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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Bibliography of reports on research sponsored by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, November 1975--June 1976  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography of 152 reports published by contractors of the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during the period November 1975 through June 1976 is presented along with abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center computer file. The bibliography has been sorted into the subject categories used by NRC to organize the research program. Within the subject categories, the reports are sorted by contractor organization and then chronologically. A brief description of the NRC research program precedes the bibliography.

Buchanan, J.R.

1976-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Motor-operated valve reliability programs: Lessons learned to meet new NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, reliability problems have surfaced with power plant motor-operated valves (MOVs) that (a) fail to perform as designed, and/or (b) require excessive maintenance to perform their intended function. As a result, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) mandated certain testing and reporting requirements in inspection and enforcement bulletin 85-03 (85-03). The NRC's generic letter 89-10 (89-10) significantly expands these requirements, to include all safety-related and position-changeable MOVs. The MOV program experience at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Rancho Seco plant is particularly valuable since the NRC, to a large extent, utilized this program as the prototype for 89-10's requirements. The MOV inspection, overhaul, and testing began in September 1986, with completion scheduled for December 1986. The paper discusses problems encountered, recovery plant, results of recovery planning, and lessons learned. Experience at Rancho Seco has shown that comprehensive valve programs incorporating appropriate design practices, preventive maintenance practices, and operational constraints can improve plant availability.

Anderson, M.W.; Fadel, D.P.; Fraser, P.J.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Draft Report for Comment Office of Nuclear Regulatory ResearchAVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 21, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 244)] December 21, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 244)] [Proposed Rules] [Page 71331-71333] From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr21de99-21] ======================================================================= ----------------------------------------------------------------------- NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 RIN 3150-AG41 Advance Notification to Native American Tribes of Transportation of Certain Types of Nuclear Waste AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering an amendment to its regulations that would require NRC licensees to notify

5

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory and licensing matters of interest to DOE, either as an NRC license applicant or in connection with related authorities and responsibilities of DOE and NRC on nuclear material, nuclear waste, and nuclear nonproliferation matters. GC-52 attorneys provide advice and support on a variety of NRC matters including regulation and licensing of DOE independent spent fuel storage facilities (ISFSIs) and a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility, consultation with NRC on certain DOE waste determinations, and imports and exports of nuclear materials and radioactive sealed sources.

6

PILGRIM NUCLEAR POWER STATION- NRC INTEGRATED INSPECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inspection results, which were discussed on July 18, 2012 with you and other members of your staff. The inspection examined activities conducted under your license as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commission’s rules and regulations and with the conditions of your license. The inspectors reviewed selected procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. This report documents one NRC-identified finding of very low safety significance (Green). This finding was determined to involve a violation of NRC requirements. However, because of its very low safety significance, and because it has been entered into your corrective action program (CAP), the NRC is treating this finding as a non-cited violation (NCV), consistent with Section 2.3.2 of the NRC Enforcement Policy. If you contest any NCV in this report, you should provide a written response within 30 days of the date of this inspection report, with the basis for your denial, to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ATTN: Document Control Desk, Washington DC 20555-0001; with copies to the Regional Administrator, Region I; the Director,

Region I; Mr. Robert Smith; Pilgrim Nuclear; Power Station

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (2012). NRC: Nuclear Security andRegulatory Commission (2013). NRC: New Reactors. nrc.gov.Regulatory Commission [US NRC], 2012). The NRC mandates

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NRC Research to Support Regulatory Decisions Related to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, NRC Research to Support Regulatory Decisions Related to Subsequent License Renewal Periods. Author(s), C. E. (Gene) Carpenter. On-

9

Decommissioning Regulatory Process Interactions in 2000: EPRI Support to NEI for NRC Proposed Decommissioning Rule Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the technical support EPRI provided to the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Decommissioning Working Group in 2000. It includes the material supplied to the NEI for their use in generating comments on behalf of the nuclear energy industry concerning the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) new draft regulations on decommissioning.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

10

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest, 1991 edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, and the areas NRC licenses. This digest is a compilation of NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1990, with exceptions noted. For operating US commercial nuclear power reactors, information on generating capacity and average capacity factor is obtained from Monthly Operating Reports submitted to the NRC directly by the licensee. This information is reviewed for consistency only. No independent validation and/or verification is performed by the NRC. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications. This digest is published annually for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. 30 figs., 12 tabs.

Olive, K L

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

NRC Regulatory Issue Summary on EPRI Digital Licensing Guideline, TR-102348 (NEI 01-01)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued this regulatory issue summary (RIS) to announce that the NRC has reviewed the EPRI / Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Joint Task Force Report entitled "Guideline on Licensing Digital Upgrades: EPRI TR-102348, Revision 1, NEI 01-01: A Revision of EPRI TR-102348 To Reflect Changes to the 10 CFR 50.59 Rule," and has endorsed the report for use as guidance in designing and implementing digital upgrades to instrumentation and control systems. The attached safe...

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

qU oSoLTJRC qU oSoLTJRC United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Protecting People and the Environment NUREG-1872, Vol. 2 HudcD [jE©wftamfsýýpc Wafm(M oran EA Office of New Reactors AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material As of November 1999, you may electronically access NUREG-series publications and other NRC records at NRC's Public Electronic Reading Room at http:t/www.nrc..ov/reading-rm.html. Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments.

13

Prepared for U.S. Nuclear Regulatory CommissionI AVAILABILIlY NOTICE Availablity of Reference Mateials Cited In NRC Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the listing that follows represents the majority of documents cited In NRC publications, It Is not Intended to be exhaustive. Referenced documents available for Inspection and copying for a fee from the NRC Public Document Room Include NRC correspondence and Internal NRC memoranda; NRC bulletins, circulars, Information notices. Inspection and Investigation notices; licensee event reports: vendor reports and correspondence; Comrinsslon papers; and applicant and licensee documents and correspondence. The following documents In the NUREG series are available for purchase from the GPO Sales Program:

J. K. Wang; M. S. Kalsi

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to Advance Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to Advance Global Nuclear Energy Partnership July 17, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expanded cooperation for President Bush's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that was signed on Friday by DOE's GNEP Deputy Program Manager Paul Lisowski and NRC Executive Director for Operations Luis Reyes. The MOU establishes the foundation for increased cooperation between DOE and NRC on technological research and engineering studies and marks another important milestone

15

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

16

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

17

VERMONT YANKEE NUCLEAR POWER STATION- NRC LICENSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your application for a renewed license of your Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station. The enclosed report documents the result of the inspection which was discussed with members of your staff on May 24, 2007, at a publicly observed exit meeting conducted at the Latchis Theater in Brattleboro, VY. The purpose of this inspection was to examine the plant activities and documents that supported the application for a renewed license of the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station. The inspection reviewed the screening and scoping of non-safety related systems, structures, and components, as required in 10 CFR 54.4(a)(2), and determined whether the proposed aging management programs are capable of reasonably managing the effects of aging. These NRC inspection activities constitute one of several inputs into the NRC review process for license renewal applications. The inspection team concluded screening and scoping of nonsafety-related systems, structures, and components, were implemented as required in 10 CFR 54.4(a)(2), and the aging management portions of the license renewal activities were conducted as described in the License Renewal Application. The inspection results supported a conclusion that the

Mr. Theodore; A. Sullivan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

EPRI/NRC-RES Fire PRA Methodology for Nuclear Power Facilities Volume 1: Summary & Overview, Volume 2: Detailed Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fire Risk Requantification Study has resulted in state-of-the-art methods, tools, and data for a fire probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for commercial nuclear power plant application. This study was conducted jointly by EPRI and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) under the terms of an NRC/EPRI Memorandum of Understanding and an accompanying Fire Research Addendum. Industry participants supported demonstration analyses and provided peer review of...

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

19

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

SciTech Connect

This document is the March 1996 listing of NRC issuances. Included are: (1) NRC orders granting Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company`s petition for review of the ASLB order LBP-95-17, (2) NRC orders relating to the potential disqualification of two commissioners in the matter of the decommissioning of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (3) ASLB orders pertaining to the Oncology Services Corporation, (4) ASLB orders pertaining to the Radiation Oncology Center, (5) ASLB orders pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and (6) Director`s decision pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1994 edition. Volume 6  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest (digest) provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRCs regulatory responsibility the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. The digest, published annually, is a compilation of nuclear-and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1993, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed.

Stadler, L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Regulatory Process for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC revised decommissioning rule 10 CFR 50.82 in 1996 to make significant changes in the regulatory process for nuclear power plant licensees. This report provides a summary of ongoing federal agency and industry activities. It also describes the regulatory requirements applicable, or no longer applicable, to nuclear power plants at the time of permanent shutdown through the early decommissioning stage. The report describes the major components of a typical decommissioning plan, and provides industry...

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

22

Spent nuclear fuel project multi-canister overpack, additional NRC requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), established in the K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Regulatory Policy, dated August 4, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the Policy), the requirement for new Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities to achieve nuclear safety equivalency to comparable US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. For activities other than during transport, when the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) is used and resides in the Canister Storage Building (CSB), Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility or Hot Conditioning System, additional NRC requirements will also apply to the MCO based on the safety functions it performs and its interfaces with the SNF Project facilities. An evaluation was performed in consideration of the MCO safety functions to identify any additional NRC requirements needed, in combination with the existing and applicable DOE requirements, to establish nuclear safety equivalency for the MCO. The background, basic safety issues and general comparison of NRC and DOE requirements for the SNF Project are presented in WHC-SD-SNF-DB-002.

Garvin, L.J.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting DOE Directives & Manuals DOE Standards Central Technical Authorities (CTA) Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) Line Management SSO/ FAC Reps 48 CFR 970 48 CFR 952 Federal Acquisition Regulations External Oversight *Defense Nuclear Facility

24

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress, Volume 1, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This document is the first of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Atomic Energy Act, Energy Reorganization Act, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act, and Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Other information included in this volume pertains to NRC user fees, NRC authorizations, the Inspector General Act, and the Administrative Procedure Act.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains organization charts for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and for the five offices of the NRC. Function statements are provided delineating the major responsibilities and operations of each office. Organization and function are provided to the branch level. The head of each office, division, and branch is also listed.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Regulatory Guide 5.29, Revision 2, "Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants".  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION June 2013 U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION June 2013 Revision 2 REGULATORY GUIDE OFFICE OF NUCLEAR REGULATORY RESEARCH Written suggestions regarding this guide or development of new guides may be submitted through the NRC's public Web site under the Regulatory Guides document collection of the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/reg-guides/contactus.html. Electronic copies of this regulatory guide, previous versions of this guide, and other recently issued guides are available through the NRC's public Web site under the Regulatory Guides document collection of the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/. The regulatory guide is also available through the NRC's Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) at

27

ORISE: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Radiation Exposure Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information and Reporting System (REIRS) Information and Reporting System (REIRS) ORISE maintains large database of radiation exposure records for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is required by federal mandate to maintain and evaluate radiation protection data for workers at facilities that it licenses. As part of its mission of safety, the NRC operates the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS), a database system containing all occupational radiation exposure records that have been submitted to the NRC under 10 CFR Part 20. REIRS encompasses 1,800-plus NRC licensees and contains more than five million records for more than one million monitored individuals.

28

Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning conference; Volume 2, Sessions 9--16  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 21st meeting of the Department of Energy/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (DOE/NRC) Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference was held in San Diego, CA on August 13--16, 1990. The proceedings have been published as a two volume set. Volume 2 contains sessions covering adsorbents, nuclear codes and standards, modelling, filters, safety, containment venting and a review of nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. Also included is the list of attendees and an index of authors and speakers. (MHB)

First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit in Just One Month Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit in Just One Month March 27, 2007 - 12:10pm Addthis The Entergy Corporation's Grand Gulf Site in Mississippi Receives NRC Approval for an ESP WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today applauded the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) decision to approve an Early Site Permit (ESP) for the Entergy Corporation's Grand Gulf Nuclear Station in Mississippi. This approval, the second ESP this month, demonstrates another major milestone in President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative, which plans to expand the use of safe and clean nuclear power. Earlier this

30

Technical Considerations for NRC/National Academy Proposed Study of Cancer Risks in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), is updating the 1990 U.S. National Institutes of Health - National Cancer Institute (NCI) report, "Cancer in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities." The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a committee of scientists and professionals in the fields of epidemiology, radiation biology, nuclear plant effluents, and environmental risk assessment to provide study design considerations to the NAS commit...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Office of Nuclear Reactor RegulationAVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NRC's NRC's Integrated Strategy for NRC s Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management Earl Easton 1 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission May 25, 2010 Road to Yucca Mountain * 20+ years of preparation for the licensing i review * DOE application received in June 2008 and accepted for review in September 2008 * President Obama pursues alternatives to Yucca Mountain * DOE motion to withdraw in March 2010 2 * DOE motion to withdraw in March 2010 * Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future 2 Growing Spent Fuel Inventory Cumulative Used Nuclear Fuel Scenarios 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 Metric Tons 3 - 50,000 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050 Year Reference: Crozat, March 2010 Integrated Strategy * In response to the evolving national debate on spent fuel management strategy, NRC initiated a number of actions:

33

Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AT THE AT THE U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION R. Clyde Ragland, P.E. Office of Nuclear Security and Incident Response 2011 DOE National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 11, 2011 2 NRC Focus Prior to September 11, 2001 * Historically, NRC Transportation Security Regulations Focused on Highest Risk Radioactive Material, consisted of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) NRC Actions Since September 11, 2001 * Domestically, reviewed materials transported by NRC licensees and re- evaluated security requirements considering: - applicable threats to shipments - material considerations - magnitude of adverse consequences * Internationally, participated in the development of the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive

34

A Characteristics-Based Approach to Radioactive Waste Classification in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LLW-­?GTCC   GTCC  in  NRC  criteria.   Vitrified  glass;  Matheson,   Jim.   Letter   to   NRC   Chairman   Dale   E  California   Press,   NRC  2008   Nuclear   Regulatory  

Djokic, Denia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 102d Congress. Volume 2, No. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 2, No. 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nuclear regulatory legislation: 102d Congress. Volume 1, No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include: The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 1, No. 3  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

EVALUATING INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVES ON RISK-INFORMED REGULATORY PRACTICES FOR THE NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation has begun a program to create a risk-informed environment within the reactor program. The first step of the process is to evaluate the existing environment and internal NRC stakeholder perceptions of risk-informed regulatory practices. This paper reports on the results of the first phase of this evaluation: assessing the current environment, including the level of acceptance of risk-informed approaches throughout the reactor program, the level of integration, areas of success, and areas of difficulty. The other two phases of the evaluation will identify barriers to the integration of risk into NRC activities and gather input on how to move to a risk-informed environment.

Peterson, L.K.; Wight, E.H.; Caruso, M.A.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

40

SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orders should clearly identify the NRC publication number and the requester’s Government Printing Office deposit account number or a VISA or MasterCard number and expiration date.

Brian E. Holian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PSEG Nuclear, LLC Office of Nuclear Reactor RegulationAVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

U.S. Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) publishes an Information Digest containing summary information about the NRC...

43

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1000 was designed by Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, and has been formally approved by NRC. See, and show that the member has authorized the organization to intervene on his or her behalf. Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. (Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station), CLI-00-20, 52 NRC 151, 163 (2000). B. Ruling

Laughlin, Robert B.

44

NRC antitrust licensing actions, 1978--1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG-0447, Antitrust Review of Nuclear Power Plants, was published in May 1978 and includes a compilation and discussion of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proceedings and activity involving the NRC`s competitive review program through February 1978, NUREG-0447 is an update of an earlier discussion of the NRC`s antitrust review of nuclear power plants, NR-AIG-001, The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Antitrust Review of Nuclear Power Plants: The Conditioning of Licenses, which reviewed the Commission`s antitrust review function from its inception in December 1970 through April 1976. This report summarizes the support provided to NRC staff in updating the compilation of the NRC`s antitrust licensing review activities for commercial nuclear power plants that have occurred since February 1978. 4 refs., 4 tabs.

Mayer, S.J.; Simpson, J.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Sample Form DOE NRC 740M  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Records and FOIA Privacy Services Branch (T-5 F53), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk...

46

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5. MATERIAL TYPE (Submit separate report for each type) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 1. NAME AND ADDRESS MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY NRC FORM 742...

47

Preservation and Implementation of Decommissioning Lessons Learned in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has actively worked to capture and preserve lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. More recently, NRC has involved industry groups, the Organization of Agreement States (OAS), and the Department of Energy (DOE) in the effort to develop approaches to capture, preserve and disseminate decommissioning lessons learned. This paper discusses the accomplishments of the working group, some lessons learned by the NRC in the recent past, and how NRC will incorporate these lessons learned into its regulatory framework. This should help ensure that the design and operation of current and future nuclear facilities will result in less environmental impact and more efficient decommissioning. In summary, the NRC will continue capturing today's experience in decommissioning so that future facilities can take advantage of lessons learned from today's decommissioning projects. NRC, both individually and collectively with industry groups, OAS, and DOE, is aggressively working on the preservation and implementation of decommissioning lessons learned. The joint effort has helped to ensure the lessons from the whole spectrum of decommissioning facilities (i.e., reactor, fuel cycle, and material facilities) are better understood, thus maximizing the amount of knowledge and best practices obtained from decommissioning activities. Anticipated regulatory activities at the NRC will make sure that the knowledge gained from today's decommissioning projects is preserved and implemented to benefit the nuclear facilities that will decommission in the future.

Rodriguez, Rafael L. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Executive Director for Operations CONSIDERATION OF ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES WITHIN THE U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION’S REGULATORY FRAMEWORK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this Commission paper (SECY) is to provide the Commission with information and options to address to what extent, if any, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) regulatory framework should be modified regarding its consideration of the economic consequences of an unintended release of licensed nuclear materials to the environment. SUMMARY: The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan initiated discussion of how the NRC’s regulatory framework considers offsite property damage and other economic consequences caused by a significant radiological release from an NRC-licensed facility and licensed material. In response to this discussion, on April 6, 2012, the Office of the Executive Director for Operations (OEDO) directed the staff (see Enclosure 1, “Tasking for RES”) to provide a notation vote paper to the Commission on how the NRC’s regulatory framework currently considers the economic consequences associated with the unintended 1 release of licensed nuclear material to the environment and alternatives for Commission consideration. CONTACT:

R. W. Borchardt; Alysia Bone Res/dra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Office of Nuclear Material Safety and SafeguardsAVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

Nureg- Rev

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes the issuances received during the April 1996 reporting period from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking. Included are issuances pertaining to: (1) Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (2) Georgia Tech Research Reactor, (3) River Bend Station, (4) Millstone Unit 1, (5) Thermo-Lag fire barrier material, and (6) Louisiana Energy Services.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

DOE/NRC Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

52

SUBJECT: PILGRIM NUCLEAR POWER STATION- NRC INTEGRATED INSPECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your Pilgrim reactor facility. The enclosed integrated inspection report documents the inspection findings, which were discussed on July 7, 2005, with Mr T. Kirwin and members of your staff. The inspection examined activities conducted under your license as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commission’s rules and regulations and with the conditions of your license. The inspectors reviewed selected procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. On the basis of the results of this inspection, no findings of significance were identified. After this inspection period ended, the NRC issued a letter on July 14, 2005, issuing a Severity Level III Notice of Violation and Proposed Imposition of Civil Penalty. This inspection report acknowledges issuance of that letter and assigns a tracking number for the Severity Level III Notice of Violation. Additionally, licensee-identified violations which were determined to be of very low safety significance are listed in Section 4OA7 of this report. If you contest any NCV in this report, you should provide a response with the basis for your denial, within 30 days of the

Mr. Michael; A. Balduzzi; Pilgrim Nuclear; Power Station

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

DOE/NRC Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the United States Senate Committee on Armed Services Sep 17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts...

54

DOE Petitions for NRC Review in Yucca Mountain Proceeding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The United States Department of Energy today filed with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission a petition requesting that the Commission review and reverse an order by the NRC’s Atomic Safety and...

55

Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W...

56

1996 NRC annual report. Volume 13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 22nd annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes accomplishments, activities, and plans made during Fiscal Year 1996 (FH 1996)--October 1, 1995, through September 30, 1996. Significant activities that occurred early in FY 1997 are also described, particularly changes in the Commission and organization of the NRC. The mission of the NRC is to ensure that civilian uses of nuclear materials in the US are carried out with adequate protection of public health and safety, the environment, and national security. These uses include the operation of nuclear power plants and fuel cycle plants and medical, industrial, and research applications. Additionally, the NRC contributes to combating the proliferation of nuclear weapons material worldwide. The NRC licenses and regulates commercial nuclear reactor operations and research reactors and other activities involving the possession and use of nuclear materials and wastes. It also protects nuclear materials used in operation and facilities from theft or sabotage. To accomplish its statutorily mandated regulatory mission, the NRC issues rules and standards, inspects facilities and operations, and issues any required enforcement actions.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 AUG i 3 1979 ,,~---Y--*. FCAF:Wi3 )I 70-364 : i: SNM-414,jAmendment No. 3 --A Babcock and Wilcox Company Nuclear Materials Division ATTN: Mr. Michael A. Austin Manager, Technical Control 609 North Warren Avenue Apollo, Pennsylvania 15613 Gentiemen: (1 i' \ (. \ In accordance with your application dated June 18, 1979, and pursuant to Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 70, Materials License SNM-414 is hereby amended to: 1. Delete the function of the Regulatory Projects Coordinator, and 2. Alter the experience requirements for the function of Licensing and Nuclear Safety Specialist. Replacement pages for the license and condition section of the application are attached. Included are changes to License SNM-414 pages to reflect

58

Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to Advance Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to...

59

Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the...

60

Roadmap to NRC Approval of Ceramic Matrix Composites in Generation IV Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an initial roadmap to obtain Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval for using these material systems in a nuclear application. The possible paths taken to achieving NRC approval are necessarily subject to change as this is an on-going process that shifts as more data and a clearer understanding of the nuclear regulations are gathered.

M. G. Jenkins; E. Lara-Curzio; W. Windes

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect

A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion.

Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M. (21st Century Industries, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Public comments on the proposed 10 CFR Part 51 rule for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses and supporting documents: Review of concerns and NRC staff response. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff review of public comments provided in response to the NRC`s proposed amendments to 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 51, which establish new requirements for the environmental review of applications for the renewal of operating licenses of nuclear power plants. The public comments include those submitted in writing, as well as those provided at public meetings that were held with other Federal agencies, State agencies, nuclear industry representatives, public interest groups, and the general public. This report also contains the NRC staff response to the various concerns raised, and highlights the changes made to the final rule and the supporting documents in response to these concerns.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2007 ... The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was created as an ... Its regulatory mission covers three main areas: commercial reactors for ...

64

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20555. u. S. Nuclear U. S. NRC. Reactor Safety Study: AnNUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRC Regulatory Guide 1. 101. "Report on Current Activities NRC and the Federal Interagency

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

NRC proposes new reactor embrittlement regulations  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has proposed amending its regulations regarding embrittlement of pressure vessels in commercial nuclear power reactors. The amendments, which include clarifying the pressurized thermal shock requirements, changing the fracture toughness requirements and establishing new requirements for thermal annealing of a reactor pressure vessel, were prompted in part by NRC`s 1990 inspection of the reactor pressure vessel at the Yankee Rowe nuclear plant in Massachusetts. NRC`s proposed changes would establish a screening criterion for both the rate of irradiation embrittlement or RPV materials and fracture toughness, above which a plant cannot continue to be operated safely.

Newman, P.

1994-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

66

Why GAO Did This Study The Nuclear Regulatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and inspecting the nation’s nuclear power plants to ensure their safety and security. By 2010, about one third of NRC’s workforce with mission-critical skills will be eligible to retire. At the same time, NRC’s workforce needs to expand because NRC expects to receive at least 20 applications for 29 new nuclear power reactors beginning in October 2007. GAO assessed NRC’s ability to meet its workforce needs by examining the extent to which NRC (1) has aligned its human capital planning framework with its strategic mission and programmatic goals; (2) is effectively recruiting, developing, and retaining critically skilled personnel; and (3) is addressing future uncertainties that could affect its overall workforce capacity. GAO examined strategic workforce planning and implementation documents, interviewed cognizant managers on NRC’s human capital framework and activities, and surveyed these managers about NRC’s human capital flexibilities and measures. What GAO Recommends GAO is recommending that NRC better (1) integrate its strategic human capital planning with its operations and (2) evaluate the effectiveness of its human capital flexibilities and measures. In commenting on a draft of the report, NRC agreed with GAO’s recommendations. www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-07-105. To view the full product, including the scope and methodology, click on the link above. For more information, contact Jim Wells at (202) 512-3841 or wellsj @ gao.gov.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Physical Inventory Listing NRC 742c2  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9. TOTALS 9. TOTALS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING DOE/NRC FORM 742C (7-2008) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 8. BATCH DATA of Page Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 6 hours. This information is required by NRC to fulfill its safeguards responsibilities, bilateral agreements, and responsibilities as a participant in the US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records and FOIA/Privacy Services Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and

68

Technical Considerations for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission/ National Academy of Sciences Proposed Study: Cancer in Populations L iving Near Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), is updating the 1990 U.S. National Institutes of Health - National Cancer Institute (NCI) report, Cancer in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a committee of scientists and professionals in the fields of epidemiology, radiation biology, nuclear plant effluents, and environmental risk assessment to provide study design considerations to the NAS committe...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

69

Review of nuclear power plant offsite power source reliability and related recommended changes to the NRC rules and regulations  

SciTech Connect

The NRC has stated its concern about the reliability of the offsite power system as the preferred emergency source and about the possible damage to a pressurized water reactor (PWR) that could result from a rapid decay of power grid frequency. ORNL contracted with NRC to provide technical assistance to establish criteria that can be used to evaluate the offsite power system for the licensing of a nuclear power plant. The results of many of the studies for this contract are recommendations to assess and control the power grid during operation. This is because most of the NRC regulations pertaining to the offsite power system are related to the design of the power grid, and we believe that additional emphasis on monitoring the power grid operation will improve the reliability of the nuclear plant offsite power supply. 46 refs., 10 figs.

Battle, R.E.; Clark, F.H.; Reddoch, T.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Certifies HalfPACT Transportation Container  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Certifies U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Certifies HalfPACT Transportation Container CARLSBAD, N.M., November 20, 2000 - The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a Certificate of Compliance November 2 for the HalfPACT transportation container. The HalfPACT will be used to supplement the Transuranic Package Transporter Model 2 (TRUPACT-II) for transportation of waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The TRUPACT-II is currently used for transportation of waste to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The new container is approximately 30 inches shorter than the TRUPACT-II. The HalfPACT is designed to carry seven 55-gallon drums weighing up to 1,000 pounds each, but is also capable of carrying one standard waste box or four 85-gallon drums.

71

EPRI/NRC-RES Fire Human Reliability Analysis Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2001, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (NRC-RES), operating under a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), collaborated to improve the state-of-the-art in fire risk assessment to support the new risk-informed environment in fire protection. This project produced a consensus documentNUREG/CR-6850 (EPRI report 1011989), Fire PRA Methodology for Nuclear Power Facilitieswhich addresses fire risk during operations at...

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

Sample Form DOE NRC 740M  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

CONCISE NOTE CONCISE NOTE DOE/NRC FORM 740M (6-2008) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 45 minutes. This information is required to satisfy the provisions of the US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records and FOIA Privacy Services Branch (T-5 F53), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0057), Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. If a means used to impose an information collection does not display a currently valid OMB control number, the NRC may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not

73

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances. Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1, 1994--December 31, 1994. Volume 40, Pages 1--387  

SciTech Connect

The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. This book covers the following: issuances of the NRC; issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards; and issuances of Directors` decisions.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Regulatory and technical reports: (Abstract index journal). Compilation for first quarter 1997, January--March  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. This compilation is published quarterly and cummulated annually. Reports consist of staff-originated reports, NRC-sponsored conference reports, NRC contractor-prepared reports, and international agreement reports.

Sheehan, M.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NRC Job Code R3137Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin

Recommendations For Severe; J. A. Jones; N. Bixler; S. Burns; F. J. Schelling

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E.; Banovac, K.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

77

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consultation correspondence related to the evaluation of the renewal of the operating license | for Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station (VYNPS) is identified in Table E-1. Copies of the correspondence are included at the end of this appendix. The licenses, permits, consultations, and other approvals obtained from Federal and State | authorities for VYNPS are listed in Table E-2.

Commission (r. L. Franovich; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Emerging Technologioes in Instrumentation and Controls and Their Potential Regulatory Implications for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a summary of eight instrumentation and control (&C) technology areas, with applications in nuclear power plants (NPPs), that were the focus of a recent study performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC.) The state of the technology s application in NPPs, along with potential regulatory impact(s), are discussed. The technology focus areas are: (1) sensors and measurement systems, (2) communications media and networking, (3) microprocessors and other integrated circuits, (4) computational platforms, (5) surveillance, diagnostics, and prognostics, (6) human-system interactions, (7) high-integrity software, and (8) I&C architectures in new plants. The regulatory implications of these focus areas with regard to their application in NPPs are also discussed.

Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Howlader, Mostofa [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL; Moore, Michael Roy [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Shourbaji, Ayman A [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

SouOhern Hiecr Olf•N•ucl Company, Inc. Office of Nuclear Reactor RegulationAVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

Vogtfe Ebectrdc; Generating Rant

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

License Renewal Draft Report for Comment Office of Nuclear Reactor RegulationAVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Guide to NRC reporting and recordkeeping requirements  

SciTech Connect

This compilation includes in the first two sections the reporting and recordkeeping requirements applicable to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees and applicants and to members of the public. It includes those requirements codified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter I, on December 31, 1991. It also includes, in a separate section, any of those requirements that were superseded or discontinued from January through December 1991. Finally, the appendix lists mailing and delivery addresses for NRC Headquarters and Regional Offices mentioned in the compilation.

Collins, M.; Shelton, B.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(COL) application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction of a new nuclear power plant in the United States. Dominion's application seeks approval to build...

83

o:\informs\fixforms\nrc742c.wpf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. TOTALS . TOTALS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING DOE/NRC FORM 742C (8-2003) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 8. BATCH DATA of Page Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 6 hours. This information is required by NRC to fulfill its safeguards responsibilities, bilateral agreements, and responsibilities as a participant in the US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records Management Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs,

84

USA NRC/RSR Data Bank System and Reactor Safety Research Data Repository (RSRDR)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through its Division of Reactor Safety Research (RSR) of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has established the NRC/RSR Data Bank Program to collect, process, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. An increasing number of requests for data and/or calculations generated by NRC Contractors led to the initiation of the program which allows timely and direct access to water reactor safety data in a manner most useful to the user. The program consists of three main elements: data sources, service organizations, and a data repository.

Maskewitz, B.F.; Bankert, S.F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NRC safety research in support of regulation - FY 1994. Volume 9  

SciTech Connect

This report, the tenth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1994. The goal of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) is to ensure the availability of sound technical bases for timely rulemaking and related decisions in support of NRC regulatory/licensing/inspection activities. RES also has responsibilities related to the resolution of generic safety issues and to the review of licensee submittals regarding individual plant examinations. It is the responsibility of RES to conduct the NRC`s rulemaking process, including the issuance of regulatory guides and rules that govern NRC licensed activities.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Table 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units, 1955-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Data in columns 1–3 are based on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation 10 CFR Part 50. Data in columns 4–6 are based on the NRC regulation 10 ...

87

Energy and water development appropriations for 1986. Part 6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 6 of the hearing record covers testimony by Nunzio J. Palladino and other commissioners and directors of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), who described how NRC is organized and how it operates in response to a survey and study of NRC operations prepared for the Committee on Appropriations. The witnesses responded to negative reports of distrust, fiscal inefficiency, ambiguity, and a failure to modify regulatory requirements to reflect new information. The witnesses disagreed that there has been any decline or compromise with plant safety, but agreed that the backfitting program needs better procedures. The volume includes the text of the report and both written comment and oral testimony before the committee.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

NRC/RSR Data Bank Program  

SciTech Connect

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established the NRC/Reactor Safety Research (RSR) Data Bank Program to provide a means of collecting, processing, and making available experimental data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. The NRC/RSR Data Bank Program collects qualified engineering data from experimental program data bases, stores the data in a single data bank in a common format, and makes the data available to users. The program is designed to be user oriented to minimize the effort required to obtain and manipulate data of interest. The data bank concept and structure embodied in the data bank processing system are applicable to any program where large quantities of scientific (numeric) data are generated and require compiling, storage, and accessing in order to be collected and made available to multiple users. 3 figures. (RWR)

Bankert, S.F.; Evans, C.D.; Hardy, H.A.; Litteer, G.L.; Schulz, G.L.; Smith, N.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Recommendations for NEAMS Engagement with the NRC: Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect

The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring a new generation of analytic tools to the nuclear engineering community in order to facilitate students, faculty, industry and laboratory researchers in investigating advanced reactor and fuel cycle designs. Although primarily targeting at advance nuclear technologies, it is anticipated that these new capabilities will also become interesting and useful to the nuclear regulator Consequently, the NEAMS program needs to engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as the software is being developed to ensure that they are familiar with and ready to respond to this novel approach when the need arises. Through discussions between key NEAMS and NRC staff members, we tentatively recommend annual briefings to the Division of Systems Analysis in the NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. However the NEAC subcommittee review of the NEAMS program may yield recommendations that would need to be considered before finalizing this plan.

Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Work for Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Safety Related Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Regulatory Nuclear Regulatory Commission Capabilities Sensors and Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation Overview Energy System Applications Safety-Related Applications Overview DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Homeland Security Applications Biomedical Applications Millimiter Wave Group Papers Other NPNS Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Sensors and Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation Safety Related Applications Bookmark and Share Nuclear Regulatory Commission International Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Key objectives of the International Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program

91

Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

NONE

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Memorandum of Understanding Between U.S. EPA Superfund and U.S. NRC  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are responsible for implementing the 'Memorandum of Understanding Between the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission: Consultation and Finality on Decommissioning and Decontamination of Contaminated Sites'. This paper provides a brief overview of the origin of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), the major features of the MOU, and how the MOU has been implemented site specifically. EPA and NRC developed the MOU in response to direction from the House Committee on Appropriations to EPA and NRC to work together to address the potential for dual regulation. The MOU was signed by EPA on September 30, 2002 and NRC on October 9, 2002. The two agencies had worked on the MOU since March 2000. While both EPA and NRC have statutory authority to clean up these sites, the MOU provides consultation procedures between EPA and NRC to eliminate dual regulation. Under the MOU, EPA and NRC identified the interactions of the two agencies for the decommissioning and decontamination of NRC-licensed sites and the ways in which those responsibilities will be exercised. Except for Section VI, which addresses corrective action under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this MOU is limited to the coordination between EPA, when acting under its CERCLA authority, and NRC, when a facility licensed by the NRC is undergoing decommissioning, or when a facility has completed decommissioning, and the NRC has terminated its license. EPA believes that implementation of the MOU between the two agencies will ensure that future confusion about dual regulation does not occur regarding the cleanup and reuse of NRC-licensed sites. NRC and EPA have so far exchanged MOU consultation letters on eight NRC-licensed sites. EPA has responded to each consultation request with a letter expressing its views on actions that NRC should consider that address the site-specific matter that triggered consultation. Over the course of consultations on the eight sites, there have been some reoccurring themes to EPA's views. Primarily, these are EPA: 1. Recommending that NRC consider selecting institutional controls to ensure that NRC's assumptions about future human exposure at the site are not exceeded. 2. Recommending that NRC consider using more site-specific information when conducting dose assessment modeling. 3. Recommending that NRC consider a flexible approach to groundwater protection that still ensures the public is not exposed to contamination levels over drinking water limits. 4. Recommending that NRC consider an approach similar to how EPA implements supplemental standards under 40 CFR 192 as an ARAR when the UMTRCA soil standard of 5 pCi/g is not being met.

Walker, Stuart [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation - OSRTI, Science and Policy Branch, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, 5204 P, Washington, D.C. 20460 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The documents reviewed are:...

94

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

RFI Comments - NRC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... security regulations for operating reactors and combined ... regulatory requirements and reactor oversight by ... requirements for a nuclear power plant ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

96

Material Balance Report NRC 742_7  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT 1. NAME AND ADDRESS MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY NRC FORM 742 (7-2008) (PREVIOUS EDITIONS ARE OBSOLETE) 4. REPORT PERIOD (MM/DD/YYYY) PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 5 hours. Reported lessons learned are incorporated into the licensing process and fed back to industry. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records and FOIA/Privacy Services Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0004), Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. If a means used to impose an information collection does not display a currently valid OMB

97

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications International Applications (SAIC) technical and quality program files associated with the development of the draft NUREG. The CNWRA also reviewed the SAIC spreadsheet calculations for analyses used in the draft NUREG. These calculations were transmitted by the NRC to the CNWRA on compact disks The enclosed report includes changes to our previous document (Deliverable 08801.081.001) in response to Reference I and subsequent interactions between the CNWRA and NRC staffs. /7-Washington Office • Twinbrook Metro Plaza #210

Account No; Sincf S; L. Camper; C. Haney; Cnwra Directors; R. Benke; R. Nelson; R. Hog

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process September 19, 2012 Presenter: Undine Shoop, Chief, Health Physics and Human Performance Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Purpose of the Reactor Oversight Process (ROP) ROP Framework Safety Culture within the ROP Safety Culture Assessments Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process More Documents & Publications A Commissioner's Perspective on USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 2/17/11

99

Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111989 111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W Enclosed are the copfes of the final ORNL survey reports on the radiologlcal Surveys conducted on three Teterboro, New Jersey properties; Metpath Incorporated, Allied Aerospace Corporatio; and Sumftomo Machinery Corporation. Copies of these reports have &en sent directly to the owners by our survey contractor Oak Ridge National Laboratory. If you have any questions regardfng these reports. please call me at (301) 353-5439. Sfncerely, Enclosure : < I j i Andrew Wallo III, Designation and Certffication Manager Dfvisfon 01 Facility and Site Oeconanlssionfng Projects

100

Problems and delays overshadow NRC's initial success in improving reactor-operator's capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear powerplant accident at Three Mile Island raised many questions concerning the safety of nuclear powerplant operations and, especially, the ability of nuclear power reactor operators to abnormal or accident conditions. In response, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed a plan, which included both short- and long-term actions to improve the safety of nuclear powerplants. GAO reviewed the progress in implementing operator training and qualification actions and found that: strong initial NRC and utility efforts resulted in implementation of a number of short-term actions that should improve the safety of nuclear powerplant operations; since these initial actions were taken, NRC's efforts have lost momentum and implementation problems and delays are being experienced; and NRC is relying on an industry-sponsored group to carry out most of the operator training and qualification improvements without a specific agreement covering coordination of their respective efforts.

Not Available

1982-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

Ritterbusch, S.E.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

KWOC (Key-Word-Out-of-Context) Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series  

SciTech Connect

To meet the objectives of the program funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Nuclear Energy (NE) Technology Support Programs, the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) administers a Performance Assurance Information Program that collects, compiles, and distributes program-related information, reports, and publications for the benefit of the DOE-NE program participants. THE KWOC Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series'' is prepared as an aid in searching for specific topics in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Regulatory Guide Series.

Jennings, S.D.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Reassessment of the NRC`s program for protecting allegers against retaliation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On July 6, 1993, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Executive Director for Operations established a review team to reassess the NRC`s program for protecting allegers against retaliation. The team evaluated the current system, and solicited comments from various NRC offices, other Federal agencies, licensees, former allegers, and the public. This report is subject to agency review. The report summarizes current processes and gives an overview of current problems. It discusses: (1) ways in which licensees can promote a quality-conscious work environment, in which all employees feel free to raise concerns without fear of retaliation; (2) ways to improve the NRC`s overall handling of allegations; (3) the NRC`s involvement in the Department of Labor process; (4) related NRC enforcement practices; and (5) methods other than investigation and enforcement that may be useful in treating allegations of potential or actual discrimination. Recommendations are given in each area.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years March 8, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today commended the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's decision to approve the first-ever Early Site Permit (ESP) for the Exelon Generation Company's Clinton site, in central Illinois. This decision marks a major milestone in the President's plan to expand the use of safe and clean nuclear power. As part of President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative - which seeks to change the way we power this nation - nuclear power will play an increasingly

105

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances: Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1--December 31, 1996. Volume 44, Pages 1--432  

SciTech Connect

The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. Issuances are referred to as follows: Commission--CLI, Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards--LBP, Administrative Law Judges--ALJ, Directors` Decisions--DD, and Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking--DPRM.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

o:\informs\fixforms\nrc740m.wpf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONCISE NOTE CONCISE NOTE DOE/NRC FORM 740M (5-2002) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 45 minutes. This information is required to satisfy the provisions of the US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records Management Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0057), Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. If a means used to impose an information collection does not display a currently valid OMB control number, the NRC may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to

107

o:\informs\fixforms\nrc742_3.wpf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MATERIAL TYPE MATERIAL TYPE (Submit separate report for each type) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT 1. NAME AND ADDRESS MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY NRC FORM 742 (8-2003) (PREVIOUS EDITIONS ARE OBSOLETE) 4. REPORT PERIOD (MM/DD/YYYY) PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 5 hours. Reported lessons learned are incorporated into the licensing process and fed back to industry. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records Management Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0004),

108

o:\informs\fixforms\nrc741.wpf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FORM 741 FORM 741 (5-2002) Previous editions are obsolete MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 Ăľ Ăľ Ăľ Ăľ Ăľ Ăľ 23a. MISCELLANEOUS NUCLEAR MATERIAL TRANSACTION REPORT Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 1 hr and 15 minutes. This information is required for IAEA accounting reports that show changes in inventory of nuclear materials. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records Management Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0003), Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. If a means used to

109

Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference; Sessions 1--8  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts have been prepared for the papers presented at the meeting on nuclear facility air cleaning technology in the following specific areas of interest: air cleaning technologies for the management and disposal of radioactive wastes; Canadian waste management program; radiological health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis; filter testing; US standard codes on nuclear air and gas treatment; European community nuclear codes and standards; chemical processing off-gas cleaning; incineration and vitrification; adsorbents; nuclear codes and standards; mathematical modeling techniques; filter technology; safety; containment system venting; and nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. (MB)

First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, Volume 42, No. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report include the issuances received during the specificed period (August 1995) from the NRC, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, the Administrative Law Judges, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rule Making. In these issuances, the following areas were addressed: (1) Emergency planning at the University of Missouri, (2) Transfer of operating license at Plant Vogtle, (3) Discriminatory action against a whistle-blower at Millstone Units 1 & 2, (4) Regulatory issues related to embittlement and cracking at Oyster Creek, and (5) Age-related deterioration of reactor internals components at Pilgrim.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

NRC Consent to Indirect License Transfer/Threshold Determination- Merger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company ("CY"), and Yankee Atomic Electric Company ("YR") (each a "Yankee Company," and together, "the Yankee Companies"), hereby respond to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission ("NRC") Third Request for Additional Information for Application for NRC Consent to Indirect License Transfer/Threshold Determination (TAC Nos. L24496, L24497, and L24498) ("RAI 3") received by the Yankee Companies on August 5, 2011. If you have questions or require additional information, please contact me or Joe Fay at (207) 350-0300. Sincerely, Wayne Norton

The Yankee Companies

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Annual compilation for 1994. Volume 19, Number 4  

SciTech Connect

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC`s intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually. The main citations and abstracts in this compilation are listed in NUREG number order. These precede the following indexes: secondary report number index, personal author index, subject index, NRC originating organization index (staff reports), NRC originating organization index (international agreements), NRC contract sponsor index (contractor reports), contractor index, international organization index, and licensed facility index. A detailed explanation of the entries precedes each index.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Executive Director for Operations OPTIONS FOR U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INVOLVEMENT WITH THE NAVY’S REMEDIATION OF THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To obtain Commission approval on options for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) involvement with the Navy’s remediation of the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (HPS) site, and recommended actions to inform the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Navy, and stakeholders about the Commission’s decision regarding NRC’s involvement. This paper does not address any new commitments. SUMMARY: In July 2007 the Navy requested that NRC clarify the potential for NRC involvement with the remediation of the HPS site in San Francisco, California. The Navy explained that resolving uncertainties about NRC jurisdiction and involvement is important because of the potential impact on the Navy’s ongoing remediation and expedited schedules needed to support the redevelopment plans of the City of San Francisco for the site. These redevelopment plans and schedules have high visibility and considerable support from elected Federal, State, and local officials. In response to the Navy’s request, the staff has evaluated three options for NRC’s involvement at the HPS and related policy issues. The staff recommends the option of relying CONTACT:

R. W. Borchardt; Robert L. Johnson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nuclear waste management technical support in the development of nuclear waste form criteria for the NRC. Task 1. Waste package overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report the current state of waste package development for high level waste, transuranic waste, and spent fuel in the US and abroad has been assessed. Specifically, reviewed are recent and on-going research on various waste forms, container materials and backfills and tentatively identified those which are likely to perform most satisfactorily in the repository environment. Radiation effects on the waste package components have been reviewed and the magnitude of these effects has been identified. Areas requiring further research have been identified. The important variables affecting radionuclide release from the waste package have been described and an evaluation of regulatory criteria for high level waste and spent fuel is presented. Finally, for spent fuel, high level, and TRU waste, components which could be used to construct a waste package having potential to meet NRC performance requirements have been described and identified.

Dayal, R.; Lee, B.S.; Wilke, R.J.; Swyler, K.J.; Soo, P.; Ahn, T.M.; McIntyre, N.S.; Veakis, E.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Recommendations to the NRC on human engineering guidelines for nuclear power plant maintainability  

SciTech Connect

This document contains human engineering guidelines which can enhance the maintainability of nuclear power plants. The guidelines have been derived from general human engineering design principles, criteria, and data. The guidelines may be applied to existing plants as well as to plants under construction. They apply to nuclear power plant systems, equipment and facilities, as well as to maintenance tools and equipment. The guidelines are grouped into seven categories: accessibility and workspace, physical environment, loads and forces, maintenance facilities, maintenance tools and equipment, operating equipment design, and information needs. Each chapter of the document details specific maintainability problems encountered at nuclear power plants, the safety impact of these problems, and the specific maintainability design guidelines whose application can serve to avoid these problems in new or existing plants.

Badalamente, R.V.; Fecht, B.A.; Blahnik, D.E.; Eklund, J.D.; Hartley, C.S.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Twenty-third DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning and Treatment Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the details of the Nuclear Air Cleaning and Treatment Conference held in Buffalo, New York during July 1994. Topics discussed include: nuclear air cleaning codes and standards; waste disposal; particulate filter developments; sampling and monitoring of process and effluent streams; off-gasses from fuel reprocessing; adsorbents and adsorption; accident control and analysis; revised source terms for power plant accidents; and the highlight of the conference concerned operations at the West Valley DOE facility where construction is underway to solidify radioactive wastes.

Bellamy, R.R.; Hayes, J.J.; First, M.W. [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

1995-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal). Volume 20, No. 2: Compilation for second quarter April--June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC`s intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NRC) staff responses to frequently asked questions on the decommissioning process for commercial, nuclear power reactors. The questions were taken from a variety of sources over the past several years, including written inquiries to the NRC and questions asked at public meetings and during informal discussions with the NRC staff. In responding to the questions, the NRC staff attempted to provide the answers in a clear and non-technical form. With the increase in the number of power reactors beginning the decommissioning process and significant changes that occurred in the regulations since 1996, the staff realized that there was a general lack of understanding of the decommissioning process and the risks associated with decommissioning. This document was developed in response to the staff’s concerns. The report contains a definition of decommissioning and a discussion of alternatives. It also provides a focus on decommissioning experiences in the United States and how the NRC regulates the decommissioning process. Questions related to spent fuel, low-level waste, and transportation related to decommissioning are answered. Questions related to license termination, the ultimate disposition of the facility, and finances for completing decommissioning and hazards associated with decommissioning are also addressed. This document also provides responses to questions related to public involvement in decommissioning as well as providing the public with sources for obtaining additional information on decommissioning.

John L Minns; Michael T. Masnik; U. S. Nuclear; Regulatory Commission; Washington D. C. Abstract

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission accountability report, fiscal year 1995. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is one of six Federal agencies participating in a pilot project to streamline financial management reporting. The goal of this pilot is to consolidate performance-related reporting into a single accountability report. The project, which is being carried out under the guidance of the Chief Financial Officers Council, was undertaken in accordance with the Government Management Reform Act (GMRA) of 1994. The GMRA permits the streamlining of financial management reports in consultation with the appropriate Congressional Committees through a liaison in the US Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The results of the pilot project will determine the method to be used for reporting financial management information for fiscal year (FY) 1996. This report consolidates the information previously reported in the following documents: (1) the NRC`s annual financial statement required by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990; (2) the Chairman`s annual report to the President and the Congress, required by the Federal Managers` Financial Integrity Act of 1982; (3) the Chairman`s semiannual report to the Congress on management decisions and final actions on Office of Inspector General audit recommendations, required by the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. This report also includes performance measures, as required by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nuclear Regulatory Commission approves construction of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... near Spring City, Tennessee after initial construction began in 1973. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Updates to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Consolidated NMSS Decommissioning Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 2003, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards (NMSS) consolidated and updated the policies and guidance of its decommissioning program in a three-volume NUREG report, NUREG-1757, 'Consolidated NMSS Decommissioning Guidance' [1,2,3]. This NUREG report provides guidance on: planning and implementing license termination under the NRC's License Termination Rule (LTR), in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E; complying with the radiological criteria for license termination; and complying with the requirements for financial assurance and record-keeping for decommissioning and timeliness in decommissioning of materials facilities. The staff plans to periodically update NUREG-1757, so that it reflects current NRC decommissioning policy. In September 2005, the staff issued, for public comment, draft Supplement 1 to NUREG-1757 [4], which contains proposed updates to the three volumes of NUREG-1757. Draft Supplement 1 includes new and revised decommissioning guidance that addresses some of the LTR implementation issues, which were analyzed by the staff in two Commission papers (SECY-03-0069, Results of the LTR Analysis [5]; and SECY-04-0035, Results of the LTR Analysis of the Use of Intentional Mixing of Contaminated Soil [6]). These issues include restricted use and institutional controls, onsite disposal of radioactive materials under 10 CFR 20.2002, selection and justification of exposure scenarios based on reasonably foreseeable future land use (realistic scenarios), intentional mixing of contaminated soil, and removal of material after license termination (a follow-up to the LTR Analysis issue on the relationship between the LTR and the current case-by-case approach for release of solid materials). The staff also developed new and revised guidance on other issues, including the risk-informed graded approach for engineered barriers. This paper is a follow-up to a poster session and paper at Waste Management 2004, which presented the new Consolidated NMSS Decommissioning Guidance in NUREG-1757. This paper discusses the issues addressed in the current update to NRC's decommissioning guidance and explores the relationships between the issues. (authors)

Banovac, K.L.; Johnson, R.L.; Schmidt, D.W. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

NRC ISSUES REPORT FOR COMMENT ON SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION CASK RESPONSE TO CALDECOTT TUNNEL FIRE SCENARIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is seeking public comment on a study of how a truck cask for transporting spent nuclear fuel might perform in a severe tunnel fire. The report models the performance of the NAC International Model LWT (NAC) spent fuel cask under the conditions of the April 1982 fire in the Caldecott highway tunnel near Oakland, Calif., when a gasoline tanker carrying 8,800 gallons of gasoline overturned and caught fire. Severe, intense fires such as the Caldecott fire are extremely rare. However, they provide an opportunity to study how transportation packages might perform under very severe accident conditions. The results of this study strongly indicate that any radioactive release from the NAC model or a similar spent fuel shipping cask involved in a severe tunnel fire such as that of the Caldecott highway tunnel accident would be within regulatory limits. The peak internal temperatures predicted for the NAC cask in the analysis of the Caldecott fire scenario were not high enough to result in rupture of the fuel cladding (protective metal tubing around the fuel). Therefore, it would not be expected that any radioactive material (including spent nuclear fuel particles or fission products) would be released from the fuel rods. The maximum cask temperatures experienced around the lid, vent and drain ports exceeded the

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

H. R. 1711: a Bill to authorize appropriations for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for fiscal year 1986 and fiscal year 1987. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) appropriations for fiscal years 1986 and 1987 are $429 million and $460 million, respectively. The Bill allocates sums for each year for reactor regulation, inspection and enforcement, nuclear material safety and safeguards, reactor research, program technical support, and program administration. The Bill cites conditions for spending the funds and for entering into grants and cooperative agreements. The NRC is authorized to issue reactor operating licenses in the absence of a state or local emergency preparedness plan if it determines that public safety is assured.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC Proceeding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC Proceeding DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC Proceeding March 30, 2010 - 9:57am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy yesterday filed with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission a response to Petitions to Intervene filed by several parties seeking to oppose the Department's motion to withdraw its license application for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. DOE said it is confident that its motion to withdraw the application is lawful, but that it believes the petitioning parties should be allowed to present their views to the NRC. It thus did not oppose the motions to intervene, and proposed a schedule for resolving the dispute over the Department's motion to withdraw the application. The parties seeking to intervene are

125

NUCLEAR REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I lY,.COMMISSION 475 ALLENDALE ROAD KlNG OF PRUSSIA. PENNSYLVANIA 194061415 GION I NOALE ROAD ENNSYLVANlA 194061415 MAY I5 1996 MAY I5 1996 Docket No. 040-07964 License No. SlJ (Rs Heyman Properties Attention: Mr. John S. Russo Facility Manager 333 Post Road West Westport, CT 06881 SUBJECT: INSPECTION NO. 040-07964/96-001 Dear Mr. Russo: On April 15, 1996, Todd J. Jackson of this office conducted a routine inspection at 737 Canal Street, Stamford, Connecticut of activities o Oliver Incorporated, authorized by Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Lit SUB-00967. The inspection consisted of observations by the inspect0 interviews with personnel, and a radiological survey by the inspector Jackson was accompanied on this inspection by representatives of the

126

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D. C. 20555  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REGULATORY COMMISSION REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D. C. 20555 JAN 2 2 1982 -/ Departmznt'of Ene,rgy ATTN : Dr. William E. Mott, Director Environmental and Safety Engineering Division (EP-32) Washington, D.C. 20545 Dear Dr. Mott: Enclosed is the list of contaminated'or potentially contaminated sites that I promised to send you during our recent meeting. The sites have been broken down into the followi,ng four categories: 1. Sites with known contamination that have never been 1 icensed. 2. Formerly licensed sites with known contamination. 3. Currently licensed sites that are being decontaminated prior to decoronissioning. 4. A list of formerly licensed sites that need to be visited to determine if they have been properly decontaminated prior to decommissioning.

127

LIMERICK GENERATING STATION- NRC INTEGRATED INSPECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Units 1 and 2. The enclosed report documents the inspection findings which were discussed on October 4, 2002, with Mr. W. Levis and other members of your staff. This inspection examined activities conducted under your license as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commission’s rules and regulations and with the conditions of your license. The inspectors reviewed procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. Based on the results of this inspection, the inspectors identified four issues of very low safety significance (Green). Two of these issues were determined to involve violations of NRC requirements. However, because of their very low safety significance and because they have been entered into your corrective action program, the NRC is treating these issues as Non-Cited Violations, in accordance with Section VI.A.1 of the NRC’s Enforcement Policy. If you deny these non-cited violations, you should provide a response with the basis for your denial, within 30 days of the date of this inspection report, to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission,

Exelon Nuclear

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The NRC's SPAR Models: Current Status, Future Development, and Modeling Issues  

SciTech Connect

Probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) play an increasingly important role in the regulatory framework of the U.S. nuclear power industry. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) relies on a set of plant-specific Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models to provide critical risk-based input to the regulatory process. The Significance Determination Process (SDP), Management Directive 8.3 - NRC Incident Investigation Program, Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) and Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) programs are among the regulatory initiatives that receive significant input from the SPAR models. Other uses of the SPAR models include: Screening & Resolution of Generic Safety Issues, License Amendment reviews and Notice of Enforcement Discretion (NOEDs). This paper presents the current status of SPAR model development activities, future development objectives, and issues related to the development, verification and maintenance of the SPAR models.

Robert F. Buell

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Department of Energy to Co-Sponsor Workshop on Nuclear Power Plant Life Extension R&D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) will co-sponsor a “Second Workshop on U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Life Extension Research and Development.”

130

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document is a safety evaluation report regarding the application to renew the operating licenses for Turkey Point Units 3 and 4, which was filed by the Florida Power and Light Company by letter dated September 8, 2000 and received by the NRC on September 11, 2000. The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation has reviewed the Turkey Point Units 3 and 4, license renewal application for compliance with the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal

Turkey Point; Nuclear Plant; Florida Power; Light Company

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the proposed action quite obviously entails an increased potential for offsite consequences. Instead by nuclear power plants operating in or proposed for Maryland.@ Id. at 1-2. NIRS explains miles of the proposed reactor. She further recounts that she is Aparticularly 21 See Shaw AREVA MOX

Laughlin, Robert B.

132

Comparison and Analysis of Regulatory and Derived Requirements for Certain DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments; Lessons Learned for Future Spent Fuel Transportation Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive materials transportation is stringently regulated by the Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to protect the public and the environment. As a Federal agency, however, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must seek State, Tribal and local input on safety issues for certain transportation activities. This interaction has invariably resulted in the imposition of extra-regulatory requirements, greatly increasing transportation costs and delaying schedules while not significantly enhancing the level of safety. This paper discusses the results an analysis of the regulatory and negotiated requirements established for a July 1998 shipment of spent nuclear fuel from foreign countries through the west coast to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Staff from the INEEL Nuclear Materials Engineering and Disposition Department undertook the analysis in partnership with HMTC, to discover if there were instances where requirements derived from stakeholder interactions duplicate, contradict, or otherwise overlap with regulatory requirements. The study exhaustively lists and classifies applicable Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. These are then compared with a similarly classified list of requirements from the Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) and those developed during stakeholder negotiations. Comparison and analysis reveals numerous attempts to reduce transportation risk by imposing more stringent safety measures than those required by DOT and NRC. These usually took the form of additional inspection, notification and planning requirements. There are also many instances of overlap with, and duplication of regulations. Participants will gain a greater appreciation for the need to understand the risk-oriented basis of the radioactive materials regulations and their effectiveness in ensuring safety when negotiating extra-regulatory requirements.

Kramer, George L., Ph.D.; Fawcett, Rick L.; Rieke, Philip C.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

133

NRC Postdoctoral Research Associateships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NRC Postdoctoral Research Associateships. ... Research topics and associated advisors for the Magnetics Group are listed below. ...

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Special Topics: Nuclear Materials: Web resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB: U.S.NRC Glossary United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 0, 769, Cathy Rohrer, 10/19/2007 2:38 PM by Cathy Rohrer. New Messages, Rating ...

135

IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

United States

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Selection of a discount rate for use in NRC regulatory analyses and application of discount rates to future averted health effects  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this report is to provide background information and recommendations on the use of discount rates in the regulatory analysis process. The report focuses on two issues selecting the appropriate discount rate or rates to use when conducting a regulatory analysis, and applying the selected discount rate to future health-related benefits estimated to result from alternative regulatory actions.

Paananen, O.H.; Hendrickson, P.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

HFE Process Guidance and Standards for potential application to updating NRC guidance  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews and evaluates the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of these guidance documents to ensure that they remain state-of-the-art design evaluation tools. Thus, the NRC has initiated a project with BNL to update the NRC guidance to remain current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology. INL supported Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) to update the detailed HFE review criteria contained in NUREG-0711 and NUREG-0700 based on (1) feedback obtained from end users, (2) the results of NRC research and development efforts supporting the NRC staff’s HFE safety reviews, and (3) other material the project staff identify as applicable to the update effort. INL submitted comments on development plans and sections of NUREGs 0800, 0711, and 0700. The contractor prepared the report attached here as the deliverable for this work.

Jacques Hugo; J. J. Persensky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

NRC Job Code V6060: Extended in-situ and real time monitoring. Task 4: Detection and monitoring of leaks at nuclear power plants external to structures  

SciTech Connect

In support of Task 4 of the NRC study on compliance with 10 CFR part 20.1406, minimization of contamination, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a one-year scoping study, in concert with a parallel study performed by NRC/NRR staff, on monitoring for leaks at nuclear power plants (NPPs) external to structures. The objective of this task-4 study is to identify and assess those sensors and monitoring techniques for early detection of abnormal radioactive releases from the engineered facility structures, systems and components (SSCs) to the surrounding underground environment in existing NPPs and planned new reactors. As such, methods of interest include: (1) detection of anomalous water content of soils surrounding SSCs, (2) radionuclides contained in the leaking water, and (3) secondary signals such as temperature. ANL work scope includes mainly to (1) identify, in concert with the nuclear industry, the sensors and techniques that have most promise to detect radionuclides and/or associated chemical releases from SSCs of existing NPPs and (2) review and provide comments on the results of the NRC/NRR staff scoping study to identify candidate technologies. This report constitutes the ANL deliverable of the task-4 study. It covers a survey of sensor technologies and leak detection methods currently applied to leak monitoring at NPPs. The survey also provides a technology evaluation that identifies their strength and deficiency based on their detection speed, sensitivity, range and reliability. Emerging advanced technologies that are potentially capable of locating releases, identifying the radionuclides, and estimating their concentrations and distributions are also included in the report along with suggestions of required further research and development.

Sheen, S. H. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

NRC drug-free workplace plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

On September 15, 1986, President Reagan signed Executive Order 12564, establishing the goal of a Drug-Free Federal Workplace. The Order made it a condition of employment that all Federal employees refrain from using illegal drugs on or off duty. On July 11, 1987, Congress passed legislation affecting implementation of the Executive Order under Section 503 of the Supplemental Appropriations Act of 1987, Public Law 100-71 (the Act). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission first issued the NRC Drug Testing Plan to set forth objectives, policies, procedures, and implementation guidelines to achieve a drug-free Federal workplace, consistent with the Executive Order and Section 503 of the Act. Revision 1, titled, ``NRC Drug-Free Workplace Plan,`` supersedes the previous version and its supplements and incorporates changes to reflect current guidance from the Department of Justice, the Department of Health and Human Services, as well as other guidance.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Lens of Eye Dose Limit Changes: Current Status of the Potential Regulatory Changes and Possible Effects on Radiation Protection Programs at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research suggests that the threshold for cataract formation as a result of exposure to radiation could be lower than previously considered. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is now recommending a dose limit for the lens of the eye of an average of 20 mSv (2 rem) per year, equivalent to their current recommendation for Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering reducing the lens of the eye dose limit to 50 mSv/yr ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, May 1993. Volume 37, No. 5  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the issuances received during the specified period (May 1993) from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not deemed a part of these opinions or have any independent legal significance. Contents of this document include an Issuance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District and Issuances of Directors` Decisions concerning the Interstate Nuclear Service Corporation; Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; and Texas Utilities Electric Company, et al. and All Nuclear Power Plants with Thermo-Lag Fire Barriers.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Regulatory cross-cutting topics for fuel cycle facilities.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report overviews crosscutting regulatory topics for nuclear fuel cycle facilities for use in the Fuel Cycle Research&Development Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening study. In particular, the regulatory infrastructure and analysis capability is assessed for the following topical areas:Fire Regulations (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and/or International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fire regulations to advance fuel cycle facilities)Consequence Assessment (i.e., how applicable are current radionuclide transportation tools to support risk-informed regulations and Level 2 and/or 3 PRA) While not addressed in detail, the following regulatory topic is also discussed:Integrated Security, Safeguard and Safety Requirement (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations to future fuel cycle facilities which will likely be required to balance the sometimes conflicting Material Accountability, Security, and Safety requirements.)

Denman, Matthew R.; Brown, Jason; Goldmann, Andrew Scott; Louie, David

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995. Volume 42, Pages 1-258  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the 42nd volume of issuances of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, Administrative Law Judges, and Office Directors. This book is a reprinting, containing corrections of numerous printing errors in a previously distributed book. It covers the period from July 1, 1995 to December 31, 1995. Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards conduct adjudicatory hearings on applications to construct and operate nuclear power plants and related facilities, and issue initial decisions which, subject to internal review and appellate procedures, become the final Commission action with respect to those applications. The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a 6-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly editions and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency`s strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended.

Fuches, J.L.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

2010 NMMSS Users Training Meeting | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

was sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The main objectives of the 2010 Meeting were to build on the solid interaction and...

147

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances: February 1995. Volume 41, Number 2  

SciTech Connect

This book contains an issuance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and a Director`s Decision. The issuance concerns consideration by the Commission of appeals from both the Initial Decision and a Reconsideration Order issued by the Presiding Officer involving two materials license amendment applications filed by the University of Missouri. The Director`s Decision from the Office of Enforcement denies petitions filed by Northeast Utilities employees requesting that accelerated enforcement action be taken against Northeast Utilities for activities concerned with NU`s fitness-for-duty program.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The impact of NRC guidance on concentration averaging on low level waste sealed source disposal - 11424  

SciTech Connect

As part of its ongoing efforts to revise the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) current position on blending to be risk-informed and performance based and its current review of the low-level waste classification codified in 10 CFR 61.55, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has stated that it may review the 1995 'Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation' (BTP), which is still commonly used today. Such a review will have timely advantages, given the lack of commercial disposal availability within the United States for radioactive sealed sources that are in wide beneficial use across the country. The current application of the BTP guidance has resulted in an effective cap on commercial disposal for sources larger than 1.1 TBq (30 Ci). This paper will analyze how the BTP has been implemented with respect to sealed sources, what the implications have been for commercial disposal availability, and whether alternative packaging configurations could be considered for disposal.

Whitworth, Julia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stewart, Bill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuthbertson, Abigail [DOE

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, July 1996: Volume 44, No. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes the issuances received during this period from NRC, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2007 - 12:10pm Addthis The Entergy Corporation's Grand Gulf Site in Mississippi Receives NRC Approval for an ESP WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today...

151

Minutes from 12 December 2006 DOE/NRC Video Teleconference Call on Section 3116 Implementation Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12 December 2006 DOE/NRC Video Teleconference Call on Section 3116 12 December 2006 DOE/NRC Video Teleconference Call on Section 3116 Implementation Activities Attendees: Representatives from DOE-Savannah River (DOE-SR), DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) participated in a video teleconference call from 2:00 - 4:00 on 14 December 2006. A conference phone line was planned for other DOE field office participation (Idaho, West Valley, Office of River Protection), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA-IV), and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). However, technical difficulties prevented participation from all except SCDHEC. Discussion: The participants discussed prioritization of generic and specific technical issues to be resolved and a potential schedule for future meetings to discuss resolution

152

The future of nuclear power in the United States : economic and regulatory challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the economic and regulatory challenges that must be faced by potential investors in new nuclear power plants in the United States. The historical development of the existing fleet of over 100 nuclear ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, April 1995. Volume 41, Number 4  

SciTech Connect

This book contains issuances of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and an issuance of the Director`s decision. The issuances concern a petition filed by Dr. James E Bauer seeking interlocutory Commission review of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board`s order imposing several restrictions on Dr. Bauer; a denial of an Interveners` Petition for Review addressing the application of Babcock and Wilcox for a renewal of its Special Nuclear Materials License; granting a motion for a protective order, by Sequoyah Fuel Corporation and General Atomics, limiting the use of the protected information to those individuals participating in the litigation and for the purposes of the litigation only; granting a Petitioner`s petition for leave to intervene and request for a hearing concerning Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech Research Reactor) renewal of a facility license; and a denial of a petition filed by Mr. Ted Dougherty requesting a shutdown of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station based on concerns regarding the vulnerability of the plant to earthquakes and defensibility of the plant to a terrorist threat.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

SCE Response to NRC Questions Regarding SCE Request for Temporary Exemption from the Provisions of 10 CFR 50.46 and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter responds to two Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) questions that have been raised regarding the reference submittal. The Southern California Edison (SCE) response is provided after each question in the attachment to this letter. There are no new commitments contained in this letter.

A. Edward Scherer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A safety and regulatory assessment of generic BWR and PWR permanently shutdown nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The long-term availability of less expensive power and the increasing plant modification and maintenance costs have caused some utilities to re-examine the economics of nuclear power. As a result, several utilities have opted to permanently shutdown their plants. Each licensee of these permanently shutdown (PSD) plants has submitted plant-specific exemption requests for those regulations that they believe are no longer applicable to their facility. This report presents a regulatory assessment for generic BWR and PWR plants that have permanently ceased operation in support of NRC rulemaking activities in this area. After the reactor vessel is defueled, the traditional accident sequences that dominate the operating plant risk are no longer applicable. The remaining source of public risk is associated with the accidents that involve the spent fuel. Previous studies have indicated that complete spent fuel pool drainage is an accident of potential concern. Certain combinations of spent fuel storage configurations and decay times, could cause freshly discharged fuel assemblies to self heat to a temperature where the self sustained oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding may cause cladding failure. This study has defined four spent fuel configurations which encompass all of the anticipated spent fuel characteristics and storage modes following permanent shutdown. A representative accident sequence was chosen for each configuration. Consequence analyses were performed using these sequences to estimate onsite and boundary doses, population doses and economic costs. A list of candidate regulations was identified from a screening of 10 CFR Parts 0 to 199. The continued applicability of each regulation was assessed within the context of each spent fuel storage configuration and the results of the consequence analyses.

Travis, R.J.; Davis, R.E.; Grove, E.J.; Azarm, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Summary of Information Presented at an NRC-Sponsored Low-Power Shutdown Public Workshop, April 27, 1999, Rockville, Maryland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a public workshop that was held on April 27, 1999, in Rockville, Maryland. The workshop was conducted as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts to further develop its understanding of the risks associated with low power and shutdown operations at US nuclear power plants. A sufficient understanding of such risks is required to support decision-making for risk-informed regulation, in particular Regulatory Guide 1.174, and the development of a consensus standard. During the workshop the NRC staff discussed and requested feedback from the public (including representatives of the nuclear industry, state governments, consultants, private industry, and the media) on the risk associated with low-power and shutdown operations.

Wheeler, Timothy A.; Whitehead, Donnie W.; Lois, Erasmia

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC`s Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff`s current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff`s uses of PRA.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input. Comments relevant to the following two sections of the RFI: "Long Term Issues: Managing a Grid with High Penetration of New Technologies" and "Reliability and Cyber-Security," US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input More Documents & Publications Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Reply Comments of Entergy Services, Inc. Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and

159

ORNL Projects for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly management report for Fourth Quarter, FY 1983  

SciTech Connect

Cost and budget data are presented for the Division of Engineering Technology; Division of Accident Evaluation; Divison of Risk Analysis; Division of Facility Operations; and Division of Health, Siting and Waste Management.

Malinauskas, A.P.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Indexes to Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, January--March 1996  

SciTech Connect

This publication is the 1st quarter 1996 index to issuances by the US NRC. These include issuances by the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTE TO EDITORS: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received two reports from its independent Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. The attached reports, in the form of letters, comment on a proposed amendment to the NRC's rule on license renewal for nuclear power plants and a proposed revision to the decommissioning rule for nuclear power reactors. Attachments:

T. S. Kress

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Codes and standards and other guidance cited in regulatory documents. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed a listing of industry consensus codes and standards and other government and industry guidance referred to in regulatory documents. In addition to updating previous information, Revision 1 adds citations from the NRC Inspection Manual and the Improved Standard Technical Specifications. This listing identifies the version of the code or standard cited in the regulatory document, the regulatory document, and the current version of the code or standard. It also provides a summary characterization of the nature of the citation. This listing was developed from electronic searches of the Code of Federal Regulations and the NRC`s Bulletins, Information Notices, Circulars, Generic Letters, Policy Statements, Regulatory Guides, and the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800).

Ankrum, A.; Nickolaus, J.; Vinther, R.; Maguire-Moffitt, N.; Hammer, J.; Sherfey, L.; Warner, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC`s Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Peer Review of NRC Standardized Plant Analysis Risk Models  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Models underwent a Peer Review using ASME PRA standard (Addendum C) as endorsed by NRC in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.200. The review was performed by a mix of industry probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) experts and NRC PRA experts. Representative SPAR models, one PWR and one BWR, were reviewed against Capability Category I of the ASME PRA standard. Capability Category I was selected as the basis for review due to the specific uses/applications of the SPAR models. The BWR SPAR model was reviewed against 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements; however, based on the Capability Category I level of review and the absence of internal flooding and containment performance (LERF) logic only 216 requirements were determined to be applicable. Based on the review, the BWR SPAR model met 139 of the 216 supporting requirements. The review also generated 200 findings or suggestions. Of these 200 findings and suggestions 142 were findings and 58 were suggestions. The PWR SPAR model was also evaluated against the same 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements. Of these requirements only 215 were deemed appropriate for the review (for the same reason as noted for the BWR). The PWR review determined that 125 of the 215 supporting requirements met Capability Category I or greater. The review identified 101 findings or suggestions (76 findings and 25 suggestions). These findings or suggestions were developed to identify areas where SPAR models could be enhanced. A process to prioritize and incorporate the findings/suggestions supporting requirements into the SPAR models is being developed. The prioritization process focuses on those findings that will enhance the accuracy, completeness and usability of the SPAR models.

Anthony Koonce; James Knudsen; Robert Buell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission budget estimates Fiscal Year 1978. Appropriations: salaries and expenses  

SciTech Connect

Budget estimates are presented for: nuclear reactor regulation (NRR); Standards development (SD); Inspection and enforcement (IandE); Nuclear material safety and safeguards (NMSS); Nuclear regulatory research (RES); Program technical support (PTS); and Program direction and administration (PDA); Special supporting tables are included.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

September 10, 2003, Board Public Meeting Presentations - Lessons Learned from Nuclear Power Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DAVIS DAVIS - - BESSE REACTOR VESSEL HEAD DEGRADATION BESSE REACTOR VESSEL HEAD DEGRADATION LESSONS LEARNED TASK FORCE LESSONS LEARNED TASK FORCE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD PUBLIC MEETING PUBLIC MEETING September 10, 2003 September 10, 2003 Ed Hackett, Project Director Ed Hackett, Project Director Project Directorate II Project Directorate II Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission EMH1@NRC.GOV EMH1@NRC.GOV DAVIS DAVIS - - BESSE RACTOR VESSEL HEAD DEGRADATION BESSE RACTOR VESSEL HEAD DEGRADATION BACKGROUND BACKGROUND FEBRUARY, 2002 FEBRUARY, 2002 -

167

ALL AGREEMENT STATES OPPORTUNITY TO PROVIDE INPUT ON THE U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION’S MANUAL CHAPTER FOR THE MATERIALS INSPECTION PROGRAM- INSPECTION MANUAL CHAPTER 2800 (FSME-10-013)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide an opportunity for Agreement States to review and comment on recommended changes addressing the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) materials inspection program. This is an opportunity to provide input * on Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2800. Background: The last revision to Inspection Manual Chapter 2800 (IMC 2800) occurred in September 2005. Since that time, the NRC and Agreement States have implemented new security requirements. This revision provides inspection guidance in regards to some of the more urgent new security requirements, including changes from the Government Accountability Office action plan, as well as to update the previous version in regard to other, lower priority changes. This request supersedes letter RCPD-08-013 dated August 20, 2008, which requested a similar review of IMC 2800. This revision incorporates the comments received from Agreement States that responded to RCPD-08-013.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NRC policy on Economic Performance Incentives  

SciTech Connect

The recognition by the NRC of the potential negative impact on safe nuclear plant operations of an expanded role for state and local governments in the regulation of commercial nuclear power plants is particularly poignant in its July 1991 Policy Statement on Possible Safety Impacts of Economic Performance Incentives (the 1991 Policy Statement). The 1991 Policy Statement is concerned with financial incentives provided to utilities with nuclear plants by state public utility commissions, in their regulation of electric power rates, to reward or penalize the economic performance of nuclear plants. Section 271 of the Act allows for regulation of electric power rates by state governments, which prerogative section 274(k) affirms. However, the NRC is concerned that the direct regulation of electric power rates could result in the indirect regulation of the radiological aspects of nuclear plant operations and could compromise the safe operation of nuclear plants. The 1991 Policy Statement indicates the NRC will continue to monitor the use of economic performance incentives. Finally, it requests that state public utility commissions advise the NRC of their economic performance incentive programs and of the rewards and penalties provided thereunder.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Compilation for third quarter 1994, July--September. Volume 19, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issues by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC`s intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually. The main citations and abstracts in this compilation are listed in NUREG number order: NUREG-XXXX, NUREG/CP-XXXX, NUREG/CR-XXXX, and NUREG/IA-XXXX. These precede the following indexes: Secondary Report Number Index, Personal Author Index, Subject Index, NRC Originating Organization Index (Staff Reports), NRC Originating Organization Index (International Agreements), NRC Contract Sponsor Index (Contractor Reports) Contractor Index, International Organization Index, Licensed Facility Index. A detailed explanation of the entries precedes each index.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

THE NRC HAS ISSUED Ati ACTION PLAN FOR CLEANUP OF 46 SfTES that;;ece  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NRC HAS ISSUED Ati ACTION PLAN FOR CLEANUP OF 46 SfTES that;;ece NRC HAS ISSUED Ati ACTION PLAN FOR CLEANUP OF 46 SfTES that;;ece :: ~,: : ..,.... ..,:y... included in the agency' s Site Decommissioning Managem&t Pian (SDMP) in.1990. The ., ,.;' -,; ;.L..z,. sites are all radioactive materials handling facilities in various stages of decommission- ~' ... ,' . .-_.... ..,: ,,~ ..,. -c : -: ing; some of them are slill under active Nuclear Regulatory Commission licenses,~some .~. . . . . . ...i.~ ,;::,: ' :-&-:' . -1.: : ;: _ :: .,,. >.r"!.-<,z...;::.~ ? ~' .._ .' l...' -i:i -::;.. c : of them were under licenses that are now terminated, and some were never licensed~, ,~: ,.~. ~~.. .,_. .i ' . In the Action Plan, which was published in the April 16 Federal Register, the NRC says' ;; *_: ._.:, :-.~:i:r~'

171

Indexes to Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, July--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digests and indexes for issuances of the NRC, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking are presented in this document. These digests and indexes are intended to serve as a guide to the issuances. Information elements common to the cases heard and ruled upon are: (1) case name, (2) full text reference, (3) issuance number, (4) issued raised by appellants, (5) legal citations, (6) name of facility and Docket number, (7) subject matter, (8) type of hearing, and (9) type of issuance.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

NGNP Project Regulatory Gap Analysis for Modular HTGRs  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project Regulatory Gap Analysis (RGA) for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) was conducted to evaluate existing regulatory requirements and guidance against the design characteristics specific to a generic modular HTGR. This final report presents results and identifies regulatory gaps concerning current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing requirements that apply to the modular HTGR design concept. This report contains appendices that highlight important HTGR licensing issues that were found during the RGA study. The information contained in this report will be used to further efforts in reconciling HTGR-related gaps in the NRC licensing structure, which has to date largely focused on light water reactor technology.

Wayne Moe

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is At the local level, the NRC Regulatory Staff has acceptedcriteria, if appropriate, NRC criteria for land use andPopulation Center Distance NRC Density Criteria Emergency

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Codes and standards and other guidance cited in regulatory documents  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program (SRP-UDP), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a listing of industry consensus codes and standards and other government and industry guidance referred to in regulatory documents. The SRP-UDP has been completed and the SRP-Maintenance Program (SRP-MP) is now maintaining this listing. Besides updating previous information, Revision 3 adds approximately 80 citations. This listing identifies the version of the code or standard cited in the regulatory document, the regulatory document, and the current version of the code or standard. It also provides a summary characterization of the nature of the citation. This listing was developed from electronic searches of the Code of Federal Regulations and the NRC`s Bulletins, Information Notices, Circulars, Enforcement Manual, Generic Letters, Inspection Manual, Policy Statements, Regulatory Guides, Standard Technical Specifications and the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800).

Nickolaus, J.R.; Bohlander, K.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Extremely Low Probability of Rupture pilot study : xLPR framework model user's guide.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Extremely Low Probability of Rupture (xLPR) pilot study, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was tasked to develop and evaluate a probabilistic framework using a commercial software package for Version 1.0 of the xLPR Code. Version 1.0 of the xLPR code is focused assessing the probability of rupture due to primary water stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metal welds in pressurizer surge nozzles. Future versions of this framework will expand the capabilities to other cracking mechanisms, and other piping systems for both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The goal of the pilot study project is to plan the xLPR framework transition from Version 1.0 to Version 2.0; hence the initial Version 1.0 framework and code development will be used to define the requirements for Version 2.0. The software documented in this report has been developed and tested solely for this purpose. This framework and demonstration problem will be used to evaluate the commercial software's capabilities and applicability for use in creating the final version of the xLPR framework. This report details the design, system requirements, and the steps necessary to use the commercial-code based xLPR framework developed by SNL.

Kalinich, Donald A.; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Mattie, Patrick D.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Regulatory guidance document  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

NONE

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, June 1996. Volume 43, Number 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the issuances received during the specified period form the Commission, the Atomic Safety and licensing Boards, the administrative Law Judges, the Director`s decisions and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking. Included are a memorandum and order on the decommissioning plan for Yankee Nuclear Power Station, a memorandum and order suspending byproduct material license for Eastern Testing and Inspection, Inc., an initial decision of the source materials license for Sequoyah Fuels Corporation, Director`s decisions for Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Indian Point, Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Trojan Nuclear Plant, Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, and Yankee Nuclear Power Station.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Guide to NRC reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Compiled from requirements in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations as codified on December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This compilation includes in the first two sections the reporting and recordkeeping requirements applicable to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees and applicants and to members of the public. It includes those requirements codified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter I, on December 31, 1991. It also includes, in a separate section, any of those requirements that were superseded or discontinued from January through December 1991. Finally, the appendix lists mailing and delivery addresses for NRC Headquarters and Regional Offices mentioned in the compilation.

Collins, M.; Shelton, B.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Training Module for Cyber Security in Nuclear Plant Digital Modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants face increasing regulatory requirements from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for cyber security of digital devices, components, and systems. The focus of these cyber security requirements is to protect plant digital computer systems, communications systems, and networks from cyber attacks that would affect reactor safety or generation reliability. This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) computer-based training mod...

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Proceedings: A Guide for Intervenors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workers, 367 U.S. 396 (1961); Vermont Yankee, 435 U.S. 519;in two 2. See, e.g. , Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. v.1143 (8th Cir. 1971); and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp.

Hansell, Dean

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Understanding (MOU) between USACE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) dated July 5, 2001, and subject for interagency consultation if the decommissioning criteria at 10 CFR Section 20.1402 are determined, resulting from the disposal of radiologically contaminated waste from the nearby Apollo Nuclear Fuel

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

182

Financial and ratepayer impacts of nuclear power plant regulatory reform  

SciTech Connect

Three reports - ''The Future Market for Electric Generating Capacity,'' ''Quantitative Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Licensing Reform,'' and ''Nuclear Rate Increase Study'' are recent studies performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory that deal with nuclear power. This presents a short summary of these three studies. More detail is given in the reports.

Turpin, A.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Regulatory Review of Early Site Permit Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received and is reviewing three applications for early site permits (ESPs). The ESP process allows early resolution of site-related issues affecting possible construction and operation of a new nuclear power plant. The nuclear industry views a successful and predictable ESP process as an important step in assessing whether to seek authorization to construct and operate a new generation of nuclear power reactors in the United States. Because consideration of ESP applications is a first-of-a-kind activity, a number of issues have emerged prior to and during the reviews of the first three applications. Issues have included the need for design information at the ESP stage, accident analyses, quality assurance, and seismic analyses. The NRC has been working to resolve identified issues to support a Commission decision on whether to issue an ESP approximately 33-37 months after receipt of each ESP application. (authors)

Scott, Michael L. [Senior Project Manager, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

NRC LICENSE RENEWAL SCOPING/SCREENING INSPECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dear Mr. Nazar: On May 21, 2004, the NRC completed an inspection regarding the application for license renewal for the D. C Cook Nuclear Plant. The enclosed report documents the inspection results, which were discussed with members of your staff. The purpose of this inspection was an examination of activities that support the application for a renewed license for D. C. Cook. The inspection consisted of a selected examination of procedures and representative records, and interviews with personnel regarding the process of scoping and screening plant equipment to select equipment subject to an aging management review. The inspection concluded that the scoping and screening portion of license renewal activities was conducted as described in the License Renewal Application and that documentation supporting the application is in an auditable and retrievable form. With the exception of the items identified in this report, your scoping and screening process was successful in identifying those systems, structures, and components required to be considered for aging management. In accordance with 10 CFR 2.390 of the NRC’s "Rules of Practice, " a copy of this letter and its enclosure will be available electronically for public inspection in the NRC Public Document Room or from the Publicly Available Records (PARS) component of NRC’s document system (ADAMS). ADAMS is accessible from the NRC Web site at

Cynthia D. Pederson; M. Finissi; Plant Manager; G. White; Michigan Public; Service Commission

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Regulatory Performance Requirements for Safety-Related Instrumentation, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report proposes an acceptable methodology to apply to safety-related instrumentation to demonstrate 95% probability and 95% confidence (95/95) uncertainties in support of the requirements of Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.105 Revision 3. This methodology should serve as a means to specify testing and analysis requirements to instrumentation manufacturers and suppliers for their use in meeting the RG 1.105 Revision 3 95% probability and 95% confidence requirements. A ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

186

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION WAWINQTON, 0. C....  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WAWINQTON, 0. C. ZOSSS Hr. Ray Cooperstein Nuclear Environmental Department ,of Energy Germantown..Haryland fl Stop E-201 Dear Hr. Cooperstein: Application Branch ;;;osed please...

187

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Attn: Document Control Desk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blade Interference Customer Guidance”. In that letter GEH stated that: “This determination does not apply to BWR/6 or ABWR plants or the ABWR/ESBWR Design Control Document’s (DCD).” Subsequent to the issuance of the reference letter, the NRC requested additional information as to the basis of this statement with regard to the applicability of this issue to the ABWR/ESBWR Design Control Documents (DCD). The following provides supporting information to address the basis for this statement: Both the ABWR and ESBWR reactivity control systems incorporate a Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD) that is different than the Control Rod Drives supplied to the BWR/2-6. The scram pressure source is independent of RPV pressure thus the issues presented in the September 26, 2011 communication are not applicable to the ABWR or ESBWR design. The FMCRD provides hydraulicpowered rapid insertion (scram) of control rods during normal and abnormal operating conditions. The hydraulic power required for scram is provided by high pressure water stored in the individual Hydraulic Control Units (HCUs). Each HCU contains a scram accumulator charged to high pressure and the necessary valves and components to scram two FMCRDs. Upon scram valve actuation, high

Dale E. Porter; Castle Hayne Rd

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability(LWRS) Program conducts a vigorous engagement strategy with the U.S. nuclear power industry, including the nuclear operating companies, major support organizations, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and suppliers. The goal of this engagement strategy is to develop a shared vision and common understanding across the nuclear industry of the need for II&C modernization, the performance improvement that can be obtained, and the opportunities for collaboration to enact this vision. The primary means of engaging the nuclear operating companies is through a

190

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, Volume 44, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the issuances received in October 1996. Issuances are from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Directors` Decisions. 15 issuances were received and are abstracted individually in the database: Louisiana Energy Services, U.S. Enrichment Corporation, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation, James L. Shelton, Juan Guzman, Northern States Power Company, TESTCO Inc., Washington Public Power Supply System, all nuclear plants, Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Duke Power Company, Florida Power Corporation, and Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (2 issuances). No issuances were received from the the Administrative Law Judges or the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

PHYSICAL FIDELITY CONSIDERATIONS FOR NRC ADVANCED REACTOR CONTROL ROOM TRAINING SIMULATORS USED FOR INSPECTOR/EXAMINER TRAINING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes research into the physical fidelity requirements of control room simulators to train U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff for their duties as inspectors and license examiners for next-generation nuclear power plants. The control rooms of these power plants are expected to utilize digital instrumentation and controls to a much greater extent than do current plants. The NRC is assessing training facility needs, particularly for control room simulators, which play a central role in NRC training. Simulator fidelity affects both training effectiveness and cost. Research has shown high simulation fidelity sometimes positively affects transfer to the operational environment but sometimes makes no significant difference or actually impedes learning. The conditions in which these different effects occur are often unclear, especially for regulators (as opposed to operators) about whom research is particularly sparse. This project developed an inventory of the tasks and knowledges, skills, and abilities that NRC regulators need to fulfill job duties and used expert panels to characterize the inventory items by type and level of cognitive/behavioral capability needed, difficulty to perform, importance to safety, frequency of performance, and the importance of simulator training for learning these capabilities. A survey of current NRC staff provides information about the physical fidelity of the simulator on which the student trained to the control room to which the student was assigned and the effect lack of fidelity had on learning and job performance. The study concludes that a high level of physical fidelity is not required for effective training of NRC staff.

Branch, Kristi M.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Miller, Mark; Cochrum, Steven

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Developing a Regulatory Framework Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 10-12, 2011 Denver, Colorado Earl Easton Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Outline * Current Regulatory Framework * Future Regulatory Needs * Technical Basis (with some examples) * Path Forward 2 Current NRC Regulatory Framework for Storage * Renewable Term Licenses * Aging Management Plan - Time-limited aging analyses - Design for prevention - Monitoring - how, how often, in-situ - Maintenance - what type - Corrective Actions - when 3 Dry Cask Storage * 63 licensed ISFSIs (8 more than 2010) * Expect 10 sites pursuing General License * Over 1400 loaded storage casks 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Number of ISFSIs Year Specific Licensees

193

NRC Reviewer Aid for Evaluating the Human Factors Engineering Aspects of Small Modular Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Small modular reactors (SMRs) are a promising approach to meeting future energy needs. Although the electrical output of an individual SMR is relatively small compared to that of typical commercial nuclear plants, they can be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands. Furthermore, SMRs can be used for other purposes, such as producing hydrogen and generating process heat. The design characteristics of many SMRs differ from those of current conventional plants and may require a distinct concept of operations (ConOps). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted research to examine the human factors engineering (HFE) and the operational aspects of SMRs. The research identified thirty potential human-performance issues that should be considered in the NRC's reviews of SMR designs and in future research activities. The purpose of this report is to support NRC HFE reviewers of SMR applications by identifying some of the questions that can be asked of applicants whose designs have characteristics identified in the issues. The questions for each issue were identified and organized based on the review elements and guidance contained in Chapter 18 of the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), and the Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711).

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.C.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

Design, Operation, and Performance Data for High Burnup PWR Fuel from the H. B. Robinson Plant for Use in the NRC Experimental Progr am at Argonne National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the background information -- design, irradiation history, and performance data -- for twelve high-burnup pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods that are being provided to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for use in experiments designed to study the response of highly irradiated fuel to transient accidents and long-term storage conditions. This information will establish the starting conditions needed to correctly interpret future experimental results.

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nuclear Power: A Price Worth Paying For A Stable Climate? Will Cavendish & Robert Gross  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. For a major chemical company, the CNWRA used trans- port analysis and dose techni- cal assistance and research to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Its initial focus was on work needed to license a potential geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high

196

AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and Investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through December 31, 1988.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Technical Guideline for Cyber Security Requirements and Life Cycle Implementation Guidelines for Nuclear Plant Digital Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants face increasing regulatory requirements from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for cyber security of digital devices, components, and systems. The focus of these cyber security requirements is to protect plant digital computer systems, communications systems, and networks from cyber attacks that would affect reactor safety or generation reliability. This EPRI guideline document provides technical guidance for addressing c...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

199

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances. Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders: July 1, 1992--December 31, 1992, Volume 36, Pages 1--396  

SciTech Connect

This is the thirty-sixth volume of issuances (1-396) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, Administrative Law Judges, and Office Directors. It covers the period from July 1, 1992-December 31, 1992. Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards are authorized by Section 191 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. These Boards, comprised of three members conduct adjudicatory hearings on applications to construct and operate nuclear power plants and related facilities and issue initial decisions which, subject to internal review and appellate procedures, become the final Commission action with respect to those applications. Boards are drawn from the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, comprised of lawyers, nuclear physicists and engineers, environmentalists, chemists, and economists. The Atomic Energy Commission first established Licensing Boards in 1962 and the Panel in 1967.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 3 contains copies of two reports that document the DOE/ORO regulatory oversight inspection and enforcement history for each gaseous diffusion plant site. Each report provides a formal mechanism by which DOE/ORO could communicate the inspection and enforcement history to NRC. The reports encompass the inspection activities that occurred during July 1, 1993 through March 2, 1997.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

September 10, 2003, Board Public Meeting - Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Davis-Besse Lessons Learned  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 I 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 101 inspector to a senior, and then they'll move to another facility, but seven years is the maximum, and that's written in our policy. CHAIRMAN CONWAY: Thank you. Dr. Hackett. DR. HACKETT: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I have a different challenge today, which is to try and help walk you through a story that's very important to us in the nuclear industry. In general, it dovetails with what Russ and Cindy had been talking about. The thing I'll add on this slide is that during the timeframe from May to October 2002, I was Assistant Team Leader for the NRC's Davis-Besse Lessons Learned Task Force. That's the role in which I'll be presenting this information to you. As you've been doing, I think I found that these work most

202

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances. Volume 44, Number 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes issuances received during September 1996. After reviewing in detail each of the claims made in this informal proceeding the presiding officer sustained the staff of the USNRC in its determination that the applicant did not pass the written portion of his examination to become a licensed operator of a nuclear power plant. In the proceeding concerning citizen group challenges to the decommissioning plan for the Rowe Yankee power station, the licensing board grants licensee Yankee Atomic Electric Company`s motion for summary disposition.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Detroit Edison Comments on NRC Guidance for Operability Determinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) in the preparation of industry comments on the draft revision to NRC Manual Chapter 9900. Detroit Edison appreciates the efforts by NRC staff to update and clarify the guidance for operability determinations and the opportunity to provide comments prior to final issuance. Detroit Edison concurs with the specific comments on the referenced Federal Register notice provided by NEI and the associated recommendation that the NRC continue public dialogue on this topic. Should you have any questions or require additional information, please contact me at (734) 586-4258. Sincerely, Norman K. Peterson

Detroit Edison; Washington D C; Detroit Edison; Has Participated

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

On July 1, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the RO program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These activities were performed under the authority of the lease agreement between DOE and USEC until NRC issued a Certificate of Compliance or approved a Compliance Plan pursuant to Section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and assumed regulatory responsibility. This report chronicles the formal development, operation and key activities of the RO organization from its beginning in July 1993, until the turnover of the regulatory oversight responsibility to the NRC on March 3, 1997. Through its evolution to closure, the RO program was a formal, proceduralized effort designed to provide consistent regulation and to facilitate transition to NRC. The RO Program was also a first-of-a-kind program for DOE. The process, experience, and lessons learned summarized herein should be useful as a model for transition of other DOE facilities to privatization or external regulation.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Assistance Reviews | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 14, 2002 August 14, 2002 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Fluor Hanford, Incorporated - EA-2002-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Fluor Hanford, Incorporated, related to Quality Assurance issues at the Hanford Site. June 19, 2002 Enforcement Letter, Kaiser-Hill Company, L.L.C. - June 19, 2002 Enforcement Letter issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC related to Unplanned Radioactive Material Uptakes at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site October 22, 2001 Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 Special Report Order issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Multiple Nuclear Safety Issues at the Hanford Site October 9, 2001 Enforcement Letter, LANL - October 9, 2001 Enforcement Letter issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory related to

206

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Assistance Reviews | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 22, 2013 July 22, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-03 Issued to Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC related to Programmatic Deficiencies in the Software Quality Assurance Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory February 12, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-02 Issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC related to a Radiological Contamination Event at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 7, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-01 Issued to B&W Pantex, LLC related to the Conduct of Nuclear Explosive Operations at the Pantex Plant October 23, 2012 Enforcement Letter, Controlled Power Company - WEL-2012-02 Enforcement Letter issued to Controlled Power Company related to an Electrical Shock Near Miss that occurred in the Radiological Laboratory

207

ASSURING THE AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS FOR DECOMMISSIONING NUCLEAR REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This regulatory guide is being issued in draft form to involve the public in the early stages of the development of a regulatory position in this area. It has not received complete staff review or approval and does not represent an official NRC staff position. Public comments are being solicited on this draft guide (including any implementation schedule) and its associated regulatory analysis or value/impact statement. Comments should be accompanied by appropriate supporting data. Written comments may be submitted to the Rules and Directives Branch, Office of Administration, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001. Comments may be submitted electronically or downloaded through the NRC’s interactive web site at through Rulemaking. Copies of comments received may be examined at the NRC Public

Contact B. J. Richter; B. Discussion

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Probabilistic cost-benefit analysis of enhanced safety features for strategic nuclear weapons at a representative location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carried out a demonstration analysis of the value of developing and implementing enhanced safety features for nuclear weapons in the US stockpile. We modified an approach that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed in response to a congressional directive that NRC assess the ``value-impact`` of regulatory actions for commercial nuclear power plants. Because improving weapon safety shares some basic objectives with NRC regulations, i.e., protecting public health and safety from the effects of accidents involving radioactive materials, we believe the NRC approach to be appropriate for evaluating weapons-safety cost-benefit issues. Impact analysis includes not only direct costs associated with retrofitting the weapon system, but also the expected costs (or economic risks) that are avoided by the action, i.e., the benefits.

Stephens, D.R.; Hall, C.H.; Holman, G.S.; Graham, K.F.; Harvey, T.F.; Serduke, F.J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a movement to introduce risk-informed and performance-based (RI/PB) analyses into fire protection engineering practice, both domestically and worldwide.  This movement exists in both the general fire protection and the nuclear power plant (NPP) fire protection communities.  The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has used risk-informed insights as a part of its regulatory decision making since the 1990s.In 2001, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 2. Evaluation of seismic designs: a review of seismic design requirements for Nuclear Power Plant Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the position and recommendations of the NRC Piping Review Committee, Task Group on Seismic Design. The Task Group considered overlapping conservation in the various steps of seismic design, the effects of using two levels of earthquake as a design criterion, and current industry practices. Issues such as damping values, spectra modification, multiple response spectra methods, nozzle and support design, design margins, inelastic piping response, and the use of snubbers are addressed. Effects of current regulatory requirements for piping design are evaluated, and recommendations for immediate licensing action, changes in existing requirements, and research programs are presented. Additional background information and suggestions given by consultants are also presented.

Not Available

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Physical Inventory Listing NRC 742c2  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9. TOTALS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING DOENRC FORM 742C (7-2008) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30,...

212

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances: Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders. Progress report, January 1, 1996--June 30, 1996. Volume 43, pages 1-358  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all legal precedents for the agency within a six month period. This is the forty-third volume of issuances.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Licensing Assistance team U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Region 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division of Nuclear Materials Safety 09 / z-4 (p7- 317,7p-4) The enclosed application for Material License and one copy is being submitted for the purpose of obtaining a specific license from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission to obtain two cross belt analyzers. The analyzers would be utilized at the Appalachian Power Company’s John E. Amos Plant in West Virginia. The Appalachian Power Company and the John E. Amos Plant are included in American Electric Power. If I can be of any further assistance please give me a call at my office telephone number

John E. Amos Plant; R. T. Carroll F; Cc Greg; Massey John; E. Amos Plant; Joe Beer; Corporate Radiation; Safety Officer Donald; C. Cook Plant

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Regulatory cross-cutting topics for fuel cycle facilities.  

SciTech Connect

This report overviews crosscutting regulatory topics for nuclear fuel cycle facilities for use in the Fuel Cycle Research&Development Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening study. In particular, the regulatory infrastructure and analysis capability is assessed for the following topical areas:Fire Regulations (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and/or International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fire regulations to advance fuel cycle facilities)Consequence Assessment (i.e., how applicable are current radionuclide transportation tools to support risk-informed regulations and Level 2 and/or 3 PRA) While not addressed in detail, the following regulatory topic is also discussed:Integrated Security, Safeguard and Safety Requirement (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations to future fuel cycle facilities which will likely be required to balance the sometimes conflicting Material Accountability, Security, and Safety requirements.)

Denman, Matthew R.; Brown, Jason; Goldmann, Andrew Scott; Louie, David

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-99SF21902, Am. M004) Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Research under this project addresses the barriers to long term use of nuclear-generated electricity in the United States. It was agreed that a very basic and significant change to the current method of design and regulation was needed. That is, it was believed that the cost reduction goal could not be met by fixing the current system (i.e., an evolutionary approach) and a new, more advanced approach for this project would be needed. It is believed that a completely new design and regulatory process would have to be developed--a ''clean sheet of paper'' approach. This new approach would start with risk-based methods, would establish probabilistic design criteria, and would implement defense-in-depth only when necessary (1) to meet public policy issues (e.g., use of a containment building no matter how low the probability of a large release is) and (2) to address uncertainties in probabilistic methods and equipment performance. This new approach is significantly different from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) current risk-informed program for operating plants. For our new approach, risk-based methods are the primary means for assuring plant safety, whereas in the NRC's current approach, defense-in-depth remains the primary means of assuring safety. The primary accomplishments in the first year--Phase 1 were (1) the establishment of a new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework, (2) the establishment of the preliminary version of the new, highly risk-informed design process, (3) core damage frequency predictions showing that, based on new, lower pipe rupture probabilities, the design of the emergency core cooling system equipment can be simplified without reducing plant safety, and (4) the initial development of methods for including uncertainties in a new integrated structures-systems design model. Under the new regulatory framework, options for the use of ''design basis accidents'' were evaluated. It is expected that design basis accidents would be an inherent part of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment for the plant and their evaluation would be probabilistic. Other first year accomplishments include (1) the conversion of an NRC database for cross-referencing NRC criteria and industry codes and standards to Microsoft 2000 software, (2) an assessment of the NRC's hearing process which concluded that the normal cross-examination during public hearings is not actually required by the U.S. Administrative Procedures Act, (3) the identification and listing of reliability data sources, and (4) interfacing with other industry groups (e.g., NEI and IAEA) and NRC at workshops for risk-informing regulations. The major accomplishments during the second year consisted of (1) issuance of the final report for Subtask 1.1, ''Identify Current Applicable Regulatory Requirements [and Industry Standards],'' (2) issuance of the final report for Subtask 1.2,'' Identify Structures, Systems, and Components and Their Associate d Costs for a Typical Plant,'' (3) extension of the new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework to non-light-water-reactor technology, (4) completion of more detailed thermal-hydraulic and probabilistic analyses of advanced conceptual reactor system/component designs, (6) initial evaluation and recommendations for improvement of the NRC design review process, and (7) initial development of the software format, procedures and statistical routines needed to store, analyze and retrieve the available reliability data. Final reports for Subtasks 1.1 (regulatory and design criteria) and 1.2 (costs for structures, systems, and components) were prepared and issued. A final report for Subtask 1.3 (Regulatory Framework) was drafted with the aim to issue it in Phase 3 (Year 3). One technical report was produced for Subtask 1.4 (methods development) and two technical reports were produced for Subtask 1.6 (sample problem analysis). An interim report on the NRC design review process (Subtask 1.7) was prepared and issued. Finally, a report on Subtask 2.2 (database weaknesses) addressed the i

Stanley E. Ritterbusch, et. al.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering renewal of the operating licenses for the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (HNP) for a period of an additional 20 years. The purpose of this assessment is to provide information to the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service concerning the impacts of continued operation of the HNP on the shortnose sturgeon, Acipenser brevirostrum. The

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Project Plan. The Project Plan is intended to provide the high-level direction that documents the required software activities to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Carl Wharton; Kent Norris

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an evaluation of the Project Plan. The Project Plan is intended to provide the high-level direction that documents the required software activities to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Carl Wharton; Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Project Plan. The Project Plan is intended to provide the high-level direction that documents the required software activities to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Carl Wharton

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements. Revision 18  

SciTech Connect

This document (NUREG-0325) is the current US NRC organization chart, listing all NRC offices and regions and their components down through the branch level as of July 23, 1995. Functional statements of each position are given, as is the name of the individual holding the position.

NONE

1995-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CANDU reactors, their regulation in Canada, and the identification of relevant NRC safety issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) and its subsidiary in the US, are considering submitting the CANDU 3 design for standard design certification under 10 CFR Part 52. CANDU reactors are pressurized heavy water power reactors. They have some substantially different safety responses and safety systems than the LWRs that the commercial power reactor licensing regulations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been developed to deal with. In this report, the authors discuss the basic design characteristics of CANDU reactors, specifically of the CANDU 3 where possible, and some safety-related consequences of these characteristics. The authors also discuss the Canadian regulatory provisions, and the CANDU safety systems that have evolved to satisfy the Canadian regulatory requirements as of December 1992. Finally, the authors identify NRC regulations, mainly in 10 CFR Parts 50 and 100, with issues for CANDU 3 reactor designs. In all, eleven such regulatory issues are identified. They are: (1) the ATWS rule ({section}50.62); (2) station blackout ({section}50.63); (3) conformance with Standard Review Plan (SRP); (4) appropriateness of the source term ({section}50.34(f) and {section}100.11); (5) applicability of reactor coolant pressure boundary (RCPB) requirements ({section}50.55a, etc); (6) ECCS acceptance criteria ({section}50.46)(b); (7) combustible gas control ({section}50.44, etc); (8) power coefficient of reactivity (GDC 11); (9) seismic design (Part 100); (10) environmental impacts of the fuel cycle ({section}51.51); and (11) (standards {section}50.55a).

Charak, I.; Kier, P.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Reviewing Consensus HFE Standards for NRC Use: A Case Study using the IEEE Standard for Computerized Operating Procedure Systems  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) endorsement of consensus standards provides a cost-effective means of enhancing the staff’s ability to review state-of-the-art designs. Although the NRC endorsed consensus standards in many technical disciplines, it yet has to do so in human factors engineering (HFE). The purpose of our study was to develop a standardized methodology whereby to evaluate a consensus HFE standard to determine its appropriateness to, and adequacy for using in licensing reviews. The high-level objective of the methodology is to ensure that the guidance meets the NRC’s requirements on scientific- and engineering-rigor that they use in developing their own guidance. We propose four criteria for endorsing a consensus standard: (1) It should meet an existing need for NRC’s licensing and safety reviews; (2) it should be based on sound HFE principles; (3) it should be thoroughly peer-reviewed; and, (4) it should address human performance issues identified in the literature. Our methodology offers a means to assess these four criteria. We used it to evaluate an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ (IEEE) draft standard on computerized operating procedure systems. We concluded that the IEEE standard generally met the established criteria, although several areas were identified that needed further clarification. Our evaluation methodology particularly was useful for identifying issues to be resolved, and for providing a basis for judging whether the staff should consider endorsing the standard. The methodology also helped recognize criteria in the proposed standard that may benefit from additional scrutiny by the staff. The evaluation methodology developed is applicable generally to reviewing other HFE standards that the NRC is considering for use or endorsement.

OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Xing, J., Fleger S. - NRC

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

NRC requests another round of modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes a number issues and events in the commercial nuclear power industry during this reporting period. Included are items on: (1) Issuance of NRC Bulletin 96-03 requesting modifications to BWR emergency core cooling systems, (2) Augmented inspection team to investigate a reactor trip/steam generator boil-off event at ANO-1, (3) Overall performance improvement at Dresden Station, (4) FSAR violations during refueling at a number of facilities in which the core is fully off-loaded, (5) Safety assessment at Maine Yankee, (6) Startup of Watts Bar-1, and (6) Cooling tower fire at Brown`s Ferry.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Plant Support Engineering: Aging Management Program Guidance for Medium- Voltage Cable Systems for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory and management concern regarding the reliability of medium-voltage cable systems at nuclear plants has been increasing for 5–10 years. The staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are concerned that wetted (up to and including submergence) medium-voltage cable circuits may be degrading to the point at which multiple cable circuits may fail when called on to perform functions affecting safety. Utility managers are concerned that cables may fail, causing adverse safety consequences ...

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

225

Guide to Assessing Radiological Elements for License Termination of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance in the preparation of a License Termination Plan (LTP) to utilities engaged in nuclear plant decommissioning. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires utilities to submit the LTP document years prior to the site license termination. This report focuses on the radiological components of the LTP. It identifies and addresses the regulatory requirements of each element in a way useful to the utility end user.

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

226

EPRI/NRC-RES fire human reliability analysis guidelines.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1990s, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed methods for fire risk analysis to support its utility members in the preparation of responses to Generic Letter 88-20, Supplement 4, 'Individual Plant Examination - External Events' (IPEEE). This effort produced a Fire Risk Assessment methodology for operations at power that was used by the majority of U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs) in support of the IPEEE program and several NPPs overseas. Although these methods were acceptable for accomplishing the objectives of the IPEEE, EPRI and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recognized that they required upgrades to support current requirements for risk-informed, performance-based (RI/PB) applications. In 2001, EPRI and the USNRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) embarked on a cooperative project to improve the state-of-the-art in fire risk assessment to support a new risk-informed environment in fire protection. This project produced a consensus document, NUREG/CR-6850 (EPRI 1011989), entitled 'Fire PRA Methodology for Nuclear Power Facilities' which addressed fire risk for at power operations. NUREG/CR-6850 developed high level guidance on the process for identification and inclusion of human failure events (HFEs) into the fire PRA (FPRA), and a methodology for assigning quantitative screening values to these HFEs. It outlined the initial considerations of performance shaping factors (PSFs) and related fire effects that may need to be addressed in developing best-estimate human error probabilities (HEPs). However, NUREG/CR-6850 did not describe a methodology to develop best-estimate HEPs given the PSFs and the fire-related effects. In 2007, EPRI and RES embarked on another cooperative project to develop explicit guidance for estimating HEPs for human failure events under fire generated conditions, building upon existing human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This document provides a methodology and guidance for conducting a fire HRA. This process includes identification and definition of post-fire human failure events, qualitative analysis, quantification, recovery, dependency, and uncertainty. This document provides three approaches to quantification: screening, scoping, and detailed HRA. Screening is based on the guidance in NUREG/CR-6850, with some additional guidance for scenarios with long time windows. Scoping is a new approach to quantification developed specifically to support the iterative nature of fire PRA quantification. Scoping is intended to provide less conservative HEPs than screening, but requires fewer resources than a detailed HRA analysis. For detailed HRA quantification, guidance has been developed on how to apply existing methods to assess post-fire fire HEPs.

Lewis, Stuart R. (Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC); Cooper, Susan E. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD); Najafi, Bijan (SAIC, Campbell, CA); Collins, Erin (SAIC, Campbell, CA); Hannaman, Bill (SAIC, Campbell, CA); Kohlhepp, Kaydee (Scientech, Tukwila, WA); Grobbelaar, Jan (Scientech, Tukwila, WA); Hill, Kendra (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD); Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt; Forester, John Alan; Julius, Jeff (Scientech, Tukwila, WA)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference Events in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a study and analysis of reported electromagnetic interference (EMI-) related incidents in nuclear power plants. These incidents were gathered primarily from the total body of incidents reported to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) database, with a few incidents coming from U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reports. This report analyzes trends and common factors in these events. The analysis is intended to inform the estimation of risk from EMI and offer suggesti...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

228

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the United States Department Of Energy Public Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 The UNITED STATES 3 NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION and 4 the UNITED STATES 5 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 6 7 PUBLIC MEETING 8 9 DISCUSSION OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SECTION 3116 OF 10 THE NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT 11 12 Commencing at 9:10 a.m., November 16, 2006 13 at the L'Enfant Plaza Hotel 14 480 L'Enfant Plaza, SW 15 Washington DC 20024 16 17 Public meeting organized by: 18 Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. 19 20010 Century Boulevard, Suite 500 20 Germantown, Maryland 20874 21 (301) 972-4430 22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 2 P R O C E E D I N G S MR. CAMERON: Good morning everyone. My name is Chip Cameron. I'm an assistant general counsel in the office of General Counsel at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. And I would like to

229

Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Combined  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Combined Construction & Operating License Application to the NRC Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Combined Construction & Operating License Application to the NRC November 28, 2007 - 4:45pm Addthis RICHMOND, VA - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dennis Spurgeon today commended Dominion North Anna, LLC (Dominion) for submission of a combined Construction and Operating License (COL) application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction of a new nuclear power plant in the United States. Dominion's application seeks approval to build and operate one General Electric-Hitachi Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) at its

230

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommenda...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy:...

231

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a com- munity. NAS-NRC: National Academy of Sciences -Regulatory Guide (NRC) - Safety Analysis Report - UnitedICRU LET LWR MPBB MPC NCRP NRC PAG PWR RBE RG SAR UNSCEAR

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Plant Engineering, Aging Management Program Guidance for Medium-Voltage Cable Systems for Nuclear Power Plants, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared in response to regulatory and management concern regarding the reliability of medium-voltage cable systems at nuclear plants. The staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been concerned that wetted (up to and including submergence) medium-voltage cable circuits may be degrading to the point at which multiple cable circuits may fail when called on to perform functions affecting safety. A utility manager’s concern is that cables may fail, causing ...

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

233

Cooperative Project on Burnup Credit -- Data and Analysis for Spent Nuclear Fuel Transport and Storage in Burnup Credit Casks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past two years, the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE/RW), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (NRC/RES) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have pursued a coordinated project having as its objective to develop and/or obtain the scientific and technical information necessary to support preparation and review of a safety evaluation for cask designs that use full (actinide and fission product) burnup credit...

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Confirmatory Order (NRC Inspection Report 030-03732/2008 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is the holder of Nuclear Regulatory Commission ... failure to have a radiation safety program sufficient ... occupational doses and doses to members of ...

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

235

Regulatory Reform and License Termination Planning in Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) must be safe and cost-effective and consider the needs of a wide range of stakeholders. The creative tension among these objectives has provided opportunities to reform the way these plants are regulated and managed in decommissioning. Enlightened and visionary leaders from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry are seizing these opportunities to create new paradigms for risk-informed regulation; creative stakeholder involvement; and effective, end-state focused, license termination planning.

Michael J. Meisner

2000-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

236

ARM - Campaign Instrument - nrc-convair580  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Send Campaign Instrument : National Research Council - Canada CONVAIR 580 (NRC-CONVAIR580) Instrument Categories Airborne Observations Campaigns Indirect and...

237

NRC Docket No. 50-254  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is to inform the NRC that Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, will be deferring the examination of thirty-three weld overlays. In accordance with Quad Cities Generic Letter (GL) 88-01 Program, "NRC Position on IGSCC in BWR Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping, " these overlays would have been scheduled for examination during the next refueling outage scheduled for October 2000. These inspections are being deferred in accordance with Reference 1, which provides interim guidance pending approval of the Boiling Water Reactor Vessels and Internals Project (BWRVIP) EPRI Report TR-1 10172, 'Technical Justification for the Extension of the Interval Between Inspections of Weld Overlay Repair." Reference 1 grants deferral of inspections to those weld overlays that meet the criteria stated below. 1. The plant is operated in compliance with the EPRI water chemistry guidelines, 2. The overlay for which deferral is applied meets GL 88-01 or ASME Code Case N-504 (full structural overlay) as opposed to a temporary duty (leakage barrier) overlay, and AI ( nc1(1)011 paip ý

Th Avenuc North

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Chief Nuclear Officer of Maine Yankee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company ("CY"), and Yankee Atomic Electric Company ("YR") (each a "Yankee Company," and together, "the Yankee Companies"), hereby respond to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission ("NRC") Third Request for Additional Information for Application for NRC Consent to Indirect License Transfer/Threshold Determination (TAC Nos. L24496, L24497, and L24498) ("RAI 3") received by the Yankee Companies on August 5, 2011. If you have questions or require additional information, please contact me or Joe Fay at (207) 350-0300. Sincerely, Wayne Norton

The Yankee Companies

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

September 10, 2003, Board Public Meeting - Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approach to Oversight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 25 63 carefully, also. In fact, I would like to put in the r e c o r d at this point a letter that the Board sent to Admiral Bowman complimenting him on those reports , because we find them very helpful. Thank you. Any other questions? DR. MANSFIELD: I second that: especially the radiological safety reports and environmental reports. CHAIFWAN CONWAY: Yes , very important , and we thank you. We thank you for your assistance here today . Thank you very much. Now we have the experienced representatives from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Ms. Cynthia Carpenter and Dr. Edwin Hackett. If you would each introduce yourselves for the record. MS. CARPENTER: Good morning. My name is Cynthia Carpenter. I'm the Deputy Director of the Division of Inspection Program Management from the

240

Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

:14 :14 Report number: 2013:14 ISSN: 2000-0456 Available at www.stralsakerhetsmyndigheten.se Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries Evaluation for Regulatory Input Robert A. Meck Author: SSM perspektiv SSM har nyligen beslutat om föreskrifter om friklassning av material, loka- ler, byggnader och mark vid verksamhet med joniserande strålning (SSMFS 201 1:2). Föreskrifterna innehåller bland annat krav på att tillståndshavare, vid avveckling av verksamhet med joniserande strålning, ska vidta åtgärder som möjliggör friklassning av lokaler, byggnader och mark. Föreskrifterna innehåller nuklidspecifika friklassningsnivåer i becquerel per m2 för lokaler och byggnader men ger ingen upplysning om vilka friklassningsnivåer som

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241

Vital area identification for U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear power reactor licensees and new reactor applicants.  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear power plant licensees and new reactor applicants are required to provide protection of their plants against radiological sabotage, including the placement of vital equipment in vital areas. This document describes a systematic process for the identification of the minimum set of areas that must be designated as vital areas in order to ensure that all radiological sabotage scenarios are prevented. Vital area identification involves the use of logic models to systematically identify all of the malicious acts or combinations of malicious acts that could lead to radiological sabotage. The models available in the plant probabilistic risk assessment and other safety analyses provide a great deal of the information and basic model structure needed for the sabotage logic model. Once the sabotage logic model is developed, the events (or malicious acts) in the model are replaced with the areas in which the events can be accomplished. This sabotage area logic model is then analyzed to identify the target sets (combinations of areas the adversary must visit to cause radiological sabotage) and the candidate vital area sets (combinations of areas that must be protected against adversary access to prevent radiological sabotage). Any one of the candidate vital area sets can be selected for protection. Appropriate selection criteria will allow the licensee or new reactor applicant to minimize the impacts of vital area protection measures on plant safety, cost, operations, or other factors of concern.

Whitehead, Donnie Wayne; Varnado, G. Bruce

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Political Cycles of Rulemaking: An Empirical Portrait of the Modern Administrative State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), an independent agency,Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), OFHEO, PBGC, Securitiesthe EPA (100 direct final rules), NRC (26), Department of

O’Connell, Anne Joseph

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule  

SciTech Connect

Title 44 United States Code, Public Printing and Documents,'' regulations cited in the General Services Administration's (GSA) Federal Information Resources Management Regulations'' (FIRMR), Part 201-9, Creation, Maintenance, and Use of Records,'' and regulation issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter XII, Subchapter B, Records Management,'' require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA's General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 2, contains NRC's Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,'' and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 2 totally reorganizes the records schedules from a functional arrangement to an arrangement by the host office. A subject index and a conversion table have also been developed for the NRC schedules to allow staff to identify the new schedule numbers easily and to improve their ability to locate applicable schedules.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Progress in Nuclear Eneroy, Vol. 14, No. 2, pp. 165-196, 1984. 0149-1970/84 $0.00+.50 Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved. Copyright ~ 1984 Pergamon Press Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- dents, NRC, Doc.No NUREG/CR-6967 (2008). 12. D.D. Lanning, C.E. Beyer, and C.L. Painter, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NUREG CR-6534 (1997). 13. M.C.Billone,Y. Yan,T.Burtseva,andR.S. Daum,NRC, 2008. 14. A- sion, NUREG/CR-6742 (2001). 51. R. Meyer, R.K. McCardell, and H.H. Scott, International Topical Meeting

Pázsit, Imre

245

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Risk Management Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an evaluation of the risk management. Risk management is intended to ensure a methodology for conducting risk management planning, identification, analysis, responses, and monitoring and control activities associated with the SAPHIRE project work, and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kent Norris

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Two Approaches to Reactor Decommissioning: 10 CFR Part 50 License Termination and License Amendment, Lessons Learned from the Regulatory Perspective  

SciTech Connect

Trojan Nuclear Plant (Trojan) and Maine Yankee Nuclear Plant (Maine Yankee) were the first two power reactors to complete decommissioning under the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) License Termination Rule (LTR), 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. The respective owners' decisions to decommission the sites resulted in different approaches to both the physical aspects of the decommissioning, and the approach for obtaining approval for completing the decommissioning in accordance with regulations. Being in different States, the two single-unit pressurized water reactor sites had different State requirements and levels of public interest that impacted the decommissioning approaches. This resulted in significant differences in decommissioning planning, conduct of decommissioning operations, volumes of low- level radioactive waste disposed, and the final status survey (FSS) program. While both licensees have Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSIs), Trojan obtained a separate license for the ISFSI in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 72 and terminated their 10 CFR Part 50 license. Maine Yankee elected to obtain a general license under 10 CFR Part 50 for the ISFSI and reduce the physical site footprint to the ISFSI through a series of license amendments. While the NRC regulations are flexible and allow different approaches to ISFSI licensing there are separate licensing requirements that must be addressed. In 10 CFR 50.82, the NRC mandates public participation in the decommissioning process. For Maine Yankee, public input resulted in the licensee entering into an agreement with a concerned citizen group and resulted in State legislation that significantly lowered the dose limit below the NRC radiological criteria of 25 mrem (0.25 mSv) per year (yr) in 10 CFR 20.1402 for unrestricted use. The lowering of the radiological criteria resulted in a significant dose modeling effort using site-specific Derived Concentrations Guideline Levels (DCGLs) that were well below the NRC DCGL screening values. This contributed to a longer than anticipated period to obtain NRC approval of the Maine Yankee License Termination Plan (LTP). By employing the lessons learned from its first LTP submittal, which was not accepted by the NRC staff, Trojan was able to obtain approval of its revised LTP promptly. While both licensees provided final status survey reports (FSSRs) for NRC approval, the Trojan approach to decommissioning and data management allowed NRC to efficiently review FSS records and supporting documentation. Therefore, NRC was able to review Trojan's FSSR more efficiently than Maine Yankee's FSSR. This paper describes the regulatory impacts of the two different approaches to the decommissioning, the development of licensee required plans, decommissioning operations and records, the differences in licensing processes, and the lessons learned for improving the processes. (authors)

Watson, B.A.; Buckley, J.T.; Craig, C.M. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards, Decommissioning Directorate (T7E18), Washington, D.C. 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Nuclear Renaissance & the NRC Seismic Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Existing and New Reactor Licensing Offices ... Seismic Isolation • Small Modular Reactors • SSI modeling of NPPs under non-traditional loads ...

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Microsoft PowerPoint - 5_Pat Smith_NMMSS_2013_Presentation_NRC Reconciliation.pptx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reconciliation Reconciliation Pat Smith PSI NRC Lead NRC Reconciliation  NRC Reconciliation requirements per NUREG/BR-0007, Rev. 6  All RIS's must submit an MSR (Material Summary Report) (Form 742, 742C) to NMMSS under the following conditions: - A RIS has a reportable quantity as of their inventory date - A RIS has shipped or received a reportable quantity during the material balance reporting period NRC Reconciliation  All NRC licensees are required to report their physical inventory to NMMSS each year if they: - possess one gram or more of special nuclear material (SNM) (plutonium, uranium-233, or uranium-235 contained in enriched uranium) - one kilogram or more of foreign obligated source material (natural uranium, depleted uranium, or thorium) are required to report their physical inventory to NMMSS each

250

A compilation of reports of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, 1997 annual, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 19  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This compilation contains 67 ACRS reports submitted to the Commission, or to the Executive Director for Operations, during calendar year 1997. It also includes a report to the Congress on the NRC Safety Research Program. Specific topics include: (1) advanced reactor designs, (2) emergency core cooling systems, (3) fire protection, (4) generic letters and issues, (5) human factors, (6) instrumentation, control and protection systems, (7) materials engineering, (8) probabilistic risk assessment, (9) regulatory guides and procedures, rules, regulations, and (10) safety research, philosophy, technology and criteria.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry`s practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

Benson, B.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

Benson, B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Going the Distance? NRC's Response to the National Academy of Science's Transportation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In February 2006, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) published the results of a 3 1/2-year study, titled Going the Distance, that examined the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) in the United States. NAS initiated this study to address what it perceived to be a national need for an independent, objective, and authoritative analysis of SNF and HLW transport in the United States. The study was co-sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. This paper addresses some of the recommendations made in the NAS study related to the performance of SNF transportation casks in long duration fires, the use of full-scale package testing, and the need for an independent review of transportation security prior to the commencement of large scale shipping campaigns to an interim storage site or geologic repository. In conclusion: The NRC believes that the current regulations in 10 CFR Part 71 for the design of SNF and HLW transportation packages provide a very high level of protection to the public for very severe accidents and credible threat scenarios. As recommended by the NAS study, additional studies of accidents involving severe fires have been completed. These studies have confirmed that spent fuel casks would be expected to withstand very severe fires without the release of any fission products from the spent fuel. Additionally, changes in rail operating procedures such as the use of dedicated trains and prohibition on the co-location of SNF and flammable liquids in rail tunnels can further reduce the already low probability of severe rail accident fires involving SNF and HLW. (authors)

Easton, E.P.; Bajwa, C.S. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Executive Director for Operations RENEWAL OF FULL-POWER OPERATING LICENSE FOR PILGRIM NUCLEAR POWER STATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper (1) requests that the Commission authorize the Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) to renew the operating license for Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (PNPS) for an additional 20 years, and (2) informs the Commission of the results of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff’s review of the PNPS license renewal application (LRA) (Ref. 1) submitted by Entergy Nuclear Generation Company (Entergy Nuclear) and Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. (ENO) (owner and operator, respectively, of PNPS). In the Staff Requirements Memorandum for SECY-02-0088, “Turkey Point Nuclear Plant, Units 3 and

R. W. Borchardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Part 70 License NRC Docket No. 70-07018 Subject: References: SUPPLEMENT TO APPLICATION FOR A SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LICENSE FOR WATTS BAR NUCLEAR PLANT UNIT 2 IN ACCORDANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(TAC NO. ME0853)" As part of TVA's application for a Special Nuclear Material (SNM) License for Watts Bar Unit 2

Watts Bar; Nuclear Plant; Watts Bar; Nuclear Plant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5975, Incentive Regulation of Investor-Owned Nuclear Power Plants by Public Utility Regulators, published in January 1993. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Seely, H.E.; Merritt, C.R.; Baker, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

U.S. Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) Dataset Summary Description The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) publishes an Information Digest containing summary information about the NRC and its industry. The report's appendices include demographic data on U.S. nuclear power reactors, both commercial and test facilities. Details include licensee data, location, and capacity. In addition there is information on dry spent fuel storage. The data include activities through 2009 or the most current data available. Source U.S. Nuclear Reactor Commission (USNRC) Date Released August 31st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords nuclear Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon US Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors (xls, 132.6 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon US Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors, Permanently Shutdown (xls, 32.8 KiB)

258

Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 4. Evaluation of other loads and load combinations  

SciTech Connect

Six topical areas were covered by the Task Group on Other Dynamic Loads and Load Combinations as described below: Event Combinations - dealing with the potential simultaneous occurrence of earthquakes, pipe ruptures, and water hammer events in the piping design basis; Response Combinations - dealing with multiply supported piping with independent inputs, the sequence of combinations between spacial and modal components of response, and the treatment of high frequency modes in combination with low frequency modal responses; Stress Limits/Dynamic Allowables - dealing with inelastic allowables for piping and strain rate effects; Water Hammer Loadings - dealing with code and design specifications for these loadings and procedures for identifying potential water hammer that could affect safety; Relief Valve Opening and Closing Loads - dealing with the adequacy of analytical tools for predicting the effects of these events and, in addition, with estimating effective cycles for fatigue evaluations; and Piping Vibration Loads - dealing with evaluation procedures for estimating other than seismic vibratory loads, the need to consider reciprocating and rotary equipment vibratory loads, and high frequency vibratory loads. NRC staff recommendations or regulatory changes and additional study appear in this report.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Safety-research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects reported are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Development, Validation and Application, CRBR Balance of Plant Modeling, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, LWR Plant Analyzer Development LWR Code Assessment and Application; Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Bolting Failure Analysis, Probability Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures, Mechanical Piping Benchmark Problems, Soil Structure Interaction; Human Error Data for Nuclear Power Plant Safety Related Events, Criteria for Human Engineering Regulatory Guides and Human Factors in Nuclear Power Plant Safeguards.

Bari, R.A.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Site Selection & Characterization Status Report for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect

In the near future, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will need to make important decisions regarding design and construction of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). One part of making these decisions is considering the potential environmental impacts that this facility may have, if constructed here at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides DOE decision makers with a process to systematically consider potential environmental consequences of agency decisions. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Title VI, Subtitel C, Section 644) states that the 'Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) shall have licensing and regulatory authority for any reactor authorized under this subtitle.' This stipulates that the NRC will license the NGNP for operation. The NRC NEPA Regulations (10 CFR Part 51) require tha thte NRC prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a permit to construct a nuclear power plant. The applicant is required to submit an Environmental report (ER) to aid the NRC in complying with NEPA.

Mark Holbrook

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SUBJECT: NORTH ANNA POWER STATION- NRC INTEGRATED INSPECTION REPORT NO. 05000338/2004002 AND 05000339/2004002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

documents the inspection findings which were discussed on March 18 and March 30, 2004, with Mr. Larry Lane and other members of your staff. The inspection examined activities conducted under your licenses as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commission’s rules and regulations and with the conditions of your licenses. The inspectors reviewed selective procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. Based on the results of the inspection, no findings of significance were identified by the NRC. However, three licensee-identified violations which were determined to be of very low safety significance (Green) are listed in Section 4OA7 of this report. If you contest any non-cited violation in this report, you should provide a response within 30 days of the date of this inspection report, with the basis for your denial, to the United States Nuclear Regulatory

Attn Mr; David A. Christian; Chief Nuclear Officer; The North Anna Power Station; Kerry D. L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Directory of certificiates of compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved packages. Revision 19, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This directory provides information on packagings approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, including states with new programs, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Elliot, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 News Updates Luminant has requested a suspension of the NRC's review of its Comanche Peak Combined Construction and Operating License (COL) application. The company cited impacts to the review schedule of the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries US Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (US-APWR) due to the vendor's desire to refocus its resources to reactor restarts in Japan as well as low electricity prices driven by low natural gas prices as reasons for the suspension. Unistar Nuclear Operating Co. has formally withdrawn its COL application from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to build and operate Areva's U.S. EPR at its Nine Mile Point site in Oswego, NY. In

265

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

266

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

267

Program Overview Shane Johnson Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Overview Program Overview Shane Johnson Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology April 15, 2002 Presentation to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Johnson/April15_02 NP 2010 to NERAC.ppt 2 Nuclear Power 2010 Overview Nuclear Power 2010 Overview Goals 6 Orders for one or more new nuclear plants by 2005 6 Operation of new nuclear power plants by 2010 6 New program initiative unveiled February 2002 6 Based on Near-Term Deployment Roadmap 6 Public/private partnership to: ! Develop advanced reactor technologies ! Explore sites that could host new nuclear power plants ! Demonstrate new Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory processes Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Johnson/April15_02 NP 2010 to NERAC.ppt 3

268

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Detection of Gas Voids in Pipe Using Guided Wave Ultrasonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plant systems continue to be challenged by gas accumulation in both safety-related and safety-significant piping systems. In January 2008, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter 2008-01, "Managing Gas Accumulation in Emergency Core Cooling, Decay Heat Removal, and Containment Spray Systems." The Generic Letter requests that each licensee evaluate its emergency core cooling system, decay heat removal system, and containment spray system licensing basis, design, te...

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

269

Microsoft Word - 0906 NMMSS News DOE NRC Approved.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

as a result of the on-going negotiations. The Nuclear Regulatory and Department of Energy will keep you informed on the development of the Agreements and of any changes that...

270

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1992. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. Information is presented on five parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export and Critical Assembly.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

DOE Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application DOE Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application July 19, 2010 -...

272

Compendium of Nuclear Reactor Containment Experiments and Reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This CD-ROM contains 36 reports and papers about the structural integrity of steel-lined concrete and steel shell containments subjected to internal pressurization. Most were published in the period 1981–1990, following the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) accident, but work continued during the following decade. There is a listing of the report numbers and titles. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports are complete, but the journal articles and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reports are li...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

Optimization of Fire Protection Impairments at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, risk-informed and performance-based (RI/PB) fire protection is gaining further acceptance by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the industry. In addition, fire risk assessment methods are gaining some level of maturity since the first industrywide experience with individual plant examination for external events (IPEEE). RI/PB methods can reduce the cost of operating fire protection programs and maintaining fire safety.

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

Current NRC Perspectives Concerning PWSCC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Materials currently used in nuclear power plants are reliable and are ... This paper provides a historical assessment of operating experience ... Crack Growth Rates of Irradiated Commercial Stainless Steels in BWR and PWR

275

Of RIGoNRC Reference Material AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and ritle 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Environmental Management ProgramsNRC Reference Material AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

Dispkosalg Ariesp

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Summary of Utility License Termination Documents and Lessons Learned: Summary of License Termination Plan Submittals by Three Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) 1996 revised decommissioning regulations specify that the operator of a nuclear plant must submit a "License Termination Plan" (LTP) two years prior to termination of the plant license. The LTP explicitly defines the elements that the plant operator must address in the decommissioning plan. This report focuses on the approaches and experience gained by three of the leading plants in the preparation and submittal of their LTP submittals under the 1996 regul...

2002-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

278

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - tanks and pools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continued operation of nuclear power plants for periods that extend beyond their original 40-year license period is a desirable option for many U.S. utilities. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of operating license renewals is necessary before continued operation becomes a reality. Effective aging management for plant components is important to reliability and safety, regardless of current plant age or extended life expectations. However, the NRC requires that aging evaluations be performed and the effectiveness of aging management programs be demonstrated for components considered within the scope of license renewal before granting approval for operation beyond 40 years. Both the NRC and the utility want assurance that plant components will be highly reliable during both the current license term and throughout the extended operating period. In addition, effective aging management must be demonstrated to support Maintenance Rule (10 CFR 50.65) activities.

Blocker, E.; Smith, S.; Philpot, L.; Conley, J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Thomas Miller Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Miller Miller Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy September 30, 2002 Presentation at the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Nuclear Power 2010 Program Strategy to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants Nuclear Power 2010 Program Strategy to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology TMiller/Sept11_02 ESE Project.ppt ( 2) Nuclear Power 2010: Overview Nuclear Power 2010: Overview Goal 6 Achieve industry decision by 2005 to deploy at least one new advanced nuclear power plant by 2010 Cooperative Activities 6 Regulatory Demonstration Projects * Early Site Permit (ESP) * Combined Construction and Operating License (COL) 6 Reactor Technology Development Projects * NRC Design Certification (DC) * First-of-a-kind engineering for a standardized plant

280

ACTION: Environmental Assessment and Draft Finding of No Significant Impact. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission (NRC) has prepared an Environmental Assessment for the issuance of an Order under Section 274f of the Atomic Energy Act that would modify an Order issued to Waste Control Specialists, LLC (WCS) on November 5, 2004. In accordance with 10 CFR 51.33, the NRC has also prepared a draft Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for public review and comment. The current action is in response to a request by

Licensing Requirements For Special

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D. [Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report of the Nuclear Manpower Study Committee  

SciTech Connect

The anticipated personnel needs of the nuclear power industry have varied widely in recent years, in response to both increasing regulatory requirements and declining orders for new plants. Recent employment patterns in the nuclear energy field, with their fluctuations, resemble those of defense industries more than those traditionally associated with electric utilities. Reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 by industry and regulators have increased the demand for trained and experienced personnel, causing salaries to rise. Industry, for example, has established several advisory organizations like the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). At the same time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed many new construction and operating requirements in an effort to take advantage of lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident and to respond to the perceived public interest in better regulation of nuclear power. Thus, at present, utilities, architect-engineer firms, reactor vendors, and organizations in the nuclear development community have heavy workloads.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

President and Chief Nuclear Officer, Exelon Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

documents the inspection results which were discussed on July 13, 2011, with Mr. W. Maguire and other members of your staff. The inspection examined activities conducted under your license as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commission’s rules and regulations and with the conditions of your license. The inspectors reviewed selected procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. This report documents two self-revealing findings of very low safety significance (Green). One of the findings was determined to involve a violation of NRC requirements. Additionally, a licensee-identified violation which was determined to be of very low safety significance is listed in this report. However, because of the very low safety significance and because they are entered into your corrective action program (CAP), the NRC is treating these violations as noncited violations (NCVs), consistent with Section 2.3.2 of the NRC Enforcement Policy. If you contest any NCV in this report, you should provide a response within 30 days of the date of this inspection report, with basis for your denial, to the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission,

Mr. Michael; J. Pacilio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Recent Updates to NRC Fuel Performance Codes and Plans for Future Improvements  

SciTech Connect

FRAPCON-3.4a and FRAPTRAN 1.4 are the most recent versions of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) steady-state and transient fuel performance codes, respectively. These codes have been assessed against separate effects data and integral assessment data and have been determined to provide a best estimate calculation of fuel performance. Recent updates included in FRAPCON-3.4a include updated material properties models, models for new fuel and cladding types, cladding finite element analysis capability, and capability to perform uncertainty analyses and calculate upper tolerance limits for important outputs. Recent updates included in FRAPTRAN 1.4 include: material properties models that are consistent with FRAPCON-3.4a, cladding failure models that are applicable for loss-of coolant-accident and reactivity initiated accident modeling, and updated heat transfer models. This paper briefly describes these code updates and data assessments, highlighting the particularly important improvements and data assessments. This paper also discusses areas of improvements that will be addressed in upcoming code versions.

Geelhood, Kenneth J.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Public Comments on the proposed 10 CFR Part 51 rule for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses and supporting documents: Review of concerns and NRC staff response. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains several appendices. Appendix A contains the list of individuals and organizations providing comments at various stages of the rulemaking process. The names of commenters at the public meetings are listed in the order that they spoke at the meeting; those who submitted written comments are listed by docket number. Appendix B contains the summaries of comments made. Each comment summary is identified by a unique comment number. Appendix C presents the concerns and NRC staff responses. Each concern embodies one or more comments on similar or related issues. The associated comment numbers are referenced for each concern. The concerns are organized by topic areas. A three-letter identifier for the topic, followed by a number, is assigned to each concern.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

NRC staff site characterization analysis of the Department of Energy`s Site Characterization Plan, Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Site Characterization Analysis (SCA) documents the NRC staff`s concerns resulting from its review of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada, which is the candidate site selected for characterization as the nation`s first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. DOE`s SCP explains how DOE plans to obtain the information necessary to determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for a repository. NRC`s specific objections related to the SCP, and major comments and recommendations on the various parts of DOE`s program, are presented in SCA Section 2, Director`s Comments and Recommendations. Section 3 contains summaries of the NRC staff`s concerns for each specific program, and Section 4 contains NRC staff point papers which set forth in greater detail particular staff concerns regarding DOE`s program. Appendix A presents NRC staff evaluations of those NRC staff Consultation Draft SCP concerns that NRC considers resolved on the basis of the SCP. This SCA fulfills NRC`s responsibilities with respect to DOE`s SCP as specified by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and 10 CFR 60.18. 192 refs., 2 tabs.

NONE

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2014 January 2014 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 News Updates Luminant has requested a suspension of the NRC's review of its Comanche Peak Combined Construction and Operating License (COL) application. The company cited impacts to the review schedule of the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries US Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (US-APWR) due to the vendor's desire to refocus its resources to reactor restarts in Japan as well as low electricity prices driven by low natural gas prices as reasons for the suspension. Unistar Nuclear Operating Co. has formally withdrawn its COL application from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to build and operate Areva's U.S. EPR at its Nine Mile Point site in Oswego, NY. In late 2009, Unistar requested a suspension of the application review due to

288

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2007 ... The NRC regulates commercial nuclear power plants and other uses of nuclear materials, such as in nuclear medicine, through licensing, ...

289

LWRS II&C Industry and Regulatory Engagement Activities for FY 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To ensure broad industry support and coordination for the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Controls (II&C) Systems Technologies research pathway, an engagement process will be continually pursued with nuclear asset owners, vendors, and suppliers, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the major industry support organizations of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), and Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). Nuclear asset owner engagement is a necessary and enabling activity to obtain data and accurate characterization of long-term operational challenges, assess the suitability of proposed research for addressing long-term needs, and gain access to data and representative infrastructure and expertise needed to ensure success of the proposed research and development (R&D) activities. Engagement with vendors and suppliers will ensure that vendor expectations and needs can be translated into requirements that can be met through technology commercialization.

Ken Thomas

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Safety culture in the nuclear power industry : attributes for regulatory assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety culture refers to the attitudes, behaviors, and conditions that affect safety performance and often arises in discussions following incidents at nuclear power plants. As it involves both operational and management ...

Alexander, Erin L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

292

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

293

Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks  

SciTech Connect

Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits.

Cochran, J.R. Shyr, L.J.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

294

Nuclear reactor safety. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, May 22 and July 16, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two days of hearings addressed reactor safety and public perceptions that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has neglected the problem of utility mismanagement of nuclear power plants. One point of concern has been the proprietary approach to safety that has evolved since the NRC delegated much of the regulation to the industry-sponsored Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Other points of contention were the move to standardize reactor designs which have already been identified as having safety problems. Attention during the second day focused on the Pilgrim plant in Massachusetts which was allowed to operate despite management deficiencies. The 18 witnesses included NRC commissioners, utilities, and several representatives of government agencies and private groups from Massachusetts. Additional material submitted for the record follows their testimony.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Interim Storage of Used or Spent Nuclear Fuel Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) supports the safe, controlled, licensed, and regulated interim storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) (irradiated, spent fuel from a nuclear power reactor) until disposition can be determined and completed. ANS supports the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) determination that “spent fuel generated in any reactor can be stored safely and without significant environmental impacts for at least 30 years beyond the licensed life for operation. ” 1 Current operational and decommissioned nuclear power plants in the United States were licensed with the expectation that the UNF would be stored at the nuclear power plant site until shipment to an interim storage facility, reprocessing plant, or permanent storage. Because of delays in Federal programs and policy issues, utilities have been forced to store UNF. Current means of interim storage of UNF at nuclear power plant sites include storage of discharged fuel in a water-filled pool or in a sealed dry cask, both under safe, controlled, and monitored conditions. This UNF interim storage is designed, managed, and controlled to minimize or preclude potential radiological hazards or material releases. At nuclear power plant sites in the United States and internationally, this interim storage is regulated under site license requirements and technical specifications imposed by the national or state regulator. In the United States, NRC is the licensing and regulatory authority. ANS believes that UNF interim storage

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Regulatory Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Tools Regulatory Tools Home CRA - 2004 Final Recertification Decision CRA Comments & Responses CCA - 1996 CRA CARDs & TSDs CCA CARDs & TSDs Regulatory Tools Title 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. Title 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the Certification and Re-Certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance With the 40 CFR Part 191 Disposal Regulations. Part I Title 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the Certification and Recertification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance With the Disposal Regulations; Alternative Provisions; Proposed Rule. Friday August 9, 2002. Part II Title 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the Certification and Recertification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance With the Disposal Regulations: Certification Decision; Final Rule. May 18, 1998. Part III

297

Guide to NRC reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Compiled from requirements in Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations as codified on December 31, 1993; Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This compilation includes in the first two sections the reporting and recordkeeping requirements applicable to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees and applicants and to members of the public. It includes those requirements codified in Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, on December 31, 1993. It also includes, in a separate section, any of those requirements that were superseded or discontinued between January 1992 and December 1993. Finally, the appendix lists mailing and delivery addresses for NRC Headquarters and Regional Offices mentioned in the compilation. The Office of Information Resources Management staff compiled this listing of reporting and recordkeeping requirements to briefly describe each in a single document primarily to help licensees readily identify the requirements. The compilation is not a substitute for the regulations, and is not intended to impose any new requirements or technical positions. It is part of NRC`s continuing efforts to comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 and the Office of Management and Budget regulations that mandate effective and efficient Federal information resources management programs.

Collins, M.; Shelton, B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Physical Inventory Listing NRC 742cu  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NRC FORM 742CU (MM-YYYY) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70,72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 EXPIRES: MMDDYYYY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF...

299

NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule. Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title 44 US Code, ``Public Printing and Documents,`` regulations issued by the General Service Administration (GSA) in 41 CFR Chapter 101, Subchapter B, ``Management and Use of Information and Records,`` and regulations issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter 12, Subchapter B, ``Records Management,`` require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA`s General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 3, contains ``NRC`s Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,`` and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 3 incorporates NARA approved changes and additions to the NRC schedules that have been implemented since the last revision dated March, 1992, reflects recent organizational changes implemented at the NRC, and includes the latest version of NARA`s General Records Schedule (dated August 1995).

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT APPROACHES: CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

Engineered barriers including cementitious barriers are used at sites disposing or contaminated with low-level radioactive waste to enhance performance of the natural environment with respect to controlling the potential spread of contaminants. Drivers for using cementitious barriers include: high radionuclide inventory, radionuclide characteristics (e.g., long half-live, high mobility due to chemical form/speciation, waste matrix properties, shallow water table, and humid climate that provides water for leaching the waste). This document comprises the first in a series of reports being prepared for the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The document is divided into two parts which provide a summary of: (1) existing experience in the assessment of performance of cementitious materials used for radioactive waste management and disposal and (2) sensitivity and uncertainty analysis approaches that have been applied for assessments. Each chapter is organized into five parts: Introduction, Regulatory Considerations, Specific Examples, Summary of Modeling Approaches and Conclusions and Needs. The objective of the report is to provide perspective on the state of the practice for conducting assessments for facilities involving cementitious barriers and to identify opportunities for improvements to the existing approaches. Examples are provided in two contexts: (1) performance assessments conducted for waste disposal facilities and (2) performance assessment-like analyses (e.g., risk assessments) conducted under other regulatory regimes. The introductory sections of each section provide a perspective on the purpose of performance assessments and different roles of cementitious materials for radioactive waste management. Significant experience with assessments of cementitious materials associated with radioactive waste disposal concepts exists in the US Department of Energy Complex and the commercial nuclear sector. Recently, the desire to close legacy facilities has created a need to assess the behavior of cementitious materials for applications in environmental remediation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) applications. The ability to assess the use and benefits of cementitious materials for these applications can significantly affect decisions related to cleanup activities. For example the need for costly remedial actions may not be necessary if existing or new cementitious barriers were adequately represented. The sections dealing with regulatory considerations include summaries of the different regulations that are relevant for various applications involving cementitious materials. A summary of regulatory guidance and/or policies pertaining to performance assessment of cementitious materials and sensitivity and uncertainty analyses is also provided in the following chapters. Numerous examples of specific applications are provided in each report. The examples are organized into traditional waste disposal applications (performance assessments), applications related to environmental remediation and D&D, and reactor and spent fuel related assessments. Sections that discuss specific facilities or sites contain: (1) descriptions of the role of the cementitious barriers or sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, (2) parameter assumptions and conceptual models, and (3) a relative discussion of the significance in the context of the assessment. Examples from both the U.S. Department of Energy Sites and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission are provided to illustrate the variety of applications and approaches that have been used. In many cases, minimal credit was taken for cementitious barriers. However, in some of those cases, benefits of being able to take credit for barriers were identified. The examples included: (1) disposal facilities (vaults, trenches, tank closures, cementitious waste forms and containers, etc.), (2) environmental remediation (old disposal facilities), (3) reactor and large structure decommissioning, and (4) spent fuel pools. These examples were selected to provide a perspective on the various ne

Langton, C.; Burns, H.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Program on Technology Innovation: Response to the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses Review of EPRI Reports on Igneous Pro cesses at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's 2004 and 2005 technical reports (1008169 and 1011165) describe what might occur in the unlikely event of extrusive or intrusive igneous events at Yucca Mountain repository. The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) reviewed these two reports in 2007. EPRI has evaluated this review; this report discusses and clarifies several salient points that EPRI believes were misinterpreted in the CNWRA review.

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

Microsoft PowerPoint - 8_Peter Habighorst_NRC_Act of 2012-status...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Use of NMMSS Data in Support of the American Medical Isotopes Production Act of 2012 Peter Habighorst Nuclear Regulatory Commission Background * Section 3175 of the act requires: -...

303

Report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission from the staff panel on the Commission's determination of an Extraordinary Nuclear Occurrence (ENO)  

SciTech Connect

The Panel finds that the first criterion, pertaining to whether the accident caused a discharge of radioactive material or levels of radiation offsite as defined in 10 CFR 140.84, has not been met. It further finds that there is presently insufficient information to support any definitive finding as to whether or not the second criterion, relating to damage to persons or property offsite as defined in 10 CFR 140.85, has been met. Since the Panel has not found that both criteria have been met, it recommends that the Commission determine that the accident at Three Mile Island did not constitute an extraordinary nuclear occurrence.

none,

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3-70). Volume 2, Public comments and NRC response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (Volume 1), was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to assess the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana by Louisiana Energy Services, L.P. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are co on, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning of the site. In order to help assure that releases from the operation of the facility and potential impacts on the public are as low as reasonably achievable, an environmental monitoring program was developed by LES to detect significant changes in the background levels of uranium around the site. Other issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment, and proposes to issue a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility. The letters in this Appendix have been divided into three sections. Section One contains letters to which the NRC responded by addressing specific comments. Section Two contains the letters that concerned the communities of Forest Grove and Center Springs. Section Three is composed of letters that required no response. These letters were generally in support of the facility.

Zeitoun, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effect of Hurricane Andrew on the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station from August 20--30, 1992. [Final report  

SciTech Connect

On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Turkey Point Electrical Generating Station with sustained winds of 145 mph (233 km/h). This is the report of the team that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) jointly sponsored (1) to review the damage that the hurricane caused the nuclear units and the utility`s actions to prepare for the storm and recover from it, and (2) to compile lessons that might benefit other nuclear reactor facilities.

Hebdon, F.J. [Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Laboratory investigations of effective flow behavior in unsaturated heterogeneous sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Priority List NRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NUREG U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Wildenschild, Dorthe

307

Guidelines for inservice testing at nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) gives licensees guidelines and recommendations for developing and implementing programs for the inservice testing of pumps and valves at commercial nuclear power plants. The staff discusses the regulations; the components to be included in an inservice testing program; and the preparation and content of cold shutdown justifications, refueling outage justifications, and requests for relief from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code requirements. The staff also gives specific guidance on relief acceptable to the NRC and advises licensees in the use of this information at their facilities. The staff discusses the revised standard technical specifications for the inservice testing program requirements and gives guidance on the process a licensee may follow upon finding an instance of noncompliance with the Code.

Campbell, P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Tomorrow: Secretary Chu to Participate in New Millenium Nuclear Summit |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tomorrow: Secretary Chu to Participate in New Millenium Nuclear Tomorrow: Secretary Chu to Participate in New Millenium Nuclear Summit Tomorrow: Secretary Chu to Participate in New Millenium Nuclear Summit December 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Tomorrow, December 7, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will participate in the New Millenium Nuclear Summit along with White House Advisor Carol Browner, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Chairman Greg Jaczko, and members of the U.S. Congress as well as members of industry, labor and non-governmental organizations. The forum on the future of nuclear energy in the United States is being hosted by Third Way and the Idaho National Lab. U.S. Senators Tom Carper and George V. Voinovich are honorary co-chairs of the event. New Millenium Nuclear Summit When: Tuesday, December 7

309

NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Title 44 United States Code, ``Public Printing and Documents,`` regulations cited in the General Services Administration`s (GSA) ``Federal Information Resources Management Regulations`` (FIRMR), Part 201-9, ``Creation, Maintenance, and Use of Records,`` and regulation issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter XII, Subchapter B, ``Records Management,`` require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA`s General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 2, contains ``NRC`s Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,`` and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 2 totally reorganizes the records schedules from a functional arrangement to an arrangement by the host office. A subject index and a conversion table have also been developed for the NRC schedules to allow staff to identify the new schedule numbers easily and to improve their ability to locate applicable schedules.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The NUCLARR databank: Human reliability and hardware failure data for the nuclear power industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) was developed to provide human reliability and hardware failure data to analysts in the nuclear power industry. This IBM-compatible databank is contained on a set of floppy diskettes which include data files and a menu-driven system for locating, reviewing, sorting, and retrieving the data. NUCLARR contains over 2500 individual data records, drawn from more, than 60 sources. The system is upgraded annually, to include additional human error and hardware component failure data and programming enhancements (i.e., increased user-friendliness). NUCLARR is available from the NRC through project staff at the INEL.

Reece, W.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Two dose-estimation models CSA-N288.1 and Nureg 1.109, 1.113 - compared for chronic aquatic releases from nuclear facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US-NRC) have published guidelines for the calculation of doses to the public due to emissions from nuclear facilities. In the sale of CANDU reactors overseas, either of these guidelines may be used as part of the approval process in the recipient country. This study compares the aquatic exposure pathways described in the guidelines. These include direct consumption of contaminated water and food, and exposure to contaminated sediments. The CSA and US-NRC guidelines for estimating dilution of aquatic emissions are of a general nature and the choice of model used to quantify dilution is left to the user. The models prescribed for the different exposure pathways by these two regulatory guides are similar in many attributes. Many of the recommended parameter values are identical and many of the formulations are either identical, or become identical under general conditions. However, despite these similarities, there...

Sheppard, S C; Peterson, S R

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

September 10, 2003, Board Public Meeting Presentations - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board on NRC's Reactor Oversight Process Presented by Cynthia Carpenter Deputy Director, Division of Inspection Program Management, Nuclear...

314

Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety September 20, 2012 Presenter: Commissioner George Apostolakis US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Management of (unquantified at the time) uncertainty was always a concern. Defense-in-depth and safety margins became embedded in the regulations. "Defense-in-Depth is an element of the NRC's safety philosophy that employs successive compensatory measures to prevent accidents or mitigate damage if a malfunction, accident, or naturally caused event occurs at a nuclear facility." [Commission's White Paper, February 1999] Design Basis Accidents are postulated accidents that a nuclear facility must be designed and built to withstand without loss to the

315

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1983. Volume 3, No. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects reported are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Development, Validation and Application, CRBR Balance of Plant Modeling, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, LWR Plant Analyzer Development, LWR Code Assessment and Application; Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Bolting Failure Analysis, Probability Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures, Mechanical Piping Benchmark Problems, Soil Structure Interaction; Human Error Data for Nuclear Power Plant Safety Related Events, Criteria for Human Engineering Regulatory Guides and Human Factors in Nuclear Power Plant Safeguards.

Bari, R.A.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.; Guppy, J.G.; Hall, R.E.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.; Reich, M.; Saha, P.; Sastre, C.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Volume 3. No. 2. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects reported are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC development, Validation and Application, CRBR balance of plant modeling, thermal-hydraulic reactor safety experiments, LWR plant analyzer development, LWR code assessment and application, thermal reactor code development (RAMONA-3B); stress corrosion cracking of PWR steam generator tubing, bolting failure analysis, probability based load combinations for design of category I structures, mechanical piping benchmark problems; human error data for nuclear power plant safety related events, criteria for human engineering regulatory guides and human factors in nuclear power plant safeguards.

Bari, R.A.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.; Guppy, J.G.; Hall, R.E.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.; Reich, M.; Saha, P.; Sastre, C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

USNRC REGULATORY GUIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Guides are issued to describe and make available to the public methods acceptable to the NRC staff of implementing specific parts of the Commission's regulations, to delineate tech niques used by the staff in evaluating specific problems or postu lated accidents or to provide guidance to applicants. Regulatory Guides are not substitutes for regulations, and compliance with them is not required. Methods and solutions different from those set out in the guides will be acceptable If they provide a basis for the findings requisite to the Issuance or continuance of a permit or license by the Commission. This guide was issued after consideration of comments received from the public. Comments and suggestions for improvements in these guides are encouraged at all times, and guides will be revised, as appropriate, to accommodate comments and to reflect new Informa tion or experience. Comments should be sent to the Secretary of the Commission,

unknown authors

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

USING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT PROACTIVE MANAGEMENT OF MATERIALS DEGRADATION FOR THE U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

SciTech Connect

The majority of the U.S. reactor fleet is applying for license renewal to extend the operating life from the current 40 years to 60 years, and there is now active interest in extending the operating life to beyond 60 years. Many plants are also applying for increases in power rating and both of these changes increases the need for an improved understanding of materials degradation. Many materials degrade over time and much is known about the degradation of materials under normal environmental conditions; however, less is known about the characteristics of materials degradation when the environment is subject to higher than normal radiological conditions over extended periods of time. Significant efforts are being made by industrial, academic and regulatory groups worldwide to identify, classify and mitigate potential problems arising from degradation of components in this context. From a regulatory perspective, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is very interested in being able to identify ways to insure their licensees proactively manage the identification of materials degradation and the mitigation of its effects. To date, the USNRC has consolidated “generic” programs for mitigating aging issues in the two volume Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report (NUREG-1801) [1][2], and have encouraged applicants for license renewal to use these programs where applicable in their plant when applying for renew of their reactor’s license. The USNRC has also published a comprehensive report entitled Expert Panel Report on Proactive Materials Degradation (NUREG/CR-6923) [3] that inventories the types of degradation mechanisms that could exist in each component of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) and each degradation mechanism is assessed regarding how much is known about mitigating its effects. Since the number of plant designs and materials used varies greatly within the U.S. fleet, there are many variations to implementing aging management programs (AMPs), requiring significant dialogs between the Licensee and the USNRC. These discussions are part of the licensing basis and as such are documented with up to multi-hundred page responses that are loosely coupled through the USNRC Agency-wide Document Access and Management System (ADAMS), which serves as an electronic records repository for the USNRC . These discussions have supported revisions to the GALL, including the revision that is being prepared as this paper is being written. The USNRC has sought the help of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to improve the staff’s ability to navigate the significant numbers of documents that are generated in this process and to provide a forum for regulators, licensees and researchers to share knowledge in the efforts to improve the cyclic process for defining, applying, validating and re-defining AMPs. Work to date in this area is publicly accessible and this paper will describe that work and outline a potential path forward. The presenter will also demonstrate the capabilities of the PMMD information tools (http://pmmd.pnl.gov).

Taylor, W Boyd; Knobbs, Katherine J.; Carpenter, C. E. (Gene) [Gene; Malik, Shah

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

Regulatory Perspective on the Use of Cementitious ...  

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1 ... - Development of accelerated laboratory-scale test methods. - Compilation of a database of ...

320

ADDITIONAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR NRC WORK Additional Terms and Conditions for NRC Work -March 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the NRC may direct the Laboratory/DOE to not publish the work as a NUREG/CR, but publish as a Laboratory shall follow general guidance provided in NUREG/BR-0167, "Software Quality Assurance Program with the designation NUREG/IA-XXXX for international agreement reports or NUREG/CR-XXXX for contractor reports. Details

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Survey of Field Programmable Gate Array Design Guides and Experience Relevant to Nuclear Power Plant Applications  

SciTech Connect

From a safety perspective, it is difficult to assess the correctness of FPGA devices without extensive documentation, tools, and review procedures. NUREG/CR-6463, "Review Guidelines on Software Languages for Use in Nuclear Power Plant Safety Systems," provides guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on auditing of programs for safety systems written in ten high-level languages. A uniform framework for the formulation and discussion of language-specific programming guidelines was employed. Comparable guidelines based on a similar framework are needed for FPGA-based systems. The first task involves evaluation of regulatory experience gained by other countries and other agencies, and those captured in existing standards, to identify regulatory approaches that can be adopted by NRC. If existing regulations do not provide a sufficient regulatory basis for adopting relevant regulatory approaches that are uncovered, ORNL will identify the gaps. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL; Bouldin, Don [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Smith, Stephen Fulton [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

DOE Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application DOE Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application July 19, 2010 - 4:07pm Addthis In a reply brief filed with the NRC today, DOE explained that the arguments that it lacked authority to withdraw the pending Yucca Mountain license application are uniformly without merit. DOE's reply brief is available here. In a separate filing, DOE explained that there is no basis for arguments that two NRC Commissioners should recuse themselves from the Yucca proceeding. That brief is available here. Addthis Related Articles DOE Makes Filing with NRC in Support OF Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application DOE Opposes Injunction Motion

323

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Requirements Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE requirements definition is to assess the activities that results in the specification, documentation, and review of the requirements that the software product must satisfy, including functionality, performance, design constraints, attributes and external interfaces. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIRE’s Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP).

Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Requirements Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE requirements definition is to assess the activities that results in the specification, documentation, and review of the requirements that the software product must satisfy, including functionality, performance, design constraints, attributes and external interfaces. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIRE’s Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP).

Kent Norris

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Director, Office of Enforcement U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Mail Stop 0-14E1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requested that United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) provide a written response that describes the actions taken or planned to assure there is not a chilling effect on the willingness of employees to raise safety and compliance concerns within USEC or to the NRC as a result of the January 27, 2006 Administrative Law Judge Tiemey's Recommended Decision and Order. The enclosure to this letter provides the requested information. If you have any questions regarding this review, please contact Steven Toelle (301) 564-3250. There are no new commitments contained in this submittal. Sincerely, R. B. StarkeyJ.

Russell B. Starkey, Jr.; Dir; Mr. Michael; R. Johnson; Letter Michael; R. Johnson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

EPRI/NRC-RES Fire Human Reliability Analysis Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2001, EPRI and Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) collaborated to improve the state of the art in fire risk assessment to support the new risk-informed environment in fire protection. This project produced a consensus documentNUREG/CR-6850 (EPRI report 1011989), Fire PRA Methodology for Nuclear Power Facilitieswhich addresses fire risk during operations at power plants. NUREG/CR-6850 developed high-level guidance on identifying and including human failure events (HFEs) into the fire PRA (FPRA) and a me...

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Reference: Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station- Preconditioning of Emergency Diesel Generator Air Start Systems, Fuel Systems, and other Engine and Electrical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is twofold. First, to inform the NRC that Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station will not dispute the Non-Cited Violation (50-254/01-05-04; 50-265/01-05-04) of 10 CFR 50 Appendix B, Criterion XI, "Test Control, " described in the referenced NRC report. The station similarly concurs that the risk significance was very low (Green). Senior station management and station personnel understand the importance of scheduling and performing Technical Specifications required surveillances such that unacceptable preconditioning does not occur. The instances identified in the referenced NRC report have been entered into the station's corrective action program and corrective actions have been implemented or are scheduled for implementation. Second, given the importance of this subject and based upon our review of the NRC integrated inspection report, the station is providing an update on several of the issues discussed in section three, "Units 1 and 2 Emergency Diesel Generator Timed Test Preconditioning Concerns. " This is intended to update the NRC and supplement our shared understanding of the issues. The following specific points are provided: August 8, 2001 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

NRC safety research in support of regulation. Volume 8, FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report, the ninth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1993. A special emphasis on accomplishments in nuclear power plant aging research reflects recognition that number of plants are entering the final portion of their original 40-year operating licenses and that, in addition to current aging effects, a focus on safety considerations for license renewal becomes timely. The primary purpose of performing regulatory research is to develop and provide the Commission and its staff with sound technical bases for regulatory decisions on the safe operation of licensed nuclear reactors and facilities, to find unknown or unexpected safety problems, and to develop data and related information for the purpose of revising the Commission`s rules, regulatory guides, or other guidance.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC/EPRI weld residual stress (WRS) program currently consists of four phases, with each phase increasing in complexity from lab size specimens to ...

330

Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A RE-LOOK AT THE US NRC SAFETY GOALS  

SciTech Connect

Since they were adopted in 1986, the US NRC’s Safety Goals have played a valuable role as a de facto risk acceptance criterion against which the predicted performance of a commercial nuclear power reactor can be evaluated and assessed. The current safety goals are cast in terms of risk metrics called quantitative health objectives (QHOs), limiting numerical values of the risks of the early and latent health effects of accidental releases of radioactivity to the offsite population. However, while demonstrating compliance with current safety goals has been an important step in assessing the acceptance of the risk posed by LWRs, new or somewhat different goals may be needed that go beyond the current early fatality and latent cancer fatality QHOs in assessing reactor risk. Natural phenomena such as hurricanes seem to be suitable candidates for establishing a background rate to derive a risk goal as their order of magnitude cost of damages is similar to those estimated in severe accident Level 3 PRAs done for nuclear power plants. This paper obtains a risk goal that could have a wider applicability, compared to the current QHOs, as a technology-neutral goal applicable to future reactors and multi-unit sites.

mubayi v.

2013-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

332

Letter from Nuclear Energy Institute regarding Integrated Safety Analysis: Why it is Appropropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

082 l F: 202.533.0166 l rxm@nei.org l www.nei.org 082 l F: 202.533.0166 l rxm@nei.org l www.nei.org Rod McCullum DIRECTOR FUEL CYCLE PROJECTS NUCLEAR GENERATION DIVISION September 10, 2010 Ms. Catherine Haney Director Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, DC 20555-0001 Subject: Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities Project Number: 689 Dear Ms. Haney: Enclosed for your review is a Nuclear Energy Institute white paper on the use of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) at U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed recycling facilities. This paper is intended as an information source for the NRC and should serve as a foundation for discussion with industry representatives on the issue.

333

VOLUME FIVE DISPERSANTS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastes NRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission OCC Oklahoma Corporation Commission OCD Oil Conservation

334

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Design basis for the NRC Operations Center  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of a design for a new NRC Operations Center (NRCOC). The project was conducted in two phases: organizational analysis and facility design. In order to control the amount of traffic, congestion and noise within the facility, it is recommended that information flow in the new NRCOC be accomplished by means of an electronic Status Information Management System. Functional requirements and a conceptual design for this system are described. An idealized architectural design and a detailed design program are presented that provide the appropriate amount of space for operations, equipment and circulation within team areas. The overall layout provides controlled access to the facility and, through the use of a zoning concept, provides each team within the NRCOC the appropriate balance of ready access and privacy determined from the organizational analyses conducted during the initial phase of the project.

Lindell, M.K.; Wise, J.A.; Griffin, B.N.; Desrosiers, A.E.; Meitzler, W.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

339

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The applications reflect the intentions of those companies to build 21 new reactors, with some applications covering two reactors at the same site. All five reactor designs that have been certified, or are currently under review for possible certification, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are

340

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The applications reflect the intentions of those companies to build 21 new reactors, with some applications covering two reactors at the same site. All five reactor designs that have been certified, or are currently under review for possible certification, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are represented in the Part I applications. DOE also has received Part I

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

342

N reactor individual risk comparison to quantitative nuclear safety goals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A full-scope level III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been completed for N reactor, a US Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided the technical leadership for this work, using the state-of-the-art NUREG-1150 methodology developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The main objectives of this effort were to assess the risks to the public and to the on-site workers posed by the operation of N reactor, to identify changes to the plant that could reduce the overall risk, and to compare those risks to the proposed NRC and DOE quantitative safety goals. This paper presents the methodology adopted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and SNL for individual health risk evaluation, its results, and a comparison to the NRC safety objectives and the DOE nuclear safety guidelines. The N reactor results, are also compared with the five NUREG-1150 nuclear plants. Only internal events are compared here because external events are not yet reported in the current draft NUREG-1150. This is the first full-scope level III PRA study with a detailed quantitative safety goal comparison performed for DOE production reactors.

Wang, O.S.; Rainey, T.E.; Zentner, M.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Operating experience review for nuclear power plants in the Systematic Evaluation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Systematic Evaluation Program Branch (SEPB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) whose purpose is to determine the safety margins of the design and operation of the eleven oldest operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. This paper describes the methodology and results of the operational experience review portion of the SEP evaluation. SEPB will combine the results from these operational reviews with other safety topic evaluations to perform an integrated assessment of the SEP plants.

Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials...

345

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System...

346

Request for Comment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear: NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) NEI (Nuclear Energy Institute ... prior to being approved for use • Decommissioning practices such as ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

347

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities At the request of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Research Universities, the Council on Governmental Relations (COGR), the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) have assembled a set of ten recommendations for regulatory reform that would improve research universities' ability to carry out their missions without requiring a significant financial investment by the Federal government. Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations

348

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance Plan. The Software Quality Assurance Plan is intended to ensure all actions necessary for the software life cycle; verification and validation activities; documentation and deliverables; project management; configuration management, nonconformance reporting and corrective action; and quality assessment and improvement have been planned and a systematic pattern of all actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that a software product conforms to established technical requirements; and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kent Norris

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance Plan. The Software Quality Assurance Plan is intended to ensure all actions necessary for the software life cycle; verification and validation activities; documentation and deliverables; project management; configuration management, nonconformance reporting and corrective action; and quality assessment and improvement have been planned and a systematic pattern of all actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that a software product conforms to established technical requirements; and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Web-Based Training on Reviewing Dose Modeling Aspects of NRC Decommissioning and License Termination Plans  

SciTech Connect

NRC licensees at decommissioning nuclear facilities submit License Termination Plans (LTP) or Decommissioning Plans (DP) to NRC for review and approval. To facilitate a uniform and consistent review of these plans, the NRC developed training for its staff. A live classroom course was first developed in 2005, which targeted specific aspects of the LTP and DP review process related to dose-based compliance demonstrations or modeling. A web-based training (WBT) course was developed in 2006 and 2007 to replace the classroom-based course. The advantage of the WBT is that it will allow for staff training or refreshers at any time, while the advantage of a classroom-based course is that it provides a forum for lively discussion and the sharing of experience of classroom participants. The objective of this course is to train NRC headquarters and regional office staff on how to review sections of a licensee's DP or LTP that pertain to dose modeling. The DP generally refers to the decommissioning of non-reactor facilities, while the LTP refers specifically to the decommissioning of reactors. This review is part of the NRC's licensing process, in which the NRC determines if a licensee has provided a suitable technical basis to support derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs)1 or dose modeling analyses performed to demonstrate compliance with dose-based license termination rule criteria. This type of training is one component of an organizational management system. These systems 'use a range of practices to identify, create, represent, and distribute knowledge for reuse, awareness and learning'. This is especially important in an organization undergoing rapid change or staff turnover to retain organizational information and processes. NRC is committed to maintaining a dynamic program of training, development, and knowledge transfer to ensure that the NRC acquires and maintains the competencies needed to accomplish its mission. This paper discusses one specific project related to training, developing, and transferring knowledge to NRC staff on how to review dose-modeling portions of licensee-submitted DPs and LTPs. This project identified specific cases and examples, created easily updateable educational modules, represented material in an engaging format through animations, video, and graphics, and distributed information on how to perform these reviews in an accessible, web-based format. WBT promotes consistency in reviews and has the advantage of being able to be used as a resource to staff at any time. The WBT will provide reviewers with knowledge needed to perform risk-informed analyses (e.g., information related to development of realistic scenarios and use of probabilistic analysis). WBT on review of LTP or DP dose modeling will promote staff development, efficiency, and effectiveness in performing risk-informed, performance-based reviews of decommissioning activities at NRC-licensed facilities. One of the key advantages of this type of web-based training is that it can be loaded on-demand and can be reused indefinitely. In addition to the benefits of on-demand training, the modules can also be used for reference. The presentations are hosted on a web server that can be accessed by registered users at any time. Staff can return to a particular module to review the material long after they have completed the course.

LePoire, D.; Cheng, J.J.; Kamboj, S.; Arnish, J.; Richmond, P.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Barr, C.; McKenney, C. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 11555 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

SUBJECT: PRAIRIE ISLAND NUCLEAR GENERATING PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating Plant. The enclosed report documents the inspection findings which were discussed on February 22, 2001, with you and other members of your staff. This inspection examined activities conducted under your license as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commission’s rules and regulations and with the conditions of your license. The inspectors reviewed selected procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. Based on the results of this inspection, the inspectors identified two issues of very low safety significance (Green). One of these issues was determined to involve a violation of NRC requirements. However, because of its very low safety significance and because it has been entered into your corrective action program, the NRC is treating the issue as a non-cited violation, in accordance with Section VI.A.1 of the NRC’s Enforcement Policy. If you deny the non-cited violation, you should provide a response with the basis for your denial, within 30 days of the date of this inspection report, to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ATTN: Document Control Desk, Washington DC 20555-0001; with copies to the Regional Administrator,

Dear Mr. Sorensen; Roger D. Lanksbury

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities January 21, 2011 Introduction At the request of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Research Universities, the Council on Governmental Relations (COGR), the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) have assembled a set of ten recommendations for regulatory reform that would improve research universities' ability to carry out their missions without requiring a significant financial investment by the Federal government. We firmly believe that compliance and regulatory oversight are essential to the conduct of federally-supported research. Rationalizing the Federal regulatory infrastructure is essential to

355

Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

356

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, COUNTRY CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 3 RRRR XXX 1 33 20 210.00 68.00 04 05 2008 1 FOREIGN 1 EG 309 J...

357

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

YYY RRRR 000001 A B 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 YYY RRRR 04 05 2008 1 AH31...

358

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

XXX XXX 000031 A M 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 4 1 31 20 -1405.00 -93.00 2 32 50...

359

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 1 32 50 -1042.00 2 32 50 1002.00 03 31 2008 004 A01 1 2 NP NP PRODUCTION PRODUCTION 50 50 309 309 J J -105736.00 105736.00 13.2962 13.2962 -88991.00 88905.00...

360

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

A A 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 YYY RRRR 03 31 2008 1 AH31 1 EG 309 J...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

XXX VVV 000001 A A 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT WASTE COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 1 VVV XXX 03 31 2008 1 LD WASTE...

362

Nuclear Material Transaction Report NRC 741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

D 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 4 YYY XXX 1 31 20 -50397.00 -2335.00 2 31 20 50300.00...

363

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

A B 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 YYY RRRR 04 05 2008 1 AH31 1 EG 309 J...

364

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

A A M 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 1 32 50 -1042.00 2 32 50 1002.00 03 31 2008 004...

365

Nuclear Material Transaction Report NRC 741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

B 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 0 YYY XXX 04 01 2008 BASED ON SHIPPER'S VALUES Example...

366

Nuclear Material Transaction Report NRC741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

C 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 4 YYY XXX 1 31 20 -50397.00 -2335.00 2 31 20 50300.00...

367

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

A M 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 4 1 31 20 -1405.00 -93.00 2 32 50 1042.00 03 31...

368

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, COUNTRY CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 3 RRRR XXX 1 33 20 210.00 68.00 04 05 2008 1 FOREIGN 1 EG 309 J 177999.00...

369

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, COUNTRY CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 3 RRRR XXX 1 33 20 210.00 68.00 03 31 2008 1 FOREIGN 1 EG 309 J 177999.00...

370

Nuclear Material Transaction Report NRC741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 31 20 -50397.00 -2335.00 2 31 20 50300.00 2330.00 04 16 2008 Example 1-c 002 1 FAB FUEL ELE -2 -1 20 309 J -377609.00 4.7962 -18111.00 101 004 103 2 3 4 FAB FUEL ELE -2 FAB...

371

Nuclear Material Transaction Report NRC 741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 31 20 -50397.00 -2335.00 2 31 20 50300.00 2330.00 04 23 2008 Example 1-d 002 1 FAB FUEL ELE -2 -1 20 309 J -377609.00 4.7962 -18111.00 101 004 103 2 3 4 FAB FUEL ELE -2 FAB...

372

Clearance Levels For Redundant Material From Decommissioning Of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, a great deal is happening in the regulatory field regarding the release of radiologically contaminated material: . The IAEA is working on the revision of Safety Series 89 (governing the principles of exemption and clearance) and of the TECDOC 855 on clearance levels. . The European Commission Directive on basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation in both nuclear and non-nuclear industries will become effective in May 2000. . The U.S. NRC has issued its draft on clearance of material from nuclear facilities (NUREG 1640), as well as an "issues" paper on the release of solid materials. The U.S. State Department has launched an International Radioactive Source Management Initiative, one of the objectives being to "develop international standards and guidelines and `harmonize' U.S. and IAEA radioactive clearance levels." Of great significance to the implementor of clearance regulations in the nuclear industry is the emergence of the NORM issue durin...

Shankar Menon Program; Shankar Menon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Halting_Title_XVII_Nuclear_Loan_Guarantees.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Friends of the Earth ♦ Greenpeace ♦ South Carolina Chapter-Sierra Club ♦ NC Waste Friends of the Earth ♦ Greenpeace ♦ South Carolina Chapter-Sierra Club ♦ NC Waste Awareness and Reduction Network ♦ Georgia Women's Action for New Directions ♦ Nuclear Information and Resource Service ♦ Beyond Nuclear ♦ NIRS-Southeast ♦ AP1000 Oversight Group October 19, 2009 Secretary of Energy Chu U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 Mr. Richard Frantz Director, Loan Guarantee Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 NRC Reveals AP1000 Nuclear Reactor Design Problems, DOE Must Halt Issuance of Conditional Loan Guarantees to Utilities Pursuing AP1000 Dear Secretary of Energy Chu and Director Frantz: In a surprise move with potentially serious impacts, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

374

Evaluation of the applicability of existing nuclear power plant regulatory requirements in the U.S. to advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect

The current wave of small modular reactor (SMR) designs all have the goal of reducing the cost of management and operations. By optimizing the system, the goal is to make these power plants safer, cheaper to operate and maintain, and more secure. In particular, the reduction in plant staffing can result in significant cost savings. The introduction of advanced reactor designs and increased use of advanced automation technologies in existing nuclear power plants will likely change the roles, responsibilities, composition, and size of the crews required to control plant operations. Similarly, certain security staffing requirements for traditional operational nuclear power plants may not be appropriate or necessary for SMRs due to the simpler, safer and more automated design characteristics of SMRs. As a first step in a process to identify where regulatory requirements may be met with reduced staffing and therefore lower cost, this report identifies the regulatory requirements and associated guidance utilized in the licensing of existing reactors. The potential applicability of these regulations to advanced SMR designs is identified taking into account the unique features of these types of reactors.

LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Middleton, Bobby D.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Baum, Gregory A.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Design-Basis Flood Estimation for Site Characterization at Nuclear Power Plants in the United States of America  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to describe approaches and methods for estimation of the design-basis flood at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 defines the design-basis flood and lists the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations that require estimation of the design-basis flood. For comparison, the design-basis flood estimation methods used by other Federal agencies are also described. A brief discussion of the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency for estimation of the design-basis floods in its member States is also included.

Prasad, Rajiv; Hibler, Lyle F.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Technical support for the Ukrainian State Committee for Nuclear Radiation Safety on specific waste issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The government of Ukraine, a now-independent former member of the Soviet Union, has asked the United States to assist its State Committee for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SCNRS) in improving its regulatory control in technical fields for which it has responsibility. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is providing this assistance in several areas, including management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. Radioactive wastes resulting from nuclear power plant operation, maintenance, and decommissioning must be stored and ultimately disposed of appropriately. In addition, radioactive residue from radioisotopes used in various industrial and medical applications must be managed. The objective of this program is to provide the Ukrainian SCNRS with the information it needs to establish regulatory control over uranium mining and milling activities in the Zheltye Vody (Yellow Waters) area and radioactive waste disposal in the Pripyat (Chernobyl) area among others. The author of this report, head of the Environmental Technology Section, Health Sciences Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, accompanied NRC staff to Ukraine to meet with SCNRS staff and visit sites in question. The report highlights problems at the sites visited and recommends license conditions that SCNRS can require to enhance safety of handling mining and milling wastes. The author`s responsibility was specifically for the visit to Zheltye Vody and the mining and milling waste sites associated with that facility. An itinerary for the Zheltye Vody portion of the trip is included as Appendix A.

Little, C.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been restricted core. Nuclear tests are not scheduled untilnuclear NRC, the non-nuclear tests are proceedingInstitute test reactor - megawatts - megawatts - Nuclear

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Microsoft Word - SmartGrid - NRC Input to DOE Requestrvjcomments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

complicated. NPPs control systems will not be interfaced with or controlled from grid network control systems. Control of a NPP has to be handled by the NRC licensed operators to...

379

Agenda Highlights: 2012 DOE-NRC NMMSS Annual User Training  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Agenda as of February 2, 2012 Agenda Highlights: 2012 DOE-NRC NMMSS Annual User Training Date Morning Sessions (8:30 am - 12 pm) Afternoon Sessions (1:00 pm - 5:00 pm) Monday May...

380

Regulatory Perspective on Implementation of a Dose Standard for a One-Million Year Compliance Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is governed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The EPA has the responsibility for setting public health and safety and environmental standards for radioactive waste disposal at Yucca Mountain and it is the NRC's responsibility to implement those standards in its regulations to ensure public health and safety and the environment are protected. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as the developer of the potential repository, must submit a license application to the NRC to seek approval to construct the repository. DOE must comply with NRC's regulations for NRC to authorize construction and license operation of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 2005, EPA issued proposed revised standards and NRC issued proposed revised regulations for conducting performance assessment beyond 10,000 years up to 1 million years. The challenge for the EPA and NRC is to develop standards and regulations that provide an appropriate method for evaluating the safety of the potential repository given the unprecedented time period to be analyzed and the inherent uncertainties in estimating the future evolution of the Yucca Mountain site and the containment of the waste in the waste packages. A fundamental aspect of the proposed EPA standard is the specified approach for limiting undue speculation on future behavior of the site by constraining the features, events, and processes that need to be considered in the performance assessment. EPA proposed to limit the assessment of specific features, events, and processes in the period after 10,000 years to effects on the repository system that are most relevant (i.e., ignoring lesser or secondary effects that may add to speculation and uncertainties but would not be expected to have a significant effect on peak dose over a 1 million year period). For example, DOE's performance assessment may (1) limit the analysis of seismic activity to the effects caused by damage to the drifts and the waste package; (2) limit analysis of igneous activity to effects on the waste package that result in release of radionuclides to the atmosphere or ground water; (3) require DOE to include general corrosion in its analysis of engineered barrier performance, and (4) limit the effect of climate variation to those resulting from increased water flowing to the repository. NRC has been reviewing its performance assessment models and techniques to assure they are consistent with EPA's proposed requirements for the period after 10,000 years and adequate to assist the review of a potential license application from the DOE. Currently, only slight modifications to the models and approaches used in the performance assessment for the initial 10,000 years are expected to be needed to accommodate calculations for longer times (e.g., modifications to implement a steady-state value to represent the proposed climate change). NRC staff will be able to use the modified performance assessment to identify additional sensitivities associated with estimating doses over very long time periods and improve its understanding of the performance of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. (author)

McCartin, Timothy [HLW Repository Safety, U.S. Nuclear Reg. Commission, Two White Flint North, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD, 20852 - 2738 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Development of a Consensus Standard for Verification and Validation of Nuclear System Thermal-Fluids Software  

SciTech Connect

With the resurgence of nuclear power and increased interest in advanced nuclear reactors as an option to supply abundant energy without the associated greenhouse gas emissions of the more conventional fossil fuel energy sources, there is a need to establish internationally recognized standards for the verification and validation (V&V) of software used to calculate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of advanced reactor designs for both normal operation and hypothetical accident conditions. To address this need, ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Standards and Certification has established the V&V 30 Committee, under the jurisdiction of the V&V Standards Committee, to develop a consensus standard for verification and validation of software used for design and analysis of advanced reactor systems. The initial focus of this committee will be on the V&V of system analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for nuclear applications. To limit the scope of the effort, the committee will further limit its focus to software to be used in the licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. In this framework, the Standard should conform to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other regulatory practices, procedures and methods for licensing of nuclear power plants as embodied in the United States (U.S.) Code of Federal Regulations and other pertinent documents such as Regulatory Guide 1.203, 'Transient and Accident Analysis Methods' and NUREG-0800, 'NRC Standard Review Plan'. In addition, the Standard should be consistent with applicable sections of ASME NQA-1-2008 'Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications (QA)'. This paper describes the general requirements for the proposed V&V 30 Standard, which includes; (a) applicable NRC and other regulatory requirements for defining the operational and accident domain of a nuclear system that must be considered if the system is to be licensed, (b) the corresponding calculation domain of the software that should encompass the nuclear operational and accident domain to be used to study the system behavior for licensing purposes, (c) the definition of the scaled experimental data set required to provide the basis for validating the software, (d) the ensemble of experimental data sets required to populate the validation matrix for the software in question, and (e) the practices and procedures to be used when applying a validation standard. Although this initial effort will focus on software for licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors, it is anticipated that the practices and procedures developed for this Standard can eventually be extended to other nuclear and non-nuclear applications.

Edwin A. Harvego; Richard R. Schultz; Ryan L. Crane

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Engineering Development & Applications - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies (FCT) Generation IV (Gen IV) Nuclear Energy Program Decontamination and Decommissioning Nuclear Regulatory Research Facilities Environmentally Assisted Cracking...

383

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Radiological characterization of Yankee Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is the determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. This paper describes the site radiological characterization program that has been implemented for decommissioning the Yankee plant. Radiological scoping surveys were completed to support submittal of a decommissioning plan to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by October 1, 1993. These surveys were designed to provide sufficient detail to estimate the extent of contamination, volume of radiological waste, activity of radiological waste, and personnel dose estimates for removal activities. Surveys were conducted both inside and on the grounds outside of the Yankee plant buildings. Survey results were combined with analytical evaluations to characterize the Yankee site.

Bellini, F.X.; Cumming, E.R.; Hollenbeck, P. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Comparative analysis of United States and French nuclear power plant siting and construction regulatory policies and their economic consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the substantial commitments of time and money which are devoted to the nuclear power plant siting process, the effectiveness of the system in providing a balanced evaluation of the technical, environmental and ...

Golay, Michael Warren.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decommissioning means permanently removing a nuclear facility from service and reducing radioactive material on the licensed site to levels that would permit termination of the NRC license. On June 27, 1988, the NRC issued general requirements on decommissioning that contained technical and financial criteria and dealt with planning needs, timing, funding mechanisms, and environmental review

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198  

SciTech Connect

Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

Lowry, N.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

NRC Licensing Strategy Development for the NGNP  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project will provide the basis for commercialization of a new generation of advanced nuclear plants that utilize hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The inherently safe HTGR design characteristics can be utilized to supply high-temperature process heat, co-generated electricity, and/or hydrogen for a number of industrial applications (e.g., petrochemical processes). Completion of the NGNP will result in a facility that demonstrates the safety and economics of the design, the commercial industrial potential of the technology, and the viability of the licensing strategy.

Mark R. Holbrook; Trevor Cook

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

William Shack elected Chairman of NRC's Advisory Committee on...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

391

The NRC OIG: Who We Are and What We Do  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear waste – transportation, storage and disposal of nuclear material and waste, decommissioning of nuclear facilities; and ...

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

Controlling the atom. The beginnings of nuclear regulation 1946--1962  

SciTech Connect

This book traces the early history of nuclear power regulation in the US. It focuses on the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the federal agency that until 1975 was primarily responsible for planning and carrying out programs to protect public health and safety from the hazards of the civilian use of nuclear energy. It also describes the role of other groups that figured significantly in the development of regulatory policies, including the congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, federal agencies other than the AEC, state governments, the nuclear industry, and scientific organizations. And it considers changes in public perceptions of and attitudes toward atomic energy and the dangers of radiation exposure. The context in which regulatory programs evolved is a rich and complex mixture of political, legislative, legal, technological, scientific, and administrative history. The basic purpose of this book is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which inherited responsibility for nuclear safety after Congress disbanded the AEC, and the general public with information on the historical antecedents and background of regulatory issues.

Mazuzan, G.T.; Walker, J.S.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are collaborating to assess and validate fire computer codes for nuclear power plant applications. ...

394

Mixed Waste Storage and Treatment: Regulatory Compliance Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management and storage of mixed wastes represents one of the most challenging regulatory issues currently facing NRC licensees. This report provides instructions and guidance regarding the on-site storage and treatment of mixed waste in compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Nuclear Energy CFD Application Management System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In modeling and simulation (M&S), it is virtually impossible to separately evaluate the effectiveness of the model from the data used because the results produced rely heavily on the interaction between the two. Both the data and the simulation are responsible for achieving the ultimate goal of providing defensible research and development (R&D) products and decisions. It is therefore vital that data verification and validation (V&V) activities, along with stringent configuration management, be considered part of the overall M&S accreditation process. In support of these goals is the Nuclear Energy CFD Application Management System (NE-CAMS) for nuclear system design and safety analysis. Working with Bettis Laboratory and Utah State University, a plan of action is being developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that will address the highest and most immediate needs to track and manage computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and experimental data in an electronic database. The database will intrinsically incorporate the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved policies and procedures for quality. The quality requirements will be such that the model and data must conform to the quality specifications outlined by the NRC before they can be entered into the database. The primary focus of this database is CFD V&V for nuclear industry needs and will, in practice, serve as the best practice guideline that will accommodate NRC regulations. Such a database, along with a prescriptive methodology for how to utilize it, will provide the NRC with accepted CFD results that could potentially be used for licensing. NE-CAMS will incorporate data V&V as key precursors to the distribution of nuclear systems design and safety data, ensuring that these data are appropriate for use in a particular M&S application. Verification will be conducted to provide a level of confidence that the data selected are the most appropriate for the simulation and are properly prepared, i.e., they are complete, correct and conform to predefined procedures and requirements. Validation will ensure that the data accurately represent the real world activity that is being simulated, ensuring the analytical quality of the data. The level of detail and stringency applied against the data V&V activities will be based on a graded approach principle; the higher the risk, the more rigorous the V&V activities. For the V&V activities to be complete, it will be necessary to scrutinize the physical and statistical properties of the extracted data during the overall process. Regardless of the specific technique or methodology, data V&V will be an important component of NE-CAMS.

Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

An Evaluation of Alternative Classification Methods for Routine Low Level Waste from the Nuclear Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the feasibility of classifying all routine nuclear power plant low level waste, including Class B and Class C waste, as Class A low level waste within the framework of NRC regulatory requirements. A change in classification could expand disposal venues and reduce the uncertainty of future disposal. The report shows that all of the waste, when managed as a composite stream, will meet the requirements for Class A disposal without leaving a portion of the stream orphaned to on-site ...

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

398

Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

399

Remedial action plan for the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. DOE responses to comments from U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment  

SciTech Connect

This report contains responses by the US Department of Energy to comments from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment on the Naturita remedial action plan. This was done in an attempt to clarify information. The site is an inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado.

NONE

1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

Nuclear materials 1993 annual report. Volume 8, No. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1993. The report is published in two parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1993 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Note that the subtitle of No. 2 has been changed from ``Nonreactors`` to ``Nuclear Materials.`` Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1993.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

AVAILABILITY NOTICE Availability of Reference Materials Cited in NRC Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NUREG series comprises (1) brochures (NUREG/BR-XoXX), (2) proceedings of confer ences (NUREG/CP-XXXX), (3) reports resulting from international agreements (NUREG/IA-X)OOQ, (4) technical and administrative reports 'and books [(NUREG-)000) or (NUREG/CR-X)ooq], and (5) compilations of legal decisions and orders of the Commission and Atomic and Safety Ucensing Boards and of Office Directors ' decisions under Section 2.206 of NRC's regulations (NUREG x)OOQ. A single copy of each NRC draft report for com ment is available free, to the extent of supply, upon written request as follows:

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Technical Letter Report - Analysis of Ultrasonic Data on Piping Cracks at Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant Before and After Applying a Mechanical Stress Improvement Process, JCN-N6319, Task 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing a position on the management of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in piping systems previously analyzed for leak-before-break (LBB). Part of this work involves determining whether inspections alone are sufficient or if inspections plus mitigation techniques are needed. The work described in this report addresses the reliability of ultrasonic phased-array (PA) examinations for inspection of cracks that have been subjected to the mitigation method of mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). It is believed that stresses imparted during MSIP may make ultrasonic crack responses in piping welds more difficult to detect and accurately characterize. To explore this issue, data were acquired, both before and after applying MSIP, and analyzed from cracked areas in piping at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. This work was performed under NRC Project JCN-N6319, PWSCC in Leak-Before-Break Systems.

Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Crawford, Susan L.

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Main report, draft report for comment. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Technical and regulatory review of the Rover nuclear fuel process for use on Fort St. Vrain fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an analysis for processing and final disposal of Fort St. Vrain (FSV) irradiated fuel in Rover-type equipment or technologies. This analysis includes an evaluation of the current Rover equipment status and the applicability of this technology in processing FSV fuel. The analyses are based on the physical characteristics of the FSV fuel and processing capabilities of the Rover equipment. Alternate FSV fuel disposal options are also considered including fuel-rod removal from the block, disposal of the empty block, or disposal of the entire fuel-containing block. The results of these analyses document that the current Rover hardware is not operable for any purpose, and any effort to restart this hardware will require extensive modifications and re-evaluation. However, various aspects of the Rover technology, such as the successful fluid-bed burner design, can be applied with modification to FSV fuel processing. The current regulatory climate and technical knowledge are not adequately defined to allow a complete analysis and conclusion with respect to the disposal of intact fuel blocks with or without the fuel rods removed. The primary unknowns include the various aspects of fuel-rod removal from the block, concentration of radionuclides remaining in the graphite block after rod removal, and acceptability of carbon in the form of graphite in a high level waste repository.

Hertzler, T. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Updating Human Factors Engineering Guidelines for Conducting Safety Reviews of Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. This paper describes the role of HFE guidelines in the safety review process and the content of the key HFE guidelines used. Then we will present the methodology used to develop HFE guidance and update these documents, and describe the current status of the update program.

O, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger - NRC

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

408

Demonstrating Structural Adequacy of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures for Beyond Design-Basis Pressure Loadings  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Demonstrating the structural integrity of U.S. nuclear power plant (NPP) containment structures, for beyond design-basis internal pressure loadings, is necessary to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements and performance goals. This paper discusses methods for demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment for beyond design-basis pressure loadings. Three distinct evaluations are addressed: (1) estimating the ultimate pressure capacity of the containment structure (10 CFR 50 and US NRC Standard Review Plan, Section 3.8) ; (2) demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment subjected to pressure loadings associated with combustible gas generation (10 CFR 52 and 10 CFR 50); and (3) demonstrating the containment structural integrity for severe accidents (10 CFR 52 as well as SECY 90-016, SECY 93-087, and related NRC staff requirements memoranda (SRMs)). The paper describes the technical basis for specific aspects of the methods presented. It also presents examples of past issues identified in licensing activities related to these evaluations.

Braverman, J.I.; Morante, R.

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

Insights into the behavior of nuclear power plant containments during severe accidents  

SciTech Connect

The containment building surrounding a nuclear reactor offers the last barrier to the release of radioactive materials from a severe accident into the environment. The loading environment of the containment under severe accident conditions may include much greater than design pressures and temperatures. Investigations into the performance of containments subject to ultimate or failure pressure and temperature conditions have been performed over the last several years through a program administered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These NRC sponsored investigations are subsequently discussed. Reviewed are the results of large scale experiments on reinforced concrete, prestressed concrete, and steel containment models pressurized to failure. In conjunction with these major tests, the results of separate effect testing on many of the critical containment components; that is, aged and unaged seals, a personnel air lock and electrical penetration assemblies subjected to elevated temperature and pressure have been performed. An objective of the NRC program is to gain an understanding of the behavior of typical existing and planned containment designs subject to postulated severe accident conditions. This understanding has led to the development of experimentally verified analytical tools that can be applied to accurately predict their ultimate capacities useful in developing severe accident mitigation schemes. Finally, speculation on the response of containments subjected to severe accident conditions is presented.

Horschel, D.S.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Parks, M.B.; Lambert, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R. [ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Decommissioning License Termination Plan Documents and Lessons Learned: Summary of LTPs for Two Reactors and Nuclear Regulatory Comm ission Safety Evaluation Reports for Three Nuclear Power Plant LTPs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report offers those utilities beginning the preparation of License Termination Plans (LTPs) in the near future a comprehensive summary of the approaches currently taken in LTP preparation by major nuclear decommissioning projects. The report details the approach taken in addressing each element of the LTP, and the lessons learned by those utilities currently undergoing the license termination process. This document provides needed guidance for the LTP process, and will greatly benefit utilities cons...

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spent Fuel Transportation NRC Update Spent Fuel Transportation NRC Update Amy M. Snyder, Project Manager Spent Fuel Project Office U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission . 2 AGENDA...

412

Tech Beat July 14, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recently ... NRC concluded that the research reactor can be ... products' ability to find security defects in ...

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

413

NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation Name NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation Address 4250 Wesbrook Mall Place Vancouver, Canada Zip V6T 1W5 Number of employees 201-500 Phone number 604-221-3000 Coordinates 49.2460722°, -123.2326432° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":49.2460722,"lon":-123.2326432,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

414

Reaching site closure for groundwater under multiple regulatory agencies  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater at the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) has been impacted by both radionuclides and chemical constituents. Furthermore, the cleanup standards and closure requirements for HNP are regulated both by federal and state agencies. The only consistent requirement is the development of a site conceptual model and an understanding of the hydrogeologic conditions that will govern contaminant transport and identify potential receptors. The cleanup criteria to reach site closure for radionuclides is regulated by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) Bureau of Air Management, Radiological Division. For license termination under the NRC, the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) for all media can not exceed 25 milli-Rem per year (mRem/yr) plus As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). The CTDEP has a similar requirement with the TEDE not to exceed 19 mRem/yr plus ALARA. To reach these criteria, derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) were developed for radiological exposures from three (3) media components; soil, existing groundwater and future groundwater from left-in place foundations or footings. Based on current conditions, the target dose contribution from existing and future groundwater is not to exceed 2 mRem/yr TEDE. After source (soil) remediation is complete, the NRC requires two (2) years of quarterly monitoring to demonstrate that groundwater quality meets the DCGLs and does not show an upward trend. CYAPCO's NRC License Termination Plan (LTP) specifies a minimum 18-month period of groundwater monitoring, as long as samples are collected during two spring/high water seasons, to verify the efficacy of remedial actions at HNP. In addition to the 19 mRem/yr criteria, the CTDEP also requires groundwater to be in compliance with the Remediation Standards Regulation (RSRs). There are no published criteria for radionuclides in the RSRs, however CTDEP has approved the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) as the clean up standards for individual constituents. After remediation of an identified contamination source, the RSRs require that at least one groundwater monitoring well, hydraulically down-gradient of the remediation area, be sampled to confirm that the remediation has not impacted groundwater quality. After four quarters of groundwater monitoring with results below the MCLs, additional groundwater sampling must continue for up to three years to reach site closure in accordance with the RSRs. The cleanup criteria for chemical constituents, including boron, are regulated by the USEPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the CTDEP Bureau of Water Protection and Land Reuse. The USEPA, however, has accepted the CTDEP RSRs as the cleanup criteria for RCRA. Therefore attainment of the CTDEP RSRs is the only set of criteria needed to reach closure, but both agencies retain oversight, interpretation, and closure authority. As stated above, under the RSRs, groundwater must be monitored following a source remediation for a minimum of four quarters. After demonstrating that the remediation was successful, then additional groundwater sampling is required for up to three additional years. However, the number of monitoring wells and frequency of sampling are not defined in the RSRs and must be negotiated with CTDEP. To successfully reach closure, the conceptual site model, groundwater transport mechanisms, and potential receptors must be defined. Once the hydrogeology is understood, a long term groundwater monitoring program can then be coordinated to meet each agencies requirement to both terminate the NRC license and reach site closure under RCRA. (authors)

Glucksberg, N. [MACTEC, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Couture, B. [Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, East Ham (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Case histories of EA documents for nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power programs and policies in the United States have been subject to environmental assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) since 1971. NEPA documentation prepared for programmatic policy decision-making within the nuclear fuel cycle and concurrent federal policy are examined as they relate to radioactive waste management in this paper. Key programmatic environmental impact statements that address radioactive waste management include: the Atomic Energy Commission document on management of commercial high-level and transuranium-contaminated radioactive waste, which focussed on development of engineered retrievable surface storage facilities (RSSF); the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) document on use of recycled plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors, which focussed on plutonium recycle and RSSF; the NRC statement on handling of spent light water power reactor fuel, which focussed on spent fuel storage; and the Department of Energy (DOE) statement on management of commercially generated radioactive wastes, which focussed on development of deep geologic repositories. DOE is currently pursuing the deep geologic repository option, with monitored retrievable storage as a secondary option.

Vocke, R.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well-defined, well-characterized data. Element 3. Standards will be established for the design and operation of experiments for the generation of new validation data sets that are to be submitted to NE-CAMS that addresses the completeness and characterization of the dataset. Element 4. Standards will be developed for performing verification and validation (V&V) to establish confidence levels in CFD analyses of nuclear reactor processes; such processes will be acceptable and recognized by both CFD experts and the NRC.

Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, draft report for comment. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s WNP-2, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Final generic environmental statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors. Volume 5. Public comments and Nuclear Regulatory Commission responses  

SciTech Connect

Copies of 69 letters are presented commenting on the Draft Generic Environmental Statement (GESMO) WASH-1327 and the NRC's responses to the comments received from Federal, State and local agencies; environmental and public interest groups, members of the academic and industrial communities, and individual citizens. An index to these letters indicating the number assigned to each letter, the author, and organization represented, is provided in the Table of Contents.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

DOE Makes Filing with NRC in Support OF Authority to Withdraw...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Makes Filing with NRC in Support OF Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application DOE Makes Filing with NRC in Support OF Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application July 9, 2010 - 3:16pm...

420

Oconee Nuclear Station Enclosures (see next page)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Carolinas, LLC, (Duke) hereby submits an application for renewal of the Oconee Nuclear Station (ONS), Site-Specific Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) license. The current license expires on January 31, 2010. Based on the expected duration of the ONS 'plant licenses and the estimated time needed to remove the storage casks from the site, Duke is requesting a license renewal period of 40 years. An exemption request to support the license renewal period is provided as Enclosure 2. The application for renewal of the Site-Specific ISFSI license, Enclosure 3, was prepared in accordance with applicable provisions of 10 CFR 72, Subpart B, and the Preliminary NRC Staff Guidance for 10 CFR 72 License Renewal. A list of the regulatory commitments associated with this submittal is provided as Enclosure 4. The

Dave Baxter; Duke Energy Corporation; Pursuant To Cfr; Duke Power; Company Llc Duke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report  

SciTech Connect

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the {prime}978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the primary responsibility for the safe use of nuclear materials. C.3.2 NRC Criteria for Decommissioning, decontamination, decommissioning, and reclamation of uranium or thorium mills and mill tailings. Both regulations, special nuclear, and byproduct materials be managed, processed, and used in a manner that protects public

424

Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 15, 2007 ... Sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses has as its overall mission to ...

428

Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities at the U.S. Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Transportation Security Rulemaking...

429

Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

applications for new nuclear construction are before the NRC today, and why the first new nuclear plants in over 30 years are under construction in the United States. As with all...

430

The US uranium industry: Regulatory and policy impediments  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 required the DOE to develop recommendations and implement government programs to assist the domestic uranium industry in increasing export opportunities. In 1993, as part of that effort, the Office of Nuclear Energy identified several key factors that could (or have) significantly impact(ed) export opportunities for domestic uranium. This report addresses one of these factors: regulatory and policy impediments to the flow of uranium products between the US and other countries. It speaks primarily to the uranium market for civil nuclear power. Changes in the world political and economic order have changed US national security requirements, and the US uranium industry has found itself without the protected market it once enjoyed. An unlevel playing field for US uranium producers has resulted from a combination of geology, history, and a general US political philosophy of nonintervention that precludes the type of industrial policy practiced in other uranium-exporting countries. The US has also been hampered in its efforts to support the domestic uranium-producing industry by its own commitment to free and open global markets and by international agreements such as GATT and NAFTA. Several US policies, including the imposition of NRC fees and licensing costs and Harbor Maintenance fees, directly harm the competitiveness of the domestic uranium industry. Finally, requirements under US law, such as those in the 1979 Nuclear Nonproliferation Act, place very strict limits on the use of US-origin uranium, limitations not imposed by other uranium-producing countries. Export promotion and coordination are two areas in which the US can help the domestic uranium industry without violating existing trade agreements or other legal or policy constraints.

Drennen, T.E.; Glicken, J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nuclear containment steel liner corrosion workshop : final summary and recommendation report.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the proceedings of an expert panel workshop conducted to evaluate the mechanisms of corrosion for the steel liner in nuclear containment buildings. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored this work which was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. A workshop was conducted at the NRC Headquarters in Rockville, Maryland on September 2 and 3, 2010. Due to the safety function performed by the liner, the expert panel was assembled in order to address the full range of issues that may contribute to liner corrosion. This report is focused on corrosion that initiates from the outer surface of the liner, the surface that is in contact with the concrete containment building wall. Liner corrosion initiating on the outer diameter (OD) surface has been identified at several nuclear power plants, always associated with foreign material left embedded in the concrete. The potential contributing factors to liner corrosion were broken into five areas for discussion during the workshop. Those include nuclear power plant design and operation, corrosion of steel in contact with concrete, concrete aging and degradation, concrete/steel non-destructive examination (NDE), and concrete repair and corrosion mitigation. This report also includes the expert panel member's recommendations for future research.

Erler, Bryan A. (Erler Engineering Ltd., Chicago, IL); Weyers, Richard E. (Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA); Sagues, Alberto (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL); Petti, Jason P.; Berke, Neal Steven (Tourney Consulting Group, LLC, Kalamazoo, MI); Naus, Dan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Design and Interface Design Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE software design and interface design is to assess the activities that results in the development, documentation, and review of a software design that meets the requirements defined in the software requirements documentation. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIRE’s Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP) design specification.

Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Design and Interface Design Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE software design and interface design is to assess the activities that results in the development, documentation, and review of a software design that meets the requirements defined in the software requirements documentation. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIRE’s Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP) design specification.

Kent Norris

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. The information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Maine Yankee was selected as one of a series of plants for study. ne product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Maine Yankee plant.

Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Moffitt, N.E.; Bumgardner, J.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant.

Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Appendix B  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This report consists of Volume 2, which consists of the GALL literature review tables for the NUMARC Industry Reports reviewed for the report.

Kasza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Regulatory overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end of 2012 and beginning of 2013 was a busy time for US regulators and standard-setters as two regulations and one consensus standard made the news. All have implications for oilseed processing and edible oil refining. Regulatory overview Public

438

The A-bomb, 50 years later: The evolution of nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the wake of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, the U.S. government began to invest heavily in its nuclear program. Nuclear medicine stood to gain from these postwar policies, but it also suffered some setbacks. Fifty years ago this month, two atomic bombs were dropped on Japan, killing thousands of civilians and ushering in a quick and final end to World War II. The beginning of the post-war era signaled the birth of nuclear medicine as it is widely applied today. In fact, the same nuclear reactor that produced elements for the A-bomb project was turned over for the mass production of radionuclides for medicine and industry. The link between the A-bomb and nuclear medicine, however, has always been a sensitive subject among nuclear physicians whose patients may associate radionuclide injections with mushroom clouds. Although this link is not justified, the government`s interest in developing nuclear technology following World War II did have a significant impact on nuclear medicine: on the upside, millions of federal dollars were funneled into the production of radionuclides for research and medicine. On the downside, Congress established the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)-which later became the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-to oversee safety issues, making nuclear medicine the only medical field regulated by a federal agency.

Kotz, D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Civilian Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste (HLW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Management of Nuclear Materials and Non-HLW Nuclear Fuel Cycle Energy Research and Development Non-Proliferation Nuclear Regulatory...

440

Materials Development for Nuclear Applications and Extreme ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aladar A Csontos, Nuclear Regulatory Commission ... on lifetime extension of existing nuclear reactors and meeting the challenges of future nuclear endeavors