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Sample records for nsls stanford synchrotron

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Format for Proposal Extension Request Proposals are eligible for a one-time extension request. Submit extension requests by Email as a Word or PDF attachment to: Michelle Steger (steger@slac.stanford.edu) Proposal Number: Date of Extension Request: Spokesperson: 1. PROGRESS: Provide a progress report describing work accomplished at SSRL on this proposal to date (1-2 pages) 2. NEW ELEMENTS: Describe any new elements that may add interest to extending the

  2. About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford Synchrotron

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    Radiation Lightsource About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SSRL is a forefront lightsource providing bright X-rays and oustanding user support. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a directorate of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Stanford University. Located in Menlo Park, California, SLAC is a multi-program national laboratory exploring frontier

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    as well as at the ALS and NSLS, reveal a complicated association between bromine and organic carbon in both sea water and soil. One study measured absolute organobromine...

  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    to right: Ryan Toomey, U. South Florida; Mark Dadmun, U. Tennessee; Christopher Kim, Chapman U. (SNUG Chair); Hendrik Ohldag, Stanford U. SSRLUO functions include: sponsoring and...

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA Operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Content Owner: Cathy...

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    the terms and conditions set forth below. NOTE: All EXPORTS MUST BE APPROVED BY STANFORD. DELAYS IN PROVIDING THIS INFORMATION WILL DELAY YOUR SHIPMENT. For more information...

  7. SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

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    Management of SPEAR3 Project at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory wins DOE Award for Excellence Friday, August 13, 2004 Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham, Hanley Lee (DOE Stanford Site Office), Richard Boyce, Bob Hettel, Tom Elioff, and Deputy Secretary of Energy Kyle McSlarrow (L to R). The SPEAR3 Management Team and Hanley Lee received the award from The Secretary. Trophy awarded to the laboratory. Each of the members of the Project Management Team also received individual plaques.

  8. History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford

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    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project (SSRP). The first synchrotron scientific user activities were originally attached to the SPEAR ring and were operated in "parasitic mode" on the SPEAR high-energy physics program. SSRL/SSRP was the first multi-GeV storage ring based synchrotron radiation source in the

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Advanced Light Source (ALS) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

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    Extension Application for Macromolecular Crystallography Proposals Please submit via email attachment to Lisa Dunn (lisa@slac.stanford.edu) Proposal Number: Date of Extension Request: Spokesperson: 1. PROGRESS: Provide a progress report describing work accomplished at SSRL on this proposal to date (1-2 pages) 2. NEW ELEMENTS: Describe any new elements that may add interest to extending the proposal, if applicable (1-2 paragraphs) 3. FUTURE PLANS: Describe future plans or the next steps that you

  11. SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

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    the fund description (pdf) and to send contributions to (make checks payable to "Stanford University"): Stanford University co Cathy Knotts Manager, User Research...

  12. Contact Us | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    Contact Us Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 69 Menlo Park, CA 94025 Tel: 650-926-4000 Fax: 650-926-4100 SSRL...

  13. Team | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    geochemistry, redox processes, and synchrotron techniques. noemie.janot@gmail.com Morris Jones. (SLAC): Postdoctoral researcher. Expertise in biogeochemistry, electronchemistry,...

  14. SSRLUO Executive Committee Charter | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource Executive Committee Charter Committee Members | Committee Meetings | SSRLUO Activism Overview The purpose of the SSRL Users' Organization (SSRLUO) is to provide an organized framework for interaction between the scientists who use the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for their research and the SSRL and SLAC management, as well as to provide a channel for communication with other national laboratories, funding agencies,

  15. Celebrating Artie Bienenstock | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    Celebrating Artie Bienenstock Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 8:30am Event Details A special symposium following the SSRL/LCLS Annual Users' Conference and Workshops will be held to honor Arthur Bienenstock. Artie Bienenstock This special symposium 'Celebrating Artie Bienenstock' on Saturday, October 10, 2015 will highlight Artie's contributions to science, graduate student training, Stanford University, US science policy, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, the development of synchrotron

  16. Director's Office | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    Director's Office Kelly Gaffney, SSRL Director Chi-Chang Kao, Associate Laboratory Director Kelly Gaffney, SSRL Director Email: Kelly Gaffney, SLAC Associate Laboratory Director for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, came to SLAC in 2003. After a brief postdoctoral appointment working with Jerry Hastings and Keith Hodgson, Dr. Gaffney started his independent research career as an Assistant Professor of Photon Science. He initiated a chemical dynamics research effort at SLAC designed

  17. SSRL Science in SLAC Today | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    Science in SLAC Today Subscribe to SSRL Science in SLAC Today feed URL: https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/blog-tags/stanford-synchrotron-radiation-lightsource-ssrl Updated: 13 hours 18 min ago Stanford Scientists Celebrate Technological Advances that Finally Made Gravitational Wave Detection Possible Fri, 2016/02/12 - 1:19pm Contributions to LIGO have come from many Stanford teams, including SLAC, Applied Physics, Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautics and Astronautics and the School of Earth, Energy

  18. SSRLUO 2015 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

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    Stanford University, Stanford, CA Scott R. Daly, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Colleen Hansel, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Dept. of Marine Chemistry and...

  19. Photon Science Seminar Series | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    Photon Science Seminar Series SLAC's Photon Science Seminar Series brings together scientists from SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Photon Science and Accelerator directorates, including researchers from the Center for Sustainable Energy through Catalysis and two joint SLAC-Stanford institutes: the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences and the Pulse Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science. The seminar series' main goals are to

  20. SSRLUO 1999 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

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    Stanford CA 94305 Work: 650-723-7513 Fax: Email: trainor@pangea.stanford.edu Joe Wong Dept of Chem & Mat Science PO Box 808, L-356 Livermore CA 94551 Work:(510) 423-6385...

  1. SPEAR History | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the

  2. The Research Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    ssrl.slac.stanford.educontentsciencehighlight2013-03-31b.... A large fraction of sediment-bound uranium at the Rifle site occurs within organic-rich lenses of sediment. Slow...

  3. SSRL Meetings, Workshops & Training Archive | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oct 2003 SSRL Users' Meeting and Workshops (SSRL30) 16-19 Sep 2003 SSRL Structural Molecular Biology Summer School 25-29 Aug 2003 SRI 2003 9-13 Jun 2003 Stanford-Berkeley SR...

  4. SPEAR3 Accelerator | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    SPEAR3 Accelerator SPEAR3 SSRL utilizes x-rays produced by its accelerator, the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring (SPEAR3). Based on a 2004 upgrade funded by the...

  5. SSRLUO 2009 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource 9 Executive Committee Members Beth Wurzberg Stanford University, Structural Biology, Stanford, CA 94305 USA Beth Wurzburg is a Research Associate in the laboratory of Prof. Ted Jardetzky. She trained as a protein biochemist (Don Wiley's laboratory) and as a crystallographer (Ted Jardetzky's laboratory), and she has been collecting data at synchrotrons since 1995. Her research interests include biophysical studies of proteins of the immune system and of human pathogens. email: ph:

  6. Workshop: Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis | Stanford

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    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 8:00am 2011 SSRL/LCLS Annual Users Conference This workshop, part of the 2011 SSRL/LCLS Annual Users Conference, will focus on understanding processes in homogeneous (both biological and small molecule) and heterogeneous catalysis, using synchrotron-based methods. The workshop will cover more traditional applications (using XANES and EXAFS), as well as applications of XES, RIXS and

  7. SSRLUO 2008 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

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    Lightsource User's Organization Oct 2005-Oct 2006; and Chair, Synchrotron and Neutron User's Group Advocacy Committee since October 2005. email: joy.andrews@csueastbay.edu...

  8. SSRLUO 2009 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation and its Applications, as well as the semester-long course "Synchrotron Radiation for Materials Science Applications" at UC-Berkeley. In addition to conducting...

  9. SSRL Site Map | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    Site Map Global Menu DOE Stanford SLAC SSRL LCLS AD PPA SUNCAT PULSE SIMES Main menu Home About SSRL What is SSRL? Director's Office Organization Advisory Panels History SSRL News SSRL News and Events Science Highlights Press Releases SSRL Newsletter Photon Science Seminars SSRL Presents User Resources User Resources User Portal Schedules Deadlines Forms & Applications Beam Lines Beam Lines Map By Number By Technique Photon Source Parameters SPEAR3 Status Science at SSRL Science at SSRL

  10. SSRL Events & Presentations | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anford-synchrotron-radiation-lightsource-ssrl Updated: 11 hours 1 min ago SSRL Hosts 17th Annual RapiData Course in Macromolecular X-ray Diffraction Mon, 20150518 - 9:30am The...

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource December 2008

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    January 2016 Business & Administration Carlson, S. Safety Evans, I. Science Advisory Committee Proposal Review Panel Photon Science Faculty User Research Administration Knotts, C. Director - Gaffney, K. Deputy Director Pianetta, P. Science Director Hedman, B. SSRL Users' Organization Beam Line Development & Support Harrington, D. Synchrotron Radiation Materials Sciences Division Toney, M. / Lu, D. Beam Line Systems Division Rabedeau, T. Synchrotron Radiation Chemistry & Catalysis

  12. SSRLUO 1996 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource 6 Executive Committee Members Frank G. Bridges University of California Dept of Physics Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Ph: 408-459-2893 Fax: 408-459-3043 Suzanne Barrett (SSRL Liaison) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource P.O. Box 4349, M/S 99 Stanford, CA 94309 Ph: 415-926-3191 Fax: 415-926-3600 Alice M. Fischer-Colbrie (Chair) Hewlett-Packard Laboratories Bldg 26M, 3500 Deer Creek Rd. Palo Alto, CA 94304 Ph: 415-857-8879 Fax: 415-813-3279 Melissa M. Grush University of California

  13. SSRLUO 2011 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource 1 Executive Committee Members Serena DeBeer Cornell University, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Ithaca, NY 14853 Serena DeBeer is an Assistant Professor in the Chemistry and Chemical Biology Department at Cornell University. She holds a B.S. from Southwestern University and a Ph.D. from Stanford University, and spent several years as a staff scientist at SSRL. Her research focuses on the development and application of synchrotron spectroscopies to understand fundamental

  14. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS capabilities and much-needed beam time for the life sciences, soft condensed matter physics, and nanoscience communities. Looking toward the future, a significant step has been made in expanding the user base and diversifying the work force by holding the first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Professors' Workshop. The workshop, which brought 11 professors to the NSLS to learn how to become successful synchrotron users, concluded with the formation of an HBCU User Consortium. Finally, significant contributions were made in optics and detector development to enhance the utilization of the NSLS and address the challenges of NSLS-II. In particular, x-ray detectors developed by the NSLS Detector Section have been adopted by an increasing number of research programs both at the NSLS and at light sources around the world, speeding up measurement times by orders of magnitude and making completely new experiments feasible. Significant advances in focusing and high-energy resolution optics have also been made this year.

  15. SSRLUO 2001 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource 1 Executive Committee Members Paul Alivisatos University of California at Berkeley Department of Chemistry Berkeley, CA 94720 Phone: 510-643-7371 Fax: 510-642-6911 E-mail: Cathy Knotts (SSRL Liaison) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, MS 99 2575 Sand Hill Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 Phone: 650-926-3191 Fax: 650-926-3600 E-mail: Patrick Allen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory GT Seaborg Institute for Transuranic Science 7000 East Avenue, MS L-231 Livermore, CA 94551

  16. NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLER, L.

    2006-12-31

    This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007 budget and the years to follow, we need to continue to educate our elected representatives about the benefits that are provided to our society and our economy by scientific investigation including research done at DOE user facilities like the NSLS. We face another interesting challenge as the NSLS-II project progresses: the formation of scientific research teams associated with particular beamlines at the new facility. In early 2007, the final draft of the conceptual design report will be available, which will describe the projected capabilities of NSLS-II, and we can expect a workshop in mid-2007 to launch the process leading to letters of intent for beamlines. This process will include lots of discussion about access modes, as we seek ways to allow scientific and technical innovators from the user community to play significant roles at NSLS-II.

  17. Environmental Remediation Sciences Program at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, John R.

    2006-11-15

    Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based techniques provide unique capabilities to address scientific issues underpinning environmental remediation science and have emerged as major research tools in this field. The high intensity of SR sources and x-ray photon-in/photon-out detection allow noninvasive in-situ analysis of dilute, hydrated, and chemically/structurally complex natural samples. SR x-rays can be focused to beams of micron and sub-micron dimension, which allows the study of microstructures, chemical microgradients, and microenvironments such as in biofilms, pore spaces, and around plant roots, that may control the transformation of contaminants in the environment. The utilization of SR techniques in environmental remediation sciences is often frustrated, however, by an ''activation energy barrier'', which is associated with the need to become familiar with an array of data acquisition and analysis techniques, a new technical vocabulary, beam lines, experimental instrumentation, and user facility administrative procedures. Many investigators find it challenging to become sufficiently expert in all of these areas or to maintain their training as techniques evolve. Another challenge is the dearth of facilities for hard x-ray micro-spectroscopy, particularly in the 15 to 23 KeV range, which includes x-ray absorption edges of the priority DOE contaminants Sr, U, Np, Pu, and Tc. Prior to the current program, there were only two (heavily oversubscribed) microprobe facilities in the U.S. that could fully address this energy range (one at each of APS and NSLS); none existed in the Western U.S., in spite of the relatively large number of DOE laboratories in this region.

  18. SSRLUO 2015 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource SSRLUO 2015 Executive Committee Members The SSRL Users Executive Committee (UEC) encourages users to participate in SSRL events and contact UEC members to share feedback or suggestions: Edward Snell , Hauptman Woodward Institute, Buffalo, NY (SSRL UEC Chair) David Bushnell, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Kelly Chacón, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR Justin Chartron, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Scott R. Daly, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Colleen

  19. SSRLUO 2010 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource 0 Executive Committee Members Yuji Arai Clemson University, Department of Entomology, Soils and Plant Science, Clemson, S. Carolina, 29634-0315 Assistant Professor of Environmental Soil Chemistry at Clemson University in Clemson, SC. Since 1997, he has been conducting molecular environmental soil chemistry research using bulk- and microfocused(µ)-XAS, µ-XRF and µ-XRD techniques at ALS, APS, NSLS, and SSRL. His major research interest is to understand the molecular scale

  20. Data Collection & Analysis Software | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource Collection & Analysis Software Techniques Data Collection Packages Data Analysis Packages Macromolecular Crystallography See http://smb.slac.stanford.edu/facilities/ See http://smb.slac.stanford.edu/facilities/ Materials Scattering SPEC Super X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy XAS Collect uses an X Window-based graphical user interface. It is designed to allow quick and easy XAS experimental setup and data collection, and to make optimal use of available beam time. It has many

  1. SSRLUO 1998 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource 8 Executive Committee Members Patrick Allen (Vice-Chair) Lawrence-Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 70A-1150 Berkeley CA 94720 Ph: 510-486-6937 Fax:510-486-5596 E-Mail: Suzanne Barrett (SSRL Liaison) SSRL P.O. Box 4349, M/S 99 Stanford, CA 94309 Ph: 415-926-3191 Fax: 415-926-3600 E-Mail: barrett@slac.stanford.edu John Bilello University of Michigan Dept of Material Science 2300 Haywood Street Ann Arbor MI 48109-2136 Work:(313) 764-6128 Fax: (313) 763-4788 E-Mail:

  2. SSRLUO 1999 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource 9 Executive Committee Members Patrick Allen (Chairperson) Lawrence-Livermore National Laboratory GT Seaborg Inst. for Transuranic Science 7000 East Ave, MS L-231 Livermore CA 94551 Ph: 925-423-8955 Fax: 925-423-3160 E-Mail: allen42@llnl.gov Audrey Archuleta (SSRL Liaison) SSRL P.O. Box 4349, M/S 99 Stanford, CA 94309 Ph: 650-926-3191 Fax: 650-926-3600 E-Mail: ala@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu John Bilello University of Michigan Dept of Material Science 2300 Haywood Street Ann Arbor MI

  3. Experimental Station 7-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    1 Beamline 7-1 is a wiggler side-station beamline dedicated for monochromatic, high-throughput, high-resolution macromolecular crystallography. It is SAD and MAD capable and can be run in a full remote access mode. It is equipped with an ADSC Q315R CCD detector. For aditional information about the experimental capabilities, see http://smb.slac.stanford.edu/index.shtml. Status Open Supported Techniques Macromolecular Crystallography Multi wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) Single wavelength

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The NSLS-II is a state-of-the-art, at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) External link , medium-energy electron storage ring (3 billion electron-volts) designed to deliver ...

  5. SSRLUO 1995 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource 5 Executive Committee Members Frank G. Bridges Katherine Cantwell (SSRL Liaison) University of California SSRL Dept of Physics PO Box 4349, MS 69 Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Stanford, CA 94309 Ph: 408-459-2893 Ph: 415-926-3191 Fax: 408-459-3043 Fax: 415-926-4100 Steven D. Conradson Alice M. Fischer-Colbrie (Vice-Chair) Los Alamos National Laboratory Hewlett-Packard Laboratories MS D429, MEE-11 Bldg 26M, 3500 Deer Creek Rd Los Alamos, NM 87545 Palo Alto, CA 94304 Ph: 505-667-9584 Ph:

  6. SSRLUO 1997 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource 7 Executive Committee Members Patrick Allen LBNL 1 Cyclotron Rd MS 70A-1150 Berkeley CA 94720 Ph: Fax: E-Mail: "> Suzanne Barrett (SSRL Liaison) SSRL PO Box 4349, MS 99 Stanford CA 94309 Ph: 650-926-3191 Fax: 650-926-3600 E-Mail: "> Alice Fischer-Colbrie (ex officio) Hewlett Packard Bldg 26M, 3500 Deer Creek Rd Palo Alto CA 94304 Ph: 650-857-8879 Fax : 650-813-3279 E-Mail: Jack Johnson Scripps Research Institute Dept of Molecular Biology MB13 10666 N Torry Pines

  7. Experimental Station 11-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    1 Beamline 11-1 is a PRT station, available to general users 33%; it is a wiggler side-station beamline dedicated for monochromatic, high-throughput and high-resolution macromolecular crystallography. It is SAD and MAD capable and can be run in a full remote access mode. It is equipped with an Dectris PILATUS 6M detector and a remote access controlled UV-Vis microspectrophotometer. For aditional information about the experimental capabilities, see http://smb.slac.stanford.edu/index.shtml. Status

  8. SSRLUO 2003 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource 3 Executive Committee Members Uwe Bergmann (Chair) SSRL, ESRD, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025 Scientist in the Physical Bioscience Division at LBNL and assistant researcher in Department of Applied Science at UC Davis. Uwe was a postdoc at ESRF and LBNL and holds a Ph.D. in Physics from SUNY Stony Brook. Research interests include transition metals in biology, hydrocarbons, water. Work is based on application of novel synchrotron based x-ray techniques including

  9. Orientational Analysis of Molecules in Thin Films | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Orientational Analysis of Molecules in Thin Films Monday, September 17, 2012 - 10:00am SSRL Bldg. 137, room 226 Daniel Kaefer The synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a very powerful tool to unravel the orientation of organic molecules on surfaces or in thin films. This information on the alignment of - most often - highly anisotropic molecules can become crucial if an epitaxial or even crystalline organic growth is desired, if such thin film should serve

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  14. 5th Annual SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Techniques in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials and Environmental Sciences: Theory and Application Stanford University | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES Quick Links ... Guest House Lightsources.org NUFO SNUG ALS APS NSLS Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SSRL SRXAS home 2010 Agenda Location Visitor Information Transportation Tourism & Dining Presentations 2010 Photos ± SLAC Detailed Index | SLAC Web | People Search SSRL Go 5th Annual SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Techniques in

  15. Energy Secretary Moniz Dedicates the World's Brightest Synchrotron...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Secretary Moniz Dedicates the World's Brightest Synchrotron Light Source NSLS-II at ... National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). ...

  16. First Magnet Girder Installed in NSLS-II Storage Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Frank Lincoln

    2013-07-19

    Supervisor Frank Lincoln explains how the first magnet girder is installed in the storage ring of Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

  17. Berkeley-Stanford Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley-Stanford Summer School in Synchrotron Radiation July 8-14, 2001 The first Berkeley-Stanford summer school will provide basic lectures on the synchrotron radiation process,...

  18. Bio-Imaging With Liquid-Metal-Jet X-ray Sources | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bio-Imaging With Liquid-Metal-Jet X-ray Sources Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Daniel Larsson, Stanford Program Description...

  19. Lead, Uranium, and Nickel Compound Data from the XAFS Library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is intended to be a reference library of XAFS spectra for various lead, uranium, and nickel compounds. Compounds are organized by central atom and all spectra are transmission data. Molecular Environmental Science (MES) research at SSRL focuses on the fundamental interfacial, molecular- and nano-scale processes that control contaminant and nutrient cycling in the biosphere with the goal of elucidating global elemental cycles and anthropogenic influences on the environment. Key areas of investigation include the: (a) Structural chemistry of water and dissolved solutes, (b) Structural chemistry and reactivity of complex natural environmental materials with respect to heavy metals and metalloids (biominerals, Fe- and Mn-oxides, biofilms, and organic materials), (c) Reactions at environmental interfaces, including sorption, precipitation and dissolution processes that affect the bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants, and (d) Microbial transformations of metals and anions. SSRL-based MES research utilizes synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), x-ray standing wave (XSW) spectroscopy, and photoemission spectroscopy (PES) because of their unique capabilities to probe structure/composition relationships in complex, non-crystalline, and dilute materials. [copied from http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/mes/index.html

  20. Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-17

    Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

  1. STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE The Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the very nature of bacteria and viruses, exposed how genetic mutations may cause diabetes, and mapped the structures of proteins for use in biology and medicine. Opportunities...

  2. NSLS 2009 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasta K.; Mona R.

    2009-05-01

    2009 was an incredibly exciting year for light sources at Brookhaven. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) hosted more than 2,200 visiting researchers, who, along with the about 50 members of our scientific staff, produced a total of 957 publications - about 20 percent of which appeared in premier journals. Covering topics ranging from Alzheimer's disease detection to ethanol-powered fuel cells, a sampling of these findings can be found in this Activity Report. We've also seen the resurfacing of some of our long-time users hard work. I was very proud to hear that two of the three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry have ties to the NSLS. Venki Ramakrishnan, a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department and long-time user of the NSLS, now at Cambridge University, and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University, also a long-time NSLS user, shared the prize with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science for their work on the structure and function of the ribosome. In the late 1990s, Ramakrishnan and Steitz used protein crystallography at the NSLS to gather atomic-level images of two ribosome subunits: 30S (Ramakrishnan) and 50S (Steitz). Both laureates solved the high-resolution structures for these subunits based on this data. After struggling with a rough budget for several years, we received excellent funding, and then some, this year. In addition to NSLS operations funding, we received $3 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). We used that additional money for two exciting projects: construction of a full-field x-ray microscope and acquisition of several advanced x-ray detectors. The x-ray microscope will be able to image objects with a targeted spatial resolution of 30 nanometers. This capability will be particularly important for new initiatives in energy research and will prepare our users for the projected 1-nanometer resolution benchmark at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The detectors project is expected to increase the throughput of several high-demand beamlines by an order of magnitude as well as enable new classes of experiments. In addition, a huge chunk of ARRA money - $150 million - was put toward accelerating the construction of NSLS-II, which is now taking shape across the street. Now physically much more than just a pile of dirt, NSLS-II was granted Critical Decision 3 status by the Department of Energy (DOE) early last year, giving the official go-ahead for construction. In July, construction began, marked by a groundbreaking ceremony that attracted elected officials, media, and DOE, Battelle, and Stony Brook University representatives from across the state and the country. As progress on NSLS-II continues, we're working with Stony Brook University to identify ways to capitalize on the facility's unique capabilities through the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). Included in this effort is a series of workshops to encourage the development and application of the photon sciences with collaborative research between industries, universities, and national laboratories. We helped host three of these workshops this year, focusing on microelectronics, energy storage, and materials in next-generation energy systems. The conversation and ideas generated at these meetings has been fresh and valuable and we hope to use this model to organize research opportunities in other scientific fields. Also this year: Brookhaven was deemed the lead institution for one of DOE's 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, focused on understanding the underlying nature of superconductivity in complex materials by using techniques at the NSLS and CFN; DOE awarded a $100,000 supplemental grant to our detector program to continue the development of a new generation of x-ray detectors that use germanium sensors, which, at high energies, are much more efficient than equivalent ones based on silicon; and funding for one of our largest consortia, Case Western Reserve University's Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB), was renewed through the National Inst

  3. Structural Studies of Al:ZnO Powders and Thin Films | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Structural Studies of Al:ZnO Powders and Thin Films Monday, June 18, 2012 - 2:00pm SSRL Main Conference Room 137-322 Dr. Bridget Ingham, Associate Investigator, MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials & Nanotechnology Al-doped ZnO (Al:ZnO) is a promising transparent conducting oxide. We have used complementary synchrotron and laboratory techniques to study the incorporation of Al within the ZnO lattice, and measure its effect on the crystallinity of thin films

  4. A seven-crystal Johann-type hard x-ray spectrometer at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokaras, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Nordlund, D.; Velikov, P.; Wenger, D.; Garachtchenko, A.; George, M.; Borzenets, V.; Johnson, B.; Rabedeau, T.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Bergmann, U.

    2013-05-15

    We present a multicrystal Johann-type hard x-ray spectrometer ({approx}5-18 keV) recently developed, installed, and operated at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. The instrument is set at the wiggler beamline 6-2 equipped with two liquid nitrogen cooled monochromators - Si(111) and Si(311) - as well as collimating and focusing optics. The spectrometer consists of seven spherically bent crystal analyzers placed on intersecting vertical Rowland circles of 1 m of diameter. The spectrometer is scanned vertically capturing an extended backscattering Bragg angular range (88 Degree-Sign -74 Degree-Sign ) while maintaining all crystals on the Rowland circle trace. The instrument operates in atmospheric pressure by means of a helium bag and when all the seven crystals are used (100 mm of projected diameter each), has a solid angle of about 0.45% of 4{pi} sr. The typical resolving power is in the order of (E/{Delta}E){approx}10 000. The spectrometer's high detection efficiency combined with the beamline 6-2 characteristics permits routine studies of x-ray emission, high energy resolution fluorescence detected x-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering of very diluted samples as well as implementation of demanding in situ environments.

  5. NSLS-II Transport Line Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

    2012-05-20

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This limited understanding of the molecular mechanism and the scope of drug design for these enzymes. A team of researchers from SSRL and the University of Iowa used SSRL's Beam ...

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supporting the User Community Register | Submit Proposals | Request Time | Check-In Plus Sign Overview SSRL experimental facilities are scheduled and managed centrally to...

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to your user account. Specialty gases cannot be returned for credit to your account. Gas: Balance: Grade: Analyzed? Yes No No. Cylinders: Dewars: SSRL has a small supply of...

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water-Rock Reactions Produce Hydrogen Gas at Temperatures within the Limits of Life June 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications and Lisa E....

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis Identify Evolutionary Secret of SerRS in Vascular Development July 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of...

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Basis for Iron Piracy by Pathogenic Neisseria January 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure (Courtesy of the Buchanan Lab...

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Navigating Fermi Arcs SSRL Science Summary - November 2012 Figure In solids, Fermi surfaces are the boundaries between occupied and unoccupied electron levels, as defined in...

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    able to follow a single nanoscale catalytic particle, a bulk iron oxide promoted with titanium, zinc and potassium oxides, during activation and under Fischer-Tropsch reaction...

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Long-sought Structure of α-Catenin Defines Its Functions for Cell-cell Interactions June 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Full-length α-catenin crystal structure reveals its dimeric asymmetric arrangement. The individual domains are colored individually (dimerization domain in yellow, vinculin binding domain in green, M-fragment in cyan, and the F-actin binding domain in magenta). A: View onto the vinculin binding domains. B: View onto the

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Appears to Exhibit Conformational Control of Genome Binding January 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Surface representation of the Lassa virus nucleoprotein showing the RNA bound in between the two sub-domains, highlighting, in particular, a deep pocket that could be a prime target for anti-virals. (Courtesy of the Ollmann Saphire lab, The Scripps Research Institute.) Lassa virus is endemic in Western Africa, and is

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mesoscale Phase Distribution in Li-ion Battery Electrode Materials May 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Figure 1a) Chemical phase map obtained by linear combination fitting of XANES data at each pixel acquired with FF TXM at Beam Line 6-2 for a particle with nominal composition of Li0.74FePO4. b) STEM image of a fully delithiated sample. Figure adapted from Boesenberg et al. 2013 Li-ion batteries are key devices in the effort to develop efficient

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biotic-Abiotic Pathways: A New Paradigm for Uranium Reduction in Sediments March 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure As part of a larger, DOE-funded investigation into bioremediation of uranium in contaminated aquifers, a group of SSRL scientists made a surprising discovery about how uranium ions behave in the environment. In addition to overturning current scientific models, this research will lead to more efficient, less costly methods for uranium

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 XRD Rapid Access Application Form A block of 6 shifts of beam time will be set aside periodically for rapid access XRD on BL11-3. Both new and current users are eligible to apply. Allocation of time will be based on a one-page scientific proposal, which will be reviewed by the MEIS subpanel of the SSRL Proposal Review Panel. Rapid access proposals should be submitted by the first of each month, and users will be notified ~2 weeks prior to their allocated beam time. New users scheduled for beam

  19. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Excel When you see a security warning, click the "options" button and enable the macros. Step 2: Fill out the Excel spreadsheet Complete Cells B2 to B19 with general...

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as a dissociative anesthetic acting as a noncompetitive antagonist on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, it is also a potent inhibitor of neuronal nAChRs, and the sites of...

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it can cause rare metabolic diseases such as Tay-Sachs and Gaucher, which often cause death in affected children by their early teens. Three years ago, researchers discovered...

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LASER USE yes no If yes, please fill out all of the fields in this section. ANSI classification Wavelength Total Power Laser hazard controls you will apply. HAZARDOUS...

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Created in Test Tube Promises Biocatalysts for a Range of Uses December 2012 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure larger image In...

  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    preparation and data analysis. This will help new users efficiently utilize their beam time, and prepare them for successful future experiments. Spokesperson: Institution:...

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on sample preparation and data analysis to help new users efficiently utilize their beam time and prepare them for successful future experiments. Spokesperson: Institution: Email:...

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    much is yet to be determined regarding their fate, transport, and toxicity in the environment, including the implications of the potential storage of these ENPs or their...

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the next steps that you propose to pursue under this proposal (1-2 paragraphs) 4. COLLABORATORS: If different from the original proposal, list current collaborators, including...

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    under this proposal. Please cover safety concerns -if any. (1-2 paragraphs) 4. COLLABORATORS: If different from the original proposal, list current collaborators, including...

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoparticulate FeS as an Effective Redox Buffer to Prevent Uraninite (UO2) Oxidation August 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida Figure A major concern in the nuclear age is...

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Structure and Dynamics of Eukaryotic Glutaminyl-tRNA Synthetase May 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Full-length Gln4 shown...

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantification of the Mercury Adsorption Mechanism on Brominated Activated Carbon August 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida Figure Emissions from coal-fired power plants are...

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SIRAS) method using x-ray diffraction data collected at SSRL's Beam Line 9-2 and NE-CAT at the Advanced Photon Source. Surprisingly, the non-toxic NTNHA exhibited a...

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study had three components: low-temperature measurements that revealed three distinct ground states at different dopings; temperature-dependence measurements that revealed that...

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    white due to high attenuation of lead-uranyl acetate, with bone tissue appearing grey and voids black. Scale bar: A,C,E 50 m; B,D,F 5 m. Sample created in the...

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cone center is the "Dirac point"; which is equivalent to the "Fermi level" in graphene. Grey indicates electrons. If there are electrons (shaded grey) above the Fermi level, the...

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the roughness correlation function. Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering and Diffraction on Thin Films Grazing incidence X-ray scattering or diffraction (GIXS) refers to a...

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    while slightly nonstoichiometric material gives rises to magnetic order. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis performed on Beam Line 10-2 provides part...

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the design principles of natural functional sites. The team targeted a surface on the influenza hemagglutinin protein that enables flu viruses to attach to and invade cells lining...

  19. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reviewed by SSRL's SMB & Biophysics Proposal Review Panel for scientific merit and feasibility. Rapid Access will in general only be granted once for a user group during a single...

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PDF Version Contacts Corwin Booth, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Tsu-Chien Weng, SSRL 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS: 99, Menlo Park, California, 94025, USA Tel:...

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of photon science capabilities available at the lab to investigate a proposal that adsorption and desorption of a molecule to a surface - both fundamental processes of...

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxygenic photosynthesis approximately 2.3 to 2.4 billion years ago revolutionized life on Earth. For most modern-day terrestrial life, oxygen has become indispensable. At the heart...

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systematic Expansion of Porous Crystals to Include Large Molecules February 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Recently, scientists...

  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of Human Argonaute2: A Programmable Ribonuclease July 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications Figure RNA degradation is an important...

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coming to SSRL) before beam time. Spokesperson: Institution: Email: Degree: Work Phone: Fax: Principal Investigator: Email: Work Phone: Collaborators: Institution: (if...

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPAIN 2019-10-30 IDAHO NATIONAL LAB-BATTELLE ENERGY ALLIA 2018-05-13 IFIC - INST FISICA CORPUSCULAR SPAIN 2017-12-04 ILL - INST LAUE-LANGEVIN GRENOBLE FRANCE 2018-05-07 IMCB,...

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    melanoma, and degenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Type 2 diabetes. Understanding of how Wnt proteins bind and activate Frizzled receptors is important...

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stroke: hemorrhagic, caused by a broken artery or vein leaking blood into the brain tissue, and ischemic, in which a blockage in a blood vessel starves part of the brain of oxygen. ...

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012 Figure A single reconstructed slice and a volume rendering of the tomography sequence. Energy storage materials, such as batteries, are of increasing importance in the...

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRL Science Highlights Archive SSRL Beam Lines Contact Aaron Lindenberg, PULSESSRLStanford University 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS: 99, Menlo Park, California, 94025, USA Tel:...

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  12. Commissioning and Early Operation for the NSLS-II Booster RF System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marques, C.; Cupolo, J.; Davila, P.; Gao, F.; Goel, A.; Holub, B.; Kulpin, J.; McDonald, K.; Oliva, J.; Papu, J.; Ramirez, G.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Sorrentino, C.; Towne, N.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a third generation 3GeV, 500mA synchrotron light source. We discuss the booster synchrotron RF system responsible for providing power to accelerate an electron beam from 200MeV to 3GeV. The RF system design and construction are complete and is currently in the operational phase of the NSLS-II project. Preliminary operational data is also discussed.

  13. M.; Weaver, J.N.; Wiedemann, H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the 2 MeV microwave gun for the SSRL 150 MeV linac Borland, M.; Weaver, J.N.; Wiedemann, H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Green, M.C.; Nelson,...

  14. NSLS-II Radio Frequency Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose J.; Gao F.; Goel, A.; Holub, B.; Kulpin, J.; Marques, C.; Yeddulla, M.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The NSLS-II RF system consists of the master oscillator, digital low level RF controllers, linac, booster and storage ring RF sub-systems, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system.

  15. About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    specific data acquisition and analysis techniques as well as practice with sharing research findings through talks and poster presentations. SSRL research results in...

  16. Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRL Science in SLAC Today Q&A: Biologist Describes Milestone toward a Universal Flu Vaccine SSRL Upgrades, Adds Equipment for Next Round of Experiments X-ray Microscope Reveals...

  17. A high resolution and large solid angle x-ray Raman spectroscopy end-station at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Velikov, P.; Wenger, D.; Garachtchenko, A.; George, M.; Borzenets, V.; Johnson, B.; Rabedeau, T.; Mori, R. Alonso; Bergmann, U.; Qian, Q.

    2012-04-15

    We present a new x-ray Raman spectroscopy end-station recently developed, installed, and operated at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. The end-station is located at wiggler beamline 6-2 equipped with two monochromators-Si(111) and Si(311) as well as collimating and focusing optics. It consists of two multi-crystal Johann type spectrometers arranged on intersecting Rowland circles of 1 m diameter. The first one, positioned at the forward scattering angles (low-q), consists of 40 spherically bent and diced Si(110) crystals with 100 mm diameters providing about 1.9% of 4{pi} sr solid angle of detection. When operated in the (440) order in combination with the Si (311) monochromator, an overall energy resolution of 270 meV is obtained at 6462.20 eV. The second spectrometer, consisting of 14 spherically bent Si(110) crystal analyzers (not diced), is positioned at the backward scattering angles (high-q) enabling the study of non-dipole transitions. The solid angle of this spectrometer is about 0.9% of 4{pi} sr, with a combined energy resolution of 600 meV using the Si (311) monochromator. These features exceed the specifications of currently existing relevant instrumentation, opening new opportunities for the routine application of this photon-in/photon-out hard x-ray technique to emerging research in multidisciplinary scientific fields, such as energy-related sciences, material sciences, physical chemistry, etc.

  18. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-84 SG P-TR-- 8 4 DE85 011582 PROCEEDINGS OF THE TENTH WORKSHOP ON GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING Stanford Un iver s i t y Stanford, California January 22-24, 1985 p$'/ 5 c u d DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or

  19. NSLS-II Digital RF Controller Logic and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holub, B.; Gao, F.; Kulpin, J.; Marques, C.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Towne, N.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) accelerator consists of the Storage Ring, the Booster Ring and Linac along with their associated cavities. Given the number, types and variety of functions of these cavities, we sought to limit the logic development effort by reuse of parameterized code on one hardware platform. Currently there are six controllers installed in the NSLS-II system. There are two in the Storage ring, two in the Booster ring, one in the Linac and one in the Master Oscillator Distribution system.

  20. NSLS control system upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.D.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Tang, Yong N.

    1995-12-31

    The NSLS consists of two storage rings, a booster and a linac. A major upgrade of the control system (installed in 1978) was undertaken and has been completed. The computer architecture is being changed from a three level star-network to a two level distributed system. The microprocessor subsystem, host computer and workstations, communication link and the main software components are being upgraded or replaced. Since the NSLS rings operate twenty four hours a day a year with minimum maintenance time, the key requirement during the upgrade phase is a non-disruptive transition with minimum downtime. Concurrent with the upgrade, some immediate improvements were required. This paper describes the various components of the upgraded system and outlines the future plans.

  1. Synchrotron Studies for Nuclear Security | Stanford Synchrotron...

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    structure studies in the Tender X-ray region are giving insights on closing the nuclear fuel cycle, and micro-spectroscopy on single particles are of growing interest for...

  2. SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W.E. Spicer Young Investigator Award William E. Spicer (1929-2004) was an esteemed member of the international scientific community as a teacher and researcher in electrical...

  3. SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this award, but only nominations for individuals will be considered (no group awards). Letters of nominations summarizing the individual's contributions and why they should be...

  4. Theses | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Lisa M. B. Kirk, "In Situ Microbial Reduction of ... and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes", University of ... Heterojunction Solar Cells", University of ...

  5. Goniometer-based Femtosecond Macromolecular Crystallography | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Goniometer-based Femtosecond Macromolecular Crystallography Saturday, October 31, 2015 Scientists in the Structural Molecular Biology (SMB) program at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) in collaboration with scientists at Stanford University and at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) developed a goniometer-based system to study radiation-sensitive macromolecular complexes. The system operates in air and is complementary to the

  6. NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker, S.

    2007-11-01

    Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes for nanoscience, coherent imaging of the structure and dynamics of disordered materials, greatly increased applicability of inelastic x-ray scattering, and properties of materials under extreme conditions. Commissioned in 1982, the existing National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) provides essential scientific tools for 2,300 scientists per year from more than 400 academic, industrial, and government institutions. Their myriad research programs produce about 800 publications per year, with more than 130 appearing in premier journals. It was designed in the 1970s and is now in its third decade of service. It has been continually upgraded over the years, with the brightness increasing fully five orders of magnitude. However, it has reached the theoretical limits of performance given its small circumference and small periodicity, and only a small number of insertion devices are possible.

  7. Development of a Tender-Energy Microprobe for Geosciences at NSLS and NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Northrup, Paul A.

    2014-08-30

    We propose to develop a tender-energy (1-8 keV operational range, optimized for 1-5 keV) X-ray microprobe, to bring the functionality and scientific benefits of hard (>5 keV) X-ray microprobes to a largely untapped domain of lighter, geologically-important elements. This proposal seeks to extend and enhance user-facility capabilities particularly optimized for research in Geosciences. This will be accomplished through development and implementation of unique new synchrotron instrumentation for high-performance microspectroscopy and imaging in the distinctive tender energy range. This new user facility at Beamline X15B at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) will benefit the specific Earth Science research programs described in this proposal, and will be available for use by the broader community through the merit-based General User program and through the User Cooperative that operates X15B. Its development will provide immediate benefit to regional and national Earth Science research conducted at the NSLS. It will achieve even higher performance at the Tender Energy Spectroscopy (TES) Beamline at NSLS-II, a new state-of-the-art synchrotron under construction and scheduled to begin operation in 2014. Project Objectives: Our goals are threefold: 1. Develop superlative capabilities to extend hard X-ray microprobe functionality and ease of use to the tender energy range. 2. Bring high-performance XAS (including full EXAFS) to the micron scale, over the range of 1-8 keV. 3. Deliver high flux and element sensitivity for geoscience applications. Our user facility will be designed and optimized for tender-energy microbeam applications and techniques for Earth Science research, including XRF imaging and high-quality extended XAS. Its key attributes will be an energy range of 1 to 8 keV, user-tunable spot size ranging from 40x14 to 3x2 ?m, high flux up to 2x1011 photons/s, beam positional stability and energy calibration stability optimized for high-quality and extended XAS and both XRF and XAS imaging, a helium sample environment for vacuum-incompatible samples, and on-the-fly scanning. At NSLS-II, these capabilities will be further enhanced and performance will improve in spot size, to the range from 19x23 to <1x1 ?m, and flux, up to 1012 ph/s. Thus the proposed microprobe will deliver much of the versatility and ease of use of hard Xray KB microprobes (sample accommodation, minimal sample preparation requirements, wet or in-situ measurements, etc.), plus capabilities for high quality and rapid EXAFS at microbeam spatial resolution. Specific new capabilities proposed here are: 1. Tender-energy XRF imaging of Na to Co, utilizing their K fluorescence lines, Cu to Ho by their L lines, and the Pr to Pu M lines. 2. Microbeam and singleparticle XANES and EXAFS over the energy range for Mg to Co K edges, Ge to Ho L3 edges, and Tb to Pu M5 edges. 3. XAS speciation imaging in several step- and on-the-fly- scanning modes. 4. Usertunable spatial resolution from microbeam to mm scales. Concentrating on development of the core microfocusing capabilities at X15B will result in a very high and immediate impact on Earth Science microprobe research at NSLS. This proposal will enable collection of publishable tender-energy microbeam data within about 6 months, and strongly complement and enhance existing NSLS microprobe programs. Establishment of this user facility at NSLS X15B will ensure its transfer to the NSLS-II TES beamline and its earliest possible availability for Geoscience research. This is essential for continuity of user science programs across the transition from NSLS to NSLS-II, to ensure their productivity early in the start-up of NSLS-II. Ultimately, the proposed facility will provide unique new microspectroscopic capabilities that currently do not exist elsewhere.

  8. PERFORMANCE OF THE DIAGNOSTICS FOR NSLS-II LINAC COMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller III, R.; Padrazo, D.; Wang, G.M.; Heese, R.; Hseuh H.-C.; Johanson, M.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Pinayev, I.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The transfer lines not only provide a means to deliver the beam from one machine to another, they also provide a suite of diagnostics and utilities to measure the properties of the beam to be delivered. In this paper we discuss the suite of diagnostics that will be used to commission the NSLS-II linac and measure the beam properties. The linac to booster transfer line can measure the linac emittance with a three screens measurement or a quadrupole scan. Energy and energy spread are measured in a dispersive section. Total charge and charge uniformity are measured with wall current monitors in the linac and transformers in the transfer line. We show that the performance of the diagnostics in the transfer line will be sufficient to ensure the linac meets its specifications and provides a means of trouble shooting and studying the linac in future operation.

  9. DESIGN OF VISIBLE DIAGNOSTIC BEAMLINE FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, W.; Fernandes, H.; Hseuh, H.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    A visible synchrotron light monitor (SLM) beam line has been designed at the NSLS2 storage ring, using the bending magnet radiation. A retractable thin absorber will be placed in front of the first mirror to block the central x-rays. The first mirror will reflect the visible light through a vacuum window. The light is guided by three 6-inch diameter mirrors into the experiment hutch. In this paper, we will describe design work on various optical components in the beamline. The ultra high brightness NSLS-II storage ring is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It will have 3GeV, 500mA electron beam circulating in the 792m ring, with very low emittance (0.9nm.rad horizontal and 8pm.rad vertical). The ring is composed of 30 DBA cells with 15 fold symmetry. Three damping wigglers will be installed in long straight sections 8, 18 and 28 to lower the emittance. While electrons pass through the bending magnet, synchrotron radiation will be generated covering a wide spectrum. There are other insertion devices in the storage ring which will generate shorter wavelength radiation as well. Synchrotron radiation has been widely used as diagnostic tool to measure the transverse and longitudinal profile. Three synchrotron light beam lines dedicated for diagnostics are under design and construction for the NSLS-II storage ring: two x-ray beam lines (pinhole and CRL) with the source points from Cell 22 BM{_}A (first bending in the DBA cell) and Cell22 three-pole wiggler; the third beam line is using visible part of radiation from Cell 30 BM{_}B (second bending magnet from the cell). Our paper focuses on the design of the visible beam line - SLM.

  10. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  12. NSLS annual report 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaffky, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1984-01-01

    The first comprehensive Annual Report of the National Synchrotron Light Source comes at a time of great activity and forward motion for the facility. In the following pages we outline the management changes that have taken place in the past year, the progress that has been made in the commissioning of the x-ray ring and in the enhanced utilization of the uv ring, together with an extensive discussion of the interesting scientific experiments that have been carried out.

  13. Alternative Designs for the NSLS-II Injection Straight Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaftan,T.; Heese, R.; Weihreter, E.; Willeke, F.; Rehak, M.; Meier, R.; Fliller, R.; Johnson, E. D.

    2009-05-04

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is developing a state-of-the-art 3 GeV synchrotron light source, the NSLS-II [1]. The 9.3 meter-long injection straight section of its storage ring now fits a conventional injection set-up consisting of four kickers producing a closed bump, together with a DC septum and a pulsed septum. In this paper, we analyze an alternative option based on injection via a pulsed sextupole magnet. We discuss the dynamics of the injected and stored beams and, subsequently, the magnet's specifications and tolerances. We conclude by summarized the advantages and drawbacks of each injection scheme.

  14. Concrete Pour in NSLS-II Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruno Semon

    2013-07-22

    The mezzanine floor of the ring building tunnel for NSLS-II was completed when the last concrete was placed in February 2011.

  15. History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

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    government labs and foreign institutions in numerous disciplines including chemistry, biology, medicine, environmental science, materials science, and engineering as well as...

  16. NSLS-II injector commissioning and initial operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacha, B.; Blum, E.; Bassi, B.; Bengtsson, J.; Blednykh, A.; Buda, S.; Cheng, W.; Choi, J.; Cuppolo, J.; D Alsace, R.; Davidsaver, M.; DeLong, J.; Doom, L.; Durfee, d.; fliller, R.; Fulkerson, M.; Ganetis, G.; Gao, F.; Gardner, C.; Guo, W.; Heese, R.; Hidaka, Y.; Hu, Y.; Johanson, M.; Kosciuk, B.; Kowalski, S.; Dramer, S.; Krinsky, S.; Li, Y.; Louie, W.; Maggipinto, M.; Marino, P.; Mead, J.; Oliva, G.; Padrazo, D.; Pedersen, K.; Podobedov, B.; Rainer, R.; Rose, J.; Santana, M.; Seletskiy, S.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Singh, P.; Smalyuk, V.; Smith, R.; Summers, T.; Tagger, J.; Tian, Y.; Wahl, W.; Wang, G.; Weiner, G.; Willeke, F.; Yang, L.; Yang, X.; Zeitler, E.; Zitvogel, E.; Zuhoski, P.

    2015-05-03

    The injector for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) storage ring consists of a 3 GeV booster synchrotron and a 200 MeV S-band linac. The linac was designed to produce either a single bunch with a charge of 0.5 nC of electrons or a train of bunches up to 300 ns long containing a total charge of 15 nC. The booster was designed to accelerate up to 15 nC each cycle in a train of bunches up to 300 ns long. Linac commissioning was completed in April 2012. Booster commissioning was started in November 2013 and completed in March 2014. All of the significant design goals were satisfied including beam emittance, energy spread, and transport efficiency. While the maximum booster charge accelerated was only 10 nC, this has proven to be more than sufficient for storage ring commissioning and operation. The injector has operated reliably during storage ring operation since then. Results will be presented showing measurements of linac and booster operating parameters achieved during commissioning and initial operation. Operating experience and reliability during the first year of NSLS-II operation will be discussed.

  17. Commissioning of NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willeke, F.

    2015-05-03

    NSLS-II, the new 3rd generation light source at BNL was designed for a brightness of 1022 photons s-1mm-2mrad-2 (0.1%BW)-1. It was constructed between 2009 and 2014. The storage ring was commissioned in April 2014 which was followed by insertion device and beamline commissioning in the fall of 2014. All ambitious design parameters of the facility have already been achieved except for commissioning the full beam intensity of 500mA which requires more RF installation. This paper reports on the results of commissioning.

  18. PULSE at Stanford University

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    Photon Science @ SLAC - LCLS - LUSI - SSRL - PULSE - Stanford University Go Search Home Publications Atomic & Molecular Physics Condensed Matter Physics Single Molecule Imaging...

  19. SSRL Users' Organization | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    users, particularly students, to share their research results or new techniques; promoting, selecting recipients, and presenting the Farrel W. Lytle Award and the Melvin P....

  20. THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC...

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    ... on the understanding of the complex biological machinery that drive the biology in cells. ... and making distribution of timing signals inexpensive. * Controls Upgrade ...

  1. SSRLUO 2003 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

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    925-423-9719 Nicholas Pingitore UTEP, Environmental & Geosciences, El Paso, TX 79968-0555 Analytical geochemistprofessor at the University of Texas at El Paso with broad...

  2. SSRLUO 2002 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

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    Pingitore University of Texas at El Paso Environmental & Geosciences El Paso, TX 79968-0555 Phone: 915-747-5754 Fax: 915-747-5073 E-mail: nick@geo.utep.edu MACROMOLECULAR...

  3. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron...

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    located at certain surfaces or interfaces between semiconducting crystalline regions with Bernal stacking order inside graphite samples. Recently published theoretical works...

  4. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    located at certain surfaces or interfaces between semiconducting crystalline regions with Bernal stacking order inside graphite samples. Recently published theoretical works 9,10...

  5. SSRLUO Executive Committee Meetings | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Executive Committee Meetings All users are encouraged to participate in SSRL Users' Organization activities. Meetings of the SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee (SSRLUO-EC) include open sessions that all members of the SSRL user community are invited to attend. Meetings are held 2-3 times a year and include an annual users' conference. If you have issues that you would like to present to the committee or have added as a discussion item on the next agenda, please feel

  6. Translocator Protein Structure and Function | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Translocator Protein Structure and Function Monday, November 30, 2015 Translocator protein (TSPO) is an ancient conserved protein whose functions in bacteria and higher eukaryotes are yet to be clearly defined in spite of more than 30 years of study. In mitochondria, it was first recognized as an outer membrane protein that binds benzodiazepine drugs, but distinct from the central nervous system site, the GABAA receptor(1). Originally called the peripheral

  7. Ultrafast Demagnetisation at 20 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

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    Lightsource Ultrafast Demagnetisation at 20 Wednesday, February 10, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Christian Dornes, ETH Zurich Program Description First discovered in 1996, ultrafast demagnetisation has sparked a wide variety of research in magnetism on the femtosecond timescale. The effect observed was that the elemental ferromagnet nickel demagnetises by a considerable amount (>30%) upon excitation by an ultrashort IR laser pulse. This result was seminal

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3

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    at the SLAC Gun Test Facililty Friday, December 3, 2010 A workshop was held on Friday, December 3, 2010 to discuss possible photo-cathode experiments at the SLAC Gun Test Facility ...

  9. Proprietary Research | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    Proprietary Research Proprietary Research is defined as that for which users request confidentiality of proposal, data and results for a certain period of time. This research...

  10. SSRL Deadlines | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    6 pm 82115-3 pm 82215; some user portal functions may not be available during this outage. XrayVUV BTR deadline extended thru 8 am 82415. The current run year is November...

  11. STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT...

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    (Name, Authorized Representative for Int'l User Group) (Name of Int'l User Group Organization) the Foreign Principal Party in Interest, that is subject to the jurisdiction...

  12. Scientific Advisory Committee | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

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    Scientific Advisory Committee Role and Charter of the SSRL SAC Scope The SSRL Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) reports to and advises the SSRL Director on issues related to:...

  13. Proposal Review Panel | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    Applied Physics New Haven, CT, USA Owen Duckworth (MEIS) North Carolina State University Soil Science Raleigh, NC, USA Lawrence Que, Jr. (BIO) University of Minnesota Department...

  14. Workshop: Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis | Stanford...

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    Applications in Chemical Catalysis Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 8:00am 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users Conference This workshop, part of the 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users...

  15. User Research Administration | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

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    X-rayVUV Proposals, Scheduling) Tel: (650) 926-2886 Fax: (650) 926-3600 Joint SSRLLCLS User Registration, Safety Training, Check-In, On-Boarding Services Sacha Hanigan SLAC...

  16. SSRLUO Executive Committee Meetings | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users Executive Committee Representatives. Review summary article about the Annual SSRLLCLS Users' Conference & Workshops, October 7-10, 2015. Review previous programs from the...

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The second revolutionary discovery made at SPEAR was that of a new particle called the tau, which turned out to be the third in the sequence of electrically charged elementary...

  18. Translocator Protein Structure and Function | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Translocator Protein Structure and Function Monday, November 30, 2015 Translocator protein (TSPO) is an ancient conserved protein whose functions in bacteria and higher eukaryotes...

  19. SSRLUO 1998 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Francisco CA 94080 Ph: (415) 225-2523 Fax: (415) 225-3734 E-mail: devos@gene.com Joe Wong Dept of Chem & Mat Science PO Box 808, L-356 Livermore CA 94551 Work:(510) 423-6385...

  20. Radioactive Materials at SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

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    Run, there are requests from users to transport and use small amounts of radioactive material in their experiments, either as stand alone samples or in a matrix of other...

  1. Celebrating Artie Bienenstock | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kortright, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Program Committee Chair Chi-Chang Kao, SLAC Director Early Science Chair: Brian Stephenson 9:15 Slade Cargill, Lehigh...

  2. Experimental Equipment | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment SSRL plans the distribution of its limited equipment on the basis of the information supplied on the Beam Time Request Form and the User Support Requirements Form. Please make sure to state all of your needs. Standard X-Ray Station Equipment Standard equipment to be found on an x-ray station includes: (1 ea.) Small and large ionization chambers (1) Exit slits (1) X-Y sample positioner (3) Keithly 427 current-to-voltage amplifier TEK 2215 60 MHZ 2 channel scope Voltage-to-frequency

  3. Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Floor Support Service Responsible Person BLDG Extension (650) 926-XXXX Beam Status Duty Operator 120 926-2326 (BEAM) Duty Operator Cell Duty Operator 120 926-4040 User Program/Beam Line Scheduling X-ray/VUV Beam Lines Macromolecular Crystallography/Bio SAXS Beam Lines Cathy Knotts TBD Lisa Dunn 137 120 120 3191 2886 2087 User Check-In/Badging Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 User Financial Accounts Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 Beam Lines/ VUV Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Bart Johnson 120 3858

  4. Administrative Contacts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administrative Contacts Business and Administration Kelley Anderton Kelley Anderton Executive admin for BioSciences Division, SSRL Travel x2033 Stephanie Carlson SSRL Business Manager x2033 Natalie Cramar SSRL Financial Planner Budgets, Proposals, Financial planning, Monthly cost statements, Journal corrections x3648 Todd Slater Purchasing coordinator, Building manager, Shipping & receiving, Ordering chemicals and gases, Online Time Sheets x2066 Michelle Steger Petty Cash, Special Pay

  5. User Facility Access Policy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    discrimination based on nationality, country of origin, ethnicity, gender, race, or religion. This User Facility Access Policy provides a concise overview of the framework for...

  6. 2005 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Publications Journal Papers E. C. Abresch, H. L. A. Axelrod, J. T. Beatty, J. A. Johnson, R. Nechushtai and M. L. Paddock, "Characterization of a Highly Purified, Fully Active, Crystallizable RC-LH1-PufX Core Complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides", Photosynth. Res. 86, 61 (2005) E. J. Adams, Y.-H. Chien and K. C. Garcia, "Structure of a gdT Cell Receptor in Complex with the Nonclassical MHC T22", Science 308, 5719 (2005) H. Adhikari, P. C. McIntyre, S. Sun, P. Pianetta and

  7. 2006 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Publications Journal Papers Y. Acremann, J. P. Strachan, V. Chembrolu, S. D. Andrews, T. Tyliszczak, J. A. Katine, M. J. Carey, B. M. Clemens, H. C. Siegmann and J. Stöhr, "Time-resolved Imaging of Spin Transfer Switching: Beyond the Macrospin Concept", Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 217202 (2006) O. S. Alexeev, A. Siani, G. Lafaye, C. T. Williams, H. J. Ploehn and M. D. Amiridis, "EXAFS Characterization of Dendrimer-Pt Nanocomposites Used for the Preparation of Pt/g-Al2O3

  8. 2007 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Publications Journal Papers Y. Acremann, V. Chembrolu, J. P. Strachan, T. Tyliszczak and J. Stöhr, "Software Defined Photon Counting System for Time Resolved X-ray Experiments", Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 014702 (2007) M. V. Aldrich, J. R. Peralta-Videa, J. G. Parsons and J. L. Gardea-Torresdey, "Examination of Arsenic(III) and (V) Uptake by the Desert Plant Species Mesquite (Prosopis spp.) Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy", Sci. Total Environ. 279, 249 (2007) O. S.

  9. 2008 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Publications Journal Papers R. J. Abergel, M. C. Clifton, J. C. Pizarro, J. A. Warner, D. K. Shuh, R. K. Strong and K. N. Raymond, "The Siderocalin/Enterobactin Interaction: A Link between Mammalian Immunity and Bacterial Iron Transport", J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 11524 (2008) doi: 10.1021/ja803524w Y. Acremann, X. W. Yu, A. A. Tulapurkar, A. Scherz, V. Chembrolu, J. A. Katine, M. J. Carey, H. C. Siegmann and J. Stöhr, "An Amplifier Concept for Spintronics", Appl. Phys. Lett.

  10. 2009 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 Publications Journal Papers J. Abendroth, A. C. Kreger and W. G. J. Hol, "The Dimer Formed by the Periplasmic Domain of EpsL from the Type 2 Secretion System of Vibrio parahaemolyticus", J. Struct. Biol. 168, 313 (2009) doi: 10.1016/j.jsb.2009.07.022 J. Abendroth, D. D. Mitchell, K. V. Korotkov, T. L. Johnson, A. Kreger, M. Sandkvist and W. G. J. Hol, "The Three-dimensional Structure of the Cytoplasmic Domains of EpsF from the Type 2 Secretion System of Vibrio cholerae",

  11. 2010 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Publications Journal Papers J. B. Aitken, E. A. Carter, H. Eastgate, M. J. Hackett, H. H. Harris, A. Levina, Y.-C. Lee, C.-l. Chen, B. Lai, S. Vogt and P. A. Lay, "Biomedical Applications of X-ray Absorption and Vibrational Spectroscopic Microscopies in Obtaining Structural Information from Complex Systems", Radiat. Phys. Chem. 79, 176 (2010) doi: 10.1016/j.radphyschem.2009.03.068 F. Aksoy, G. Akgul, Y. Ufuktepe and D. Nordlund, "Thickness Dependence of the L2,3 Branching Ratio

  12. 2011 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Publications Journal Papers D. W. Abbott and A. Boraston, "Structural Analysis of a Putative Family 32 Carbohydrate-binding Module from the Streptococcus pneumoniae Enzyme EndoD", Acta Crystallogr. F 67, 429 (2011) doi: 10.1107/S1744309111001874 J. V. Acrivos, "Chemical Activity in YBa2Cu3O7-δ across the Normal to Superconducting Phase Transition", Microchem. J. 99, 239 (2011) doi: 10.1016/j.microc.2011.05.011 J. J. Adams, S. Narayanan, B. Liu, M. E. Birnbaum, A. C. Kruse,

  13. 2012 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Publications Journal Papers L. A. Abriata, D. Alvarez-Paggi, G. N. Ledesma, N. J. Blackburn, A. J. Vila and D. H. Murgida, "Alternative Ground States Enable Pathway Switching in Biological Electron Transfer", Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17348 (2012) doi: 10.1073/pnas.1204251109 H. B. Akkerman, A. C. Chang, E. Verploegen, C. J. Bettinger, M. F. Toney and Z. Bao, "Fabrication of Organic Semiconductor Crystalline Thin Films and Crystals from Solution by Confined

  14. 2014 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Publications Journal Papers P. Acharya, W. D. Tolbert, N. Gohain, X. Wu, L. Yu, T. Liu, W. Huang, C.-c. Huang, Y. D. Kwon, R. K. Louder, T. S. Luongo, J. S. McLellan, M. Pancera, Y. Yang, B. Zhang, R. Flinko, J. S. Foulke, Jr., M. M. Sajadi, R. Kamin-Lewis, J. E. Robinson, L. Martin, P. D. Kwong, Y. Guan, A. L. DeVico, G. K. Lewis and M. Pazgier, "Structural Definition of an Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) Response Implicated in Reduced Risk for HIV-1 Infection", J.

  15. 2015 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Publications Journals N. M. Abdul-Jabbar, T. R. Forrest, R. Gronsky, E. D. Bourret-Courchesne and B. D. Wirth, "Effect of Vacancies on the Structure and Properties of Ga2(Se0.33Te0.67)3", J. Appl. Phys. 118, 085707 (2015), doi: 10.1063/1.4928812 D. E. Acevedo-Cartagena, J. Zhu, E. Trabanino, E. Pentzer, T. Emrick, S. S. Nonnenmann, A. L. Briseno and R. C. Hayward, "Selective Nucleation of Poly(3-hexyl thiophene) Nanofibers on Multilayer Graphene Substrates", ACS Macro Lett.

  16. User Shipments | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    If shipment requires special handling (e.g. refrigeration), please alert them in advance. Due to a lack of storage space, we request that your equipment andor materials arrive no ...

  17. SSRLUO 2012 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at SSRL since 1986, and has managed the administration of protein crystallography experiments since 2000. Lisa earned her Bachelor of Science degree from San Jose State...

  18. SSRLUO 2011 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at SSRL since 1986, and has managed the administration of protein crystallography experiments since 2000. Lisa earned her Bachelor of Science degree from San Jose State...

  19. Computer Networking Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Networking Group Do you need help? For assistance please submit a CNG Help Request ticket. CNG Logo Chris Ramirez SSRL Computer and Networking Group (650) 926-2901 | email Jerry Camuso SSRL Computer and Networking Group (650) 926-2994 | email Networking Support The Networking group provides connectivity and communications services for SSRL. The services provided by the Networking Support Group include: Local Area Network support for cable and wireless connectivity. Installation and

  20. Photon Source Parameters | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photon Source Parameters Beam Lines by Techniques | Beam Lines by Number Beam Energy 3 GeV Injection Energy 3 GeV Current 300-500 mA Fill Pattern 270 bunches distributed in six groups of 45 with 17 bunch gaps in between Circumferenc 234.137 Radio Frequency 476.315 MHz Bunch Spacing 2.1 n Horizontal Emittance 10 nm*rad Vertical Emittance 14 pm*rad Critical Energy 7.6 keV Energy Spread 0.097 Lifetime 12 hours @ 350 mA e- size (x,y) Dipole: 140, 14 µm rms Standard ID: 310, 8 µm rms Chicane ID:

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Middlelayer LOCO Top-Up Beam Dynamics SLM EPICS Engineering Drawings General Controls Photos Power Supplies Documentation General Technical Operations SPEAR3 CDR SPEAR3 History...

  2. SSRLUO 2007 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committee Members Joy Andrews (Ex-Officio) California State University East Bay, Chemistry, 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward, CA 94542 Professor in the Department of Chemistry...

  3. Experimental Stations by Number | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Experimental Stations by Number Beam Line by Techniques Photon Source Parameters Station Type Techniques Energy Range Contact Person Experimental Station 1-5 X-ray Materials Small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) focused 4600-16000 eV Christopher J. Tassone Tim J. Dunn Experimental Station 2-1 X-ray Powder diffraction Thin film diffraction Focused 5000 - 14500 eV Apurva Mehta Charles Troxel Jr Experimental Station 2-2 X-ray X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy 1000-40000 eV Ryan Davis

  4. SSRLUO 2004 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research involves condensed matter physicsEXAFS. She received a B.A. in Physics from Bard College in May 2001, and her...

  5. SLAC Access Update | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SLAC Access Update Effective October 2015, visit the SUSB VUE Center for badging and SLAC access. Before traveling to SLAC, please complete these procedures. 1. Register through the user portal to provide or update contact information; also confirm your proximity access/expiration through the user portal. 2. Alert us of all experimenters who will participate in scheduled experiments by listing everyone on proposals & beam time/support requests. Contact URA to add additional members to your

  6. SSRL Deadlines | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deadlines Beam Time Requests - See How to Request Beam Time We encourage users to 'bookmark' this page and set a reminder for these annual deadlines in their calendars. Deadline reminders are also included in user portal and in the SSRL Newsletter. Log in to user portal to view and accept beam time allocations. The current run year is November 10, 2015 through July 25, 2016 when we shutdown for maintenance and upgrades over the summer. Request X-ray / VUV Beam Lines (Submit in User Portal) Due

  7. SSRL Imaging Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging Group Wakefield With the high brightness of SPEAR3, imaging techniques over a wide range of length scales are being developed and added to the capabilities being made available to users, for various research projects in fields including biological, environmental, and materials science. Focused beams using mirrors, capillaries, and apertures are used to create x-ray beam sizes over a wide range, from a few microns to a few hundred microns. These techniques are used at beam lines 2-3, 10-2

  8. SSRL Science Highlights Archive | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Science Highlights Archive Approximately 1,600 scientists visit SSRL annually to conduct experiments in broad disciplines including life sciences, materials, environmental science, and accelerator physics. Science highlights featured here and in our monthly newsletter, Headlines, increase the visibility of user science as well as the important contribution of SSRL in facilitating basic and applied scientific research. Many of these scientific highlights have been included in

  9. SSRL Science | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science SSRL Science Visit our Science Highlights Archive and list of User and Staff Publications for examples of SSRL user research. Accelerator Physics Macromolecular Crystallography (SMB) Magnetic Dichroism Spectroscopy & Microscopy Materials Scattering Molecular Environmental & Interface Science Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) SAXS Materials Science Powder Diffraction Small Angle Scattering/Diffraction (SMB) Total X-ray Reflection Fluorescence (TXRF) X-ray

  10. Staff Resources | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Staff Resources General Online Time and Effort System (online form) SSRL Weekly Reports Senior Management Group (SharePoint) Beam Line Coordination Minutes Administrative Contacts SSRL General Phonelist SSRL Organizational Chart BL Ops Staff Support Website (VMS log in) SLAC Budget Office SLAC only (petty cash info) SLAC Conference Rooms SLAC Staff Resources SLAC/SSRL Tours - contact, Administration and SLAC Security. Requisitions & Property SLAC Shipper Request PeopleSoft Procurement

  11. Food Options | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    local restaurants from midday to late evening. Avanti (link is external) (Pizza and Italian) - http:www.avantipizzafreshpasta.com (link is external) Siam Orchid (link is...

  12. Foreign Users | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    During the registration process, we are also required to collect biographic and demographic information for DOE reporting. Before traveling to SLAC, please review and comply...

  13. SSRL Presents Series | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Techniques 08212013 Correlating Spatial Heterogeneities in Porosity and Permeability with Metal Poisoning within an Individual Catalyst Particle using X-ray Microscopy...

  14. 2013 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Geothermal Springs in Yellowstone National Park", Geobiology 11, 86 (2013) doi: 10.1111gbi.12015 Y. Madrona, S. A. Hollingsworth, B. Khan and T. L. Poulos, "P450cin Active Site ...

  15. User Agreements | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPAIN 2019-10-30 IDAHO NATIONAL LAB-BATTELLE ENERGY ALLIA 2018-05-13 IFIC - INST FISICA CORPUSCULAR SPAIN 2017-12-04 ILL - INST LAUE-LANGEVIN GRENOBLE FRANCE 2018-05-07 IMCB,...

  16. UF Access List | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UF Access List Last Name First Name Id Scheduled Prop. Home Institution Abdallah Bahige 549260 121715-121715 LJ94 ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY Abel Tom 256188 102915-110215...

  17. Advisory Panels | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reviews proposals for imaging, X-ray spectroscopic studies, small-angle scattering experiments, and crystallography of biologically important samples. MAT1: The materials-1 panel...

  18. Press Releases | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlight) May 5, 2010 Scientists Reveal How Genetic Mutations May Cause Type 1 Diabetes (see Scripps News & Views) May 3, 2010 Why Young Are Most Affected by Swine Flu...

  19. Computer Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Accounts Each user group must have a computer account. Additionally, all persons using these accounts are responsible for understanding and complying with the terms...

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource December 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RF Sebek, J. Facilities Bayugo, A. Protection Systems Horton, M. Engineering Physicists Rabedeau, T. Beam Line Electronics Rafael, F. End Station Eng. & Development Van Campen, D....

  1. User Financial Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Financial Accounts Why Have a User Financial Account? Each user group should establish a user financial account to procure gases, chemicals, supplies or services to support your ...

  2. Forms & Applications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forms & Applications Forms: Before You Arrive User Information Log in to the User Portal to Register or Update Contact Informatioin Proposals Submit Proposals via User Portal...

  3. Emergency Exit Maps | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Exit Maps SSRL Exit Maps Exit map 219 exit map trailer 274 exit map 450 trailers exit map trailer 271 exit map trailer 270 exit map trailer 294 exit maps 118 & 117 exit...

  4. Energy Secretary Moniz Dedicates the World's Brightest Synchrotron Light

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Source | Department of Energy the World's Brightest Synchrotron Light Source Energy Secretary Moniz Dedicates the World's Brightest Synchrotron Light Source February 6, 2015 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact 202 586 4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov Energy Secretary Moniz Dedicates the World's Brightest Synchrotron Light Source NSLS-II at Brookhaven National Lab will Accelerate Unprecedented Advances in Energy, Environmental Science, and Medicine WASHINGTON - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

  5. Achieving Vibration Stability of the NSLS-II Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simos, N.; Chu, Y. N.; Broadbent, A.; Nazaretski, E.; Margulies, L.; Dyling, O.; Shen, Q.; Fallier, M.

    2010-08-30

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) Beamline of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-lI) requires high levels of stability in order to achieve the desired instrument resolution. To ensure that the design of the endstation helps meet the stringent criteria and that natural and cultural vibration is mitigated both passively and actively, a comprehensive study complimentary to the design process has been undertaken. Vibration sources that have the potential to disrupt sensitive experiments such as wind, traffic and NSLS II operating systems have been studied using state of the art simulations and an array of field data. Further, final stage vibration isolation principles have been explored in order to be utilized in supporting endstation instruments. This paper presents results of the various study aspects and their influence on the HXN design optimization.

  6. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Now in its 40th year, the Stanford Geothermal Workshop is one of the world's longest running technical meetings on geothermal energy. The conference brings together engineers, scientists and...

  7. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.

    1996-05-01

    This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

  8. NSLS-II RF BEAM POSITION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vetter, K.; Della Penna, A. J.; DeLong, J.; Kosciuk, B.; Mead, J.; Pinayev, I.; Singh, O.; Tian, Y.; Ha, K.; Portmann, G.; Sebek J.

    2011-03-28

    An internal R&D program has been undertaken at BNL to develop a sub-micron RF Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the NSLS-II 3rd generation light source that is currently under construction. The BPM R&D program started in August 2009. Successful beam tests were conducted 15 months from the start of the program. The NSLS-II RF BPM has been designed to meet all requirements for the NSLS-II Injection system and Storage Ring. Housing of the RF BPM's in +-0.1 C thermally controlled racks provide sub-micron stabilization without active correction. An active pilot-tone has been incorporated to aid long-term (8hr min) stabilization to 200nm RMS. The development of a sub-micron BPM for the NSLS-II has successfully demonstrated performance and stability. Pilot Tone calibration combiner and RF synthesizer has been implemented and algorithm development is underway. The program is currently on schedule to start production development of 60 Injection BPM's starting in the Fall of 2011. The production of {approx}250 Storage Ring BPM's will overlap the Injection schedule.

  9. CURRENT STATUS OF INSERTION DEVICE DEVELOPMENT AT THE NSLS-II AND ITS FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe, T.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Harder, D.A.; He, P.; Kitegi, C.; Rank, J.; Rhein, C.; Rakowsky, G.; Spataro, C.

    2011-03-28

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is currently under construction. Procurement of various insertion devices (IDs) has begun. This ring assumes a very high beam stability requirement which imposes tighter field specifications on insertion devices (IDs) compared to the rings of previous generation. The state of the art ID Magnetic Measurement Facility is being set up in order to be able to certify the stringent requirements on the magnetic field of NSLS-II IDs. The IDs in the project baseline scope include six 3.5m long damping wigglers (DWs) with 100mm period length and 15mm pole gap, two 2.0m Elliptically Polarizing Undulator (EPU) with 49mm period and 11.5mm minimum magnetic gap, two 3.0m long 20mm period and one 1.5m long 21mm period IVU, which the minimum gap of these is 5mm and 5.5mm, respectively. Recently a special device for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) beamline has been added to the collection of baseline devices. Three pole wigglers with a 28mm magnetic gap and a peak field over 1 Tesla will be utilized to accommodate the users of the type of radiation which is currently produced with bending magnets at the NSLS.

  10. Safe operating conditions for NSLS-II Storage Ring Frontends commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seletskiy, S.; Amundsen, C.; Ha, K.; Hussein, A.

    2015-04-02

    The NSLS-II Storage Ring Frontends are designed to safely accept the synchrotron radiation fan produced by respective insertion device when the electron beam orbit through the ID is locked inside the predefined Active Interlock Envelope. The Active Interlock is getting enabled at a particular beam current known as AI safe current limit. Below such current the beam orbit can be anywhere within the limits of the SR beam acceptance. During the FE commissioning the beam orbit is getting intentionally disturbed in the particular ID. In this paper we explore safe operating conditions for the Frontends commissioning.

  11. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Lessons Learned

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Synchrotron Light Source II Project Lessons Learned August 2015 Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York 11973 NSLS-I Project Lessons Learned August 2015 BROOIÍHßUE]I 1 NÂTIONAL LABORATOR' NSLS-II Project Lessons Learned August 2015 Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION.... 2. OVERALL PROJECT 2.1 Success Lessons 2.2 Areas of Potential Improvements.. 3. PROJECT MANAGEMENT .............. 3.1 Success Lessons 3.2 Potential Improvements 4. HUMAN RESOURCES......,.... 4.1 Success Lessons 4.2

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3) high-temperature superconducting materials that carry electricity with no loss for efficient power transmission lines; and (4) materials for solid-state lighting with half of the present power consumption. Excitement about NSLS-II is evident in many ways, most notably the extraordinary response we had to the 2010 call for beamline development proposals for the anticipated 60 or more beamlines that NSLS-II will ultimately host. A total of 54 proposals were submitted and, after extensive review, 34 were approved. Funding from both the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health has already been secured to support the design and construction of a number of these beamlines. FY11 is a challenging and exciting year for the NSLS-II Project as we reach the peak of our construction activity. We remain on track to complete the project by March 2014, a full 15 months ahead of schedule and with even more capabilities than originally planned. The Photon Sciences Directorate is well on its way to fulfilling our vision of being a provider of choice for world-class photon sciences and facilities.

  14. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jay Nathwani, (Acting) Director Geothermal Technologies Office Stanford Geothermal Workshop January 26-28, 2015 Courtesy GRC Courtesy NREL SOURCE: Laura Garchar SOURCE: Enel Green Power Nofth America Akutan Fumeroles, sourece: GRC SOURCE: TAS Energy AltaRock Newberry EGS, source: E.Metcalfe Old Faithful Geyser, source: Laura Garchar SOURCE: FastCAP Systems DOE Budget, Geothermal Technologies Office, FY15 $22.4 $16.0 $16.0 $19.7 $27.1 $32.1 $13.0 $13.0 $7.9 $10.3 $12.5 $14.5 $4.0 $5.0 $2.9 $4.7

  15. William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award William E. Spicer (1929-2004) was an esteemed member of the international scientific community as a teacher and researcher in electrical engineering, applied physics and materials science. Bill spent the past 40 years as a professor at Stanford where he pioneered the technique ofultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and its subsequent expansion

  16. Seeking New Approaches to Investigate Domestication Events | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Seeking New Approaches to Investigate Domestication Events Monday, October 29, 2012 - 3:30am SSRL Bldg. 137, Rm. 322 Krish Seetah, Stanford University, Department of Anthropology and Zooarcheology Laboratory The domestication of wild animal species has underpinned some of the most fundamental developments in human history. The inclusion of a range of fauna into the human menagerie has altered the way we feed and transport ourselves, not to mention how we

  17. How Low Can Synchrotron Studies Go - Synchrotron Studies Below 1 K |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource How Low Can Synchrotron Studies Go - Synchrotron Studies Below 1 K Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Clement Burns, Western Michigan University Program Description Many systems show interesting states as they are cooled. States include exotic superconductivity, magnetic ordering, and quantum crystals. While neutron scattering is regularly used to study materials at temperatures below 1 K, x-ray

  18. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  19. The NSLS 100 element solid state array detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furenlid, L.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Stephani, D.; Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Beren, J. ); Cramer, S.P. . Dept. of Applied Science)

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption studies of dilute samples require fluorescence detection techniques. Since signal-to-noise ratios are governed by the ratio of fluorescent to scattered photons counted by a detector, solid state detectors which can discriminate between fluorescence and scattered photons have become the instruments of choice for trace element measurements. Commercially available 13 element Ge array detectors permitting total count rates < 500,000 counts per second are now in routine use. Since x-ray absorption beamlines at high brightness synchrotron sources can already illuminate most dilute samples with enough flux to saturate the current generation of solid state detectors, the development of next-generation instruments with significantly higher total count rates is essential. We present the design and current status of the 100 element Si array detector being developed in a collaboration between the NSLS and the Instrumentation Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detecting array consists of a 10*10 matrix of 4mm * 4mm elements laid out on a single piece of ultra-high purity silicon mounted at the front end of a liquid nitrogen dewar assembly. A matrix of charge sensitive integrating preamplifiers feed signals to an array of shaping amplifiers, single channel analyzers, and scalers. An electronic switch, delay amplifier, linear gate, digital scope, peak sensing A to D converter, and histogramming memory module provide for complete diagnostics and channel calibration. The entire instrument is controlled by a LabView 2 application on a MacII ci; the software also provides full control over beamline hardware and performs the data collection.

  20. The NSLS 100 element solid state array detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furenlid, L.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Stephani, D.; Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Beren, J.; Cramer, S.P.

    1991-12-31

    X-ray absorption studies of dilute samples require fluorescence detection techniques. Since signal-to-noise ratios are governed by the ratio of fluorescent to scattered photons counted by a detector, solid state detectors which can discriminate between fluorescence and scattered photons have become the instruments of choice for trace element measurements. Commercially available 13 element Ge array detectors permitting total count rates < 500,000 counts per second are now in routine use. Since x-ray absorption beamlines at high brightness synchrotron sources can already illuminate most dilute samples with enough flux to saturate the current generation of solid state detectors, the development of next-generation instruments with significantly higher total count rates is essential. We present the design and current status of the 100 element Si array detector being developed in a collaboration between the NSLS and the Instrumentation Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detecting array consists of a 10*10 matrix of 4mm * 4mm elements laid out on a single piece of ultra-high purity silicon mounted at the front end of a liquid nitrogen dewar assembly. A matrix of charge sensitive integrating preamplifiers feed signals to an array of shaping amplifiers, single channel analyzers, and scalers. An electronic switch, delay amplifier, linear gate, digital scope, peak sensing A to D converter, and histogramming memory module provide for complete diagnostics and channel calibration. The entire instrument is controlled by a LabView 2 application on a MacII ci; the software also provides full control over beamline hardware and performs the data collection.

  1. EERE Days at Stanford University

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy hosts the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Days at Stanford University to engage students and faculty on key energy issues aligned with EERE’s...

  2. Achieving Stability Requirements for Nanoprobe and Long Beam Lines at NSLS II. A Comprehensive Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simos,N.; Fallier, M.; Hill, J.; Berman, L.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Broadbent, A.

    2008-06-23

    Driven by beam stability requirements at the NSLS II synchrotron, such that the desired small beam sizes and high brightness are both realized and stable, a comprehensive study has been launched seeking to provide assurances that stability at the nanometer level at critical x-ray beam-lines, is achievable, given the natural and cultural vibration environment at the selected site. The study consists of (a) an extensive investigation of the site to evaluate the existing ground vibration, in terms of amplitude, frequency content and coherence, and (b) of a numerical study of wave propagation and interaction with the infrastructure of the sensitive lines. The paper presents results from both aspects of the study.

  3. Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II Authors: Sarrao,...

  4. Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II You are...

  5. Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Woods Institute for the Environment Name: Stanford- Woods Institute for the Environment...

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work explaining how one class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses.

  7. BEAM CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, S.L.; Casey, W.; Job, P.K.

    2010-05-23

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam loss in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of {le} 10% full beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses don't exceed these levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation levels outside the shield walls. This beam containment system will measure, provide a level of control and alarm indication of the beam power losses along the beam path from the source (e-gun, linac) thru the injection system and the storage ring. This system will consist of collimators that will provide limits to (and potentially to measure) the beam miss-steering and control the loss points of the charge and monitors that will measure the average beam current losses along the beam path and alarm when this beam power loss exceeds the level set by the shielding specifications. This will require some new ideas in beam loss detection capability and collimation. The initial planning and R&D program will be presented.

  8. Synchrotron Light Options at Super-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittmer, Walter

    2012-04-27

    Super-B is a planned asymmetric high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance as PEP-II and KEKB, to be built in Italy. The Super-B High (HER, 7 GeV) and Low (LER, 4 GeV) Energy beams characteristics are comparable to NSLS-II and other state of the art synchrotron light sources. This suggests the use of this facility, either parasitically or in dedicated runs, as light source. In this paper we compare the characteristics of the synchrotron light generated at Super-B with existing, in construction and proposed facilities. We investigate different schemes to incorporate the generation of synchrotron radiation in the collider lattice design and look at different beam line layouts for users. In the past high energy particle colliders were designed to collide as many particle as possible. This was done by maximizing the beam current, using relative large emittances and squeezing the beam at the interaction point. During the operation of PEP II the limits of both raising the beam currents and squeezing the beam were experienced. Therefore the optics was modified to lower emittance. The successful test of the 'large Piwinski angle' and crab waist scheme, with extremely low design emittances, at the DAPHNE collider at Frascati made it the design choice for Super-B. Both HER and LER have been designed to meet these requirements and the design parameters relevant to our study, are shown in Table 1. As comparison the design parameters from NSLS II and other state of the art synchrotron light sources have been added to this table. From these parameters it is obvious that synchrotron radiation generated from both HER and LER is comparable to this last generation sources.

  9. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia

  10. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia

  11. Shining Light on Catalysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsourc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shining Light on Catalysis Tuesday, July 19, 2011 - 4:38pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Jeroen A. van Bokhoven, Professor for Heterogeneous Catalysis Institute for Chemical and...

  12. Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis Thursday, November 17, 2011 - 1:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Dr. Alexander V. Shkumatov, Biological Small Angle...

  13. New developments with SDD detectors | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New developments with SDD detectors Wednesday, October 9, 2013 - 1:30pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 SDD General Operation Mode Thick and large active area SDD Multi-element SDD...

  14. SLAC Science Focus Area | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rifle Research Ferrihydrite banner Nano biogenic uraninite Introduction: Uranium is a toxic and problematic redox-active contaminant at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) legacy...

  15. Systems Biology in Prokaryote - Eukaryote Symbiosis | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Systems Biology in Prokaryote - Eukaryote Symbiosis Monday, June 25, 2012 - 12:00pm SLAC, SSRL Main Conference Room, 137-322 Allen M. Orville, Brookhaven National Laboratory Frontier challenges for macromolecular crystallography (MX) now include determining structures of trapped reactive intermediates, large macromolecules and viruses, membrane proteins, protein-protein complexes, and protein-nucleic acid complexes. Although structure and function are intimately linked,

  16. Stimulated X-Ray Emission for Spectroscopy | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room 108A Speaker: Clemens Weninger, Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems Program Description The recent advance of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs)...

  17. SSRLUO 2000 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource 0 Executive Committee Members Patrick Allen (Past Chair, ex-officio) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory GT Seaborg Institute for Transuranic Science 7000 East Avenue, MS L-231 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: 925-423-8955 Fax: 925-423-3160 E-mail: Marilyn Olmstead University of California at Davis One Shields Avenue Davis, CA 95616-5295 Phone: 530-752-6668 Fax: 530-752-8995 E-mail: Paul Alivisatos University of California at Berkeley Department of Chemistry Berkeley, CA 94720

  18. SSRLUO 2002 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource 2 Executive Committee Members ENVIRONMENTAL/GEOSCIENCES Satish Myneni Princeton University Geoscience 151 Guyot Hall Princeton, NJ 08544 Phone: 609-258-5848 E-mail: smyneni@princeton.edu Nicholas Pingitore University of Texas at El Paso Environmental & Geosciences El Paso, TX 79968-0555 Phone: 915-747-5754 Fax: 915-747-5073 E-mail: nick@geo.utep.edu MACROMOLECULAR CRYSTALLOGRAPHY Paul Foster(ex-officio) UCSF/Exelixis Biophysics Box 0448 San Francisco, CA 94143 Phone:

  19. SSRLUO 2004 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource 4 Executive Committee Members Joy Andrews California State University Hayward, Chemistry, 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward, CA 94542 Associate Professor of Chemistry at California State University, Hayward, has had 10 years' experience at SSRL, first with University of California Berkeley from 1992-1996, and continuing with research in the remediation of heavy metals in the environment with plants and novel materials. Her work on safety and other committees at LBNL and CSUH will

  20. SSRLUO 2005 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource 5 Executive Committee Members Juana Acrivos CSU San Jose, Chemistry, 1 Washington Square, SanJose, CA 95192-0101 Juana Acrivos has done experiments at SSRL since 1978. She is a chemist at SJSU (Professor). Her students first work at SSRL (Alan Robertson, Kevin Hathaway) showed how metal (Rb and Ba) in ammonia solutions change valence from 0 (in metallic solutions) to ionic values as the dilution is increased. The dynamics of intercalation chemistry was investigated in the '80s

  1. SSRLUO 2006 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource 6 Executive Committee Members Juana Acrivos CSU San Jose, Chemistry, 1 Washington Square, SanJose, CA 95192-0101 Juana Acrivos has done experiments at SSRL since 1978. She is a chemist at SJSU (Professor). Her students first work at SSRL (Alan Robertson, Kevin Hathaway) showed how metal (Rb and Ba) in ammonia solutions change valence from 0 (in metallic solutions) to ionic values as the dilution is increased. The dynamics of intercalation chemistry was investigated in the '80s

  2. SSRLUO 2007 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource 7 Executive Committee Members Joy Andrews (Ex-Officio) California State University East Bay, Chemistry, 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward, CA 94542 Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at California State University, East Bay, where she has taught since 1996. Her B.A. degree is in biochemistry from Barnard College, and Ph.D. in Biophysical Chemistry from UC Berkeley. Her research is on the detection, speciation and remediation of heavy metal contamination at

  3. SSRLUO 2008 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource 8 Executive Committee Members Joy Andrews California State University East Bay, Chemistry, 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward, CA 94542 Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at California State University, East Bay, where she has taught since 1996. Her B.A. degree is in biochemistry from Barnard College, and Ph.D. in Biophysical Chemistry from UC Berkeley. Her research is on the detection, speciation and remediation of heavy metal contamination at various

  4. SSRLUO 2012 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource 2 Executive Committee Members Eva Rose Balog University of California Santa Cruz, MCD Biology, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Eva Rose Balog is a fifth year Ph.D. student studying molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and cancer using x-ray crystallography in the laboratory of Dr. Seth Rubin at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Eva Rose is originally from Maine and graduated from the California Institute of Technology in 2006 with a B.S. in Biology. At Caltech she learned

  5. SSRLUO 2013-2014 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource 2013-2014 Executive Committee Members Charter | Committee Meetings | SSRLUO Activism Jordi Cabana University of Illinois at Chicago, IL 60607 Jordi Cabana recently joined the University of Illinois in 2013. Prior to that time, Jordi was a Research Scientist at LBNL. He moved to the US in 2005 to join Prof. Clare P. Grey's group at the State University of New York at Stony Brook as a Postdoctoral Research Associate, after completing his Ph.D. in Materials Science at the

  6. Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis Thursday, November 17, 2011 - 1:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Dr. Alexander V. Shkumatov, Biological Small Angle Scattering Group, EMBL Hamburg

  7. Research for the Energy System of the Future | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    increasing demand is one of the grand challenges of our society. Rising concerns about air pollution and man made climate change with not exactly predictable consequences demand...

  8. While You Are Here | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste, including solvent wipes, must be disposed of properly, i.e., not in the regular trash receptacles and not mixed inappropriately. There are disposal containers available on...

  9. Watching Spins Travel across Borders | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Watching Spins Travel across Borders Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Spintronics is a field that keeps both scientists and engineers excited from a fundamental physics and applications perspective. But what is "spintronics" exactly? In order to understand this new field of magnetism research, it is necessary to take a step back and revisit conventional electronics. For almost a century, electronic devices - starting with the early vacuum tubes - have used the charge of

  10. Shining Light on Catalysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shining Light on Catalysis Tuesday, July 19, 2011 - 4:38pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Jeroen A. van Bokhoven, Professor for Heterogeneous Catalysis Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering ETH Zurich Head of Laboratory for Catalysis and Sustainable Chemistry (LSK) Swiss Light Source Paul Scherrer Institute Understanding a functioning catalyst requires understanding at the atomic scales in a time-resolved manner. X-rays can be readily used to accomplish that task, because of the large

  11. CRISPR RNA-guided Surveillance in Escherichia Coli | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource CRISPR RNA-guided Surveillance in Escherichia Coli Friday, January 30, 2015 CRISPR figure Figure 1. Overview of the Cascade crystal structure (PDB 4TVX). A) Shown is a schematic of the Type IE CRISPR operon in E. coli. The Cas genes are shown as arrows and the CRISPR repeat and guide sequences are shown as black squares and red barrels, respectively. The Cas genes cse1, cse2, cas7, cas5e, and cas6e (colored arrows) are expressed in an uneven stoichiometry (numbers above

  12. Phone Numbers for Beam Lines and Other Services | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8650 11-3 8656 12-2 5212 13-1 5131 13-2 5132 13-3 5133 User LabsServices Building LabService Extension 120 Control Room 3707 120 User Reception Lobby 4039 120 Mail Room 4941...

  13. Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Wednesday, November 27, 2013 The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix

  14. The Farrel W. Lytle Award | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (2015) Bart Johnson (2014) Sean Brennan (2013) Clyde Smith (2012) Piero Pianetta (2011) Sam Webb (2010) Michael Toney (2009) Robert Scott (2008) Cathy Knotts (2007) Mike Soltis...

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, BL6-2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface phenomena, which can be characterized using TXM. For effective catalysis, fuel cells require transport of electrons and ions and therefore studies of porosity, and...

  16. Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Li-ion Batteries Monday, February 13, 2012 - 1:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Stephen J. Harris, General Motors R&D While battery performance is well predicted by the...

  17. New developments with SDD detectors | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource New developments with SDD detectors Wednesday, October 9, 2013 - 1:30pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 SDD General Operation Mode Thick and large active area SDD Multi-element SDD High count rate performance with current SDD/processor Extremely high count rate performance with new SDD/ASIC device

  18. SSRLUO 2013-2014 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Laurie Balistrieri involves studying the sorption mechanism of tellurium (used in solar panel manufacture) to iron oxides and tellurium speciation in various geomedia. Her...

  19. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Caught in the Act | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    elongation and tailoring steps on the growing fatty acid chain (Figure 1a)4. These steps are determined by AcpP-Fab enzyme interactions during which AcpP chooses the...

  20. Probing nonlinear QED with strong laser fields | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Probing nonlinear QED with strong laser fields Wednesday, January 20, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Sebastian Meuren, Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics Program Description Quantum electrodynamics exhibits a so-called critical field strength, where nonlinear and even nonperturbative quantum effects are expected to play an important role. This regime could be studied by combining strong lasers with highly energetic particles like in

  1. Data Management at SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management at SSRL SSRL Users are responsible for meeting the Data Management obligations of their home institutions and granting agencies. In general, SSRL provides data acquisition systems (computers/software) and short term data storage on all of its beam lines. The beam line computers are connected to central servers via a high speed network, and data are transferred to these servers for backup and short-term storage. SSRL does not provide long term storage or archiving of data; users must

  2. Experimental Run Schedules for Previous Years | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Run Schedules for Previous Years SPEAR Operating / Maintenance Beam Line Schedule Accelerator Physics FY2015 X-ray VUV, BL13 Macromolecular Crystallography FY2014 X-ray VUV, BL13 Macromolecular Crystallography FY2013 X-ray VUV Macromolecular Crystallography FY2012 X-ray Macromolecular Crystallography VUV FY2011 X-ray Macromolecular Crystallography VUV BL13 2011 FY2010 X-ray Macromolecular Crystallography VUV FY2009 X-ray Macromolecular Crystallography VUV FY2008 X-ray

  3. Experimental Station 1-5 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -5 Beamline 1-5 is a bend magnet end station dedicated primarily to small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), with the capability to perform wide angle x-ray scattering experiments as well. 1-5 is equipped with a two dimensional rayonix 165 CCD detector. Supports sample-to-detector distances of 1-3 meters, and is capable of changing energy in the range of (8-16 keV). There are several sample environments available including a capillary cell, 6-sample holder heated transmission stage, grazing

  4. Experimental Station 10-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beamline 10-1 is a wiggler side-station beamline for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and core-level Photoelectron Spectroscopy. It has a generic chamber for primarily ex-situ characterization of a large number of samples. XAS can be recorded in AEY, TEY, FY yields. PES is analysed with a CMA. Status Open Supported Techniques X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Photoemission spectroscopy Main Scientific Disciplines Environmental Sciences Materials Sciences Beam Line Specifications Source 33-pole,

  5. Experimental Station 10-2B | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Beamline 10-2 is a wiggler end-station beamline. The 10-2 front hutch is dedicated for rapid/continuous-scanning x-ray fluorescence imaging. The 10-2 back hutch is equiped with a six-circle diffractometer for X-ray scattering. Status Open Supported Techniques X-ray diffraction X-ray reflectivity X-ray scattering Main Scientific Disciplines Environmental Sciences Materials Sciences Beam Line Specifications Source 30-pole, 1.27-Tesla wiggler, 1.5 mrad acceptance Energy Range Resolution ΔE/E

  6. Experimental Station 10-2a | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Beam line 10-2 is a wiggler end-station that splits time between the front hutch (BL10-2a), which is instrumented for X-ray absorption spectroscopy imaging, and the rear hutch (BL10-2b), which has a dedicated 6-circle diffractometer that is used for materials scattering. The front hutch utilizes a polycapillary focusing optic to provide a beam spot as small as ~10 microns. Samples as large as 300 x 600 mm can be measured in one image, but larger samples can also be accommodated. In addition,

  7. Experimental Station 11-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beam line 11-2 is a high-flux XAS station dedicated to molecular biogeochemical and interface sciences. It is optimized for challenging XAS measurements on dilute or radioactive samples, single crystals, and interfaces. To support these experiments, BL11-2 is equipped with collimating and focusing optics, a "double double" Si(220) LN2-cooled monochromator, and a 100-element solid state Ge detector array. Additional instrumentation includes LHe and LN2 cryostats, a grazing incidence

  8. Experimental Station 11-3 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Beamline 11-3 is a wiggler side-station beamline dedicated for Wide Angle Scattering. 11-3 is equipped with MAR 345 image plate. Status Open Supported Techniques X-ray diffraction X-ray scattering X-ray Wide angle scattering (WAX); GIWAX Main Scientific Disciplines Bioscience Environmental Sciences Materials Sciences Beam Line Specifications Source 24-pole, 2-Tesla wiggler, 1.0 mrad acceptance, side station Energy Range Resolution ΔE/E Spot Size Flux Focused 12700 eV ~5 x 10-4 3.0 x 0.15mm 2

  9. Experimental Station 12-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-2 Beamline 12-2 is a PRT station, realized through third party funding from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation via the California Institute of Technology and available to general users 60%; it is an undulator beamline with fully adjustable focus from 100 to 15 microns. Micron-sized beams can be achieved by the use of microcollimators. It is optimized for microdiffraction, monochromatic, high-throughput and high-resolution macromolecular crystallography. It is SAD and MAD capable and can be

  10. Experimental Station 13-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beamline 13-1 is a side-station of an elliptical undulator beamline that is dedicated for scanning transmission x-ray spectro microscopy of magnetic materials. The endstation is equipped with a STXM microscope that provides 30 nm spatial resolution and a fast Avalanche photodiode that allows for time resolved pump probe experiments with 50 ps temporal resolution. Status Open Supported Techniques Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy X-ray Dichroism Pump-Probe Scanning Transmission X-ray

  11. Experimental Station 13-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 BL13-2 has stations designed for surface and solid state experiments (SSE). The SSE station has an electron spectrometer (SES-R3000, VG-Scienta) for photoemission spectroscopy and Auger electron yield X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and a Ni coated elliptical grating spectrometer for C 1s, N 1s and O 1s x-ray emission spectroscopy. A horizontally mounted manipulator is provided for experiments with a minimum sample temperature of about 40 K. The manipulator transfers samples between the

  12. Experimental Station 14-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 N/A Status In Design Supported Techniques White Light Station Main Scientific Disciplines Structural Molecular Biology Beam Line Specifications Source Bending Magnet Energy Range Resolution ΔE/E Spot Size Flux Angular Acceptance Focused 4000-14500 eV ~5 x 10-4 .20 x 0.45mm - 1.5 mrad Optics N/A Absorption N/A Instrumentation N/A Sample Environment N/A Data Acquisition and Analysis N/A Beam Line Phone 650-926- . On-site Users: Contact the Duty Operator at 9-926-4040 Beam Line Contact Lisa Dunn

  13. Experimental Station 14-3a | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a BL 14-3A, located on the upstream table of the hutch of the BL14-3 bending magnet side station, is dedicated to bulk X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological, material, and geological samples in the X-ray photon energy range 2.1-5.0 keV. BL14-3 is the only beamline at SSRL capable of obtaining spectroscopy data at the phosphorous edge. In this configuration the beam is unfocused over a size of 1 mm x 6 mm to allow for high energy-resolution measurements on homogenous samples. BL 14-3 is

  14. Experimental Station 14-3b | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    b Beam line 14-3 is a bending magnet side station dedicated to X-ray imaging and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological, biomedical, materials, and geological samples. Most often used for data collection at the S K edge, BL14-3 is the only SSRL beam line capable of XAS at the P K edge. During imaging mode, a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror system is used to achieve microfocus with a beam size of ~ 5 x 5 microns. BL14-3 is equipped with a Vortex silicon drift detector and ionization

  15. Experimental Station 2-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 BL2-1 is a dedicated thin film/powder diffraction and reflectivity station. It is equipped with a Huber 2-circle goniometer and a high-resolution crystal-analyzer detector. There are several different types of sample stages to cater to a broad user-base including a motorized xyz stage, a capillary spinner, a "wet" liquid sample stage, and an Anton-Paar furnace (25-900 ºC). Data acquisition is performed using SPEC, with SPECPlot GUI interface (in-house diffractometer control, peak

  16. Experimental Station 2-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beam line 2-2 is a bending magnet end-station beam line dedicated to in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Quick-EXAFS, and EXAFS measurements of samples with absorption edges of 4.5 - 24 keV. BL2-2 is equipped with a water-cooled double crystal monochromator, with multiple crystal sets available [Si(111), Si(220)]. Available detectors at BL2-2 are currently limited to ionization chambers, Lytle, 13-element Ge array, and Vortex detectors. Status Open Supported Techniques X-ray Absorption

  17. Experimental Station 2-3 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 BL2-3 is a bending magnet side station dedicated to X-ray imaging and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy as well as micro diffraction of biological, material, and geological samples. A Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors system is used to achieve microfocus with a beam size of ~ 2 x 2 microns. The energy range of the beam line optics at BL 2-3 covers from 5-23 keV, with detection of fluorescent X-rays as low as Si. Beamline 2-3 is equipped with a Vortex silicon drift detector and ionization chambers.

  18. Experimental Station 4-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beam line 4-1 is a high-flux station optimized for x-ray absorption spectroscopy and EXAFS experiments requiring x-rays with energies between ~ 6 and 38 keV. This energy range includes most of the transition metals (all rows), lanthanides and actinides, P-block elements, alkaline and alkaline earths. While it is possible to access x-rays as low as 5 keV, these experiments are challenging because of air absorption and are better performed at beam line 4-3. BL 4-1 can accommodate samples

  19. Experimental Station 4-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beam line 4-2 is a small-angle scattering/diffraction station dedicated to structural biology studies primarily on non-crystalline systems. The instrument covers the range of characteristic length scale of a few Angstroms to a few micrometers by the combined use of a pin-hole geometry camera, which can be automatically configured to have one of 7 sample-to-detector distances, and a separate ultra small angle scattering setup. A Rayonix MX225-HE area detector is the primary detector. For fast

  20. Experimental Station 5-4 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-4 The BL5-4 station is a normal incidence monochromator beam line optimized for high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in the photon energy range of 7 - 40 eV. The dedicated experimental end station is equipped with a SCIENTA R4000 electron spectrometer. This system is capable of performing ARPES experiments with a total energy resolution of a few meV and an angular resolution of 0.3°. It is also equipped with a low-temperature sample manipulator with two degree of

  1. Experimental Station 6-2C | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C Beamline 6-2 is a wiggler end-station beamline dedicated for advanced x-ray spectroscopy and transmission x-ray microscopy. The 6-2 middle hutch is equipped with a 40-crystal non-resonant x-ray Raman scattering, a 7-crystal spectrometer operating on a Rowland circle for x-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements, and a 14-crystal high-q XRS spectrometer. The 6-2 back hutch houses a Transmission X-ray Microscope. Status Open Supported Techniques

  2. Experimental Station 6-2b | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    b Beam line 6-2b is a wiggler end-station dedicated for High Resolution Hard X-ray Spectroscopy. The end station combines three multicrystal Johann spectrometers that enable X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES), Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS), High-Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detected X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (HERFD-XAS) and X-ray Raman Spectroscopy (XRS) techniques. The ambient pressure operation of the end-station provides a great flexibility of implementing various sample

  3. Experimental Station 7-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beamline 7-2 is a wiggler beamline dedicated for X-ray scattering and time-resolved experiments (>0.005 s). 7-2 is equipped with a customized Huber type 5021 6+2 axis diffractometer and uses PILATUS 100k and 300k area detectors (including time-resolved experiments), a Si crystal-analyzer with point detector for high resolution studies, or a 1 mradian Soller slit with a Vortex Si drift detector. Status Open Supported Techniques X-ray diffraction X-ray reflectivity X-ray scattering Main

  4. Experimental Station 8-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 BL8-1 is equipped with a post-monochromator beam-splitting mirror to allow for two sample chamber locations. BL8-1a accommodates roll-on user chambers. BL8-1b is under modification to provide energy range from 2 eV to 10 eV. The mirror cooling system was upgraded in FY04 and the BL8-1 stations are SPEAR3 500 mA compatible. Stations 8-1a and 8-1b cannot be used simultaneously. This experimental station is NOT open to users. Status Closed Supported Techniques Photoemission spectroscopy Soft

  5. Gate Hours & Services | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gate Hours & Services Sand Hill Road Main Gate Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week 650-926-2551 Alert URA or User Check-In Coordinator Jackie Kerlegan before traveling to SLAC. SLAC has proximity card readers at the entrances from Sand Hill Road and Alpine Road as well as at Security Gate 17 and Sector 30. If you do not have an ID badge with proximity access issued by Security after October 2014, stop first at the SLAC Security Office Building 235 during office hours which are 7 am-12 noon

  6. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource powders. Special emphasis will be given to the possible ways to differentiate between ferromagnetic- from superconducting-like signals when the magnetic moments of interest remain small in comparison with the large diamagnetic backgrounds. Recently done transport and persistent currents experiments at room temperature on graphite flakes embedded in alkanes and their reproducibility. All the experimental evidence as a whole suggests the existence of superconductivity at very high

  7. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource powders [7]. Special emphasis will be given to the possible ways to differentiate between ferromagnetic- from superconducting-like signals when the magnetic moments of interest remain small in comparison with the large diamagnetic backgrounds. Recently done transport and persistent currents experiments at room temperature on graphite flakes embedded in alkanes and their reproducibility. All the experimental evidence as a whole suggests the existence of superconductivity at very

  8. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Caught in the Act | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Caught in the Act Monday, March 31, 2014 The Escherichia coli (E. coli) proteome consists of 5993 proteins, of which 853 are involved in primary metabolic processes critical for the survival and functioning of the cell1. Fatty acid biosynthesis is at the core of primary metabolism responsible for the synthesis of fatty acids, essential metabolites that are the major components of cellular membranes and energy storage. Due to the high prevalence of

  9. Integrated Safety & Environmental Management System | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Integrated Safety & Environmental Management System How do you plan for SAFETY in your job? In an effort to provide a formal and organized process to manage all aspects of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) issues at its laboratories, the DOE developed the Integrated Safety and Environmental Management System (ISEMS). In short, it's a process that allows people (such as staff and Users) at all levels to plan, perform, assess and improve their implementation

  10. Crystal Structure of Cascade | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure of Cascade Friday, January 30, 2015 Immune pathways protect all organisms from infection by genetic invaders such as viruses. It was recently discovered that prokaryotes protect against invasion by bacteriophages via an RNA based adaptive immune system, called the CRISPR system (1, 2). By acting as a barrier to the exchange of genetic information, a major route for the acquisition of antibiotic-resistance and virulence factors, the CRISPR system modulates the evolution of

  11. Watching Spins Travel across Borders | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30, 2015 Spintronics is a field that keeps both scientists and engineers excited from a fundamental physics and applications perspective. But what is "spintronics" exactly? ...

  12. SSRL Beam Lines Map | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRL Beam Lines Map Beam Line by Number | Beam Line by Techniques | Photon Source Parameters

  13. SSRL Experimental Run Schedule | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Run Schedule November 2015- May 2016 Schedules for X-ray, VUV and Macromolecular Crystallography beamlines. X-ray VUV (BL5, 8, 10-1, 13-1/2/3) Macromolecular Crystallography see also: Support Staff Schedule SPEAR3 Operating / Maintenance LCLS see Schedule Archive The SSRL storage ring team is in the final stages of installing hardware that will enable reducing the SPEAR3 emittance to 6 nm from its present value of 10 nm. The last piece is the installation of the thin septum

  14. SSRL News & Events | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRL News & Events To stay informed about SSRL news & events, subscribe to SSRL Headline News by sending an e-mail to with "subscribe ssrl-headlines" in the body. Events, Meetings, Conferences, Seminars, Schools, and Workshops Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Diffraction Studies, March 28-30, 2016 Crystallization: Focus on Micro and Nano Crystals and High Throughput Methods, April 19-22, 2016 RapiData Course on Data Collection and Structure Solution, April 24-29, 2016 Ultrafast

  15. SSRL Publications & Reports | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications & Reports Reporting Requirements & Acknowledgment Statements SSRL provides technical tools for world-leading science at no charge for scientists who conduct non-proprietary research, with the understanding that significant results are to be publicly disseminated. Scientists must acknowledge use of the facility in presentations and publications and must inform the facility of all publications, theses, awards, patents and other forms of recognition resulting from research

  16. SSRL Safety Guidelines & Resources | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Safety Guidelines & Resources The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) is committed to conducting research in a manner that ensures protection of the workers, the public and the environment, and it is a direct and individual responsibility of all BES managers and BES supported researchers and their staff. Funds provided by BES for research will be applied as necessary to ensure that all BES research activities are conducted safely and in an environmentally conscientious

  17. Welcome to the SSRL User Research Site | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource the SSRL User Research Site Responsive Design User Portal Try the new responsive User Portal platform for your research activities. * IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING ACCESS TO SLAC: To gain access to SLAC, all users must be registered on the SSRL/LCLS user portal and be listed on a scheduled experiment (this will alert Security and the VUE Center). Please coordinate other meetings or visits with your SSRL BL or floor support staff, or contact the URA office for assistance. *

  18. How to Request & Access Beam Time | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    who were born in, are citizens of, or have affiliations with organizations from Cuba, Iran, Sudan or Syria, we must collect additional information and obtain ADVANCE...

  19. New Glass Vial Procedure | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crimp vials consist of 3 pieces: 1) a glass vial, 2) a rubber septum, and 3) an aluminum cap. The sample is introduced into the glass vial in an inert atmosphere glove box, the...

  20. SSRL Beam Lines by Technique | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Lines by Number | SPEAR3 Parameters Supported Technique(s) Beam Line X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Biological x-ray absorption spectroscopy 2-2, 4-3, 7-3, 9-3, 14-3...

  1. Experimental Station 7-3 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy Main Scientific Disciplines Biomedical Sciences Structural Molecular Biology Beam Line Specifications Source 20-pole, 2-Tesla wiggler, 0.8 mrad beam, Side station...

  2. Experimental Station 9-3 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy Main Scientific Disciplines Biomedical Sciences Structural Molecular Biology Beam Line Specifications Source 16-pole, 2-Tesla Wiggler, 2 mrad acceptance, side...

  3. Experimental Station 14-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) Main Scientific Disciplines Structural Molecular Biology Beam Line Specifications Source Bending Magnet Source Bending magnet, side...

  4. Experimental Station 13-3 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performed by the drain current (total electron yield, TEY), during the scattering measurement. Status Open Supported Techniques Coherent soft x-ray scattering Soft x-ray...

  5. Experimental Station 4-3 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for low-temperature measurements. A motorized sample holder stage allows sequential measurement on multiple samples. Status Open Supported Techniques X-ray Absorption...

  6. Experimental Station 8-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for controlling a temperature (4 - 350 K) and pressure (10-4 10-11 Torr) during XAS measurement. Status Open Supported Techniques Photoemission spectroscopy Soft x-ray...

  7. The Dale E. Sayers Fellowship | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dale E. Sayers Fellowship North Carolina State University Physical and Mathematical Sciences Foundation A dear colleague, Dale E. Sayers, one of the three pioneers of the...

  8. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and absorption of rare earth elements in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fossils: implications for anatomical and taphonomical studies | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and absorption of rare earth elements in fossils: implications for anatomical and taphonomical studies Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Pierre Gueriau, Synchrotron SOLEIL Program Description Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) has mainly been used in fossils to map organics and metal

  9. Another First at NSLS-II Construction Site

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    Workers at the NSLS-II ring building construction site recently completed the first complicated concrete pour for the approximately 19-ft.-tall walls of the Utility Tunnel. The continuous pour was the first of its kind, as previous pours have been for foo

  10. NSLS-II RF Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Dilgen, T.; Gash, B.; Gosman, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Papu, J.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, R.; Sitnikov, A.; Wilhelm, H.; Jia, Y.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. A new helium refrigerator system has been installed and commissioned to support the superconducting RF cavities in the storage ring. Special care was taken to provide very stable helium and LN2 pressures and flow rates to minimize microphonics and thermal effects at the cavities. Details of the system design along with commissioning and early operations data will be presented.

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains seven sections discussing the following: (1) scientific research at the NSLS; (2) symposia and workshops held at the NSLS; (3) a facility report; (4) NSLS projects; (5) NSLS operational highlights; (6) informational guides to the VUV and X-ray beamlines; and (7) appendices which include abstracts on projects carried out at the VUV and X-ray beamlines.

  12. Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy - Geothermal Technologies Office Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office Presentation by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford Geothermal Workshop on February 11-13, 2013. PDF icon stanford_2013_hollett.pdf More Documents & Publications Geothermal Technologies Program Annual Peer Review Presentation By Doug Hollett Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Geothermal Technologies Program GRC

  13. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Geothermal Workshop | Department of Energy Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop General overview of Geothermal Technologies Program that includes information about subprograms and where each focuses. PDF icon gtp_overview_stanford_final.pdf More Documents & Publications Fiscal Year 2013 Budget Request Briefing Geothermal Technologies Program GRC Presentation, 10/1/2012 Geothermal

  14. First Major Milestone Achieved for Brookhavens Next Big Machine, NSLS-II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    John Skaritka

    2010-01-08

    After recent road testing, NSLS- II magnets hold high-precision alignment, marking first major R&D achievement for BNLs newest accelerator.

  15. Pixel and Microstrip detectors for current and future synchrotron light

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sources | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Pixel and Microstrip detectors for current and future synchrotron light sources Friday, July 1, 2011 - 1:00pm SLAC, Kavli Auditorium Dr. Christian Brönnimann, CEO, DECTRIS Ltd., CH-5400 Baden, Switzerland The PILATUS pixel detectors, large area modular two-dimensional hybrid pixel array detectors, have revolutionized protein crystallography and biological small- and wide-angle scattering by combining noise-free counter properties with

  16. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Stanford University

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stanford University employs best practices to minimize the environmental impact of its operations, including its award-winning Transportation Demand Management program.

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  18. In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Johanna Nelson, Stanford Postdoctoral Scholar, SSRL MSD Hard X-ray Department A key factor in the global move towards clean, renewable energy is the electrification of the automobile. Current battery technology limits EV (electric vehicles) to a short travel range, slow recharge, and costly price tag. Li-ion batteries promise the high

  19. Performance of the upgraded NSLS beam position monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nawrocky, R.J.; Keane, J.

    1997-07-01

    The design and initial performance of the original NSLS beam position monitor were described by J. Bittner and R. Biscardi in 1989. The receiver, which processes signals from four button type pick-up electrodes by time-division multiplexing, operates at the third harmonic of the ring rf frequency (158.66 MHz). It has an output bandwidth of about 2 kHz and a dynamic signal range of approximately 36 dB. A total of 92 receivers have been installed in the NSLS X-ray and VUV storage rings for orbit monitoring and for real time feedback. As part of a continuous effort to improve the NSLS storage ring performance, the BPMs as well as other instrumentation systems have also been undergoing upgrades over the past two years to improve their performance. In the BPM, the front end has been modified to prevent saturation of the rf multiplexing switch, the detector operating point was changed to improve output signal linearity, the dynamic range was increased to over 60 dB, and the gain calibration was standardized to 0.5 volts/mm (i.e. 2 {micro}m/mV). This paper describes the BPM modifications and presents some performance data and measurements on stored beam.

  20. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC) 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC) Annual Planning Summaries briefly...

  1. Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Name: Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Address: 473 Via...

  2. Doug Hollett Gives Keynote Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Program Manager of the Geothermal Technologies Program, Doug Hollett gave a keynote address at the 37th Stanford Geothermal Workshop in Stanford, California.

  3. Workshop: New Advances in Crystallography with Synchrotrons and X-FELs |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource New Advances in Crystallography with Synchrotrons and X-FELs Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 8:00am 2011 SSRL/LCLS Annual Users Conference This workshop, part of the 2011 SSRL/LCLS Annual Users Conference, will describe resources and results from synchrotron-based micro crystallography and X-FEL-based nanocrystallography, and explore the future of these tools in producing important scientific results

  4. Design of the NSLS-II Top-Off Safety System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller, III R.; Doom, L.; Ganetis, G.; Hetzel, C.; Job, P. K.; Li, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Sharma, S.; Singh, O.; Wang, G. M.; Xia, Z.

    2015-05-03

    The NSLS-II accelerators finished commissioning in the fall of 2014, with beamline commissioning underway. Part of the design for the NSLS-II is to operate in top off mode. The Top Off Safety System (TOSS) is presently being installed. In this report we discuss the Top Off Safety System design and implementation, along with the necessary tracking results and radiological calculations.

  5. Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Since last year, we have had three 3-week blocks of beamtime, in April and November 1991 and February 1992, on the Ames/Montana beamline at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). These runs continued our program on high temperature superconductors, heavy Fermion and related uranium and rare earth materials, and started some work on transition metal oxides. We have also had beamtime at the Brookhaven NSLS, 5 days of beamtime on the Dragon monochromator, beamline U4B, studying resonant photoemission of transition metal oxides using photon energies around the transition metal 2p edges. Data from past runs has been analyzed, and in some cases combined with photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) data taken in the home U-M lab. 1 fig.

  6. Stanford Geothermal Workshop 2012 Annual Meeting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2012 Annual Meeting Stanford Geothermal Workshop 2012 Annual Meeting Presentation slides for the Stanford Geothermal Workshop Annual Meeting presentation by Doug Hollett, Geothermal Technologies Program Manager PDF icon stanford_keynote_2012_hollett.pdf More Documents & Publications Geothermal Technologies Program Annual Peer Review Presentation By Doug Hollett Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2013 Budget Request Briefing

  7. Stanford Geothermal Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford Geothermal Workshop Stanford Geothermal Workshop February 22, 2016 8:00AM EST to February 24, 2016 6:00PM EST The goals of the conference are to bring together engineers, scientists and managers involved in geothermal reservoir studies and developments; provide a forum for the exchange of ideas on the exploration, development and use of geothermal resources; and to enable prompt and open reporting of progress. We strongly encourage all scientists and engineers involved in geothermal

  8. Microsoft Word - EDUconnectStanford11-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford University and DOE/Predecessor Note: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford has the dual associations of Stanford University and DOE/Predecessor. Nobel Laureate Name Date/Award In Association with Stanford Association with DOE/Predecessor George Wells Beadle 1958 Physiology or Medicine Professor of Biology 1937 - 1947 Consultant to the AEC Felix Bloch 1952 Physics Professor of Physics 1934 - 1971; Professor Emeritus Berkeley Laboratory 1930's; Manhattan Project at

  9. Insertion Devices for NSLS-II Baseline and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe,T.

    2008-06-23

    NSLS-II is going to employ Damping Wigglers (DWs) not only for emittance reduction but also as broad band hard X-ray source. In-Vacuum Undulators (IVUs) with the minimum RMS phase error (< 2 degree) and possible cryo-capability are planned for X-ray planar device. Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) are envisioned for polarization controls. Due to the lack of hard X-ray flux from weak dipole magnet field (0.4 Tesla), three pole wigglers (3PWs) of the peak field over 1 Tesla will be mainly used by NSLS bending magnet beam line users. Magnetic designs and kick maps for dynamic aperture surveys were created using the latest version of Radia [1] for Mathematica 6 which we supported the development. There are other devices planned for the later stage of the project, such as quasi-periodic EPU, superconducting wiggler/undulator, and Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU) with Praseodymium Iron Boron (PrFeB) magnets and textured Dysprosium poles. For R&D, Hybrid PrFeB arrays were planned to be assembled and field-measured at room temperature, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperature using our vertical test facility. We have also developed a specialized power supply for pulsed wire measurement.

  10. Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II (Conference) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II Authors: Sarrao, John L. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-08-15 OSTI Identifier: 1090634 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-26447 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: NSLS-II First Experiments Workshop ; 2013-08-12 -

  11. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  12. Advances in x-ray computed microtomography at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowd, B.A.; Andrews, A.B.; Marr, R.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Jones, K.W.; Peskin, A.M.

    1998-08-01

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the gridding algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel{sup 2} slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method.

  13. The NSLS-II Multilayer Laue Lens Deposition System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Biancarosa, J.; Shen, Q.; Boas, L.; Feraca, J.; Rosenbaum, L.

    2009-08-02

    The NSLS-II[1] program has a requirement for an unprecedented level of x-ray nanofocusing and has selected the wedged multilayer Laue lens[2,3] (MLL) as the optic of choice to meet this goal. In order to fabricate the MLL a deposition system is required that is capable of depositing depth-graded and laterally-graded multilayers with precise thickness control over many thousands of layers, with total film growth in one run up to 100?m thick or greater. This machine design expounds on the positive features of a rotary deposition system[4] constructed previously for MLLs and will contain multiple stationary, horizontally-oriented magnetron sources where a transport will move a substrate back and forth in a linear fashion over shaped apertures at well-defined velocities to affect a multilayer coating.

  14. Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    :"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map References: Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Web Site1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Stanford- Global...

  15. YingYing Lu > Postdoc - Stanford University > Center Alumni ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    YingYing Lu Postdoc - Stanford University yl854@stanford.edu Formerly a graduate student with the Archer Group, she received her PhD in 2014. She is now a postdoc in Materials...

  16. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Stanford University - November 20, 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Stanford University - November 20, 2014 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Stanford University - November 20, 2014 November 20, 2014 Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Stanford University On November 20, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (WEA-2014-05) to Stanford University for violations of the Department's worker safety and

  17. Design of a wire imaging synchrotron radiation detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, J.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Hogan, A.; King, M.; Rowe, W.; Watson, S.; Von Zanthier, C. ); Briggs, D.D. ); Levi, M. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper documents the design of a detector invented to measure the positions of synchrotron radiation beams for the precision energy spectrometers of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The energy measurements involve the determination, on a pulse-by-pulse basis, of the separation of pairs of intense beams of synchrotron photons in the MeV energy range. The detector intercepts the beams with arrays of fine wires. The ejection of Compton recoil electrons results in charges being developed in the wires, thus enabling a determination of beam positions. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  18. SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Materials Sciences: 2009 Home Agenda Location Visitor Information Transportation Tourism & Dining SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmental and Materials Sciences: Theory and Application June 2-5, 2009 Group photo of the attendees at the SSRL School on X-ray Spectropscopy Techniques in Environmental and Materials Sciences: Theory and Application held June 2-5, 2009 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. » View photos from XAS 2009

  19. First Structural Steel Erected at NSLS-II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    Ten steel columns were incorporated into the ever-growing framework for the National Synchrotron Light Source II last week, the first structural steel erected for the future 400,000-square-foot facility.

  20. Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford Geothermal Workshop February 11-13, 2013 Doug Hollett, Director Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Desert Peak (Source: Ormat Nevada, Inc) 2 Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov Geothermal Program: Key Goals and Objectives Creating Impact Increased Focus * Identify New Geothermal Opportunities * Lowered risk and cost * New prospecting workflow * EGS R&D and Underground Field Observatory * New techniques and technologies *

  1. Stanford Geothermal Workshop 2012 Annual Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Program Stanford Geothermal Workshop 2012 Annual Meeting Jan 30-Feb 1, 2012 Doug Hollett, Program Manager Glass Buttes, OR (DOE) Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov Accelerate Near Term Hydrothermal Growth * Lower hydrothermal exploration risks and costs. * Lower hydrothermal cost of electricity to 6 cents/kWh by 2020. * Accelerate the development of 30 GWe of undiscovered hydrothermal resources. Secure the Future with Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) *

  2. Stanford-Berkeley Summer School 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    different methods, and a broad range of scientific applications. It will cover both fundamentals of EUV, soft x-ray ,and hard x-ray synchrotron radiation and its use in...

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Stanford Linear Accelerator Center -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    005 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - 005 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (005) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was established in 1962 as a research facility for high energy particle physics. The Environmental Management mission at this site is to

  4. DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Media contact(s): (202) 586-4940 Addthis Related Articles Department of Energy Cites Stanford University for Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites the ...

  5. Stanford University | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mouthpiece for concussion study Novel math formula can predict success of certain cancer therapies Stanford's Solar Car Project New method reveals parts of bacterium genome ...

  6. Stanford's input to the Commission to Review the Effectiveness...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    President of SLAC National Acceleratory Laboratory and Chair, Board of Overseers, Stanford University. PDF icon Governance and Contracting Models More Documents & Publications...

  7. The high level programmer and user interface of the NSLS control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.N.; Smith, J.D.; Sathe, S.

    1993-07-01

    This paper presents the major components of the high level software in the NSLS upgraded control system. Both programmer and user interfaces are discussed. The use of the high-speed work stations, fast network communications, UNIX system, X-window and Motif have greatly changed and improved these interfaces.

  8. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco

  9. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  10. Magnetic Field Mapping and Integral Transfer Function Matching of the Prototype Dipoles for the NSLS-II at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, P.; Jain, A., Gupta, R., Skaritka, J., Spataro, C., Joshi, P., Ganetis, G., Anerella, M., Wanderer, P.

    2011-03-28

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) will be equipped with 54 dipole magnets having a gap of 35 mm, and 6 dipoles having a gap of 90 mm. Each dipole has a field of 0.4 T and provides 6 degrees of bending for a 3 GeV electron beam. The large aperture magnets are necessary to allow the extraction of long-wavelength light from the dipole magnet to serve a growing number of users of low energy radiation. The dipoles must not only have good field homogeneity (0.015% over a 40 mm x 20 mm region), but the integral transfer functions and integral end harmonics of the two types of magnets must also be matched. The 35 mm aperture dipole has a novel design where the yoke ends are extended up to the outside dimension of the coil using magnetic steel nose pieces. This design increases the effective length of the dipole without increasing the physical length. These nose pieces can be tailored to adjust the integral transfer function as well as the homogeneity of the integrated field. One prototype of each dipole type has been fabricated to validate the designs and to study matching of the two dipoles. A Hall probe mapping system has been built with three Group 3 Hall probes mounted on a 2-D translation stage. The probes are arranged with one probe in the midplane of the magnet and the others vertically offset by {+-}10 mm. The field is mapped around a nominal 25 m radius beam trajectory. The results of measurements in the as-received magnets, and with modifications made to the nose pieces are presented.

  11. Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator...

  12. Single particle imaging: opportunities and challenges | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Single particle imaging: opportunities and challenges Thursday, December 17, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Ivan Vartaniants, DESY Program Description X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) may allow us to employ the single-particle imaging (SPI) method to determine the structure of macromolecules that do not form stable crystals [1]. Ultrashort pulses of 10 fs and less allow us to outrun complete disintegration by Coulomb

  13. Macromolecular Diffractive Imaging using Disordered Crystals | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Macromolecular Diffractive Imaging using Disordered Crystals Wednesday, March 9, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Henry Chapman, Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY Program Description X-ray crystallography suffers from the well-known phase problem. This means that it is not possible to reconstruct an image of a molecule from its crystal diffraction pattern of Bragg peaks without additional knowledge or assumptions

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Leland Stanford University - CA 0-04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Leland Stanford University - CA 0-04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Leland Stanford University (CA.0-04 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see http://www.stanford.edu/group/ginzton/ Documents Related to Leland Stanford University

  15. A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department's Office of Science and Technical Information is proud to highlight the great work happening at Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Lab located in Palo Alto, California.

  16. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Geothermal Technologies Program For JoAnn Milliken Program Manager Enel Stillwater Courtesy of Enel Green Power North America Stanford Geothermal Workshop Program Manager Jay Nathwani Stanford Geothermal Workshop Jan 31, 2011 t Contractor ort: I i E l i Program Manager Seismicity & Roadmapping - John Ziagos (LLNL) Analysis & Nat'l Geothermal Data System - Arlene Anderson Systems

  17. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office (SLAC) | Department of Energy Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC) 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC) Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. PDF icon 2010 Annual Planning Summary for

  18. Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries Monday, February 13, 2012 - 1:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Stephen J. Harris, General Motors R&D While battery performance is well predicted by the macrohomogeneous model of Newman and co-workers, predicting degradation and failure remains a challenge. It may be that, like most materials, failure depends on local imperfections and inhomogeneities. We use tomographic data to evaluate the homogeneity of the tortuosity of the

  19. The Ductility of Human Jaw Bone Attached to a Tooth | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource The Ductility of Human Jaw Bone Attached to a Tooth Saturday, May 31, 2014 In a bone-tooth fibrous joint, the articulation between harder materials such as the cementum of the tooth root and alveolar bone (human jaw bone) of the socket is permitted by an intervening softer periodontal ligament. To investigate adaptations of the bony socket, basic principles from tribology, mechanics of materials, and materials science were used to postulate that the ductile nature of an

  20. Engineering at SLAC: Designing and constructing experimental devices for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djang, Austin

    2015-08-22

    Thanks to the versatility of the beam lines at SSRL, research there is varied and benefits multiple fields. Each experiment requires a particular set of experiment equipment, which in turns requires its own particular assembly. As such, new engineering challenges arise from each new experiment. My role as an engineering intern has been to help solve these challenges, by designing and assembling experimental devices. My first project was to design a heated sample holder, which will be used to investigate the effect of temperature on a sample's x-ray diffraction pattern. My second project was to help set up an imaging test, which involved designing a cooled grating holder and assembling multiple positioning stages. My third project was designing a 3D-printed pencil holder for the SSRL workstations.

  1. New SSRL/LCLS/FACET/AD User Research Portal launched | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource New SSRL/LCLS/FACET/AD User Research Portal launched The User Portal Development Team has launched a visually redesigned, mobile-friendly version of the current SSRL/LCLS/FACET/AD User Portal. This new portal interface is more responsive and adaptive across devices and platforms. One of the goals of our redesign was to offer an interface that aligns more closely to SLAC's branding strategy and that makes it easier for our researchers and administrators to manage

  2. Welcome to SSRL: User Check-In Procedures | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource SSRL: User Check-In Procedures Prior to traveleing to SLAC, review changes for badging/automated access and updated user check-in procedures: STEP 1. Register or Update Profile in User Portal. Provide or update your user information through the user portal (this must be completed prior to arrival). Ensure that you have correctly listed your current institution. If a user agreement with your institution is not executed in advance, you will not be able to visit or participate in

  3. Publications and Presentations at Scientific Meetings | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Publications and Presentations at Scientific Meetings Calendar Year 2014: †Denotes papers on which a university or other collaborator was the lead author. Alessi D.S., J.S. Lezama-Pacheco, J.E. Stubbs, M. Janousch, J.R. Bargar, P. Persson, and R. Bernier-Latmani (2014) The product of microbial uranium reduction includes multiple species with U(IV)-phosphate coordination, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, in press. †Qafoku, N.P., B.N. Gartman, R.K. Kukkadapu,

  4. Support for the Advanced Polymers Beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2008-10-01

    The primary focus of the X27C beamline is to investigate frontier polymer science and engineering problems with emphasis on real-time studies of structures, morphologies and dynamics from atomic, nanoscopic, microscopic to mesoscopic scales using simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. The scientific merit of this project is as follows. Currently, many unique sample chambers for in-situ synchrotron studies, developed by the PI (B. Hsiao) and Co-PI (B. Chu), are available for general users of X27C at NSLS. These instruments include a gel/melt spinning apparatus, a continuous fiber drawing apparatus, a tensile stretching apparatus, a high pressure X-ray cell using supercritical carbon dioxide, a parallel plate strain-controlled shear stage and a dynamic rheometer for small-strain oscillatory deformation study. Based on the use of these instruments in combination with synchrotron X-rays, many new insights into the relationships between processing and structure have been obtained in recent years. The broader impact of this project is as follows. The X27C beamline is the first synchrotron facility in the United States dedicated to chemistry/materials research (with emphasis on polymers). The major benefit of this facility to the materials community is that no extensive synchrotron experience and equipment preparation are required from general users to carry out cutting-edge experiments.

  5. Synchrotron polarization in blazars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Bttcher, Markus; Chen, Xuhui

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for ?-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by ? 180, as observed in connection with ?-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  6. Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Since last year, we have had three 3-week blocks of beamtime, in April and November 1991 and February 1992, on the Ames/Montana beamline at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). These runs continued our program on high temperature superconductors, heavy Fermion and related uranium and rare earth materials, and started some work on transition metal oxides. We have also had beamtime at the Brookhaven NSLS, 5 days of beamtime on the Dragon monochromator, beamline U4B, studying resonant photoemission of transition metal oxides using photon energies around the transition metal 2p edges. Data from past runs has been analyzed, and in some cases combined with photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) data taken in the home U-M lab. 1 fig.

  7. Department of Energy Cites Stanford University for Worker Safety and Health Violations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Stanford University (Stanford) for four violations of the Department's worker safety and health regulations.

  8. Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

  9. Stanford's input to the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Energy Laboratories | Department of Energy Stanford's input to the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories Stanford's input to the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories Stanford's input was presented to the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories by Bill Madia, Vice President of SLAC National Acceleratory Laboratory and Chair, Board of Overseers, Stanford University. PDF icon

  10. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CITES STANFORD UNIVERSITY FOR WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY FOR WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH VIOLATIONS November 21, 2014 - 11:25am Share on emailShare on facebook NEWS MEDIA CONTACT * 202-586-4940 Department of Energy Cites Stanford University for Worker Safety and Health Violations WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Stanford University (Stanford) for four violations of the Department's worker safety and health regulations. Worker safety is a priority for the Department, and

  11. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  12. Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: An Evaluation of the State of the Field in 2002 A BioSync Report. Issued by the Structural Biology Synchrotron users Organization, October, 2002. 2 Table of Contents: Introduction .................................................................................................... 3 Abbreviations .................................................................................................. 5 Executive Summary

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  14. Advanced Light Source (ALS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Light Source (ALS) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Advanced Light Source (ALS) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home X-Ray Light

  15. Advanced Photon Source (APS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Photon Source (APS) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Advanced Light Source (ALS) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home X-Ray Light

  16. X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Sources Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Advanced Light Source (ALS) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home User Facilities X-Ray Light

  17. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Advanced Light Source (ALS) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home

  18. LCLS - Activities of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Members of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) Bill Colson Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Chairman Jerry Hastings National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Pat O'Shea University of Maryland (UMD) Jörg Rossbach Deutsches Electronen-Synchrotron (DESY) Ron Ruth Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Ross Schlueter Lawrence Berkely National Laboratory (LBNL) Meetings of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) 5) December 10-11, 2001: Fifth meeting of the LCLS Technical Advisory

  19. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), The NSLS 200 MeV Linear Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumberg, L.N.; Ackerman, A.I.; Dickinson, T.; Heese, R.N.; Larson, R.A.; Neuls, C.W.; Pjerov, S.; Sheehan, J.F.

    1993-06-15

    The radiological, fire and electrical hazards posed by a 200 MeV electron Linear Accelerator, which the NSLS Department will install and commission within a newly assembled structure, are addressed in this Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Although it is clear that this accelerator is intended to be the injector for a future experimental facility, we address only the Linac in the present PSAR since neither the final design nor the operating characteristics of the experimental facility are known at the present time. The fire detection and control system to be installed in the building is judged to be completely adequate in terms of the marginal hazard presented - no combustible materials other than the usual cabling associated with such a facility have been identified. Likewise, electrical hazards associated with power supplies for the beam transport magnets and accelerator components such as the accelerator klystrons and electron gun are classified as marginal in terms of potential personnel injury, cost of equipment lost, program downtime and public impact perceptions as defined in the BNL Environmental Safety and Health Manual and the probability of occurrence is deemed to be remote. No unusual features have been identified for the power supplies or electrical distribution system, and normal and customary electrical safety standards as practiced throughout the NSLS complex and the Laboratory are specified in this report. The radiation safety hazards are similarly judged to be marginal in terms of probability of occurrence and potential injury consequences since, for the low intensity operation proposed - a factor of 25 less than the maximum Linac capability specified by the vendor - the average beam power is only 0.4 watts. The shielding specifications given in this report will give adequate protection to both the general public and nonradiation workers in areas adjacent to the building as well as radiation workers within the controlled access building.

  20. New timing system for the Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffrath, L.; Bernstein, D.; Kang, H.; Koontz, R.; Leger, G.; Ross, M.; Pierce, W.; Wilmunder, A.

    1984-11-01

    In order to be able to meet the goals of the Stanford Linear Collider, a much more precise timing system had to be implemented. This paper describes the specification and design of this system, and the results obtained from its use on 1/3 of the SLAC linac. The functions of various elements are described, and a programmable delay unit (PDU) is described in detail.

  1. Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) is a physical optics computer code for calculation of detailed characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) generated by relativistic electrons in magnetic fields of arbitrary configuration and for simulation of the radiation wavefront propagation through optical systems of beamlines. Frequency-domain near-field methods are used for the SR calculation, and the Fourier-optics based approach is generally used for the wavefront propagation simulation. The code enables both fully- and partially-coherent radiation propagation simulations inmore » steady-state and in frequency-/time-dependent regimes. With these features, the code has already proven its utility for a large number of applications in infrared, UV, soft and hard X-ray spectral range, in such important areas as analysis of spectral performances of new synchrotron radiation sources, optimization of user beamlines, development of new optical elements, source and beamline diagnostics, and even complete simulation of SR based experiments. Besides the SR applications, the code can be efficiently used for various simulations involving conventional lasers and other sources. SRW versions interfaced to Python and to IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics), as well as cross-platform library with C API, are available.« less

  2. Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    researchers studied the laser-heated, pressure-treated particles applying state-of-the-art nanoscale synchrotron X-ray tomography at SSRL's Beam Line 6-2. They observed for the...

  3. Orientational Analysis of Molecules in Thin Films | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecules in Thin Films Monday, September 17, 2012 - 10:00am SSRL Bldg. 137, room 226 Daniel Kaefer The synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a very powerful tool to...

  4. Optimisation of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ILINSKI P.

    2012-07-10

    Optimisation of blade type x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, con and #64257;guration and operation principle was analysed in order to improve XBPM performance. Optimisation is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission type XBPM a Diamond Detector Blades (DDB) were analysed as blades for XBPMs. DDB XBPMs can help to overcome drawbacks of the photoemission blade XBPMs.

  5. Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Research | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Research New Proposals Standard GU Proposals Instructions for New Standard Proposals (Not LOI or Rapid Access) Tips for How to Wow Rapid Access Letter of Intent (LOI) Proposal Extension Requests X-ray/VUV Macromolecular Crystallography Beam Time Allocation/Scheduling How to Request Beam Time SSRL Access Policy SSRL Schedules Publications & Reports New Proposals SSRL operates as a dedicated synchrotron

  6. DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Health Violations | Department of Energy Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations April 3, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued Preliminary Notices of Violation (PNOVs) to three contractors - Stanford University, Pacific Underground Construction, Inc., and Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - for violations in September 2007 of

  7. Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 | Department of Energy of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 November 15, 2004 On October 11, 2004, at approximately 11:15 am, a subcontractor electrician working at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) received serious burn injuries requiring hospitalization due to an electrical

  8. Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy Joins U.S. Department of Energy and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MIT Energy Initiative Program to Advance Women's Leadership in Clean Energy | Department of Energy Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy Joins U.S. Department of Energy and MIT Energy Initiative Program to Advance Women's Leadership in Clean Energy Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy Joins U.S. Department of Energy and MIT Energy Initiative Program to Advance Women's Leadership in Clean Energy December 17, 2015 - 2:55pm Addthis Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy Joins U.S. Department

  9. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC SO) (See also Science).

  10. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  11. Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 A cold sulfur...

  12. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01

    In FY 1998, following the 50th Anniversary Year of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven Science Associates became the new Managers of BNL. The new start is an appropriate time to take stock of past achievements and to renew or confirm future goals. During the 1998 NSLS Annual Users Meeting (described in Part 3 of this Activity Report), the DOE Laboratory Operations Board, Chaired by the Under Secretary for Energy, Ernest Moniz met at BNL. By chance all the NSLS Chairmen except Martin Blume (acting NSLS Chair 84-85) were present as recorded in the picture. Under their leadership the NSLS has improved dramatically: (1) The VUV Ring current has increased from 100 mA in October 1982 to nearly 1 A today. For the following few years 10 Ahrs of current were delivered most weeks - NSLS now exceeds that every day. (2) When the first experiments were performed on the X-ray ring during FY1985 the electron energy was 2 GeV and the current up to 100 mA - the X-Ray Ring now runs routinely at 2.5 GeV and at 2.8 GeV with up to 350 mA of current, with a very much longer beam half-life and improved reliability. (3) Starting in FY 1984 the proposal for the Phase II upgrade, mainly for a building extension and a suite of insertion devices and their associated beamlines, was pursued - the promises were delivered in full so that for some years now the NSLS has been running with two undulators in the VUV Ring and three wigglers and an undulator in the X-Ray Ring. In addition two novel insertion devices have been commissioned in the X13 straight. (4) At the start of FY 1998 the NSLS welcomed its 7000th user - attracted by the opportunity for pursuing research with high quality beams, guaranteed not to be interrupted by 'delivery failures', and welcomed by an efficient and caring user office and first class teams of PRT and NSLS staff. R & D have lead to the possibility of running the X-Ray Ring at the higher energy of 2.8 GeV. Figure 1 shows the first user beam, which was provided thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

  13. From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 11:00am SSRL, Bldg. 137, Rm 226 Dr. Frank Uwe Renner Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH

  14. International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  15. National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, Eva

    1999-05-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report for period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998

  16. Single-bunch synchrotron shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norris, James R.; Tang, Jau-Huei; Chen, Lin; Thurnauer, Marion

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for selecting a single synchrotron pulse from the millions of pulses provided per second from a synchrotron source includes a rotating spindle located in the path of the synchrotron pulses. The spindle has multiple faces of a highly reflective surface, and having a frequency of rotation f. A shutter is spaced from the spindle by a radius r, and has an open position and a closed position. The pulses from the synchrotron are reflected off the spindle to the shutter such that the speed s of the pulses at the shutter is governed by: s=4.times..pi..times.r.times.f. such that a single pulse is selected for transmission through an open position of the shutter.

  17. Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries Print Friday, 01 February 2013 00:00 In experiments at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source, scientists observed a surprisingly dense form of water that remained liquid well beyond its typical freezing point. Researchers applied a superthin coating of water-no deeper than a few molecules-to the surface of a barium fluoride crystal.

  18. Structure of Human Argonaute2: A Programmable Ribonuclease | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Human Argonaute2: A Programmable Ribonuclease Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Ribonucleases (RNases) are a class of enzymes that degrade ribonucleic acids (RNA) by catalyzing hydrolysis of the phosphodiester backbone. RNases are vital to many cellular processes ranging from messenger RNA (mRNA) decay to DNA replication. Most of these enzymes are relatively non-specific, catalyzing the degradation of RNA with very little sequence specificity. Argonaute proteins,

  19. Structure of Molecular Thin Films for Organic Electronics | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Structure of Molecular Thin Films for Organic Electronics Friday, April 6, 2012 - 1:00pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Bert Nickel, Physics Faculty and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, München Thin films made out of conjugated small molecules and polymers exhibit very interesting semiconducting properties. While some applications such as light emitting diodes (OLED) are already on the market, other application such as solar cells, integrated circuits,

  20. Discovery of the Fundamental Mechanism of Action of Resveratrol | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Discovery of the Fundamental Mechanism of Action of Resveratrol Thursday, May 28, 2015 Resveratrol is reported to extend lifespan and provide cardio-neuro-protective, anti-diabetic, and anti-cancer effects by initiating a protective stress response. Resveratrol is produced in grapes, cacao beans (dark chocolates), peanuts (peanut butter), Japanese knotweed, blueberries and some other plants, in response to environmental stress conditions including infection,

  1. Lensless Imaging of Atomic Surface Structures via Ptychography | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Lensless Imaging of Atomic Surface Structures via Ptychography Monday, August 12, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Chenhui Zhu Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) is a lensless technique, which has been in rapid progress recently due to its great potential for high spatial resolution and in-situ measurement. We demonstrate by numerical simulation that atomic

  2. Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering Monday, September 10, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Keoki Seu Seminar: With the advent of free electron lasers there has been interest in using coherent x-rays to probe condensed matter systems. Resonant scattering with x-rays allow elemental specificity with magnetic contrast, and coherent light leads to speckle in the scattered pattern due to interference from waves exiting the sample.

  3. A New Center for Organic Electronics at Masdar Institute | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource A New Center for Organic Electronics at Masdar Institute Friday, August 2, 2013 - 10:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Samuele Lilliu Masdar Institute is a graduate level, research-oriented university, which is focused on alternative energy, sustainability, and the environment. It is located in Masdar City in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. The project here outlined focuses on improving the performance of organic/hybrid bulk heterojunction

  4. Scientists Pass Solid Particles Through Rock in DOE-Sponsored Research at Stanford University

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE-sponsored research at Stanford University under the direction of Dr. Roland Horne is advancing the application of nanotechnology in determining fluid flow through enhanced geothermal system reservoirs at depth.

  5. DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Stanford Geothermal Program had a noteworthy result this week, having achieved a proof of concept in the use of tiny particles called nanoparticles as tracers to characterize fractured rocks.

  6. M.; /Bern U.; Auty, D.J.; /Alabama U.; Barbeau, P.S.; /Stanford...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136Xe with EXO-200 Auger, M.; Bern U.; Auty, D.J.; Alabama U.; Barbeau, P.S.; Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Beauchamp, E.; Laurentian U.;...

  7. Big Machines and Big Science: 80 Years of Accelerators at Stanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loew, Gregory

    2008-12-16

    Longtime SLAC physicist Greg Loew will present a trip through SLAC's origins, highlighting its scientific achievements, and provide a glimpse of the lab's future in 'Big Machines and Big Science: 80 Years of Accelerators at Stanford.'

  8. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Order R2-2005-0022, May 18, 2005

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CALIFORNIA REGIONAL WATER QUALITY CONTROL BOARD SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION ORDER No. R2-2005-0022 RESCISSION of: ORDER No. 85-88, WASTE DISCHARGE REQUIREMENTS and ADOPTION of: SITE CLEANUP REQUIREMENTS for: STANFORD UNIVERSITY and the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY for the property located at the: STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER 2575 SAND HILL ROAD MENLO PARK, SAN MATEO COUNTY FINDINGS: The California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region (Water Board) finds that:

  9. Picosecond to Nanosecond Measurements at High Repetition Rate | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Picosecond to Nanosecond Measurements at High Repetition Rate Since FY2012, SSRL is now scheduling three to four three-day periods each year dedicated to running SPEAR3 in hybrid low-alpha operation. In this mode the SPEAR3 ring has 1-4 camshaft pulses with very low current, and pulse duration of 5-20 picoseconds, for timing measurements. The rest of the buckets are filled to provide 100-200 mA current for other users not involved in timing experiments. The

  10. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  11. ARPA-E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use ARPA-E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use May 25, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis Members of Girl Scout Troop #61373 from Santa Clara, CA create an instructional video for home energy use. | Photo courtesy of Troop Leader Sylvia Kennedy Members of Girl Scout Troop #61373 from Santa Clara, CA create an instructional video for home energy use. | Photo courtesy of Troop Leader Sylvia

  12. NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells Devices could charge battery-powered products in the future January 10, 2013 It may be possible soon to charge cell phones, change the tint on windows, or power small toys with peel-and-stick versions of solar cells, thanks to a partnership between Stanford University and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A scientific paper, "Peel and Stick: Fabricating Thin Film Solar Cells on Universal

  13. Synchrotron Science at the AAAS Annual Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Science at the AAAS Annual Meeting Synchrotron Science at the AAAS Annual Meeting Print Light sources took center stage at several sessions at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2016 Annual Meeting in Washington, DC. The meeting's theme of Global Science Engagement lent itself well to the inherently collaborative nature of synchrotron science, which was featured in the following sessions. SESAME: A Scientific Source of Light in the Middle East SESAME light

  14. Impedance scaling and synchrotron radiation intercept (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Impedance scaling and synchrotron radiation intercept Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impedance scaling and synchrotron radiation intercept This paper presents several scalings in 2-D and 3-D impedance calculations. Most of the scalings are empirical and found by using the boundary perturbation method and numerical simulations. As an application of these scalings, the impedance of one type of synchrotron radiation intercept is calculated. The results are then

  15. Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    parallel plates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel ...

  16. Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analytical theory...

  17. WC_1996_001_CLASS_WAIVER_FOR_LELAND_STANFORD_JUNIOR_UNIVERSI.pdf |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 6_001_CLASS_WAIVER_FOR_LELAND_STANFORD_JUNIOR_UNIVERSI.pdf More Documents & Publications WC_1993_002_CRADA_CLASS_WAIVER_SOUTHERN_UNIVERSITY_RESEARCH_.pdf WC_1993_008_CLASS_WAIVER_ROCKETDYNE_DIVISION_ROCKWELL_INTERN.pdf WC_1990_012_CLASS_WAIVER_of_Patent_Rights_in_Inventions_Made

  18. Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in...

  19. Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular ...

  20. Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in ...

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Lessons Learned Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a highly optimized, third-generation synchrotron facility that will enable the study of material properties and...

  2. Improved models for synchrotron radiation sources in SHADOW ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Improved models for synchrotron radiation sources in SHADOW Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improved models for synchrotron radiation sources in SHADOW...

  3. Rapid Cycling Synchrotron Option for Project X (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rapid Cycling Synchrotron Option for Project X Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rapid Cycling Synchrotron Option for Project X You are accessing a document from the...

  4. ON THE DURATION OF BLAZAR SYNCHROTRON FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichmann, B.; Schlickeiser, R.; Rhode, W.

    2012-01-10

    A semi-analytical model is presented that describes the temporal development of a blazar synchrotron flare for the case of a broadband synchrotron power spectrum. We examine three different injection scenarios and present its influence on the synchrotron flare. An accurate approximation of the half-life of a synchrotron flare is analytically computed and we give some illustrative examples of the time evolution of the emergent synchrotron intensity by using a numerical integration method. The synchrotron flare starts at all photon energies right after the injection of ultrarelativistic electrons into the spherical emission volume of radius R and its duration exceeds the light travel time 2R/c in the low energy regime. Furthermore, the flare duration extends by the period of injection of relativistic electrons into the emission knot. However, the energetic and spatial distribution of these injected electrons has no significant influence on the flare duration. We obtain a temporal behavior that agrees most favorably with the observations of PKS 2155-304 on 2006 July 29-30 and it differs considerably from the results that were recently achieved by using a monochromatic approximation of the synchrotron power.

  5. 33rd International Symposium on Combustion Hottel Lecture Applications of Quantitative Laser Sensors to Kinetics, Propulsion and Practical Combustion Systems Ronald K. Hanson Department of Mechanical Engineering Stanford University, Stanford CA, 94305

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Combustion Science Stanford University Contribution R. K. Hanson and D. F. Davidson Department of Mechanical Engineering Stanford University 1 * Butanol Studies * Ignition Delay Times * Species Time-Histories * Reaction Rate Constants * Methyl Ester Studies * Ignition Delay Times Long-Term Objectives * Generate high-quality fundamental kinetics database using shock tube/laser absorption methods Leading to: * Improved detailed mechanisms for next-generation fuels First Targets: * Isomers of

  6. Presentation: Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources Presentation: Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources delivered by Patricia Dehmer, U.S. Department of Energy PDF icon Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources More Documents & Publications EA-1426: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1904: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1904: Final Environmental Assessment

  7. Type B Accident Investigation of the January 28, 2003, Fall and Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by John S. Muhlestein, Director, Stanford Site Office (DOE/SC), U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  9. Opportunities in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Highly Dispersed Supported Gold Catalysts 3:00-3:30 Russell R. Chianelli University of Texas at El Paso Advanced Synchrotron and Simulation Techniques Applied to Problems in...

  10. Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 A cold sulfur spring in Germany is the only place where archaea are known to dominate bacteria in a microbial community. How this unique community thrives and the lessons it may hold for understanding global carbon and sulfur cycles are beginning to emerge from research by the University of Regensburg's Christine Moissl-Eichinger and her

  11. Nanoparticles and nanowires: synchrotron spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sham, T.K.

    2008-08-11

    This paper reviews the research in nanomaterials conducted in our laboratory in the last decade using conventional and synchrotron radiation techniques. While preparative and conventional characterisation techniques are described, emphasis is placed on the analysis of nanomaterials using synchrotron radiation. Materials of primary interests are metal nanoparticles and semiconductor nanowires and nanoribbons. Synchrotron techniques based on absorption spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS), which includes X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structures (EXFAS), and de-excitation spectroscopy, including X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) are described. We show that the tunability, brightness, polarisation and time structure of synchrotron radiation are providing unprecedented capabilities for nanomaterials analysis. Synchrotron studies of prototype systems such as gold nanoparticles, 1-D nanowires of group IV materials, C, Si and Ge as well as nanodiamond, and compound semiconductors, ZnS, CdS, ZnO and related materials are used to illustrate the power and unique capabilities of synchrotron spectroscopy in the characterisation of local structure, electronic structure and optical properties of nanomaterials.

  12. Using XAFS to Determine Origin of Ferromagnetism in LaCoO3 | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Using XAFS to Determine Origin of Ferromagnetism in LaCoO3 Monday, April 23, 2012 - 1:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 George Sterbinsky

  13. VISA: A Milestone on the Path towards X-Ray Free Electron Lasers | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource VISA: A Milestone on the Path towards X-Ray Free Electron Lasers Friday, June 28, 2002 Figure 1. Figure 1 Intensity distribution of a Single SASE radiation pulse as produced by VISA when operating at saturation. Advances in accelerator technology and in the theoretical understanding of collective instabilities and production of coherent radiation, have been the driving forces of the progress toward brighter synchrotron radiation sources, with scientific

  14. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

  15. In situ monitoring of the electrochemical absorption of deuterium into palladium by x-ray diffraction using synchrotron-wiggler radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, D.D.; Hagans, P.L.; Skelton, E.F.; Qadri, S.B.; Nagel, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    With low energy x-rays, such as those from a Cu x-ray tube, only the outer few microns of a metallic sample can be probed. This low penetrating power prohibits structural studies from being carried out on the interior of an electrode in an electrochemical cell because of absorption by the cell material, electrodes and the electrolyte. The work described in this paper circumvents this problem by utilizing high energy, high brightness x-rays produced on the superconducting wiggler beam line, X-17C, at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The penetrating power of the higher energy x-rays allowed Pd diffraction spectra to be obtained in-situ on a 1 mm diameter Pd wire cathode during electrolysis of heavy water. Moreover, the beam (28 x 28 {micro}m in cross-section) allowed diffraction spectra to be acquired as a function of distance across the sample. Spectra were recorded in 50 {micro}m steps from the edge of the Pd wire to its core. This was done at 2 minute intervals as a function of electrolysis time. The {alpha}-{beta} phase transition induced in the Pd while deuterium was electrochemically absorbed was observed by monitoring the Pd-(422) diffraction peaks. Results allowed the diffusion rate and the diffusivity of deuterium atoms in the Pd wire to be determined. Other features of the structural changes associated with the absorption of deuterium into Pd are reported.

  16. SYNCHROTRON RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plotkin, M.; Raka, E.C.; Snyder, H.S.

    1963-05-01

    A system for canceling varying phase changes introduced by connecting cables and control equipment in an alternating gradient synchrotron is presented. In a specific synchrotron embodiment twelve spaced accelerating stations for the proton bunches are utilized. In order to ensure that the protons receive their boost or kick at the exact instant necessary it is necessary to compensate for phase changes occurring in the r-f circuitry over the wide range of frequencies dictated by the accelerated velocities of the proton bunches. A constant beat frequency is utilized to transfer the r-f control signals through the cables and control equipment to render the phase shift constant and readily compensable. (AEC)

  17. Characterization of New Cathode Materials using Synchrotron-based...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials using Synchrotron-based X-ray Techniques and the Studies of Li-Air Batteries Characterization of New Cathode Materials using Synchrotron-based X-ray Techniques and the...

  18. 14.05.14 RH Synchrotron X-ray - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Throughput Synchrotron X-Ray Experimentation for Combinatorial Phase Matching Gregoire, J. M. et al. High-throughput synchrotron X-ray diffraction for combinatorial phase mapping. Journal of Synchrotron Radiation 21, 1262-1268, DOI: 10.1107/s1600577514016488 (2014). Scientific Achievement Development of new synchrotron X-ray diffraction and fluorescence methods for rapid characterization of material libraries. Significance & impact First demonstration of prototype facility capable of

  19. SYNCHROTRONS AND ACCUMULATORS FOR HIGH INTENSITY PROTONS: ISSUES AND EXPERIENCES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEI,J.

    2000-06-30

    This paper summarizes physical and engineering issues of high-intensity synchrotrons and accumulators, and discusses future applications and outlook.

  20. Negligible sample heating from synchrotron infrared beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Michael C.; Tsvetkova, Nelly M.; Crowe, John H.; McKinney, Wayne R.

    2000-08-30

    The use of synchrotron sources for infrared (IR) spectromicroscopy provides greatly increased brightness enabling high-quality IR measurements at diffraction-limited spatial resolutions. This permits synchrotron-based IR spectromicroscopy to be applied to biological applications at spatial resolutions of the order of the size of a single mammalian cell. The question then arises, ''Does the intense synchrotron beam harm biological samples?'' Mid-IR photons are too low in energy to break bonds directly, however they could cause damage to biological molecules due to heating. In this work, we present measurements showing negligible sample heating effects from a diffraction-limited synchrotron IR source. The sample used is fully hydrated lipid bilayers composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine(DPPC), which undergoes a phase transition from a gel into a liquid-crystalline state at about 315 K during heating. Several IR-active vibrational modes clearly shift in frequency when the sample passes through the phase transition. We calibrate and then use these shifting vibrational modes as an in situ temperature sensor.

  1. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fr Bioanorganische Chemie, Stiftstrasse 34-36, D-45470 Mlheim an der Ruhr, Germany 2 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA...

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 1, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  3. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  4. MICROANALYSIS OF MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.

    2000-12-01

    High intensity synchrotron radiation produces photons with wavelengths that extend from the infrared to hard x rays with energies of hundreds of keV with uniquely high photon intensities that can be used to determine the composition and properties of materials using a variety of techniques. Most of these techniques represent extensions of earlier work performed with ordinary tube-type x-ray sources. The properties of the synchrotron source such as the continuous range of energy, high degree of photon polarization, pulsed beams, and photon flux many orders of magnitude higher than from x-ray tubes have made possible major advances in the possible chemical applications. We describe here ways that materials analyses can be made using the high intensity beams for measurements with small beam sizes and/or high detection sensitivity. The relevant characteristics of synchrotron x-ray sources are briefly summarized to give an idea of the x-ray parameters to be exploited. The experimental techniques considered include x-ray fluorescence, absorption, and diffraction. Examples of typical experimental apparatus used in these experiments are considered together with descriptions of actual applications.

  5. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of Laser-heated Copper Foils | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Time-resolved Spectroscopy of Laser-heated Copper Foils Tuesday, July 16, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Kelly Cone, PhD Engineering, Dept. of Applied Science, University of California, Davis The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated by a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET)

  6. Towards High-Flux Isolated Attosecond Pulses with a 200 TW CPA | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Towards High-Flux Isolated Attosecond Pulses with a 200 TW CPA Wednesday, December 16, 2015 - 10:00am Kavli Third Floor Conference Room Speaker: Eric Cunningham, University of Central Florida Program Description Attosecond pulses have been developed as a means for investigating phenomena that proceed on the order of the atomic unit of time (24 as). Unfortunately, these extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses by themselves contain too few photons to initiate

  7. X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the complex compounds | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the complex compounds Wednesday, September 25, 2013 - 1:00pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Dr. Hoyoung Jang, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany In condensed matter physics, in particular a field of complex oxide materials, most of the research-activity is focusing on finding a new functionality in materials as well as its understanding. In this fashion, during past few

  8. Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase Tuesday, March 31, 2015 All living organisms depend on the availability of nitrogen for incorporation into the basic biological building blocks such as amino acids and DNA. Globally the largest reservoir for nitrogen is the atmosphere, with an N2 content of roughly 78%. However, as a highly unreactive gas, most organisms are unable to directly utilize dinitrogen due to the severe energy barrier required

  9. New Method Tracks Metal-ion Movement in Periplasmic Proteins | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource New Method Tracks Metal-ion Movement in Periplasmic Proteins Friday, October 31, 2014 Fig 1 Figure 1. Cartoon overview of the CusCBFA efflux pump in the periplasm. Copper is an essential nutrient for most organisms. However, it is toxic at high concentrations and, in fact, is used by macrophages to kill invading microbes. To counter the lethal effects of both environmental and host-defense onslaught, bacteria have devolved intricate efflux systems that

  10. New SSRL/LCLS/FACET/AD User Research Portal launched this month | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource New SSRL/LCLS/FACET/AD User Research Portal launched The User Portal Development Team has launched a visually redesigned, mobile-friendly version of the current SSRL/LCLS/FACET/AD User Portal. This new portal interface is more responsive and adaptive across devices and platforms. One of the goals of our redesign was to offer an interface that aligns more closely to SLAC's branding strategy and that makes it easier for our researchers and administrators to

  11. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Thursday, February 23, 2012 - 10:30am SSRL Third Floor Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as

  12. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Monday, May 14, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as conventional reservoirs.

  13. Do you have the correct Visa stamp for getting a SLAC badge? | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Do you have the correct Visa stamp for getting a SLAC badge? Users from foreign countries should follow this advice to obtain the correct stamp on their passport in order to obtain a SLAC badge. For more detailed information on SLAC access and visa documentation requirements, please refer to the following link. Upon entering the US, travelers will present their passport to the Immigration Officer at the airport who may ask a few questions about the purpose

  14. Women @ Energy: Lynne Ecker | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lynne Ecker works on materials in radiation environments at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and NSLS-II at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Lynne Ecker works on materials in radiation environments at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and NSLS-II at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Lynne Ecker works on materials in

  15. 17th Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17th Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference SRI2013 is now accepting abstract submissions (until March 31, 2013). June 19-21, 2013; Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA

  16. Synchrotron infrared reflectivity measurements of iron at high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    RANGE GIGA PA; REFLECTIVITY; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE 1000-4000 K; WAVELENGTHS ...

  17. Workshop: New Advances in Crystallography with Synchrotrons and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Synchrotrons and X-FELs Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 8:00am 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users Conference This workshop, part of the 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users...

  18. How electron spectroscopy with synchrotron light can help us...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close How electron spectroscopy with synchrotron light can help us understand high tc superconductivity and other complex states of matter Zoom Video Closed Captions Info Title...

  19. 17th Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17th Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference SRI2013 is now accepting abstract submissions (until March 31, 2013). June 19-21, 2013; Gaithersburg, Maryland,...

  20. First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on ...

  1. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Gopal (Naperville, IL); Lewellen, John (Plainfield, IL); Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Vinokurov, Nikolai (Novosibirsk, RU)

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  2. Impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, B. J.; Owens, C. T.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Saavedra, R. A.; Luo, S. N.; Hooks, D. E.; Iverson, A. J.; Fezzaa, K.

    2013-01-15

    The impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments, or IMPULSE, is a 12.6-mm bore light-gas gun (<1 km/s projectile velocity) designed specifically for performing dynamic compression experiments using the advanced imaging and X-ray diffraction methods available at synchrotron sources. The gun system, capable of reaching projectile velocities up to 1 km/s, was designed to be portable for quick insertion/removal in the experimental hutch at Sector 32 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne, IL) while allowing the target chamber to rotate for sample alignment with the beam. A key challenge in using the gun system to acquire dynamic data on the nanosecond time scale was synchronization (or bracketing) of the impact event with the incident X-ray pulses (80 ps width). A description of the basic gun system used in previous work is provided along with details of an improved launch initiation system designed to significantly reduce the total system time from launch initiation to impact. Experiments were performed to directly measure the gun system time and to determine the gun performance curve for projectile velocities ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 km/s. All results show an average system time of 21.6 {+-} 4.5 ms, making it possible to better synchronize the gun system and detectors to the X-ray beam.

  3. The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser: A Progress Report | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser: A Progress Report Friday, December 2, 2011 - 2:00pm SLAC, Redtail Conference Room (901-108) M. Altarelli, European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg, Germany The present status of the construction of the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg will be reviewed, and challenges in the development of the instrumentation, in order to exploit the time-structure of the superconducting linear accelerator, will be described. Programs

  4. Workshop: Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate Saturday, October 22, 2011 - 8:30am SSRL Conference Room 137-322 In conjunction with the 2011 LCLS/SSRL User Meeting, SSRL and the APS will jointly host a two-day workshop focused on opportunities with short-pulse, high-repetition rate X-ray Science. The workshop will feature international speakers and panel experts presenting the scientific basis, preliminary results and future potential of high rep-rate

  5. Comments on Landau damping due to synchrotron frequency spread

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    An inductive/space-charge impedance shifts the synchrotron frequency downwards above/below transition, but it is often said that the coherent synchrotron frequency of the bunch is not shifted in the rigid-dipole mode. On the other hand, the incoherent synchrotron frequency due to the sinusoidal rf always spreads in the downward direction. This spread will therefore not be able to cover the coherent synchrotron frequency, implying that there will not be any Landau damping no matter how large the frequency spread is. By studying the dispersion relation, it is shown that the above argument is incorrect, and there will be Landau damping if there is sufficient frequency spread. The main reason is that the coherent frequency of the rigid-dipole mode will no longer remain unshifted in the presence of a synchrotron frequency spread.

  6. Synchrotron-based EUV lithography illuminator simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2004-07-27

    A lithographic illuminator to illuminate a reticle to be imaged with a range of angles is provided. The illumination can be employed to generate a pattern in the pupil of the imaging system, where spatial coordinates in the pupil plane correspond to illumination angles in the reticle plane. In particular, a coherent synchrotron beamline is used along with a potentially decoherentizing holographic optical element (HOE), as an experimental EUV illuminator simulation station. The pupil fill is completely defined by a single HOE, thus the system can be easily modified to model a variety of illuminator fill patterns. The HOE can be designed to generate any desired angular spectrum and such a device can serve as the basis for an illuminator simulator.

  7. Quadrupole magnet for a rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, H.; Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) feature interleaved warm and cold dipole magnets; the field of the warm magnets is used to modulate the average bending field depending on the particle energy. It has been shown that RCS can be an attractive option for fast acceleration of particles, for example, muons, which decay quickly. In previous studies it was demonstrated that in principle warm dipole magnets can be designed which can provide the required ramp rates, which are equivalent to frequencies of about 1 kHz. To reduce the losses it is beneficial to employ two separate materials for the yoke; it was also shown that by employing an optimized excitation coil geometry the eddy current losses are acceptable. In this paper we show that the same principles can be applied to quadrupole magnets targeting 30 T/m with a repetition rate of 1kHz and good field quality.

  8. Deconstructing the Peptide-MHC Specificity of T Cell Recognition | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Deconstructing the Peptide-MHC Specificity of T Cell Recognition Saturday, May 31, 2014 T Cell Figure Figure 1. Overlay of TCR-pMHC structures for 2B4 recognizing MCC (PDB ID: 3QIB), 2B4 recognizing 2A (PDB ID: 4P2O), 226 recognizing MCC (PDB ID: 3QIU), 226 recognizing MCC K99E (PDB ID: 3QIW), 5cc7 recognizing 5c1 (PDB ID: 4P2R), and 5cc7 recognizing 5c2 (PDB ID: 4P2Q), all presented by I-Ek. Despite considerable differences in peptide sequence for 2A, 5c1,

  9. 3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2009-06-02

    Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

  10. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage

  11. Synchrotron infrared reflectivity measurements of iron at high pressures

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Synchrotron infrared reflectivity measurements of iron at high pressures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synchrotron infrared reflectivity measurements of iron at high pressures The infrared reflectance of iron was studied using high-pressure synchrotron radiation methods up to 50 GPa at room temperature in a diamond anvil cell of 1000-8000 cm{sup -1} (1.25-10 {mu}m). The magnitude of the reflectivity shows a weak pressure

  12. On the implementation of computed laminography using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helfen, L.; Pernot, P.; Elyyan, M.; Myagotin, A.; Mikulik, P.; Voropaev, A.; Di Michiel, M.; Baruchel, J.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-06-15

    Hard x rays from a synchrotron source are used in this implementation of computed laminography for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of flat, laterally extended objects. Due to outstanding properties of synchrotron light, high spatial resolution down to the micrometer scale can be attained, even for specimens having lateral dimensions of several decimeters. Operating either with a monochromatic or with a white synchrotron beam, the method can be optimized to attain high sensitivity or considerable inspection throughput in synchrotron user and small-batch industrial experiments. The article describes the details of experimental setups, alignment procedures, and the underlying reconstruction principles. Imaging of interconnections in flip-chip and wire-bonded devices illustrates the peculiarities of the method compared to its alternatives and demonstrates the wide application potential for the 3D inspection and quality assessment in microsystem technology.

  13. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring ...

  14. In operando Investigation of SOFC Electrodes Using Synchrotron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of SOFC Electrodes Using Synchrotron-based Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (AP-XPS) in a Novel Two- Environment Chamber. Citation Details In-Document Search...

  15. Homegrown solution for synchrotron light source | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Homegrown solution for synchrotron light source Ames Laboratory physicist develops new technique to study electronic properties It's often said that necessity is the mother of invention. Such was the case for Ames Laboratory physicist Adam Kaminski who took the research challenge he was facing and turned it into a new solution that will help advance his research. Two years ago the National Science Foundation closed the synchrotron in Stoughton, Wisc. More recently, Brookhaven National Lab closed

  16. Elastic wave velocity measurement combined with synchrotron X-ray

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measurements at high pressure and high temperature conditions: Towards prediction and reproduction of MoHole rocks (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Elastic wave velocity measurement combined with synchrotron X-ray measurements at high pressure and high temperature conditions: Towards prediction and reproduction of MoHole rocks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Elastic wave velocity measurement combined with synchrotron X-ray measurements at high pressure and high temperature

  17. Synchrotron light sources: The search for quantum chaos (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Synchrotron light sources: The search for quantum chaos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synchrotron light sources: The search for quantum chaos × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy

  18. Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates Authors: Stupakov, Gennady ; /SLAC ; Zhou, Demin ; /KEK, Tsukuba Publication Date: 2016-01-22 OSTI Identifier: 1236428 Report

  19. Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber Authors: Cai, Yunhai ; /SLAC ; , Publication Date: 2014-01-06 OSTI Identifier: 1114162 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15875 Journal ID: ISSN 1098--4402 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical

  20. Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular chamber

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular chamber Authors: Cai, Yunhai Publication Date: 2014-02-12 OSTI Identifier: 1180843 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue:

  1. Focusing monochromators for high energy synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suortti, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Bent crystals are introduced as monochromators for high energy synchrotron radiation. The reflectivity of the crystal can be calculated reliably from a model where the bent crystal is approximated by a stack of lamellas, which have a gradually changing angle of reflection. The reflectivity curves of a 4 mm thick, asymmetrically cut ({chi}=9.5{degree}) Si(220) crystal are measured using 150 keV radiation and varying the bending radius from 25 to 140 m. The width of the reflectivity curve is up to 50 times the Darwin width of the reflection, and the maximum reflectivity exceeds 80%. The crystal is used as a monochromator in Compton scattering measurements. The source is on the focusing circle, so that the resolution is limited essentially by the detector/analyzer. A wide bandpass, sharply focused beam is attained when the source is outside the focusing circle in the transmission geometry. In a test experiment. 10{sup 12} photons on an area of 2 mm{sup 2} was observed. The energy band was about 4 keV centered at 40 keV. A powder diffraction pattern of a few reflections of interest was recorded by an intrinsic Ge detector, and this demonstrated that a structural transition can be followed at intervals of a few milliseconds.

  2. Asymmetrically cut crystals for synchrotron radiation monochromators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez del Rio, M. ); Cerrina, F. )

    1992-01-01

    Asymmetrically cut crystals are interesting for use in synchrotron radiation monochromators because of their good energy resolution characteristics and their focusing properties. Ray tracing codes, such as SHADOW, are very efficient in the design and development of new optical devices. In order to determine the convenience of using asymmetrically cut crystals for x-ray monochromators, SHADOW has been extended to include these kinds of crystals. The physical approach to ray tracing asymmetrically cut crystals is based on the coexistence of two periodic structures. One of these is the bulk periodic structure of the Bragg planes. Such a structure determines the existence of a rocking curve near the Bragg condition, and is implemented in SHADOW following the Darwin--Prins formalism of the dynamical theory of diffraction. The second periodic structure is a one-dimensional grating on the crystal surface, formed by the truncation of the lattice planes with the surface. This grating is responsible for the focusing properties of these crystals and plays an essential role in determining the trajectory of the rays. The combination of an asymmetric crystal and a nonplanar surface can be easily achieved by bending (Johann case) to provide improved properties. More complex cases such as the ground-bent crystals (i.e., Johansson geometry) can be considered as a particular case of asymmetrical crystals in which the angle between the Bragg planes and the surface change along the crystal surface. All these cases have been implemented in SHADOW.

  3. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  4. Mysterious dipole synchrotron oscillations during and after adiabatic capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    Strong synchrotron oscillations were observed during and after the 2.5-MHz rf adiabatic capture of a debunched booster batch in the Main Injector. Analysis shows two possible sources for the synchrotron oscillations. One is the frequency drift of the 2.5-MHz rf after the turning off of the 53-MHz rf voltage, thus resulting in an energy mismatch with the debunched beam. The second source is the energy mismatch of the injected booster beam with the frequency of the 53-MHz rf. We have been able to rule out the first possibility.

  5. APS 1999 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of interest to the APS researcher community. Workshop on Scientific Applications of the LCLS. (Jan. 12-14) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSLC) Stanford, CA Workshop on...

  6. 27th Annual SSRL Users' Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Users' Meeting Stanford, California USA October 18-21, 2000 Meeting Chairs: Paul Foster (UC San Francisco) Jan Lning (SSRL) The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

  7. First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefevre, Thibaut; Bravin, Enrico; Burtin, Gerard; Guerrero, Ana; Jeff, Adam; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2012-07-13

    The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on the use of synchrotron radiation and intensified video cameras. Depending on the beam energy, different synchrotron light sources must be used. A dedicated superconducting undulator has been built for low beam energies (450 GeV to 1.5 TeV), while edge and centre radiation from a beam-separation dipole magnet are used respectively for intermediate and high energies (up to 7 TeV). The emitted visible photons are collected using a retractable mirror, which sends the light into an optical system adapted for acquisition using intensified CCD cameras. This paper presents the design of the imaging system, and compares the expected light intensity with measurements and the calculated spatial resolution with a cross calibration performed with the wire scanners. Upgrades and future plans are also discussed.

  8. Rapid cycling medical synchrotron and beam delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peggs, Stephen G. (Port Jefferson, NY); Brennan, J. Michael (East Northport, NY); Tuozzolo, Joseph E. (Sayville, NY); Zaltsman, Alexander (Commack, NY)

    2008-10-07

    A medical synchrotron which cycles rapidly in order to accelerate particles for delivery in a beam therapy system. The synchrotron generally includes a radiofrequency (RF) cavity for accelerating the particles as a beam and a plurality of combined function magnets arranged in a ring. Each of the combined function magnets performs two functions. The first function of the combined function magnet is to bend the particle beam along an orbital path around the ring. The second function of the combined function magnet is to focus or defocus the particle beam as it travels around the path. The radiofrequency (RF) cavity is a ferrite loaded cavity adapted for high speed frequency swings for rapid cycling acceleration of the particles.

  9. Holographic illuminator for synchrotron-based projection lithography systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2005-08-09

    The effective coherence of a synchrotron beam line can be tailored to projection lithography requirements by employing a moving holographic diffuser and a stationary low-cost spherical mirror. The invention is particularly suited for use in an illuminator device for an optical image processing system requiring partially coherent illumination. The illuminator includes: (1) a synchrotron source of coherent or partially coherent radiation which has an intrinsic coherence that is higher than the desired coherence, (2) a holographic diffuser having a surface that receives incident radiation from said source, (3) means for translating the surface of the holographic diffuser in two dimensions along a plane that is parallel to the surface of the holographic diffuser wherein the rate of the motion is fast relative to integration time of said image processing system; and (4) a condenser optic that re-images the surface of the holographic diffuser to the entrance plane of said image processing system.

  10. Theory and calculations of synchrotron instabilities and feedback-mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijssen, T.E.M.

    1981-08-12

    The properties of the phenomenon synchrotron radiation are given with general theory on the basic processes and betatron and synchrotron oscillations. A more extended theoretical view at transverse instabilities and the influence of a damping feedback system are discussed. The longitudinal case is covered. For the calculations on the longitudinal case with M equally spaced pointbunches, with N electrons each, in the storage ring, the parasitic modes of the radio-frequency cavity were measured. A description of this is given. The values of damping rates of the longitudinal feedback system found, are as expected, but too low to damp the longitudinal instabilities calculated. This might be caused by the input data. The calculated growth rates are very sensitive to changes in frequency and width of the parasitic modes, which were measured under conditions differing slightly from the operating conditions.

  11. Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy for protein structure analysis: Potential and questions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced technique to the study of pure protein inherent structure at a cellular level in biological tissues. In this review, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advancedmore » synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to localize relatively “pure“ protein in the plant tissues and relatively reveal protein inherent structure and protein molecular chemical make-up within intact tissue at cellular and subcellular levels. Several complex protein IR spectra data analytical techniques (Gaussian and Lorentzian multi-component peak modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) are employed to relatively reveal features of protein inherent structure and distinguish protein inherent structure differences between varieties/species and treatments in plant tissues. By using a multi-peak modeling procedure, RELATIVE estimates (but not EXACT determinations) for protein secondary structure analysis can be made for comparison purpose. The issues of pro- and anti-multi-peaking modeling/fitting procedure for relative estimation of protein structure were discussed. By using the PCA and CLA analyses, the plant molecular structure can be qualitatively separate one group from another, statistically, even though the spectral assignments are not known. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for protein structure research in biological tissues at ultraspatial resolutions.« less

  12. Polymer research at synchrotron radiation sources: symposium proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, T.P.; Goland, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    The twenty-two papers are arranged into eleven sessions entitled: general overviews; time-resolved x-ray scattering; studies using fluorescence, ion-containing polymers; time-resolved x-ray scattering; novel applications of synchrotron radiation; phase transitions in polymers; x-ray diffraction on polymers; recent detector advances; complementary light, x-ray and neutron studies; and neutron scattering studies. Seven of the papers are processed separately; three of the remainder have been previously processed. (DLC)

  13. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Benesch, Jay F.; Franklin, Gregg B.; Quinn, Brian P.; Paschke, Kent D.

    2015-11-30

    Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Labs Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5moreT. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR) from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.less

  14. SRI'99

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11th U.S. National Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference (SRI'99) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, California USA October 13-15, 1999 hosted.jpg (12134 bytes) Conference Chairs: Piero Pianetta, SSRL/Stanford Herman Winick, SSRL pianetta@slac.stanford.edu winick@slac.stanford.edu The 11th US National Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference (SRI'99) provides a forum for the presentation and discussion of recent developments relating to synchrotron radiation

  15. Sulfur in the Timbers of Henry VIII's Warship Mary Rose: Synchrotrons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sulfur in the Timbers of Henry VIII's Warship Mary Rose: Synchrotrons Illuminate Conservation Concerns Magnus Sandstrm,1 Farideh Jalilehvand,2 Emiliana Damian,1 Yvonne Fors,1...

  16. High-pressure experimental studies on geo-liquids using synchrotron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: High-pressure experimental studies on geo-liquids using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  17. Phase II beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-06-01

    The expansion of the National Synchrotron Light Source has been funded by the US Department of Energy. The Phase II program consists of both increased conventional facilities and six new beam lines. In this paper, an overview of the six beam lines which will be constructed during Phase II is presented. For five of the lines special radiation sources are necessary and the designs of four of the devices are complete. The relevant parameters of the insertion devices under construction and development are presented.

  18. Proposal Study Panels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Peter Johnson (chair), Brookhaven National Laboratory Apurva Mehta, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Hendrik Ohldag, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

  19. Engineering at SLAC: Designing and Constructing Experimental Devices for SSRL - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djang, Austin

    2015-08-21

    This presentation describes the design and construction of three experimental devices for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource.

  20. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transversemore » beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.« less