 Home NRS2005 Home Agenda Organizing Committee Nuclear Resonant Scattering on Earth Materials using Synchrotron Radiation February 12-13, 2005 Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory - Argonne, Illinois, USA Nuclear Resonant Scattering (NRS) techniques provide the Earth and planetary science community with opportunities for new and exciting results on the properties of materials at high pressure and temperature conditions. Such NRS experiments have become possible due to the extreme brightness of third-generation synchrotron radiation sources. NRS techniques fall into two broad areas, which are in many ways ideally or even uniquely suited for addressing a number of important geophysical questions: Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (NRIXS) provides information on

460

Application of X-ray synchrotron microscopy instrumentation in biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray micro-fluorescence imaging technique has been used as a significant tool in order to investigate minerals contents in some kinds of materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the elemental distribution of calcium and zinc in bone substitute materials (nano-hydroxyapatite spheres) and cortical bones through X-Ray Micro-fluorescence analysis with the increment of Synchrotron Radiation in order to evaluate the characteristics of the newly formed bone and its interface, the preexisting bone and biomaterials by the arrangement of collagen fibers and its birefringence. The elemental mapping was carried out at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas - Sao Paulo, Brazil working at D09-XRF beam line. Based on this study, the results suggest that hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are biocompatible, promote osteo-conduction and favored bone repair. (authors)

Gasperini, F. M. [Medical Science Program, Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi (Brazil); Pereira, G. R. [Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Granjeiro, J. M. [Molecular and Cell Biology Dept., Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Calasans-Maia, M. D. [Oral Surgery Dept., Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rossi, A. M. [Biomaterials Laboratory, Brazilian Center of Physics Research, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Perez, C. A. [Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, R. T.; Lima, I. [Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nsls stanford synchrotron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Optical Synchrotron Radiation Beam Imaging with a Digital Mask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have applied a new imaging/optical masking technique, which employs a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR), to perform high dynamic range (DR) beam imaging at the JLAB Energy Recovery Linac and the SLAC/SPEAR3 Synchrotron Light Source. The OSR from the beam is first focused onto the DMD to produce a primary image; selected areas of this image are spatially filtered by controlling the state of individual micro-mirrors; and finally, the filtered image is refocused onto a CCD camera. At JLAB this technique has been used successfully to view the beam halo with a DR ~ 105. At SPEAR3 the DMD was used to filter out the bright core of the stored beam to study the turn-by-turn dynamics of the 10-3 weaker injected beam. We describe the optical performance, present limitations and our plans to improve the DR of both experimental systems.

Fiorito, R. B. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Zhang, H. D. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Corbett, W. J. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fisher, A. S. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mok, W. Y. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tian, K. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Douglas, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Wilson, F. G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Mitsuhashi, T. M. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Shkvarunets, A. G. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on the use of synchrotron radiation and intensified video cameras. Depending on the beam energy, different synchrotron light sources must be used. A dedicated superconducting undulator has been built for low beam energies (450 GeV to 1.5 TeV), while edge and centre radiation from a beam-separation dipole magnet are used respectively for intermediate and high energies (up to 7 TeV). The emitted visible photons are collected using a retractable mirror, which sends the light into an optical system adapted for acquisition using intensified CCD cameras. This paper presents the design of the imaging system, and compares the expected light intensity with measurements and the calculated spatial resolution with a cross calibration performed with the wire scanners. Upgrades and future plans are also discussed.

Lefevre, Thibaut; /CERN; Bravin, Enrico; /CERN; Burtin, Gerard; /CERN; Guerrero, Ana; /CERN; Jeff, Adam; /CERN; Rabiller, Aurelie; /CERN; Roncarolo, Federico; /CERN; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

463

A VERY FAST RAMPING MUON SYNCHROTRON FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 4600 Hz fast ramping synchrotron is studied as an economical way of accelerating muons from 4 to 20 GeV/c for a neutrino factory. Eddy current losses are minimized by the low machine duty cycle plus thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations and thin copper wires. Combined function magnets with high gradients alternating within single magnets form the lattice. Muon survival is 83%.

SUMMERS,D.J.BERG,J.S.PALMER,R.B.GARREN,A.A.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

464

Putting synchrotron radiation to work for technology: Analytic methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains viewgraphs on: Advanced Light Source; Ultra-ESCA: Advanced Capabilities of XPS with High-Brightness Synchrotron Radiation; High-Resolution (20 nm) XPS and XANES with the ALS; Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Industry: Current Capabilities, Needs, and Possible Roles for the ALS; Materials Analysis by Photoemission: Is This Practical at ALS?; Applications of Long-Wavelength X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and X-Ray Powder Diffractometry.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Putting synchrotron radiation to work for technology: Analytic methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains viewgraphs on: Advanced Light Source; Ultra-ESCA: Advanced Capabilities of XPS with High-Brightness Synchrotron Radiation; High-Resolution (20 nm) XPS and XANES with the ALS; Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Industry: Current Capabilities, Needs, and Possible Roles for the ALS; Materials Analysis by Photoemission: Is This Practical at ALS ; Applications of Long-Wavelength X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and X-Ray Powder Diffractometry.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

NUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF HIGH INTENSITY HADRON SYNCHROTRONS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical algorithms for PIC simulation of beam dynamics in a high intensity synchrotron on a parallel computer are presented. We introduce numerical solvers of the Laplace-Poisson equation in the presence of walls, and algorithms to compute tunes and twiss functions in the presence of space charge forces. The working code for the simulation here presented is SIMBAD, that can be run as stand alone or as part of the UAL (Unified Accelerator Libraries) package.

LUCCIO, A.; D'IMPERIO, N.; MALITSKY, N.

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

467

Application of Synchrotron Radiation in the Geological and Environmental Sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of some of the different ways that synchrotrons x-ray beams can be used to study geological materials is presented here. This field developed over a period of about 30 years, and it is clear that the geological community has made major use of the many synchrotrons facilities operating around the world during this time period. This was a time of rapid change in the operational performance of the synchrotrons facilities and this in itself has made it possible for geologists to develop new and more refined types of experiments that have yielded many important results. The advance in experimental techniques has proceeded in parallel with a revolution in computing techniques that has made it possible to cope with the great amount of data accumulated in the experiments. It is reasonable, although risky, to speculate about what might be expected to develop in the field during the next five- to ten-year period. It does seem plausible that the rate of change in the performance of what might now be called conventional x-ray storage rings will slow. There are no new facilities that are superior to the ESRF, ALS, APS, or SPring8 facilities under construction or about to come into operation. Thus, performance increments in the characteristics of the x-ray sources may come through the introduction of specialized devices in existing storage rings. The free electron laser is one example of a developing new technology that should take us into new regions of performance for radiation sources and stimulate new types of experimental applications. It is also likely that major advances will come through the introduction of more sophisticated experimental devices developed for use with the very recently operational undulator or wiggler sources at the newer rings. Improved x-ray optics and x-ray detectors and more powerful computation and high-speed data transmission can bring about more refined experiments and make the synchrotrons facilities more widely available to the experimental community. The next years should therefore be a time of high productivity and great excitement quite comparable to the previous era of synchrotron-based geological research.

Jones, Keith W.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On October 11, 2004, at approximately 11:15 am, a subcontractor electrician working at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) received serious burn injuries requiring hospitalization due to an electrical arc flash that occurred during the installation of a circuit breaker in an energized 480-Volt (V) electrical panel.

469

STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir-Under Injection........................................................... 12 Measurements ...................................................................................... 19 Thermal Stress Effects................................................................... 33 4.2 4.3 4.4 INJECTION TECHNOLOGY

Stanford University

470

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

a t all boundaries a r e taken t o be cons- t a n t taking i n t o account t h e i r remote distance f r o m the area of the most considerable temperature fluctuations. (8)...

471

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contracts issued by Department of Energy Division of Geothermal Energy San Francisco Operations Office No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 Department of Energy Division of Geothermal Energy #12;#12;1 , .... TABLE n t e r e s t t o the geothermal energy community. The topic f o r panel analysis f o r the Sixth

Stanford University

472

Artificial neural networks applied to the analysis of synchrotron nuclear resonant scattering data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capabilities of artificial neural networks for the automatic and instantaneous analysis of nuclear resonant scattering spectra obtained at a synchrotron source are discussed.

Planckaert, N.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

473

Contemporary X-ray electron-density studies using synchrotron radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of synchrotron radiation for experimental electron-density determination during the last decade is reviewed. Possible future directions of this field are examined.

J?rgensen, M.R.V.

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

474

Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism of dense vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition method was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques.

Takashima, A.

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

475

Throughput Measurement of a Multilayer-Coated Schwarzschild Objective Using Synchrotron Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The throughput of a Schwarzschild objective using undulator synchrotron radiation was measured. ... estimated from the squared reflectivity of one multilayer mirror and from the obstruction ratio. However,...

Takanori Kiyokura; Fumihiko MAEDA; Yoshio Watanabe; Yoshinori Iketaki

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - argentina synchrotron radiation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 13 IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 35, NO. 5, MAY 1999 709 Tunable Coherent Radiation in the Soft X-Ray Summary: of synchrotron radiation generated...

477

A high quality permanent-magnet wiggler for the Rocketdyne/Stanford infrared free electron laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high quality, variable gap, variable taper, permanent-magnet wiggler has been built for infrared free electron laser (FEL) experiments to be performed at the Stanford Photon Research Laboratory. The design and characterization procedure used to assemble the wiggler is discussed. A simulated annealing code was used to minimize field errors arising from variations in the individual magnets. The computed electron trajectories associated with the measured magnetic fields are presented for a range of different operating points of the wiggler. These plots indicate a very high quality field over a large range of different wiggler operating regimes. Resultant trajectory wander over the 2 m long wiggler for a 40 MeV electron at a wiggler gap corresponding to 3.3 kG was calculated to be less than 25 ?m. The ability to control trajectory wander and optical phase slip using the simulated annealing code suggests future extensions to extremely long wigglers.

Mark S. Curtin; Anup Bhowmik; Wayne A. McMullin; Stephen V. Benson; John M.J. Madey; Bruce A. Richman; Louis Vintro

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Microsoft PowerPoint - 04CifernoStanford - Capture Project Summary.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program US Perspective on CO 2 Capture and Separation Jared P. Ciferno - National Energy Technology Laboratory Global Climate and Energy Project April 27, 2004 Stanford University GCEP - JPC - 4/27/04 Presentation Outline * Carbon Sequestration Program * Pre-Combustion CO 2 Technologies * Post-Combustion CO 2 Technologies * Oxy-Fuel Technologies * Modeling and Assessment Tools * On-Site NETL R & D GCEP - JPC - 4/27/04 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned/operated * Sites in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma, Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees * FY 03 budget of $750 million National Energy Technology Laboratory GCEP - JPC - 4/27/04 Carbon Sequestration Program Structure Infrastructure 7 Regional Partnerships * Engage regional, state, local

479

In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials | Stanford  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Johanna Nelson, Stanford Postdoctoral Scholar, SSRL MSD Hard X-ray Department A key factor in the global move towards clean, renewable energy is the electrification of the automobile. Current battery technology limits EV (electric vehicles) to a short travel range, slow recharge, and costly price tag. Li-ion batteries promise the high specific capacity required for EVs to travel 300+ miles on a single charge with a number of possible earth abundant anode and cathode materials; however, set backs such as capacity fading hinder the full capability of these rechargeable batteries. In order to accurately characterize the dynamic electrochemical processes at the

480

Measurement of parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the measurement of optics parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source, which include betatron tune, beta function, dispersion function, natural chromaticity, corrected chromaticity, central RF frequency, momentum compaction factor, and linear betatron coupling. Two methods were used for beta function measurement; a conventional quadrupole scan method and a method using the fitting of the orbit response matrix. A robust Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used for nonlinear least square fitting of the orbit response matrix. In this paper, detailed methods for the parameter measurements are described. The measured results are discussed and compared with the theoretical values obtained using accelerator simulation code Accelerator Toolbox in MATLAB.

Ghodke, A. D.; Husain, Riyasat; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Surendra; Puntambekar, T. A. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, 452013, Indore (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

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481

An 8-GeV Synchrotron-Based Proton Driver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 2002, the Fermilab Director initiated a design study for a high average power, modest energy proton facility. Such a facility is a possible candidate for a construction project in the U.S. starting in the middle of this decade. The key technical element is a new machine, dubbed the ''Proton Driver,'' as a replacement of the present Booster. The study of an 8-GeV synchrotron-based proton driver has been completed and published. This paper will give a summary report, including machine layout and performance, optics, beam dynamics issues, technical systems design, civil construction, cost estimate and schedule.

Weiren Chou

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

482

Focusing optics for a synchrotron x radiation microprobe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose two constant deviation and energy-tunable fluorescent microprobe optical designs which efficiently use x rays available from ending magnets and insertion devices of synchrotron radiation sources. The simpler system consists of a cylindrically bent multilayer to focus the vertical opening angle by in-plane scattering, a fixed radius cylindrically curved multilayer which sagittally focuses the horizontal divergence, and a pinhole to further reduce the beam to microprobe dimensions. A more versatile system has a pair of flat nondispersively arranged diffracting optics followed by crossed elliptical mirrors. These nondispersive combinations can produce a fixed-exit beam. We compare the relative intensity with other optical systems.

Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Photon Sciences | About the Photon Sciences Directorate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About the Photon Sciences Directorate About the Photon Sciences Directorate The Photon Sciences Directorate operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), both funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science. These facilities support a large community of scientists using photons (light) to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. NSLS National Synchrotron Light Source NSLS-II National Synchrotron Light Source II This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven Lab and a time of unprecedented growth for the directorate. The NSLS-II Project is progressing rapidly and smoothly through design and construction, driven by

484

Stanford Geothermal Program I n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r y Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Geothermal Program I n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r y Research i n Engineering and Earth stimulation is expected to increase the productivity of geothermal reservoirs by providing increased

Stanford University

485

Microsoft Word - SPPS_report05.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technical Report Ultrafast X-ray Science at the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source Kelly J. Gaffney for the SPPS collaboration Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC, Stanford...

486

List of Authors and Contributors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Contributors J. Arthur, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford, CA, USA P. Anfinrud, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA P. Audebert, Laboratoire...

487

Injection and capture simulations for a high intensity proton synchrotron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection and capture processes in a high intensity, rapid cycling, proton synchrotron are simulated by numerical integration. The equations of motion suitable for rapid numerical simulation are derived so as to maintain symplecticity and second-order accuracy. By careful bookkeeping, the authors can, for each particle that is lost, determine its initial phase space coordinates. They use this information as a guide for different injection schemes and rf voltage programming, so that a minimum of particle losses and dilution are attained. A fairly accurate estimate of the space charge fields is required, as they influence considerably the particle distribution and reduce the capture efficiency. Since the beam is represented by a relatively coarse ensemble of macro particles, the authors study several methods of reducing the statistical fluctuations while retaining the fine structure (high intensity modulations) of the beam distribution. A pre-smoothing of the data is accomplished by the cloud-in-cell method. The program is checked by making sure that it gives correct answers in the absence of space charge, and that it reproduces the negative mass instability properly. Results of simulations for stationary distributions are compared to their analytical predictions. The capture efficiency for the rapid-cycling synchrotron is analyzed with respect to variations in the injected beam energy spread, bunch length, and rf programming.

Cho, Y.; Lessner, E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Symon, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe[sub 2] and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe{sub 2} and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

SYNCHROTRON SPECTRAL CURVATURE FROM 22 MHz TO 23 GHz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We combine surveys of the radio sky at frequencies 22 MHz to 1.4 GHz with data from the ARCADE-2 instrument at frequencies 3 GHz to 10 GHz to characterize the frequency spectrum of diffuse synchrotron emission in the Galaxy. The radio spectrum steepens with frequency from 22 MHz to 10 GHz. The projected spectral index at 23 GHz derived from the low-frequency data agrees well with independent measurements using only data at frequencies 23 GHz and above. Comparing the spectral index at 23 GHz to the value from previously published analyses allows extension of the model to higher frequencies. The combined data are consistent with a power-law index {beta} = -2.64 {+-} 0.03 at 0.31 GHz, steepening by an amount of {Delta}{beta} = 0.07 every octave in frequency. Comparison of the radio data to models including the cosmic-ray energy spectrum suggests that any break in the synchrotron spectrum must occur at frequencies above 23 GHz.

Kogut, A., E-mail: Alan.J.Kogut@nasa.gov [Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

491

Transrelativistic Synchrotron Emissivity, Cross-Section, and Polarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectrum and polarization produced by particles spiraling in a magnetic field undergo dramatic changes as the emitters transition from nonrelativistic to relativistic energies. However, none of the currently available methods for calculating the characteristics of this radiation field are adequate for the purpose of sustaining accuracy and speed of computation in the intensity, and none even attempt to provide a means of determining the polarization fraction other than in the cyclotron or synchrotron limits. But the transrelativistic regime, which we here find to lie between $5\\times 10^7$ K and $5\\times 10^9$ K for a thermal plasma, is becoming increasingly important in high-energy astrophysical environments, such as in the intra-cluster medium, and in the accretion flows of supermassive black holes. In this paper, we present simple, yet highly accurate, fitting formulae for the magnetobremsstrahlung (also known as cyclo-synchrotron) emissivity, its polarization fraction (and content), and the absorption cross-section. We demonstrate that both the harmonic and high-energy limiting behavior are well represented, incurring at most an error of $\\sim 5%$ throughout the transition region.

Brandon Wolfe; Fulvio Melia

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

492

Electron cloud observations at the ISIS Proton Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The build up of electron clouds inside a particle accelerator vacuum chamber can produce strong transverse and longitudinal beam instabilities which in turn can lead to high levels of beam loss often requiring the accelerator to be run below its design specification. To study the behaviour of electron clouds at the ISIS Proton Synchrotron, a Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) based electron cloud detector has been developed. The detector is based on the Retarding Field Analyser (RFA) design and consists of a retarding grid, which allows energy analysis of the electron signal, and a MCP assembly placed in front of the collector plate. The MCP assembly provides a current gain over the range 300 to 25K, thereby increasing the signal to noise ratio and dynamic range of the measurements. This paper presents the first electron cloud observations at the ISIS Proton Synchrotron. These results are compared against signals from a beam position monitor and a fast beam loss monitor installed at the same location.

Pertica, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

The Argonne National Laboratory 67 GeV synchrotron X-ray source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 19841985 the Argonne National Laboratory undertook a design study of a 67 GeV synchrotron radiation source. The effort led to a construction proposal which was reviewed early this year and recommended for funding by the US Department of Energy. This paper gives a general description of this Argonne synchrotron X-ray source.

Lee C. Teng

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Core-level photoemission of the Si(1 1 1) surface using synchrotron radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan c Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, The Institute of Solid StateCore-level photoemission of the Si(1 1 1)± 21 p ? 21 p -Ag surface using synchrotron radiation, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198, Japan b Department of Physics, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7

Hasegawa, Shuji

495

Putting synchrotron radiation to work: New opportunities for industrial R D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the basic categories of experimental techniques that have been successfully exploited at existing synchrotron facilities or, in some cases, that are expected to join the research armamentarium at the next-generation synchrotron sources now under construction, such as the ALS. In each case, a selection of typical industrial applications is noted.

Not Available

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility ESRF . To estimate the possible risks, the doses receivedBiological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high

Boyer, Edmond

497

EA-1321: Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of The National Synchrotron Light  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21: Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of The National 21: Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of The National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York EA-1321: Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of The National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to upgrade the facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Synchrotron Light Source Complex, namely the National Synchrotron Light Source, the Accelerator Test Facility and the Source Development Laboratory. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 12, 2001 EA-1321: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of The National Synchrotron Light Source

498

Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence and extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advent of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has led to a significant increase in activity in many areas of science dealing with the interaction of x-rays with matter. Synchrotron radiation provides intense, linearly polarized, naturally collimated, continuously tunable photon beams, which are used to determine not only the elemental composition of a complex, polyatomic, dilute material but also the chemical form of the elements with improved accuracy. Examples of the application of synchrotron radiation include experiments in synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) analysis and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. New synchrotron radiation x-ray microprobes for elemental analysis in the parts per billion range are under construction at several laboratories. 76 references, 24 figures.

Chen, J.R.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Photon Sciences Directorate | 2010 Annual Report | DISCOVERY at Light Speed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accelerator Division Delivers Reliable NSLS Beams, Key NSLS-II Components Accelerator Division Delivers Reliable NSLS Beams, Key NSLS-II Components Ferdinand Willeke "We had 14 goals for the year and checked off 11, with 'in progress' noted on the balance. This achievement is a testament to the talent and hard work of the Accelerator Division staff, our vendors, and our supporters at Brookhaven and elsewhere." - Ferdinand Willeke Director, Accelerator Division Photon Sciences' Accelerator Division had a full workload in 2010. While it was generally business as usual at NSLS, maintaining an older synchrotron at a high performance level is not easy. The NSLS-II Project placed increasing demands on the division, with 2010 seeing great growth in construction and design, and preparations ongoing for the eventual transition from NSLS to the new facility.

500

Audit Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-01 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-01 Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-01 Audit Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-01 April 6, 2010 The Department of Energy's Management of the NSLS-II Project The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Science is currently constructing the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Brookhaven) in Upton, New York. The NSLS-II is designed to replace the existing National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), which began operations in 1982. Approximately 2,100 researchers utilize the NSLS each year for research in such areas as biology and medicine, chemistry and environmental sciences, physics, and materials science. Construction of the NSLS-II began in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 and the facility is scheduled to begin operations in FY 2015.