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1

NRC - regulator of nuclear safety  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

NRC okays nuclear merger at Entergy Corp  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved the consolidation of Entergy Corp's nuclear operations into the utility's proposed nuclear management company, Entergy Operations Inc. The NRC action is a significant step in a consolidation process that would place operational responsibility for Entergy's nuclear plants in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana with Entergy Operations. The NRC action would authorize transfer of the operating licenses for Arkansas Nuclear One (ANO) at Russellville, Ark, Waterford-3 at Taft, La, and Grand Gulf-1 at Port Gibson, Miss, to Entergy Operations. A consolidated nuclear organization will allow for a more focused management structure in its nuclear operations and will result in greater operational efficiencies.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 21, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 244)] December 21, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 244)] [Proposed Rules] [Page 71331-71333] From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr21de99-21] ======================================================================= ----------------------------------------------------------------------- NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 RIN 3150-AG41 Advance Notification to Native American Tribes of Transportation of Certain Types of Nuclear Waste AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering an amendment to its regulations that would require NRC licensees to notify

4

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory and licensing matters of interest to DOE, either as an NRC license applicant or in connection with related authorities and responsibilities of DOE and NRC on nuclear material, nuclear waste, and nuclear nonproliferation matters. GC-52 attorneys provide advice and support on a variety of NRC matters including regulation and licensing of DOE independent spent fuel storage facilities (ISFSIs) and a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility, consultation with NRC on certain DOE waste determinations, and imports and exports of nuclear materials and radioactive sealed sources.

5

Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and DOE's Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and...

6

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

qU oSoLTJRC qU oSoLTJRC United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Protecting People and the Environment NUREG-1872, Vol. 2 HudcD [jE©wftamfsýýpc Wafm(M oran EA Office of New Reactors AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material As of November 1999, you may electronically access NUREG-series publications and other NRC records at NRC's Public Electronic Reading Room at http:t/www.nrc..ov/reading-rm.html. Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments.

7

Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to enhance core and spent fuel pool cooling, reactor coolant system integrity, and containment integrity. (authors)

McConnell, M. W. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop: 012-H2, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946...

9

Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to Advance Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to Advance Global Nuclear Energy Partnership July 17, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expanded cooperation for President Bush's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that was signed on Friday by DOE's GNEP Deputy Program Manager Paul Lisowski and NRC Executive Director for Operations Luis Reyes. The MOU establishes the foundation for increased cooperation between DOE and NRC on technological research and engineering studies and marks another important milestone

10

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

SciTech Connect

This thirty-second volume of issuances (1--496) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards, Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and Administrative Law Judges it covers the period from July 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990. The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. Issuances are referred to as follows: Commission--CLI, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards--ALAB, Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards--LBP, Administrative Law Judges--ALJ, Directors'Decisions--DD, and Denial of Petitions for Rulemaking--DPRM. Specific facilities discussed are: Carroll County Nuclear Station; Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station; Perry Nuclear Power Plant; Quad Cities Nuclear Power Stations; Seabrook Station; Shoreham Nuclear Generating Plant; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; and Vogtle Electric Generating Plant.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

12

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

13

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

SciTech Connect

This document is the March 1996 listing of NRC issuances. Included are: (1) NRC orders granting Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company`s petition for review of the ASLB order LBP-95-17, (2) NRC orders relating to the potential disqualification of two commissioners in the matter of the decommissioning of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (3) ASLB orders pertaining to the Oncology Services Corporation, (4) ASLB orders pertaining to the Radiation Oncology Center, (5) ASLB orders pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and (6) Director`s decision pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting DOE Directives & Manuals DOE Standards Central Technical Authorities (CTA) Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) Line Management SSO/ FAC Reps 48 CFR 970 48 CFR 952 Federal Acquisition Regulations External Oversight *Defense Nuclear Facility

15

DOE/NRC Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms DOENRC Forms DOENRC Forms U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

16

Regulatory Guide 5.29, Revision 2, "Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants".  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION June 2013 U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION June 2013 Revision 2 REGULATORY GUIDE OFFICE OF NUCLEAR REGULATORY RESEARCH Written suggestions regarding this guide or development of new guides may be submitted through the NRC's public Web site under the Regulatory Guides document collection of the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/reg-guides/contactus.html. Electronic copies of this regulatory guide, previous versions of this guide, and other recently issued guides are available through the NRC's public Web site under the Regulatory Guides document collection of the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/. The regulatory guide is also available through the NRC's Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) at

17

ORISE: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Radiation Exposure Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information and Reporting System (REIRS) Information and Reporting System (REIRS) ORISE maintains large database of radiation exposure records for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is required by federal mandate to maintain and evaluate radiation protection data for workers at facilities that it licenses. As part of its mission of safety, the NRC operates the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS), a database system containing all occupational radiation exposure records that have been submitted to the NRC under 10 CFR Part 20. REIRS encompasses 1,800-plus NRC licensees and contains more than five million records for more than one million monitored individuals.

18

Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit in Just One Month Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit in Just One Month March 27, 2007 - 12:10pm Addthis The Entergy Corporation's Grand Gulf Site in Mississippi Receives NRC Approval for an ESP WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today applauded the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) decision to approve an Early Site Permit (ESP) for the Entergy Corporation's Grand Gulf Nuclear Station in Mississippi. This approval, the second ESP this month, demonstrates another major milestone in President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative, which plans to expand the use of safe and clean nuclear power. Earlier this

19

Regulatory guidance for lightning protection in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects. (authors)

Kisner, R. A.; Wilgen, J. B.; Ewing, P. D.; Korsah, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6007 (United States); Antonescu, C. E. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Regulatory Guidance for Lightning Protection in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Abstract - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects.

Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Antonescu, Christina E [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nuclear Regulatory Commission | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Regulatory Commission Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Regulatory Commission More Documents & Publications What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from...

22

Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NRC's NRC's Integrated Strategy for NRC s Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management Earl Easton 1 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission May 25, 2010 Road to Yucca Mountain * 20+ years of preparation for the licensing i review * DOE application received in June 2008 and accepted for review in September 2008 * President Obama pursues alternatives to Yucca Mountain * DOE motion to withdraw in March 2010 2 * DOE motion to withdraw in March 2010 * Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future 2 Growing Spent Fuel Inventory Cumulative Used Nuclear Fuel Scenarios 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 Metric Tons 3 - 50,000 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050 Year Reference: Crozat, March 2010 Integrated Strategy * In response to the evolving national debate on spent fuel management strategy, NRC initiated a number of actions:

23

Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AT THE AT THE U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION R. Clyde Ragland, P.E. Office of Nuclear Security and Incident Response 2011 DOE National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 11, 2011 2 NRC Focus Prior to September 11, 2001 * Historically, NRC Transportation Security Regulations Focused on Highest Risk Radioactive Material, consisted of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) NRC Actions Since September 11, 2001 * Domestically, reviewed materials transported by NRC licensees and re- evaluated security requirements considering: - applicable threats to shipments - material considerations - magnitude of adverse consequences * Internationally, participated in the development of the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive

24

Microsoft Word - 0906 NMMSS News DOE NRC Approved.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

, Pat Tana of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) passed away unexpectedly from a heart attack. Pat worked at the NRC for more than 25 years, the majority of which were in...

25

Energy Department Issues Draft Request For Proposal for Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensed Facilities Procurement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cincinnati The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Draft Request for Proposal (DRFP) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Licensed Facilities procurement. The NRC Licensed Facilities procurement is one of the four procurements that resulted from the Idaho Site Office of Environmental Management Post FY 2015 Acquisition Planning.

26

Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and DOEs Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and DOEs Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security.

27

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress. Volume 2, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This document is the second of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, various acts pertaining to low-level radioactive waste, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act, the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Export Licensing Statutes, and selected treaties, agreements, and executive orders. Other information provided pertains to Commissioner tenure, NRC appropriations, the Chief Financial Officers Act, information technology management reform, and Federal civil penalties.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management * 20+ years of...

29

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Presentation that outlines the rules, policies and orders that comprise the Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework More...

30

Summary and analysis of public comments on NUREG-1317: Regulatory options for nuclear plant license renewal: Final report  

SciTech Connect

On August 29, 1988, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on nuclear plant license renewal and solicited public comments on NUREG-1317, ''Regulatory Options for Nuclear Plant License Renewal.'' NUREG-1317 presents a discussion of fifteen topics involving technical, environmental, and procedural issues and poses a set of related questions. As part of its ongoing task for the NRC, The MITRE Corporation has summarized and analyzed the public comments received. Fifty-three written comments were received. Of these, 83 percent were from nuclear industry representatives; the remaining comments represented federal and state agencies, public interest groups, and a private citizen.

Ligon, D.M.; Seth, S.S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 AUG i 3 1979 ,,~---Y--*. FCAF:Wi3 )I 70-364 : i: SNM-414,jAmendment No. 3 --A Babcock and Wilcox Company Nuclear Materials Division ATTN: Mr. Michael A. Austin Manager, Technical Control 609 North Warren Avenue Apollo, Pennsylvania 15613 Gentiemen: (1 i' \ (. \ In accordance with your application dated June 18, 1979, and pursuant to Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 70, Materials License SNM-414 is hereby amended to: 1. Delete the function of the Regulatory Projects Coordinator, and 2. Alter the experience requirements for the function of Licensing and Nuclear Safety Specialist. Replacement pages for the license and condition section of the application are attached. Included are changes to License SNM-414 pages to reflect

32

Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the...

33

Roadmap to NRC Approval of Ceramic Matrix Composites in Generation IV Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an initial roadmap to obtain Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval for using these material systems in a nuclear application. The possible paths taken to achieving NRC approval are necessarily subject to change as this is an on-going process that shifts as more data and a clearer understanding of the nuclear regulations are gathered.

M. G. Jenkins; E. Lara-Curzio; W. Windes

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Nuclear Crisis Communications: The Plan Worked. A Critique of NRC Communications in the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor Crisis - 12073  

SciTech Connect

'Call the AV-Photo folks and get someone in here to shoot b-roll. We'll never be able to accommodate the network cameras and the only way I can get this to the media is to produce it ourselves'. Eliot Brenner, Director NRC Office of Public Affairs, March 12, 2011. For the past four years we have been speaking to audiences at Waste Management about communications issues. Last year, though we were kept from attending because of the federal budget crisis, our surrogates described to you the lessons the nuclear industry should draw from the BP Gulf oil spill crisis. Those remarks were delivered 11 days before the Fukushima Daiichi tragedy became the nuclear landmark of a generation - an industry changing event with worldwide ramifications, both in science and regulation and in communications. Eliot Brenner cut his teeth on crisis communication in the aviation industry where tragedy unfolds rapidly. He has been a speech-writer to three cabinet secretaries, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration and now spokesman for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission since 2004. Holly Harrington manages the NRC crisis response program and has 26 years federal public affairs experience, including eight years at the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Her crisis experience includes the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, numerous hurricanes and floods, Sept 11, and, now Fukushima Daiichi. Rebecca Schmidt is a veteran government relations professional whose decades in Washington include service with the House Armed Services Committee, the House Budget Committee and the Secretary of Defense. Collectively, the Offices of Public Affairs and Congressional Affairs conducted the largest outreach for the agency since Three Mile Island. We worked with the basic rule, described to Waste Management last year just 11 days before Fukushima - communicate early, often and clearly. The response - while not without its problems and lessons - went as smoothly as a chaotic event like Fukushima could go. That was due in large measure to the fact that the NRC has a well-tested system of responding to nuclear emergencies, and we followed our plan. (authors)

Brenner, Eliot; Harrington, Holly; Schmidt, Rebecca [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect

A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion.

Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M. (21st Century Industries, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Public comments on the proposed 10 CFR Part 51 rule for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses and supporting documents: Review of concerns and NRC staff response. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff review of public comments provided in response to the NRC`s proposed amendments to 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 51, which establish new requirements for the environmental review of applications for the renewal of operating licenses of nuclear power plants. The public comments include those submitted in writing, as well as those provided at public meetings that were held with other Federal agencies, State agencies, nuclear industry representatives, public interest groups, and the general public. This report also contains the NRC staff response to the various concerns raised, and highlights the changes made to the final rule and the supporting documents in response to these concerns.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nuclear Power in Idaho  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Look at Issues Dr. Ralph Bennett Idaho National Laboratory 2 What's been Changing? 1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) * Combined constructionoperating license (COL) * Early...

38

Physical Inventory Listing NRC 742c2  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9. TOTALS 9. TOTALS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING DOE/NRC FORM 742C (7-2008) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 8. BATCH DATA of Page Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 6 hours. This information is required by NRC to fulfill its safeguards responsibilities, bilateral agreements, and responsibilities as a participant in the US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records and FOIA/Privacy Services Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and

39

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Handling of Beyond Design Basis Events for Nuclear Power Reactors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presenter: Bill Reckley, Chief, Policy and Support Branch, Japan Lessons-Learned Project Directorate, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

40

Improvements needed in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Inspector and Auditor. Report to the Congress  

SciTech Connect

To help the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) carry out its responsibilities, a special office of Inspector and Auditor was created in April 1975 to independently review and appraise all NRC operations. This office, in essence, was to provide the Commissioners with oversight over NRC programs and activities and recommend corrective actions. GAO found that the Office of Inspector and Auditor has not been using proven management techniques in scheduling and carrying out its work. These techniques range from systematic planning and prioritization to timely and consistent followup on work. If such techniques were used, it would result in a more orderly management approach and lead to higher quality reports and a better use of staff resources. The independence of the Office of Inspector and Auditor needs to be strengthened. In GAO's view, this only may be possible if NRC accepts and implements the recommendations contained in this report. GAO also suggests that Congress consider establishing a statutory Inspector General office at the NRC. Such an office could help ensure that the Congress and the Commissioners receive objective information on problems within the Commission and enhance public trust in the regulation of commercial nuclear power.

Not Available

1981-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Site-specific parameter values for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's food pathway dose model  

SciTech Connect

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Western South Carolina result in radionuclide releases to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiation doses to the off-site maximum individual and the off-site population within 80 km of the SRS are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are currently generated using dose models prescribed for the commercial nuclear power industry by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC provides default values for dose-model parameters for facilities without resources to develop site-specific values. A survey of land- and water-use characteristics for the Savannah River area has been conducted to determine site-specific values for water recreation, consumption, and agricultural parameters used in the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 (1977) dosimetric models. These site parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk, and vegetable production; recreational and commercial activities on the Savannah River; and meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates. This paper describes how parameter data were obtained at the Savannah River Site and the impacts of such data on off-site dose. Dose estimates using site-specific parameter values are compared to estimates using the NRC default values.

Hamby, D.M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Certifies HalfPACT Transportation Container  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Certifies U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Certifies HalfPACT Transportation Container CARLSBAD, N.M., November 20, 2000 - The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a Certificate of Compliance November 2 for the HalfPACT transportation container. The HalfPACT will be used to supplement the Transuranic Package Transporter Model 2 (TRUPACT-II) for transportation of waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The TRUPACT-II is currently used for transportation of waste to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The new container is approximately 30 inches shorter than the TRUPACT-II. The HalfPACT is designed to carry seven 55-gallon drums weighing up to 1,000 pounds each, but is also capable of carrying one standard waste box or four 85-gallon drums.

43

EMI/RFI and Power Surge Withstand Guidance for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the regulatory guidance implemented by U.S. NRC for minimizing malfunctions and upsets in safety-related instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants caused by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), and power surges. The engineering design, installation, and testing practices deemed acceptable to U.S. NRC are described in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.180, ''Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic and Radio-Frequency in Safety-Related Instrumentation and Control Systems'' (January 2000) and in a Safety Evaluation Report (SER) endorsing EPRI TR-102323, ''Guidelines for Electromagnetic Interference Testing in Power Plants,'' (April 1996). These engineering practices provide a well-established, systematic approach for ensuring electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and surge withstand capability (SWC).

Ewing, PD

2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

44

Review of nuclear power plant offsite power source reliability and related recommended changes to the NRC rules and regulations  

SciTech Connect

The NRC has stated its concern about the reliability of the offsite power system as the preferred emergency source and about the possible damage to a pressurized water reactor (PWR) that could result from a rapid decay of power grid frequency. ORNL contracted with NRC to provide technical assistance to establish criteria that can be used to evaluate the offsite power system for the licensing of a nuclear power plant. The results of many of the studies for this contract are recommendations to assess and control the power grid during operation. This is because most of the NRC regulations pertaining to the offsite power system are related to the design of the power grid, and we believe that additional emphasis on monitoring the power grid operation will improve the reliability of the nuclear plant offsite power supply. 46 refs., 10 figs.

Battle, R.E.; Clark, F.H.; Reddoch, T.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Sample Form DOE NRC 740M  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

CONCISE NOTE CONCISE NOTE DOE/NRC FORM 740M (6-2008) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 45 minutes. This information is required to satisfy the provisions of the US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records and FOIA Privacy Services Branch (T-5 F53), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0057), Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. If a means used to impose an information collection does not display a currently valid OMB control number, the NRC may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not

46

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances. Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1, 1994--December 31, 1994. Volume 40, Pages 1--387  

SciTech Connect

The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. This book covers the following: issuances of the NRC; issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards; and issuances of Directors` decisions.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest  

SciTech Connect

This Revision 9 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 9 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through September 30, 1990. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346. Persons using this Digest are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in support of any position before the Commission or any of its adjudicatory tribunals. Persons using this Digest are also placed on notice that it is intended for use only as an initial research tool, that it may, and likely does, contain errors, including errors in analysis and interpretation of decisions, and that the user should not rely on the Digest analyses and interpretations but must read, analyze and rely on the user's own analysis of the actual Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions cited. Further, neither the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Aspen Systems Corporation, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any material presented in the Digest. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on general matters. Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. (JF)

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E.; Banovac, K.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

49

o:\informs\fixforms\nrc742c.wpf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. TOTALS . TOTALS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING DOE/NRC FORM 742C (8-2003) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 8. BATCH DATA of Page Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 6 hours. This information is required by NRC to fulfill its safeguards responsibilities, bilateral agreements, and responsibilities as a participant in the US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records Management Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs,

50

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances. Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1, 1990--December 31, 1990: Volume 32  

SciTech Connect

This thirty-second volume of issuances (1--496) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards, Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and Administrative Law Judges it covers the period from July 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990. The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. Issuances are referred to as follows: Commission--CLI, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards--ALAB, Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards--LBP, Administrative Law Judges--ALJ, Directors`Decisions--DD, and Denial of Petitions for Rulemaking--DPRM. Specific facilities discussed are: Carroll County Nuclear Station; Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station; Perry Nuclear Power Plant; Quad Cities Nuclear Power Stations; Seabrook Station; Shoreham Nuclear Generating Plant; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; and Vogtle Electric Generating Plant.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

STATUS OF THE NRC'S DECOMMISSIONING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program. It discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors, complex decommissioning sites, and sites listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper provides the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including a Standard Review Plan for evaluating plans and information submitted by licensees to support the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the D and D Screen software for determining the potential doses from residual radioactivity. Finally, it discusses the status of the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L. W.; Buckley, J.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

52

Special committee review of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's severe accident risks report (NUREG--1150)  

SciTech Connect

In April 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) published a draft report Severe Accident Risks: An Assessment for Five US Nuclear Power Plants,'' NUREG-1150. This report updated, extended and improved upon the information presented in the 1974 Reactor Safety Study,'' WASH-1400. Because the information in NUREG-1150 will play a significant role in implementing the NRC's Severe Accident Policy, its quality and credibility are of critical importance. Accordingly, the Commission requested that the RES conduct a peer review of NUREG-1150 to ensure that the methods, safety insights and conclusions presented are appropriate and adequately reflect the current state of knowledge with respect to reactor safety. To this end, RES formed a special committee in June of 1989 under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Committee, composed of a group of recognized national and international experts in nuclear reactor safety, was charged with preparing a report reflecting their review of NUREG-1150 with respect to the adequacy of the methods, data, analysis and conclusions it set forth. The report which precedes reflects the results of this peer review.

Kouts, H.J.C. (Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (USA)); Apostolakis, G.; Kastenberg, W.E. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA)); Birkhofer, E.H.A. (Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany, F.R.)); Hoegberg, L.G. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)); LeSage, L.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Rasmussen, N.C. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Camb

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Recommendations for NEAMS Engagement with the NRC: Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect

The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring a new generation of analytic tools to the nuclear engineering community in order to facilitate students, faculty, industry and laboratory researchers in investigating advanced reactor and fuel cycle designs. Although primarily targeting at advance nuclear technologies, it is anticipated that these new capabilities will also become interesting and useful to the nuclear regulator Consequently, the NEAMS program needs to engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as the software is being developed to ensure that they are familiar with and ready to respond to this novel approach when the need arises. Through discussions between key NEAMS and NRC staff members, we tentatively recommend annual briefings to the Division of Systems Analysis in the NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. However the NEAC subcommittee review of the NEAMS program may yield recommendations that would need to be considered before finalizing this plan.

Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Work for Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Safety Related Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Regulatory Nuclear Regulatory Commission Capabilities Sensors and Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation Overview Energy System Applications Safety-Related Applications Overview DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Homeland Security Applications Biomedical Applications Millimiter Wave Group Papers Other NPNS Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Sensors and Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation Safety Related Applications Bookmark and Share Nuclear Regulatory Commission International Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Key objectives of the International Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program

55

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Annual compilation for 1996, Volume 21, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This compilation is the annual cumulation of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors.

Sheehan, M.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Material Balance Report NRC 742_7  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT 1. NAME AND ADDRESS MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY NRC FORM 742 (7-2008) (PREVIOUS EDITIONS ARE OBSOLETE) 4. REPORT PERIOD (MM/DD/YYYY) PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 5 hours. Reported lessons learned are incorporated into the licensing process and fed back to industry. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records and FOIA/Privacy Services Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0004), Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. If a means used to impose an information collection does not display a currently valid OMB

57

TRAINING THE STAFF OF THE REGULATORY BODY FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training the staff of the regulatory body for nuclear facilities: A competency framework November 2001The originating Section of this publication in the IAEA was:

Wagramer Strasse; A Competency Framework

58

Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit in Just One Month Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit...

59

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION WAWINQTON, 0. C....  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of technology, and the economics of improvements in relation to benefits to the public health and safety.' Surface Contamination The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of...

60

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process September 19, 2012 Presenter: Undine Shoop, Chief, Health Physics and Human Performance Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Purpose of the Reactor Oversight Process (ROP) ROP Framework Safety Culture within the ROP Safety Culture Assessments Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process More Documents & Publications A Commissioner's Perspective on USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 2/17/11

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986.

none,

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111989 111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W Enclosed are the copfes of the final ORNL survey reports on the radiologlcal Surveys conducted on three Teterboro, New Jersey properties; Metpath Incorporated, Allied Aerospace Corporatio; and Sumftomo Machinery Corporation. Copies of these reports have &en sent directly to the owners by our survey contractor Oak Ridge National Laboratory. If you have any questions regardfng these reports. please call me at (301) 353-5439. Sfncerely, Enclosure : < I j i Andrew Wallo III, Designation and Certffication Manager Dfvisfon 01 Facility and Site Oeconanlssionfng Projects

63

KWOC (Key-Word-Out-of-Context) Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series  

SciTech Connect

To meet the objectives of the program funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Nuclear Energy (NE) Technology Support Programs, the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) administers a Performance Assurance Information Program that collects, compiles, and distributes program-related information, reports, and publications for the benefit of the DOE-NE program participants. THE KWOC Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series'' is prepared as an aid in searching for specific topics in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Regulatory Guide Series.

Jennings, S.D.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years March 8, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today commended the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's decision to approve the first-ever Early Site Permit (ESP) for the Exelon Generation Company's Clinton site, in central Illinois. This decision marks a major milestone in the President's plan to expand the use of safe and clean nuclear power. As part of President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative - which seeks to change the way we power this nation - nuclear power will play an increasingly

65

Nuclear Returns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Returns ... For the first time since 1978, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has given the green light for a new U.S. nuclear power plant. ... NRC granted a license to Southern Co. to build and operate twin 1,100-MW reactors adjacent to two operating nuclear power plants at its Vogtle nuclear facility, near Waynesboro, Ga. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances: Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1--December 31, 1996. Volume 44, Pages 1--432  

SciTech Connect

The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. Issuances are referred to as follows: Commission--CLI, Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards--LBP, Administrative Law Judges--ALJ, Directors` Decisions--DD, and Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking--DPRM.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

o:\informs\fixforms\nrc740m.wpf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONCISE NOTE CONCISE NOTE DOE/NRC FORM 740M (5-2002) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 45 minutes. This information is required to satisfy the provisions of the US/IAEA Safeguards Agreement. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records Management Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0057), Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. If a means used to impose an information collection does not display a currently valid OMB control number, the NRC may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to

68

o:\informs\fixforms\nrc742_3.wpf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MATERIAL TYPE MATERIAL TYPE (Submit separate report for each type) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT 1. NAME AND ADDRESS MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY NRC FORM 742 (8-2003) (PREVIOUS EDITIONS ARE OBSOLETE) 4. REPORT PERIOD (MM/DD/YYYY) PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 5 hours. Reported lessons learned are incorporated into the licensing process and fed back to industry. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records Management Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0004),

69

o:\informs\fixforms\nrc741.wpf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FORM 741 FORM 741 (5-2002) Previous editions are obsolete MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 þ þ þ þ þ þ 23a. MISCELLANEOUS NUCLEAR MATERIAL TRANSACTION REPORT Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 1 hr and 15 minutes. This information is required for IAEA accounting reports that show changes in inventory of nuclear materials. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records Management Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0003), Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. If a means used to

70

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Annual compilation for 1994. Volume 19, Number 4  

SciTech Connect

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC`s intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually. The main citations and abstracts in this compilation are listed in NUREG number order. These precede the following indexes: secondary report number index, personal author index, subject index, NRC originating organization index (staff reports), NRC originating organization index (international agreements), NRC contract sponsor index (contractor reports), contractor index, international organization index, and licensed facility index. A detailed explanation of the entries precedes each index.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference; Sessions 1--8  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts have been prepared for the papers presented at the meeting on nuclear facility air cleaning technology in the following specific areas of interest: air cleaning technologies for the management and disposal of radioactive wastes; Canadian waste management program; radiological health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis; filter testing; US standard codes on nuclear air and gas treatment; European community nuclear codes and standards; chemical processing off-gas cleaning; incineration and vitrification; adsorbents; nuclear codes and standards; mathematical modeling techniques; filter technology; safety; containment system venting; and nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. (MB)

First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Creating a Comprehensive, Efficient, and Sustainable Nuclear Regulatory Structure  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. With the congressionally mandated January 1, 2013 deadline for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) program to complete its transition of MPC&A responsibility to the Russian Federation, NNSA management directed its MPC&A program managers and team leaders to demonstrate that work in ongoing programs would lead to successful and timely achievement of these milestones. In the spirit of planning for successful project completion, the NNSA review of the Russian regulatory development process confirmed the critical importance of an effective regulatory system to a sustainable nuclear protection regime and called for an analysis of the existing Russian regulatory structure and the identification of a plan to ensure a complete MPC&A regulatory foundation. This paper describes the systematic process used by the U.S. DOE MPC&A Regulatory Development Project RDP) to develop an effective and sustainable MPC&A regulatory structure in the Russian Federation. This nuclear regulatory system will address all non-military Category I and II nuclear materials at State Corporation for Atomic Energy Rosatom, the Federal Service for Ecological, Technological, and Nuclear Oversight (Rostechnadzor), the Federal Agency for Marine and River Transport (FAMRT, within the Ministry of Transportation), and the Ministry of Industry and Trade (Minpromtorg). The approach to ensuring a complete and comprehensive nuclear regulatory structure includes five sequential steps. The approach was adopted from DOEs project management guidelines and was adapted to the regulatory development task by the RDP. The five steps in the Regulatory Development Process are: 1) Define MPC&A Structural Elements; 2) Analyze the existing regulatory documents using the identified Structural Elements; 3) Validate the analysis with Russian colleagues and define the list of documents to be developed; 4) Prioritize and schedule the development of documents; 5) Identify and develop processes to measure effectiveness of regulations. Utilizing this process is resulting in an effective regulatory process that is understood and is being adopted by the four RF organizations. It is anticipated that the current regulatory development process will continue after U.S. support ends. Utilization of the systematic methodology will ensure regulatory development is based on required MPC&A structural elements and will support the continued maintenance and development of an effective regulatory base.

O'Brien, Patricia; Wright, Troy L.; Tuttle, John D.; Hazel, Michael J.; Schlegel, Steven C.; Miller, Daniel R.

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

ATTN: Document Control Desk U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station as indicated by Reference (1). In Reference (2), Entergy provided the analysis for the reactor pressure vessel feedwater nozzles. In Reference (3), the NRC, in License Condition 4, established the requirement for Entergy to submit the confirmatory analyses for the recirculation outlet nozzle and core spray nozzle at least two years prior to the period of extended operation. In Reference (4), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (ASLB) ordered Entergy to submit the results of the analysis for the core spray and recirculation outlet nozzles prior to a final ruling of Contentions 2A and 2B. Confirmatory analysis for the recirculation outlet and core spray nozzles was submitted to the NRC and ASLB in Reference (5) on January 15, 2009. Based on recent revisions to the recirculation outlet and core spray nozzle confirmatory

Vermont Yankee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal). Volume 20, No. 2: Compilation for second quarter April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC`s intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Regulatory independence and accountability: a survey of international nuclear regulatory regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As the government of India considers development of an independent regulator for civil nuclear power, examples from other nations around the world, including those with established civil nuclear programmes and those now developing new nuclear, provide interesting insights and lessons to be learned. This paper compares the organisational structure of the Indian governmental agency, the Nuclear Safety Regulatory Authority, proposed in Bill No. 76 of 2011, with the organisational structures of independent national regulators of civil nuclear power programmes from the USA, the UK, Japan, the People's Republic of China and the United Arab Emirates. The paper discusses where in the government the agency is housed, sources of authority, sources of funding, regulatory powers and functional independence, both from the government agency charged with developing civil nuclear power and from nuclear facility operators.

Timothy P. Matthews; Esther K. Park

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Nuclear waste management technical support in the development of nuclear waste form criteria for the NRC. Task 1. Waste package overview  

SciTech Connect

In this report the current state of waste package development for high level waste, transuranic waste, and spent fuel in the US and abroad has been assessed. Specifically, reviewed are recent and on-going research on various waste forms, container materials and backfills and tentatively identified those which are likely to perform most satisfactorily in the repository environment. Radiation effects on the waste package components have been reviewed and the magnitude of these effects has been identified. Areas requiring further research have been identified. The important variables affecting radionuclide release from the waste package have been described and an evaluation of regulatory criteria for high level waste and spent fuel is presented. Finally, for spent fuel, high level, and TRU waste, components which could be used to construct a waste package having potential to meet NRC performance requirements have been described and identified.

Dayal, R.; Lee, B.S.; Wilke, R.J.; Swyler, K.J.; Soo, P.; Ahn, T.M.; McIntyre, N.S.; Veakis, E.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

NRC Enforcement Policy Review, July 1995-July 1997  

SciTech Connect

On June 30, 1995, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a complete revision of its General Statement of Policy and Procedure for Enforcement Action (Enforcement Policy) (60 FR 34381). In approving the 1995 revision to the Enforcement Policy, the Commission directed the staff to perform a review of its implementation of the Policy after approximately 2 years of experience and to consider public comments. This report represents the results of that review.

Lieberman, J.; Pedersen, R.M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Recommendations to the NRC on human engineering guidelines for nuclear power plant maintainability  

SciTech Connect

This document contains human engineering guidelines which can enhance the maintainability of nuclear power plants. The guidelines have been derived from general human engineering design principles, criteria, and data. The guidelines may be applied to existing plants as well as to plants under construction. They apply to nuclear power plant systems, equipment and facilities, as well as to maintenance tools and equipment. The guidelines are grouped into seven categories: accessibility and workspace, physical environment, loads and forces, maintenance facilities, maintenance tools and equipment, operating equipment design, and information needs. Each chapter of the document details specific maintainability problems encountered at nuclear power plants, the safety impact of these problems, and the specific maintainability design guidelines whose application can serve to avoid these problems in new or existing plants.

Badalamente, R.V.; Fecht, B.A.; Blahnik, D.E.; Eklund, J.D.; Hartley, C.S.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, Volume 46, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the issuances received in October 1997. Issuances are from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Directors` Decisions. Five issuances were received on the following subjects: (1) decontamination and decommissioning funding for Sequoyah Fuels Corporation and General Atomics; (2) involvement in NRC-licensed activities by Aharon Ben-Haim; (3) Barnett Industrial X-Ray, Inc.; (4) spent fuel storage installation at Northern States Power Company; and (5) Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station. No issuances were received from the the Administrative Law Judges or the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC Proceeding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC Proceeding DOE Does Not Oppose Petitions to Intervene in Yucca Mountain NRC Proceeding March 30, 2010 - 9:57am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy yesterday filed with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission a response to Petitions to Intervene filed by several parties seeking to oppose the Department's motion to withdraw its license application for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. DOE said it is confident that its motion to withdraw the application is lawful, but that it believes the petitioning parties should be allowed to present their views to the NRC. It thus did not oppose the motions to intervene, and proposed a schedule for resolving the dispute over the Department's motion to withdraw the application. The parties seeking to intervene are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D. C. 20555  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REGULATORY COMMISSION REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D. C. 20555 JAN 2 2 1982 -/ Departmznt'of Ene,rgy ATTN : Dr. William E. Mott, Director Environmental and Safety Engineering Division (EP-32) Washington, D.C. 20545 Dear Dr. Mott: Enclosed is the list of contaminated'or potentially contaminated sites that I promised to send you during our recent meeting. The sites have been broken down into the followi,ng four categories: 1. Sites with known contamination that have never been 1 icensed. 2. Formerly licensed sites with known contamination. 3. Currently licensed sites that are being decontaminated prior to decoronissioning. 4. A list of formerly licensed sites that need to be visited to determine if they have been properly decontaminated prior to decommissioning.

82

NUCLEAR REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I lY,.COMMISSION 475 ALLENDALE ROAD KlNG OF PRUSSIA. PENNSYLVANIA 194061415 GION I NOALE ROAD ENNSYLVANlA 194061415 MAY I5 1996 MAY I5 1996 Docket No. 040-07964 License No. SlJ (Rs Heyman Properties Attention: Mr. John S. Russo Facility Manager 333 Post Road West Westport, CT 06881 SUBJECT: INSPECTION NO. 040-07964/96-001 Dear Mr. Russo: On April 15, 1996, Todd J. Jackson of this office conducted a routine inspection at 737 Canal Street, Stamford, Connecticut of activities o Oliver Incorporated, authorized by Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Lit SUB-00967. The inspection consisted of observations by the inspect0 interviews with personnel, and a radiological survey by the inspector Jackson was accompanied on this inspection by representatives of the

83

Regulatory analysis for amendments to regulations for the environmental review for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for a proposed rule that will amend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s environmental review requirements for applications for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. The objective of the proposed rulemaking is to improve regulatory efficiency by providing for the generic evaluation of certain environmental impacts associated with nuclear plant license renewal. After considering various options, the staff identified and analyzed two major alternatives. With Alternative A, the existing regulations would not be amended. This option requires that environmental reviews be performed under the existing regulations. Alternative B is to assess, on a generic basis, the environmental impacts of renewing the operating license of individual nuclear power plants, and define the issues that will need to be further analyzed on a case-by-case basis. In addition, Alternative B removes from NRC`s review certain economics-related issues. The findings of this assessment are to be codified in 10 CFR 51. The staff has selected Alternative B as the preferred alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

NRC review of the CANDU-3 reactor design  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) effort to complete an early review of the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU)-3 reactor design prior to formal submittal of an application for standard design certification. The NRC is conducting a review of the CANDU-3 design in support of a request by AECL Technologics, the US sponsor of the design. The purpose of this review is to encourage early interactions by applicants, vendors, and government agencies with the NRC. The CANDU-3 design is being developed by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL), whose CANDU operations are based in Mississauga, Ontario. AECL Technologies, a US subsidiary of AECL, Incorporated, informed the NRC of its intent to seek design certification of the CANDU-3 design under the provisions of 10CFR52 in a letter to the NRC dated May 25, 1989. This paper describes the commission's basis for this type of early review, its purposes and objectives, key elements of the review, the intended product, and the schedule.

Kennedy, J.L. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

SPOTLIGHT ON NUCLEAR POWER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SPOTLIGHT ON NUCLEAR POWER ... TOUGHER RULES are needed to improve the safety of U.S. nuclear power facilities and to better protect the public from the type of disaster that occurred this spring at Japans Fukushima Daiichi nuclear energy plant, says a preliminary report released by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on July 12. ...

GLENN HESS

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

86

Indexes to Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, January--March 1997  

SciTech Connect

This document provides digests and indexes for issuances of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking. These indexes and digests are intended to serve as a guide to the issuances.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Flooding of an underground facility at Yucca Mountain: A summary of NRC review plans  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are developing review plans for a potential high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This early preparation of NRC`s review program will ensure that important technical issues related to compliance with 10 CFR Part 60 will be identified before receipt of a license application. Under the siting criteria of NRC`s Part 60, one of the potentially adverse conditions is the potential for flooding of the underground facility by surface waters. The Department of Energy (DOE) should evaluate this and other conditions in a license application. This paper summarizes the NRC staff`s plans to review DOE`s demonstration of compliance with Part 60 regarding potential flooding of an underground facility. We present these plans recognizing that the Congress is currently considering changes in how a HLW repository would be licensed.

Coleman, N.M.; Wescott, R.G.; Johnson, T.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on analysis and evaluation of operational data - 1987: Power reactors  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1987. The report is published in two volumes. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 1, covers Power Reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry, with comments regarding the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from Licensee Event Reports, the NRC's Operations Center, and Diagnostic Evaluations. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 2, covers Nonreactors and presents a review of the nonreactors events and misadministration reports that were reported in 1987 and a brief synopsis of AEOD studies published in 1987. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD Reports issued for 1980-1987.

none,

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Department of Energy to Co-Sponsor Workshop on Nuclear Power...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Plant Life Extension R&D September 29, 2010 - 11:38am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Nuclear Energy Institute...

90

Comparisons of ANSI standards cited in the NRC standard review plan, NUREG-0800 and related documents  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of comparisons of the cited and latest versions of ANSI standards cited in the NRC Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants (NUREG 0800) and related documents. The comparisons were performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in support of the NRC`s Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program. Significant changes to the standards, from the cited version to the latest version, are described and discussed in a tabular format for each standard. Recommendations for updating each citation in the Standard Review Plan are presented. Technical considerations and suggested changes are included for related regulatory documents (i.e., Regulatory Guides and the Code of Federal Regulations) citing the standard. The results and recommendations presented in this document have not been subjected to NRC staff review.

Ankrum, A.R.; Bohlander, K.L.; Gilbert, E.R.; Pawlowski, R.A.; Spiesman, J.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comparisons of ASTM standards cited in the NRC standard review plan, NUREG-0800 and related documents  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of comparisons of the cited and latest versions of ASTM standards cited in the NRC Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants (NUREG 0800) and related documents. The comparisons were performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in support of the NRC`s Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program. Significant changes to the standards, from the cited version to the latest version, are described and discussed in a tabular format for each standard. Recommendations for updating each citation in the Standard Review Plan are presented. Technical considerations and suggested changes are included for related regulatory documents (i.e., Regulatory Guides and the Code of Federal Regulations) citing the standard. The results and recommendations presented in this document have not been subjected to NRC staff review.

Ankrum, A.R.; Bohlander, K.L.; Gilbert, E.R.; Pawlowski, R.A.; Spiesman, J.B.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Certffication Manager Dfvisfon 01 Facility and Site Oeconanlssionfng Projects office of Nuclear Energy bee: R. Foley, ORNL J. Wagoner, NE-23 R, Atkin. OR NE-23 RF 'Wa?lo RF NEG...

93

Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Trait, state or artefact? Assessing experts' regulatory focus in nuclear power plant control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We apply the theory of regulatory focus in the field of nuclear power plant (NPP) control. The first pilot study was conducted at the German simulator centre for NPPs. Here, we tested the influence of accident training lessons on the experts' regulatory ... Keywords: Experts, Human factors, Nuclear, Regulatory focus, Self-report measures

Johannes Beck, Armin Eichinger, Klaus Bengler

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

NRC Job Code V6060: Extended in-situ and real time monitoring. Task 4: Detection and monitoring of leaks at nuclear power plants external to structures  

SciTech Connect

In support of Task 4 of the NRC study on compliance with 10 CFR part 20.1406, minimization of contamination, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a one-year scoping study, in concert with a parallel study performed by NRC/NRR staff, on monitoring for leaks at nuclear power plants (NPPs) external to structures. The objective of this task-4 study is to identify and assess those sensors and monitoring techniques for early detection of abnormal radioactive releases from the engineered facility structures, systems and components (SSCs) to the surrounding underground environment in existing NPPs and planned new reactors. As such, methods of interest include: (1) detection of anomalous water content of soils surrounding SSCs, (2) radionuclides contained in the leaking water, and (3) secondary signals such as temperature. ANL work scope includes mainly to (1) identify, in concert with the nuclear industry, the sensors and techniques that have most promise to detect radionuclides and/or associated chemical releases from SSCs of existing NPPs and (2) review and provide comments on the results of the NRC/NRR staff scoping study to identify candidate technologies. This report constitutes the ANL deliverable of the task-4 study. It covers a survey of sensor technologies and leak detection methods currently applied to leak monitoring at NPPs. The survey also provides a technology evaluation that identifies their strength and deficiency based on their detection speed, sensitivity, range and reliability. Emerging advanced technologies that are potentially capable of locating releases, identifying the radionuclides, and estimating their concentrations and distributions are also included in the report along with suggestions of required further research and development.

Sheen, S. H. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Equivalence of safety requirements between CANDU and US NRC requirements  

SciTech Connect

The Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) technology has been built on an original pressurized heavy-water reactor (PHWR) concept, which has several characteristics different from those of light water reactors (LWRs). However, the philosophy of defense-in-depth, based on multiple levels of safety and implemented through the provision of several physical and functional barriers against the release of radioactivity to the environment, is applied to both types of reactor. It is not surprising, therefore, that there is conceptual convergence of safety objectives between the CANDU and the LWR designs, which in turn translates into an equivalence of CANDU safety requirements with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements established for LWRS. The demonstration of this safety requirements equivalence has been an important activity for the licensing of CANDU reactors in countries whose regulatory environment has been influenced by the NRC approach and has more recently acquired a special emphasis in the context of a preapplication review of an advanced CANDU design, the CANDU 3, for its design certification in the United States. This paper highlights results of a comparative exercise dealing with the fundamental principles of the CANDU safety philosophy and the corresponding NRC requirements.

Azeez, S.; Bonechi, M. (Sheridan Park Research Community, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)); Rib, L. (AECL Technologies, Rockville, MD (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995. Volume 42, Pages 1-258  

SciTech Connect

This is the 42nd volume of issuances of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, Administrative Law Judges, and Office Directors. This book is a reprinting, containing corrections of numerous printing errors in a previously distributed book. It covers the period from July 1, 1995 to December 31, 1995. Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards conduct adjudicatory hearings on applications to construct and operate nuclear power plants and related facilities, and issue initial decisions which, subject to internal review and appellate procedures, become the final Commission action with respect to those applications. The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a 6-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly editions and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances: February 1995. Volume 41, Number 2  

SciTech Connect

This book contains an issuance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and a Director`s Decision. The issuance concerns consideration by the Commission of appeals from both the Initial Decision and a Reconsideration Order issued by the Presiding Officer involving two materials license amendment applications filed by the University of Missouri. The Director`s Decision from the Office of Enforcement denies petitions filed by Northeast Utilities employees requesting that accelerated enforcement action be taken against Northeast Utilities for activities concerned with NU`s fitness-for-duty program.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel power plants. However,power plants, which are reviewed and licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and relatively few areas of geothermal and

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - argentine nuclear regulatory Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: argentine nuclear regulatory Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 geopolitics of gas working paper series...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparisons of ANS, ASME, AWS, and NFPA standards cited in the NRC standard review plan, NUREG-0800, and related documents  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of comparisons of the cited and latest versions of ANS, ASME, AWS and NFPA standards cited in the NRC Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants (NUREG 0800) and related documents. The comparisons were performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in support of the NRC`s Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program. Significant changes to the standards, from the cited version to the latest version, are described and discussed in a tabular format for each standard. Recommendations for updating each citation in the Standard Review Plan are presented. Technical considerations and suggested changes are included for related regulatory documents (i.e., Regulatory Guides and the Code of Federal Regulations) citing the standard. The results and recommendations presented in this document have not been subjected to NRC staff review.

Ankrum, A.R.; Bohlander, K.L.; Gilbert, E.R.; Spiesman, J.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Minutes from 12 December 2006 DOE/NRC Video Teleconference Call on Section 3116 Implementation Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12 December 2006 DOE/NRC Video Teleconference Call on Section 3116 12 December 2006 DOE/NRC Video Teleconference Call on Section 3116 Implementation Activities Attendees: Representatives from DOE-Savannah River (DOE-SR), DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) participated in a video teleconference call from 2:00 - 4:00 on 14 December 2006. A conference phone line was planned for other DOE field office participation (Idaho, West Valley, Office of River Protection), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA-IV), and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). However, technical difficulties prevented participation from all except SCDHEC. Discussion: The participants discussed prioritization of generic and specific technical issues to be resolved and a potential schedule for future meetings to discuss resolution

103

Nuclear wastes: Small disposals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Much to the relief of many east coast hospitals, universities and medical schools, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is proposing that liquid scintillation media used for detecting low levels ... for detecting low levels of radioactivity in biological samples need no longer be buried in nuclear ...

David Dickson

1980-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

The future of nuclear power in the United States : economic and regulatory challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the economic and regulatory challenges that must be faced by potential investors in new nuclear power plants in the United States. The historical development of the existing fleet of over 100 nuclear ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On December 15, Matt Moury, Associate Under Secretary, Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS DOE) and EHSS Office of Nuclear Safety staff met with the NRC Executive Director for Operations, the Deputy Executive Director for Operations, and the Director, Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards to sign a nuclear safety information exchange agreement between NRC Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards and the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security.

106

Summary of Information Presented at an NRC-Sponsored Low-Power Shutdown Public Workshop, April 27, 1999, Rockville, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a public workshop that was held on April 27, 1999, in Rockville, Maryland. The workshop was conducted as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts to further develop its understanding of the risks associated with low power and shutdown operations at US nuclear power plants. A sufficient understanding of such risks is required to support decision-making for risk-informed regulation, in particular Regulatory Guide 1.174, and the development of a consensus standard. During the workshop the NRC staff discussed and requested feedback from the public (including representatives of the nuclear industry, state governments, consultants, private industry, and the media) on the risk associated with low-power and shutdown operations.

Wheeler, Timothy A.; Whitehead, Donnie W.; Lois, Erasmia

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A safety and regulatory assessment of generic BWR and PWR permanently shutdown nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The long-term availability of less expensive power and the increasing plant modification and maintenance costs have caused some utilities to re-examine the economics of nuclear power. As a result, several utilities have opted to permanently shutdown their plants. Each licensee of these permanently shutdown (PSD) plants has submitted plant-specific exemption requests for those regulations that they believe are no longer applicable to their facility. This report presents a regulatory assessment for generic BWR and PWR plants that have permanently ceased operation in support of NRC rulemaking activities in this area. After the reactor vessel is defueled, the traditional accident sequences that dominate the operating plant risk are no longer applicable. The remaining source of public risk is associated with the accidents that involve the spent fuel. Previous studies have indicated that complete spent fuel pool drainage is an accident of potential concern. Certain combinations of spent fuel storage configurations and decay times, could cause freshly discharged fuel assemblies to self heat to a temperature where the self sustained oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding may cause cladding failure. This study has defined four spent fuel configurations which encompass all of the anticipated spent fuel characteristics and storage modes following permanent shutdown. A representative accident sequence was chosen for each configuration. Consequence analyses were performed using these sequences to estimate onsite and boundary doses, population doses and economic costs. A list of candidate regulations was identified from a screening of 10 CFR Parts 0 to 199. The continued applicability of each regulation was assessed within the context of each spent fuel storage configuration and the results of the consequence analyses.

Travis, R.J.; Davis, R.E.; Grove, E.J.; Azarm, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input. Comments relevant to the following two sections of the RFI: "Long Term Issues: Managing a Grid with High Penetration of New Technologies" and "Reliability and Cyber-Security," US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input More Documents & Publications Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Reply Comments of Entergy Services, Inc. Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and

109

Indexes to Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, January--March 1996  

SciTech Connect

This publication is the 1st quarter 1996 index to issuances by the US NRC. These include issuances by the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements  

SciTech Connect

This document is the organizational chart for the US NRC. It contains organizational structure and functional statements for the following: (1) the Commission, (2) committees and boards, (3) staff offices, (4) office of the Inspector General, (5) executive director for operations, (6) program offices, and (7) regional offices.

NONE

1996-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

111

Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order prescribes DOE minimum requirements and procedures for control and accountability of nuclear materials at DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities which are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Cancels DOE O 5633.3. Canceled by DOE O 5633.3B.

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

112

Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

DOE O 474.1 prescribes Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) for DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities which are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Cancels DOE 5633.3B

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

Codes and standards and other guidance cited in regulatory documents. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed a listing of industry consensus codes and standards and other government and industry guidance referred to in regulatory documents. In addition to updating previous information, Revision 1 adds citations from the NRC Inspection Manual and the Improved Standard Technical Specifications. This listing identifies the version of the code or standard cited in the regulatory document, the regulatory document, and the current version of the code or standard. It also provides a summary characterization of the nature of the citation. This listing was developed from electronic searches of the Code of Federal Regulations and the NRC`s Bulletins, Information Notices, Circulars, Generic Letters, Policy Statements, Regulatory Guides, and the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800).

Ankrum, A.; Nickolaus, J.; Vinther, R.; Maguire-Moffitt, N.; Hammer, J.; Sherfey, L.; Warner, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC`s Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

September 10, 2003, Board Public Meeting Presentations - Lessons Learned from Nuclear Power Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DAVIS DAVIS - - BESSE REACTOR VESSEL HEAD DEGRADATION BESSE REACTOR VESSEL HEAD DEGRADATION LESSONS LEARNED TASK FORCE LESSONS LEARNED TASK FORCE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD PUBLIC MEETING PUBLIC MEETING September 10, 2003 September 10, 2003 Ed Hackett, Project Director Ed Hackett, Project Director Project Directorate II Project Directorate II Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission EMH1@NRC.GOV EMH1@NRC.GOV DAVIS DAVIS - - BESSE RACTOR VESSEL HEAD DEGRADATION BESSE RACTOR VESSEL HEAD DEGRADATION BACKGROUND BACKGROUND FEBRUARY, 2002 FEBRUARY, 2002 -

116

Peer Review of NRC Standardized Plant Analysis Risk Models  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Models underwent a Peer Review using ASME PRA standard (Addendum C) as endorsed by NRC in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.200. The review was performed by a mix of industry probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) experts and NRC PRA experts. Representative SPAR models, one PWR and one BWR, were reviewed against Capability Category I of the ASME PRA standard. Capability Category I was selected as the basis for review due to the specific uses/applications of the SPAR models. The BWR SPAR model was reviewed against 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements; however, based on the Capability Category I level of review and the absence of internal flooding and containment performance (LERF) logic only 216 requirements were determined to be applicable. Based on the review, the BWR SPAR model met 139 of the 216 supporting requirements. The review also generated 200 findings or suggestions. Of these 200 findings and suggestions 142 were findings and 58 were suggestions. The PWR SPAR model was also evaluated against the same 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements. Of these requirements only 215 were deemed appropriate for the review (for the same reason as noted for the BWR). The PWR review determined that 125 of the 215 supporting requirements met Capability Category I or greater. The review identified 101 findings or suggestions (76 findings and 25 suggestions). These findings or suggestions were developed to identify areas where SPAR models could be enhanced. A process to prioritize and incorporate the findings/suggestions supporting requirements into the SPAR models is being developed. The prioritization process focuses on those findings that will enhance the accuracy, completeness and usability of the SPAR models.

Anthony Koonce; James Knudsen; Robert Buell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Compilation for third quarter 1994, July--September. Volume 19, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issues by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC`s intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually. The main citations and abstracts in this compilation are listed in NUREG number order: NUREG-XXXX, NUREG/CP-XXXX, NUREG/CR-XXXX, and NUREG/IA-XXXX. These precede the following indexes: Secondary Report Number Index, Personal Author Index, Subject Index, NRC Originating Organization Index (Staff Reports), NRC Originating Organization Index (International Agreements), NRC Contract Sponsor Index (Contractor Reports) Contractor Index, International Organization Index, Licensed Facility Index. A detailed explanation of the entries precedes each index.

none,

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

THE NRC HAS ISSUED Ati ACTION PLAN FOR CLEANUP OF 46 SfTES that;;ece  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NRC HAS ISSUED Ati ACTION PLAN FOR CLEANUP OF 46 SfTES that;;ece NRC HAS ISSUED Ati ACTION PLAN FOR CLEANUP OF 46 SfTES that;;ece :: ~,: : ..,.... ..,:y... included in the agency' s Site Decommissioning Managem&t Pian (SDMP) in.1990. The ., ,.;' -,; ;.L..z,. sites are all radioactive materials handling facilities in various stages of decommission- ~' ... ,' . .-_.... ..,: ,,~ ..,. -c : -: ing; some of them are slill under active Nuclear Regulatory Commission licenses,~some .~. . . . . . ...i.~ ,;::,: ' :-&-:' . -1.: : ;: _ :: .,,. >.r"!.-<,z...;::.~ ? ~' .._ .' l...' -i:i -::;.. c : of them were under licenses that are now terminated, and some were never licensed~, ,~: ,.~. ~~.. .,_. .i ' . In the Action Plan, which was published in the April 16 Federal Register, the NRC says' ;; *_: ._.:, :-.~:i:r~'

119

Codes and standards and other guidance cited in regulatory documents  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program (SRP-UDP), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a listing of industry consensus codes and standards and other government and industry guidance referred to in regulatory documents. The SRP-UDP has been completed and the SRP-Maintenance Program (SRP-MP) is now maintaining this listing. Besides updating previous information, Revision 3 adds approximately 80 citations. This listing identifies the version of the code or standard cited in the regulatory document, the regulatory document, and the current version of the code or standard. It also provides a summary characterization of the nature of the citation. This listing was developed from electronic searches of the Code of Federal Regulations and the NRC`s Bulletins, Information Notices, Circulars, Enforcement Manual, Generic Letters, Inspection Manual, Policy Statements, Regulatory Guides, Standard Technical Specifications and the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800).

Nickolaus, J.R.; Bohlander, K.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Indexes to Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, July--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

Digests and indexes for issuances of the NRC, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking are presented in this document. These digests and indexes are intended to serve as a guide to the issuances. Information elements common to the cases heard and ruled upon are: (1) case name, (2) full text reference, (3) issuance number, (4) issued raised by appellants, (5) legal citations, (6) name of facility and Docket number, (7) subject matter, (8) type of hearing, and (9) type of issuance.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The development of regulatory expectations for computer-based safety systems for the UK nuclear programme  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) of the UK's Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has completed a review of their Safety Assessment Principles (SAPs) for Nuclear Installations recently. During the period of the SAPs review in 2004-2005 the designers of future UK naval reactor plant were optioneering the control and protection systems that might be implemented. Because there was insufficient regulatory guidance available in the naval sector to support this activity the Defence Nuclear Safety Regulator (DNSR) invited the NII to collaborate with the production of a guidance document that provides clarity of regulatory expectations for the production of safety cases for computer based safety systems. A key part of producing regulatory expectations was identifying the relevant extant standards and sector guidance that reflect good practice. The three principal sources of such good practice were: IAEA Safety Guide NS-G-1.1 (Software for Computer Based Systems Important to Safety in Nuclear Power Plants), European Commission consensus document (Common Position of European Nuclear Regulators for the Licensing of Safety Critical Software for Nuclear Reactors) and IEC nuclear sector standards such as IEC60880. A common understanding has been achieved between the NII and DNSR and regulatory guidance developed which will be used by both NII and DNSR in the assessment of computer-based safety systems and in the further development of more detailed joint technical assessment guidance for both regulatory organisations. (authors)

Hughes, P. J. [HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate Marine Engineering Submarines Defence Nuclear Safety Regulator Serco Assurance Redgrave Court, Merton Road, Bootle L20 7HS (United Kingdom); Westwood, R.N; Mark, R. T. [FLEET HQ, Leach Building, Whale Island, Portsmouth, PO2 8BY (United Kingdom); Tapping, K. [Serco Assurance,Thomson House, Risley, Warrington, WA3 6GA (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Regulatory guidance document  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

NONE

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Funding cut for US nuclear waste dump  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... is expected to propose spending only the estimated US$40 million needed to let the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) move forwards in evaluating the licence application for Yucca Mountain. ... three to four years. Tom Kauffman, a spokesman for the industry policy group the Nuclear Energy Institute, says that ...

Amanda Leigh Mascarelli

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

Improvements needed in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Inspector and Auditor  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the improvements needed in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Inspector and Auditor. Also, we raise the possibility of Congress establishing an Office of Inspector General at the Commission. Such an office will ensure that the Congress and the Commissioners receive objective information on problems within the Commission and enhance public trust in the regulation of commercial nuclear power.

Not Available

1981-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

NRC Perspectives on Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Consultations and Monitoring - 13398  

SciTech Connect

Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for certain non-high level waste (HLW) determinations. The NDAA also requires NRC to monitor DOE's disposal actions related to those determinations to assess compliance with NRC regulations in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C. The NDAA applies to DOE activities that will remain within the States of South Carolina and Idaho. DOE has chosen to, under DOE Order 435.1, engage in consultation with NRC for similar activities in the State of Washington and New York, however, the NRC has no monitoring responsibilities. In 2007, the NRC developed a draft Final Report for Interim Use entitled, NUREG-1854: NRC Staff Guidance for Activities Related to U.S. Department of Energy Waste Determinations. Since the law was enacted, the DOE and NRC have consulted on three waste determinations within the affected States: (1) the Saltstone Disposal Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) within the State of South Carolina in 2005, (2) the INTEC Tank Farm at the Idaho National Laboratory within the State of Idaho in 2006, and (3) the F Tank Farm at SRS in 2011. After the end of consultation and issuance by DOE of the final waste determination, monitoring began at each of these sites, including the development of monitoring plans. In addition to the NDAA sites, DOE has requested NRC consultation support on both individual tanks and the entire C Tank Farm at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in the State of Washington. DOE also requested consultation of waste determinations performed on the melter and related feed tanks at the West Valley site in New York that would be disposed offsite. In the next few years, NRC and DOE will consult on the last of the NDAA waste determinations for a while, the H Tank Farm waste determination at SRS. DOE may identify other activities in the future but largely NRC's role will change from doing both consultation and monitoring to being focused on monitoring activities within NDAA. DOE has identified other activities at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation that would continue consultation activities but outside of the NDAA in the future. During the past seven years of consultations and monitoring a number of lessons learned about the process, communication issues, and technical guidance have been identified. With the change in focus from reviewing initial performance assessments and draft waste determinations to long-term monitoring (e.g., individual waste tank closure, at F Tank Farm or complete tank farm closure at INTEC expected in the near future), the NRC is going to revise and update its guidance over the next few years to reflect the lessons learned and the change in focus. In addition to the lessons learned, improvements in the guidance will have to account possible rule and guidance changes underway within Part 61. This paper will discuss the initial plans, approaches, and time lines to revise the guidance within NUREG-1854, including opportunities for public involvement. (authors)

McKenney, Christepher A.; Suber, Gregory F.; Felsher, Harry D.; Mohseni, Aby [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop T8F5, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop T8F5, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Transition from Consultation to Monitoring-NRC's Increasingly Focused Review of Factors Important to F-Area Tank Farm Facility Performance - 13153  

SciTech Connect

In consultation with the NRC, DOE issued a waste determination for the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) facility in March 2012. The FTF consists of 22 underground tanks, each 2.8 to 4.9 million liters in capacity, used to store liquid high-level waste generated as a result of spent fuel reprocessing. The waste determination concluded stabilized waste residuals and associated tanks and auxiliary components at the time of closure are not high-level and can be disposed of as LLW. Prior to issuance of the final waste determination, during the consultation phase, NRC staff reviewed and provided comments on DOE's revision 0 and revision 1 FTF PAs that supported the waste determination and produced a technical evaluation report documenting the results of its multi-year review in October 2011. Following issuance of the waste determination, NRC began to monitor DOE disposal actions to assess compliance with the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C. To facilitate its monitoring responsibilities, NRC developed a plan to monitor DOE disposal actions. NRC staff was challenged in developing a focused monitoring plan to ensure limited resources are spent in the most cost-effective manner practical. To address this challenge, NRC prioritized monitoring areas and factors in terms of risk significance and timing. This prioritization was informed by NRC staff's review of DOE's PA documentation, independent probabilistic modeling conducted by NRC staff, and NRC-sponsored research conducted by the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses in San Antonio, TX. (authors)

Barr, Cynthia; Grossman, Christopher; Alexander, George; Parks, Leah; Fuhrmann, Mark; Shaffner, James; McKenney, Christepher [U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States)] [U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States); Pabalan, Roberto; Pickett, David [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Dinwiddie, Cynthia [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012). NRC: Nuclear Security and Safeguards.nrc.gov.in nuclear reactor maintenance and security. However, when aof nuclear power plants, as well as physical security to

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Proceedings: A Guide for Intervenors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. 396 (1961); Vermont Yankee, 435 U.S. 519; Morningsidein two 2. See, e.g. , Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. v.8th Cir. 1971); and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. v.

Hansell, Dean

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability(LWRS) Program conducts a vigorous engagement strategy with the U.S. nuclear power industry, including the nuclear operating companies, major support organizations, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and suppliers. The goal of this engagement strategy is to develop a shared vision and common understanding across the nuclear industry of the need for II&C modernization, the performance improvement that can be obtained, and the opportunities for collaboration to enact this vision. The primary means of engaging the nuclear operating companies is through a

130

Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Developing a Regulatory Framework Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 10-12, 2011 Denver, Colorado Earl Easton Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Outline * Current Regulatory Framework * Future Regulatory Needs * Technical Basis (with some examples) * Path Forward 2 Current NRC Regulatory Framework for Storage * Renewable Term Licenses * Aging Management Plan - Time-limited aging analyses - Design for prevention - Monitoring - how, how often, in-situ - Maintenance - what type - Corrective Actions - when 3 Dry Cask Storage * 63 licensed ISFSIs (8 more than 2010) * Expect 10 sites pursuing General License * Over 1400 loaded storage casks 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Number of ISFSIs Year Specific Licensees

131

A compilation of reports of the Advisory Committee on nuclear waste, July 1995 -- June 1996  

SciTech Connect

This compilation contains 8 reports issued by the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste (ACNW) during the eighth year of its operation. The reports were submitted to the Chairman and Commissioners of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All reports prepared by the Committee have been made available to the public through the NRC Public Document Room, the U.S. Library of Congress, and the internet at http://www.nrc.gov/ACRSACNW.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, Volume 44, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the issuances received in October 1996. Issuances are from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Directors` Decisions. 15 issuances were received and are abstracted individually in the database: Louisiana Energy Services, U.S. Enrichment Corporation, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation, James L. Shelton, Juan Guzman, Northern States Power Company, TESTCO Inc., Washington Public Power Supply System, all nuclear plants, Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Duke Power Company, Florida Power Corporation, and Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (2 issuances). No issuances were received from the the Administrative Law Judges or the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To prescribe Department of Energy (DOE) requirements, including those for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) for DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). DOE N 251.60, dated 11-19-04, extends this directive until 11-19-05. Cancels DOE O 474.1.

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

hosted a GNEP Ministerial in Washington, DC, where leaders from China, France, Japan, Russia and the United States agreed to work together to bring the benefits of nuclear energy...

135

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, January 1995. Volume 41, Number 1  

SciTech Connect

This book contains issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards for January 1995. The issuances include Babcock and Wilcox Company materials license; Hydro Resources, Inc. application for uranium mining; low-level waste storage in Utah; communication of emerging and existing generic, technical issues with PWR owners groups; and radioactive waste management by Sierra Nuclear Corporation.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Reducing Regulatory Burden - EO 13563 Retrospective Review |...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research...

137

September 10, 2003, Board Public Meeting - Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Davis-Besse Lessons Learned  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 I 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 101 inspector to a senior, and then they'll move to another facility, but seven years is the maximum, and that's written in our policy. CHAIRMAN CONWAY: Thank you. Dr. Hackett. DR. HACKETT: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I have a different challenge today, which is to try and help walk you through a story that's very important to us in the nuclear industry. In general, it dovetails with what Russ and Cindy had been talking about. The thing I'll add on this slide is that during the timeframe from May to October 2002, I was Assistant Team Leader for the NRC's Davis-Besse Lessons Learned Task Force. That's the role in which I'll be presenting this information to you. As you've been doing, I think I found that these work most

138

The use of probabilistic risk assessment to satisfy the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s maintenance rule  

SciTech Connect

Maintenance and inspection at nuclear power plants consumes a large portion of a utility`s resources, making resource allocation for such procedures vital. The NRC Maintenance Rule, due to be implemented in July of 1996, requires utilities to select systems, structures, and components (SSCS) important to safety and to develop a monitoring program to ensure that these SSCs are capable of fulfilling their intended functions. In light of these concerns, two ratios were developed to compare the risk significance of individual components with the amount of plant staff time, or burden, associated with inspecting the component. These risk/burden ratios point out existing disparities between current inspection practices and safety concerns. These ratios can be used to develop new inspection schedules constituting a more equitable risk to burden distribution.

Dubord, R.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Review of the International Atomic Energy Agency International database on reactor pressure vessel materials and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory embrittlement data base  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has supported neutron radiation effects information exchange through meetings and conferences since the mid-1960s. Through an International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components, information exchange and research activities were fostered through the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) sponsored by the IAEA. The final CRP meeting was held in November 1993, where it was recommended that the IAEA coordinate the development of an International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (IDRPVM) as the first step in generating an International Database on Aging Management. The purpose of this study was to provide special technical assistance to the NRC in monitoring and evaluating the IAEA activities in developing the IAEA IDRPVM, and to compare the IDRPVM with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) and provide recommendations for improving the PR-EDB. A first test version of the IDRPVM was distributed at the First Meeting of Liaison Officers to the IAEA IDRPVM, in November 1996. No power reactor surveillance data were included in this version; the testing data were mainly from CRP Phase III data. Therefore, because of insufficient data and a lack of power reactor surveillance data received from the IAEA IDRPVM, the comparison is made based only on the structure of the IDRPVM. In general, the IDRPVM and the EDB have very similar data structure and data format. One anticipates that because the IDRPVM data will be collected from so many different sources, quality assurance of the data will be a difficult task. The consistency of experimental test results will be an important issue. A very wide spectrum of material characteristics of RPV steels and irradiation environments exists among the various countries. Hence the development of embrittlement prediction models will be a formidable task. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Assistance Reviews | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 14, 2002 August 14, 2002 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Fluor Hanford, Incorporated - EA-2002-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Fluor Hanford, Incorporated, related to Quality Assurance issues at the Hanford Site. June 19, 2002 Enforcement Letter, Kaiser-Hill Company, L.L.C. - June 19, 2002 Enforcement Letter issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC related to Unplanned Radioactive Material Uptakes at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site October 22, 2001 Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 Special Report Order issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Multiple Nuclear Safety Issues at the Hanford Site October 9, 2001 Enforcement Letter, LANL - October 9, 2001 Enforcement Letter issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory related to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Assistance Reviews | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 22, 2013 July 22, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-03 Issued to Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC related to Programmatic Deficiencies in the Software Quality Assurance Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory February 12, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-02 Issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC related to a Radiological Contamination Event at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 7, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-01 Issued to B&W Pantex, LLC related to the Conduct of Nuclear Explosive Operations at the Pantex Plant October 23, 2012 Enforcement Letter, Controlled Power Company - WEL-2012-02 Enforcement Letter issued to Controlled Power Company related to an Electrical Shock Near Miss that occurred in the Radiological Laboratory

142

Regulatory standards for permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a summary of observations drawn from twenty years of personal experience in working with regulatory criteria for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste for both the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository for transuranic defense waste and the proposed Yucca Mountain repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level wastes. Rather than providing specific recommendations for regulatory criteria, my goal here is to provide a perspective on topics that are fundamental to how high-level radioactive waste disposal regulations have been implemented in the past. What are the main questions raised relevant to long-term disposal regulations? What has proven effective in the past? Where have regulatory requirements perhaps had unintended consequences? New regulations for radioactive waste disposal may prove necessary, but the drafting of these regulations may be premature until a broad range of policy issues are better addressed. In the interim, the perspective offered here may be helpful for framing policy discussions.

Swift, Peter N.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-99SF21902, Am. M004) Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Research under this project addresses the barriers to long term use of nuclear-generated electricity in the United States. It was agreed that a very basic and significant change to the current method of design and regulation was needed. That is, it was believed that the cost reduction goal could not be met by fixing the current system (i.e., an evolutionary approach) and a new, more advanced approach for this project would be needed. It is believed that a completely new design and regulatory process would have to be developed--a ''clean sheet of paper'' approach. This new approach would start with risk-based methods, would establish probabilistic design criteria, and would implement defense-in-depth only when necessary (1) to meet public policy issues (e.g., use of a containment building no matter how low the probability of a large release is) and (2) to address uncertainties in probabilistic methods and equipment performance. This new approach is significantly different from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) current risk-informed program for operating plants. For our new approach, risk-based methods are the primary means for assuring plant safety, whereas in the NRC's current approach, defense-in-depth remains the primary means of assuring safety. The primary accomplishments in the first year--Phase 1 were (1) the establishment of a new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework, (2) the establishment of the preliminary version of the new, highly risk-informed design process, (3) core damage frequency predictions showing that, based on new, lower pipe rupture probabilities, the design of the emergency core cooling system equipment can be simplified without reducing plant safety, and (4) the initial development of methods for including uncertainties in a new integrated structures-systems design model. Under the new regulatory framework, options for the use of ''design basis accidents'' were evaluated. It is expected that design basis accidents would be an inherent part of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment for the plant and their evaluation would be probabilistic. Other first year accomplishments include (1) the conversion of an NRC database for cross-referencing NRC criteria and industry codes and standards to Microsoft 2000 software, (2) an assessment of the NRC's hearing process which concluded that the normal cross-examination during public hearings is not actually required by the U.S. Administrative Procedures Act, (3) the identification and listing of reliability data sources, and (4) interfacing with other industry groups (e.g., NEI and IAEA) and NRC at workshops for risk-informing regulations. The major accomplishments during the second year consisted of (1) issuance of the final report for Subtask 1.1, ''Identify Current Applicable Regulatory Requirements [and Industry Standards],'' (2) issuance of the final report for Subtask 1.2,'' Identify Structures, Systems, and Components and Their Associate d Costs for a Typical Plant,'' (3) extension of the new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework to non-light-water-reactor technology, (4) completion of more detailed thermal-hydraulic and probabilistic analyses of advanced conceptual reactor system/component designs, (6) initial evaluation and recommendations for improvement of the NRC design review process, and (7) initial development of the software format, procedures and statistical routines needed to store, analyze and retrieve the available reliability data. Final reports for Subtasks 1.1 (regulatory and design criteria) and 1.2 (costs for structures, systems, and components) were prepared and issued. A final report for Subtask 1.3 (Regulatory Framework) was drafted with the aim to issue it in Phase 3 (Year 3). One technical report was produced for Subtask 1.4 (methods development) and two technical reports were produced for Subtask 1.6 (sample problem analysis). An interim report on the NRC design review process (Subtask 1.7) was prepared and issued. Finally, a report on Subtask 2.2 (database weaknesses) addressed the i

Stanley E. Ritterbusch, et. al.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669  

SciTech Connect

The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Operations (NRC)), Jim O'Brien, Director, Office of Nuclear Safety (EHSS DOE), Robert Johnson (Chief, Fuel Manufacturing Branch (NRC)) Front Row: Matt Moury, Associate Under...

146

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Project Plan. The Project Plan is intended to provide the high-level direction that documents the required software activities to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Carl Wharton; Kent Norris

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Project Plan. The Project Plan is intended to provide the high-level direction that documents the required software activities to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Carl Wharton

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Project Plan. The Project Plan is intended to provide the high-level direction that documents the required software activities to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Carl Wharton; Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Regulatory guidance on soil cover systems  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in September 1991, completed revisions to 14 sections of the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility. The major purposes of the SRP are to ensure the quality and uniformity of the NRC staff`s safety reviews, and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate the acceptability of information and data provided in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) portion of the license application. SRP 3.2, entitled, Design Considerations for Normal and Abnormal/Accident Conditions, was one of the sections that was revised by the NRC staff. This revision was completed to provide additional regulatory guidance on the important considerations that need to be addressed for the proper design and construction of soil cover systems that are to be placed over the LLW. The cover system over the waste is acknowledged to be one of the most important engineered barriers for the long-term stable performance of the disposal facility. The guidance in revised SRP 3.2 summarizes the previous efforts and recommendations of the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and a peer review panel on the placement of soil cover systems. NRC published these efforts in NUREG/CR-5432. The discussions in this paper highlight selected recommendations on soil cover issues that the NRC staff considers important for ensuring the safe, long-term performance of the soil cover systems. The development phases to be discussed include: (1) cover design; (2) cover material selection; (3) laboratory and field testing; (4) field placement control and acceptance; and (5) penetrations through the constructed covers.

Kane, J.D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

CANDU reactors, their regulation in Canada, and the identification of relevant NRC safety issues  

SciTech Connect

Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) and its subsidiary in the US, are considering submitting the CANDU 3 design for standard design certification under 10 CFR Part 52. CANDU reactors are pressurized heavy water power reactors. They have some substantially different safety responses and safety systems than the LWRs that the commercial power reactor licensing regulations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been developed to deal with. In this report, the authors discuss the basic design characteristics of CANDU reactors, specifically of the CANDU 3 where possible, and some safety-related consequences of these characteristics. The authors also discuss the Canadian regulatory provisions, and the CANDU safety systems that have evolved to satisfy the Canadian regulatory requirements as of December 1992. Finally, the authors identify NRC regulations, mainly in 10 CFR Parts 50 and 100, with issues for CANDU 3 reactor designs. In all, eleven such regulatory issues are identified. They are: (1) the ATWS rule ({section}50.62); (2) station blackout ({section}50.63); (3) conformance with Standard Review Plan (SRP); (4) appropriateness of the source term ({section}50.34(f) and {section}100.11); (5) applicability of reactor coolant pressure boundary (RCPB) requirements ({section}50.55a, etc); (6) ECCS acceptance criteria ({section}50.46)(b); (7) combustible gas control ({section}50.44, etc); (8) power coefficient of reactivity (GDC 11); (9) seismic design (Part 100); (10) environmental impacts of the fuel cycle ({section}51.51); and (11) (standards {section}50.55a).

Charak, I.; Kier, P.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements. Revision 18  

SciTech Connect

This document (NUREG-0325) is the current US NRC organization chart, listing all NRC offices and regions and their components down through the branch level as of July 23, 1995. Functional statements of each position are given, as is the name of the individual holding the position.

NONE

1995-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

152

Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Combined  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Combined Construction & Operating License Application to the NRC Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Combined Construction & Operating License Application to the NRC November 28, 2007 - 4:45pm Addthis RICHMOND, VA - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dennis Spurgeon today commended Dominion North Anna, LLC (Dominion) for submission of a combined Construction and Operating License (COL) application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction of a new nuclear power plant in the United States. Dominion's application seeks approval to build and operate one General Electric-Hitachi Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) at its

153

EPRI/NRC-RES fire human reliability analysis guidelines.  

SciTech Connect

During the 1990s, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed methods for fire risk analysis to support its utility members in the preparation of responses to Generic Letter 88-20, Supplement 4, 'Individual Plant Examination - External Events' (IPEEE). This effort produced a Fire Risk Assessment methodology for operations at power that was used by the majority of U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs) in support of the IPEEE program and several NPPs overseas. Although these methods were acceptable for accomplishing the objectives of the IPEEE, EPRI and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recognized that they required upgrades to support current requirements for risk-informed, performance-based (RI/PB) applications. In 2001, EPRI and the USNRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) embarked on a cooperative project to improve the state-of-the-art in fire risk assessment to support a new risk-informed environment in fire protection. This project produced a consensus document, NUREG/CR-6850 (EPRI 1011989), entitled 'Fire PRA Methodology for Nuclear Power Facilities' which addressed fire risk for at power operations. NUREG/CR-6850 developed high level guidance on the process for identification and inclusion of human failure events (HFEs) into the fire PRA (FPRA), and a methodology for assigning quantitative screening values to these HFEs. It outlined the initial considerations of performance shaping factors (PSFs) and related fire effects that may need to be addressed in developing best-estimate human error probabilities (HEPs). However, NUREG/CR-6850 did not describe a methodology to develop best-estimate HEPs given the PSFs and the fire-related effects. In 2007, EPRI and RES embarked on another cooperative project to develop explicit guidance for estimating HEPs for human failure events under fire generated conditions, building upon existing human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This document provides a methodology and guidance for conducting a fire HRA. This process includes identification and definition of post-fire human failure events, qualitative analysis, quantification, recovery, dependency, and uncertainty. This document provides three approaches to quantification: screening, scoping, and detailed HRA. Screening is based on the guidance in NUREG/CR-6850, with some additional guidance for scenarios with long time windows. Scoping is a new approach to quantification developed specifically to support the iterative nature of fire PRA quantification. Scoping is intended to provide less conservative HEPs than screening, but requires fewer resources than a detailed HRA analysis. For detailed HRA quantification, guidance has been developed on how to apply existing methods to assess post-fire fire HEPs.

Lewis, Stuart R. (Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC); Cooper, Susan E. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD); Najafi, Bijan (SAIC, Campbell, CA); Collins, Erin (SAIC, Campbell, CA); Hannaman, Bill (SAIC, Campbell, CA); Kohlhepp, Kaydee (Scientech, Tukwila, WA); Grobbelaar, Jan (Scientech, Tukwila, WA); Hill, Kendra (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD); Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt; Forester, John Alan; Julius, Jeff (Scientech, Tukwila, WA)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION OFFICE OF INSPECTION AND ENFORCEMEN...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Gousie was reinterviewed on January 9, 1979, by NRC Inspectors R. E. Shepherd and R. H. Smith in the presence of TI representatives F. Sherman and 3. A. Haug, TI's Attleboro Patent...

155

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the United States Department Of Energy Public Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 The UNITED STATES 3 NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION and 4 the UNITED STATES 5 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 6 7 PUBLIC MEETING 8 9 DISCUSSION OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SECTION 3116 OF 10 THE NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT 11 12 Commencing at 9:10 a.m., November 16, 2006 13 at the L'Enfant Plaza Hotel 14 480 L'Enfant Plaza, SW 15 Washington DC 20024 16 17 Public meeting organized by: 18 Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. 19 20010 Century Boulevard, Suite 500 20 Germantown, Maryland 20874 21 (301) 972-4430 22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 2 P R O C E E D I N G S MR. CAMERON: Good morning everyone. My name is Chip Cameron. I'm an assistant general counsel in the office of General Counsel at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. And I would like to

156

From 1998 to 2000, through the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The parameters used in the dose modeling for the scenarios and the dose conversion factors calculated for each were taken. Approximately half of the samples were analyzed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak

157

Fitness for duty in the nuclear industry: Update of the technical issues 1996  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide an update of information on the technical issues surrounding the creation, implementation, and maintenance of fitness-for-duty (FFD) policies and programs. It has been prepared as a resource for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and nuclear power plant personnel who deal with FFD programs. It contains a general overview and update on the technical issues that the NRC considered prior to the publication of its original FFD rule and the revisions to that rule (presented in earlier NUREG/CRs). It also includes chapters that address issues about which there is growing concern and/or about which there have been substantial changes since NUREG/CR-5784 was published. Although this report is intended to support the NRC`s rule making on fitness for duty, the conclusions of the authors of this report are their own and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the NRC.

Durbin, N.; Grant, T. [eds.] [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

September 10, 2003, Board Public Meeting - Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approach to Oversight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 25 63 carefully, also. In fact, I would like to put in the r e c o r d at this point a letter that the Board sent to Admiral Bowman complimenting him on those reports , because we find them very helpful. Thank you. Any other questions? DR. MANSFIELD: I second that: especially the radiological safety reports and environmental reports. CHAIFWAN CONWAY: Yes , very important , and we thank you. We thank you for your assistance here today . Thank you very much. Now we have the experienced representatives from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Ms. Cynthia Carpenter and Dr. Edwin Hackett. If you would each introduce yourselves for the record. MS. CARPENTER: Good morning. My name is Cynthia Carpenter. I'm the Deputy Director of the Division of Inspection Program Management from the

159

Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

:14 :14 Report number: 2013:14 ISSN: 2000-0456 Available at www.stralsakerhetsmyndigheten.se Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries Evaluation for Regulatory Input Robert A. Meck Author: SSM perspektiv SSM har nyligen beslutat om föreskrifter om friklassning av material, loka- ler, byggnader och mark vid verksamhet med joniserande strålning (SSMFS 201 1:2). Föreskrifterna innehåller bland annat krav på att tillståndshavare, vid avveckling av verksamhet med joniserande strålning, ska vidta åtgärder som möjliggör friklassning av lokaler, byggnader och mark. Föreskrifterna innehåller nuklidspecifika friklassningsnivåer i becquerel per m2 för lokaler och byggnader men ger ingen upplysning om vilka friklassningsnivåer som

160

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Risk Management Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the risk management. Risk management is intended to ensure a methodology for conducting risk management planning, identification, analysis, responses, and monitoring and control activities associated with the SAPHIRE project work, and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kent Norris

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Power to the People or Regulatory Ratcheting? Explaining the Success (or Failure) of Attempts to Site Commercial U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: 1954 -19961  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Site Commercial U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: 1954 - 19961 7 April 2014 Eric Berndt2 and Daniel P. Aldrich3 Abstract: Between 1954 and 1996, more than 200 nuclear power projects were publically announced to revitalize the nuclear industry in the US and abroad. Keywords: nuclear power, siting decisions, regulatory

162

Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

Benson, B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5975, Incentive Regulation of Investor-Owned Nuclear Power Plants by Public Utility Regulators, published in January 1993. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Seely, H.E.; Merritt, C.R.; Baker, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

U.S. Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) Nuclear Regulation Data (Information Digest, 2010 - 2011) Dataset Summary Description The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) publishes an Information Digest containing summary information about the NRC and its industry. The report's appendices include demographic data on U.S. nuclear power reactors, both commercial and test facilities. Details include licensee data, location, and capacity. In addition there is information on dry spent fuel storage. The data include activities through 2009 or the most current data available. Source U.S. Nuclear Reactor Commission (USNRC) Date Released August 31st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords nuclear Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon US Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors (xls, 132.6 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon US Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors, Permanently Shutdown (xls, 32.8 KiB)

165

Microsoft PowerPoint - 5_Pat Smith_NMMSS_2013_Presentation_NRC Reconciliation.pptx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reconciliation Reconciliation Pat Smith PSI NRC Lead NRC Reconciliation  NRC Reconciliation requirements per NUREG/BR-0007, Rev. 6  All RIS's must submit an MSR (Material Summary Report) (Form 742, 742C) to NMMSS under the following conditions: - A RIS has a reportable quantity as of their inventory date - A RIS has shipped or received a reportable quantity during the material balance reporting period NRC Reconciliation  All NRC licensees are required to report their physical inventory to NMMSS each year if they: - possess one gram or more of special nuclear material (SNM) (plutonium, uranium-233, or uranium-235 contained in enriched uranium) - one kilogram or more of foreign obligated source material (natural uranium, depleted uranium, or thorium) are required to report their physical inventory to NMMSS each

166

Final report of the NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate control and accountability of licensed devices  

SciTech Connect

US NRC staff acknowledged that licensees were having problems maintaining control over and accountability for devices containing radioactive material. In June 1995, NRC approved the staff`s suggestion to form a joint NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate the problem and propose solutions. The staff indicated that the Working Group was necessary to address the concerns from a national perspective, allow for a broad level of Agreement State input, and to reflect their experience. Agreement State participation in the process was essential since some Agreement States have implemented effective programs for oversight of device users. This report includes the 5 recommendations proposed by the Working Group to increase regulatory oversight, increase control and accountability of devices, ensure proper disposal, and ensure disposal of orphaned devices. Specifically, the Working Group recommends that: (1) NRC and Agreement States increase regulatory oversight for users of certain devices; (2) NRC and Agreement State impose penalties on persons losing devices; (3) NRC and Agreement States ensure proper disposal of orphaned devices; (4) NRC encourage States to implement similar oversight programs for users of Naturally-Occurring or Accelerator- Produced Material; and (5) NRC encourage non-licensed stakeholders to take appropriate actions, such as instituting programs for material identification.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Going the Distance? NRC's Response to the National Academy of Science's Transportation Study  

SciTech Connect

In February 2006, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) published the results of a 3 1/2-year study, titled Going the Distance, that examined the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) in the United States. NAS initiated this study to address what it perceived to be a national need for an independent, objective, and authoritative analysis of SNF and HLW transport in the United States. The study was co-sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. This paper addresses some of the recommendations made in the NAS study related to the performance of SNF transportation casks in long duration fires, the use of full-scale package testing, and the need for an independent review of transportation security prior to the commencement of large scale shipping campaigns to an interim storage site or geologic repository. In conclusion: The NRC believes that the current regulations in 10 CFR Part 71 for the design of SNF and HLW transportation packages provide a very high level of protection to the public for very severe accidents and credible threat scenarios. As recommended by the NAS study, additional studies of accidents involving severe fires have been completed. These studies have confirmed that spent fuel casks would be expected to withstand very severe fires without the release of any fission products from the spent fuel. Additionally, changes in rail operating procedures such as the use of dedicated trains and prohibition on the co-location of SNF and flammable liquids in rail tunnels can further reduce the already low probability of severe rail accident fires involving SNF and HLW. (authors)

Easton, E.P.; Bajwa, C.S. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Creating a Comprehensive, Efficient, and Sustainable Nuclear Regulatory Structure: A Process Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program  

SciTech Connect

With the congressionally mandated January 1, 2013 deadline for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) program to complete its transition of MPC&A responsibility to the Russian Federation, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) management directed its MPC&A program managers and team leaders to demonstrate that work in ongoing programs would lead to successful and timely achievement of these milestones. In the spirit of planning for successful project completion, the NNSA review of the Russian regulatory development process confirmed the critical importance of an effective regulatory system to a sustainable nuclear protection regime and called for an analysis of the existing Russian regulatory structure and the identification of a plan to ensure a complete MPC&A regulatory foundation. This paper describes the systematic process used by DOEs MPC&A Regulatory Development Project (RDP) to develop an effective and sustainable MPC&A regulatory structure in the Russian Federation. This nuclear regulatory system will address all non-military Category I and II nuclear materials at State Corporation for Atomic Energy Rosatom, the Federal Service for Ecological, Technological, and Nuclear Oversight (Rostechnadzor), the Federal Agency for Marine and River Transport (FAMRT, within the Ministry of Transportation), and the Ministry of Industry and Trade (Minpromtorg). The approach to ensuring a complete and comprehensive nuclear regulatory structure includes five sequential steps. The approach was adopted from DOEs project management guidelines and was adapted to the regulatory development task by the RDP. The five steps in the Regulatory Development Process are: 1) Define MPC&A Structural Elements; 2) Analyze the existing regulatory documents using the identified Structural Elements; 3) Validate the analysis with Russian colleagues and define the list of documents to be developed; 4) Prioritize and schedule the development of documents; 5) Identify and develop processes to measure effectiveness of regulations. Utilizing this process is resulting in an effective regulatory process that is understood and is being adopted by the four RF organizations. It is anticipated that the current regulatory development process will continue after U.S. support ends. Utilization of the systematic methodology will ensure regulatory development is based on required MPC&A structural elements and will support the continued maintenance and development of an effective regulatory base.

Wright, Troy L.; O'Brien, Patricia E.; Hazel, Michael J.; Tuttle, John D.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Schlegel, Steven C.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 News Updates Luminant has requested a suspension of the NRC's review of its Comanche Peak Combined Construction and Operating License (COL) application. The company cited impacts to the review schedule of the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries US Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (US-APWR) due to the vendor's desire to refocus its resources to reactor restarts in Japan as well as low electricity prices driven by low natural gas prices as reasons for the suspension. Unistar Nuclear Operating Co. has formally withdrawn its COL application from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to build and operate Areva's U.S. EPR at its Nine Mile Point site in Oswego, NY. In

170

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

171

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

172

32 A. Agung et al. / Nuclear Engineering and Design 257 (2013) 3144 rod bank withdrawal at power, feedwater disturbances, Loss-Of-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;32 A. Agung et al. / Nuclear Engineering and Design 257 (2013) 31­44 rod bank withdrawal of the Ringhals-3 PWR. A nuclear power plant is a strongly coupled and complex system, in which there is a strong.0 (Downar et al., 2010) and the RELAP5 mod 3.3 (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission: U.S. NRC, 2006) codes

Demazière, Christophe

173

Program Overview Shane Johnson Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Overview Program Overview Shane Johnson Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology April 15, 2002 Presentation to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Johnson/April15_02 NP 2010 to NERAC.ppt 2 Nuclear Power 2010 Overview Nuclear Power 2010 Overview Goals 6 Orders for one or more new nuclear plants by 2005 6 Operation of new nuclear power plants by 2010 6 New program initiative unveiled February 2002 6 Based on Near-Term Deployment Roadmap 6 Public/private partnership to: ! Develop advanced reactor technologies ! Explore sites that could host new nuclear power plants ! Demonstrate new Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory processes Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Johnson/April15_02 NP 2010 to NERAC.ppt 3

174

NRC Construction Light Source Flicker: What We  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frequency] (CFF) ·Health - World Health Organization (1947): · ...a state of complete physical, mental Handbook: Reference & Application (9th Ed.), 2000, p. 3-20 #12;NRC Construction Flicker Effects 1;NRC Construction Flicker Problem 2 ·Does it matter what light source produces the flicker

California at Davis, University of

175

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1992  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1992. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. Information is presented on five parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export and Critical Assembly.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Nuclear Regulatory Authority low energy germanium detection system: performance for the uranium individual monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Regulatory Authority low energy germanium detection...Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina 2 Sociedad Argentina de Radioproteccion...Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina The lung counter facility...for 235U photopeaks energies and for each effective......

M. R. Spinella; M. Krimer; A. M. Rojo; I. Gomez Parada; B. N. Gregori

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Knowledge Management Initiatives Used to Maintain Regulatory Expertise in Transportation and Storage of Radioactive Materials - 12177  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1974 with the mission to license and regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials for commercial, industrial, academic, and medical uses in order to protect public health and safety, and the environment, and promote the common defense and security. Currently, approximately half (?49%) of the workforce at the NRC has been with the Agency for less than six years. As part of the Agency's mission, the NRC has partial responsibility for the oversight of the transportation and storage of radioactive materials. The NRC has experienced a significant level of expertise leaving the Agency due to staff attrition. Factors that contribute to this attrition include retirement of the experienced nuclear workforce and mobility of staff within or outside the Agency. Several knowledge management (KM) initiatives have been implemented within the Agency, with one of them including the formation of a Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation (SFST) KM team. The team, which was formed in the fall of 2008, facilitates capturing, transferring, and documenting regulatory knowledge for staff to effectively perform their safety oversight of transportation and storage of radioactive materials, regulated under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 71 and Part 72. In terms of KM, the SFST goal is to share critical information among the staff to reduce the impact from staff's mobility and attrition. KM strategies in place to achieve this goal are: (1) development of communities of practice (CoP) (SFST Qualification Journal and the Packaging and Storing Radioactive Material) in the on-line NRC Knowledge Center (NKC); (2) implementation of a SFST seminar program where the seminars are recorded and placed in the Agency's repository, Agency-wide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS); (3) meeting of technical discipline group programs to share knowledge within specialty areas; (4) development of written guidance to capture 'administrative and technical' knowledge (e.g., office instructions (OIs), generic communications (e.g., bulletins, generic letters, regulatory issue summary), standard review plans (SRPs), interim staff guidance (ISGs)); (5) use of mentoring strategies for experienced staff to train new staff members; (6) use of Microsoft SharePoint portals in capturing, transferring, and documenting knowledge for staff across the Division from Division management and administrative assistants to the project managers, inspectors, and technical reviewers; and (7) development and implementation of a Division KM Plan. A discussion and description of the successes and challenges of implementing these KM strategies at the NRC/SFST will be provided. (authors)

Lindsay, Haile; Garcia-Santos, Norma; Saverot, Pierre; Day, Neil; Gambone Rodriguez, Kimberly; Cruz, Luis; Sotomayor-Rivera, Alexis; Vechioli, Lucieann; Vera, John; Pstrak, David [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop EBB-03D-02M, 6003 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Status of NRC approval of EPRI electromagnetic interference susceptibility testing guidelines for digital equipment  

SciTech Connect

Historically, nuclear power plants installing digital equipment have been required to conduct expensive, site-specific electromagnetic interference (EMI) surveys to demonstrate that EMI will not affect the operation of sensitive electronic equipment. Consequently, EPRI formed a Utility Working Group which developed a set of generic EMI susceptibility testing guidelines, which were published as an EPRI report in September 1994. These guidelines are based upon EMI survey data obtained from several different plants and include criteria for determining their applicability. The Working Group interacted with NRC staff to obtain NRC approval. In April 1996, the NRC issued a Safety Evaluation Report (SER) endorsing the guidelines as a valid means of demonstrating EMI compatibility. The issuance of this SER was conditional on issuing a revision to the EPRI EMI Guidelines. This paper summarizes the guidelines, the NRC SER, and the current status of Revision 1 to the report.

James, R.W. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Shank, J.W. [Public Service Electric & Gas Company, Hancock`s Bridge, NJ (United States); Yoder, C. [Baltimore Gas & Electric, Lusby, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Thomas Miller Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Miller Miller Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy September 30, 2002 Presentation at the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Nuclear Power 2010 Program Strategy to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants Nuclear Power 2010 Program Strategy to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology TMiller/Sept11_02 ESE Project.ppt ( 2) Nuclear Power 2010: Overview Nuclear Power 2010: Overview Goal 6 Achieve industry decision by 2005 to deploy at least one new advanced nuclear power plant by 2010 Cooperative Activities 6 Regulatory Demonstration Projects * Early Site Permit (ESP) * Combined Construction and Operating License (COL) 6 Reactor Technology Development Projects * NRC Design Certification (DC) * First-of-a-kind engineering for a standardized plant

180

NRC Solomons RFQ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solomons RFQ Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: NRC Solomons RFQLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Below regulatory concern owners group: Individual and population impacts from BRC (below regulatory concern) waste treatment and disposal  

SciTech Connect

Using the IMPACTS-BRC and PRESTO-EPA-POP codes, researchers calculated potential individual and population doses for routine and unexpected radiation exposures resulting from the transportation and disposal of BRC nuclear power plant wastes. These calculations provided a basis for establishing annual curie and radionuclide concentration limits for BRC treatment and disposal. EPRI has initiated a program to develop a petition for rulemaking to NRC that would allow management of certain very low activity nuclear power plant waste types as below regulatory concern (BRC), thus exempting these wastes from requirements for burial at licensed low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The technical information required to support the BRC petition includes an assessment of radiologic impacts resulting from the proposed exemption, based on estimated individual and population doses that might result from BRC treatment and disposal of nuclear power plant wastes. 13 figs., 31 tabs.

Murphy, E.S.; Rogers, V.C.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report of the Nuclear Manpower Study Committee  

SciTech Connect

The anticipated personnel needs of the nuclear power industry have varied widely in recent years, in response to both increasing regulatory requirements and declining orders for new plants. Recent employment patterns in the nuclear energy field, with their fluctuations, resemble those of defense industries more than those traditionally associated with electric utilities. Reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 by industry and regulators have increased the demand for trained and experienced personnel, causing salaries to rise. Industry, for example, has established several advisory organizations like the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). At the same time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed many new construction and operating requirements in an effort to take advantage of lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident and to respond to the perceived public interest in better regulation of nuclear power. Thus, at present, utilities, architect-engineer firms, reactor vendors, and organizations in the nuclear development community have heavy workloads.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

NRC allows TVA to resume construction on unit 1  

SciTech Connect

The article very briefly describes the construction status of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Nuclear Plant unit 1. The project was halted by TVA for two years due to quality assurance issues. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved resumption of work, noting that corrective actions were adequate. The status of other TVA reactors is also noted.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2014 January 2014 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2014 News Updates Luminant has requested a suspension of the NRC's review of its Comanche Peak Combined Construction and Operating License (COL) application. The company cited impacts to the review schedule of the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries US Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (US-APWR) due to the vendor's desire to refocus its resources to reactor restarts in Japan as well as low electricity prices driven by low natural gas prices as reasons for the suspension. Unistar Nuclear Operating Co. has formally withdrawn its COL application from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to build and operate Areva's U.S. EPR at its Nine Mile Point site in Oswego, NY. In late 2009, Unistar requested a suspension of the application review due to

185

The Constellation-EdF Nuclear Joint Venture: Regulatory Issues and Subsequent Resolutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Corporate restructurings of electric utilities in the U.S. have become a significant and controversial issue due to the differing perspectives of electric utility executives and regulatory commissioners relating to corporate restructuring associated with mergers, diversification, and functional separation of generation, transmission, and distribution. The Maryland Public Service Commission assessed a joint venture between Constellation Energy Group and Electricite de France that reflects these tradeoffs.

Ryan Pfaff; Howard Lubow; J. Robert Malko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Constellation-EdF nuclear joint venture: regulatory issues and subsequent resolutions  

SciTech Connect

Corporate restructurings of electric utilities in the U.S. have become a significant and controversial issue due to the differing perspectives of electric utility executives and regulatory commissioners relating to corporate restructuring associated with mergers, diversification, and functional separation of generation, transmission, and distribution. The Maryland Public Service Commission assessed a joint venture between Constellation Energy Group and Electricite de France that reflects these tradeoffs. (author)

Pfaff, Ryan; Lubow, Howard; Malko, J. Robert

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

NRC staff site characterization analysis of the Department of Energy`s Site Characterization Plan, Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Site Characterization Analysis (SCA) documents the NRC staff`s concerns resulting from its review of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada, which is the candidate site selected for characterization as the nation`s first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. DOE`s SCP explains how DOE plans to obtain the information necessary to determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for a repository. NRC`s specific objections related to the SCP, and major comments and recommendations on the various parts of DOE`s program, are presented in SCA Section 2, Director`s Comments and Recommendations. Section 3 contains summaries of the NRC staff`s concerns for each specific program, and Section 4 contains NRC staff point papers which set forth in greater detail particular staff concerns regarding DOE`s program. Appendix A presents NRC staff evaluations of those NRC staff Consultation Draft SCP concerns that NRC considers resolved on the basis of the SCP. This SCA fulfills NRC`s responsibilities with respect to DOE`s SCP as specified by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and 10 CFR 60.18. 192 refs., 2 tabs.

NONE

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

189

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

190

Public Comments on the proposed 10 CFR Part 51 rule for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses and supporting documents: Review of concerns and NRC staff response. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains several appendices. Appendix A contains the list of individuals and organizations providing comments at various stages of the rulemaking process. The names of commenters at the public meetings are listed in the order that they spoke at the meeting; those who submitted written comments are listed by docket number. Appendix B contains the summaries of comments made. Each comment summary is identified by a unique comment number. Appendix C presents the concerns and NRC staff responses. Each concern embodies one or more comments on similar or related issues. The associated comment numbers are referenced for each concern. The concerns are organized by topic areas. A three-letter identifier for the topic, followed by a number, is assigned to each concern.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2014 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

July 2014 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2014 News Updates * The NRC Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (ASLB) has ruled that Toshiba's participation in Nuclear...

192

Safety culture in the nuclear power industry : attributes for regulatory assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety culture refers to the attitudes, behaviors, and conditions that affect safety performance and often arises in discussions following incidents at nuclear power plants. As it involves both operational and management ...

Alexander, Erin L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Regulatory Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Tools Regulatory Tools Home CRA - 2004 Final Recertification Decision CRA Comments & Responses CCA - 1996 CRA CARDs & TSDs CCA CARDs & TSDs Regulatory Tools Title 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. Title 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the Certification and Re-Certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance With the 40 CFR Part 191 Disposal Regulations. Part I Title 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the Certification and Recertification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance With the Disposal Regulations; Alternative Provisions; Proposed Rule. Friday August 9, 2002. Part II Title 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the Certification and Recertification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance With the Disposal Regulations: Certification Decision; Final Rule. May 18, 1998. Part III

194

Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B188 Summary of methods proposed for risk informing the design and regulation of future nuclear power plants. All elements of the historical design and regulation process are preserved, but the methods proposed for new plants use probabilistic risk assessment methods as the primary decision making tool.

Ritterbusch, Stanley; Golay, Michael; Duran, Felicia; Galyean, William; Gupta, Abhinav; Dimitrijevic, Vesna; Malsch, Marty

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

195

PRA In Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/ NRC Workshop)  

SciTech Connect

In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers confidence in PRA results, especially at a preoperational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues? (c) What more can be done? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

Robert Youngblood

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Review of Technical Studies in the United States in Support of Burnup Credit Regulatory Guidance  

SciTech Connect

Taking credit for the reduction in reactivity associated with fuel depletion can enable more cost-effective, higher-density storage, transport, disposal, and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) while maintaining sufficient subcritical margin to establish an adequate safety basis. Consequently, there continues to be considerable interest in the United States (U.S.), as well as internationally, in the increased use of burnup credit in SNF operations, particularly related to storage, transport, and disposal of commercial SNF. This interest has motivated numerous technical studies related to the application of burnup credit, both domestically and internationally, as well as the design of SNF storage, transport and disposal systems that rely on burnup credit for maintaining subcriticality. Responding to industry requests and needs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a burnup credit research program in 1999, with support from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to develop regulatory guidance and the supporting technical bases for allowing and expanding the use of burnup credit in pressurized-water reactor SNF storage and transport applications. Although this NRC research program has not been continuous since its inception, considerable progress has been achieved in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues, availability of relevant information and data, and subsequently updated regulatory guidance for expanded use of burnup credit. This paper reviews technical studies performed by ORNL for the U.S. NRC burnup credit research program. Examples of topics include reactivity effects associated with reactor operating characteristics, fuel assembly characteristics, burnable absorbers, control rods, spatial burnup distributions, cooling time, and assembly misloading; methods and data for validation of isotopic composition predictions; methods and data for validation of criticality calculations; and operational issues and data related to assembly burnup confirmation. The objective of this paper is to summarize the work and significant accomplishments, with references to the technical reports and publications for complete details, and provide a useful resource to others in the burnup credit community.

Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, Cecil V [ORNL] [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL] [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 29: Bolting degradation or failure in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Generic Safety Issue (GSI)-29 deals with staff concerns about public risk due to degradation or failure of safety-related bolting in nuclear power plants. The issue was initiated in November 1982. Value-impact studies of a mandatory program on safety-related bolting for operating plants were inconclusive: therefore, additional regulatory requirements for operating plants could not be justified in accordance with provisions of 10 CFR 50.109. In addition, based on operating experience with bolting in both nuclear and conventional power plants, the actions already taken through bulletins, generic letters, and information notices, and the industry-proposed actions, the staff concluded that a sufficient technical basis exists for the resolution of GSI-29. The staff further concluded that leakage of bolted pressure joints is possible but catastrophic failure of a reactor coolant pressure boundary joint that will lead to significant accident sequences is highly unlikely. For future plants, it was concluded that a new Standard Review Plant section should be developed to codify existing bolting requirements and industry-developed initiatives. 9 refs., 1 tab.

Chang, T.Y.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Microsoft PowerPoint - 5_Pat Smith_NMMSS_2013_Presentation_NRC...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reconciliation Pat Smith PSI NRC Lead NRC Reconciliation NRC Reconciliation requirements per NUREGBR-0007, Rev. 6 All RIS's must submit an MSR (Material Summary Report)...

199

Topics in Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect

The 104 nuclear plants operating in the US today are far safer than they were 20-30 years ago. For example, there's been about a 100-fold reduction in the occurrence of 'significant events' since the late 1970s. Although the youngest of currently operating US plants was designed in the 1970s, all have been significantly modified over the years. Key contributors to the safety gains are a vigilant culture, much improved equipment reliability, greatly improved training of operators and maintenance workers, worldwide sharing of experience, and the effective use of probabilistic risk assessment. Several manufacturers have submitted high quality new designs for large reactors to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for design approval, and some designers are taking a second look at the economies of smaller, modular reactors.

Budnitz, Robert J. [Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

200

Tomorrow: Secretary Chu to Participate in New Millenium Nuclear Summit |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tomorrow: Secretary Chu to Participate in New Millenium Nuclear Tomorrow: Secretary Chu to Participate in New Millenium Nuclear Summit Tomorrow: Secretary Chu to Participate in New Millenium Nuclear Summit December 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Tomorrow, December 7, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will participate in the New Millenium Nuclear Summit along with White House Advisor Carol Browner, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Chairman Greg Jaczko, and members of the U.S. Congress as well as members of industry, labor and non-governmental organizations. The forum on the future of nuclear energy in the United States is being hosted by Third Way and the Idaho National Lab. U.S. Senators Tom Carper and George V. Voinovich are honorary co-chairs of the event. New Millenium Nuclear Summit When: Tuesday, December 7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microsoft PowerPoint - Upcoming NMMSS Training 120811-NRC comments...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Date Course Location December 2-4, 2014 NRC - NMMSS I * Germantown, MD February 10-13, 2015 DOE - NMMSS I Germantown, MD March 24-26, 2015 NRC - NMMSS I * Germantown, MD June...

202

DOE Petitions for NRC Review in Yucca Mountain Proceeding | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Petitions for NRC Review in Yucca Mountain Proceeding DOE Petitions for NRC Review in Yucca Mountain Proceeding April 12, 2010 - 10:16am Addthis The United States Department of...

203

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nuclear tools for characterising radiological dispersion in complex terrain: evaluation of regulatory and emergency response models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Routine operations of a nuclear research reactor and its facilities offer opportunities for collection of rare environmental tracer datasets which can be used for atmospheric dispersion model evaluation studies. The HIFAR reactor near Sydney, Australia, routinely emits the radioactive noble gas 41Ar, and other radionuclides such as 133Xe and 135Xe are also emitted from nearby radiopharmaceutical production facilities. Despite extremely low emission levels of these gases, they are nevertheless detectable using state-of-the-art technology, and sensitive detectors have been placed at four locations in the surrounding region which features complex terrain. The high research potential of this unique dataset is illustrated in the current study, in which predictions from two atmospheric dispersion models used for emergency response are compared with 41Ar peak observations from the detector network under a range of stability conditions, and long-term integrated data is also compared with a routine impact assessment model.

Alastair G. Williams; Geoffrey H. Clark; Leisa Dyer; Richard Barton

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Lessons Learned... and Not Learned: A Case Study in Regulatory Evolution  

SciTech Connect

'Are you better off than you were four years ago?' 'You've come a long way, baby.' Eschewing politics and advertising, these idioms are applied to the evolution of regulatory processes for Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. We use a case study of a (nearly) completed D and D project at a large nuclear fuel manufacturing facility, to chronicle one licensee's experience with US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) D and D regulations from the 1990's to the present. Historical milestones include the birth of a D and D project, a false start and resultant consequences, a D and D 'moratorium' with subsequent planning and stakeholder integration, a second start which included the challenge of parallel path D and D physical work and regulatory processes, and the 'lessons learned' contributions to timely project progress. Further discussion includes a look at the 'declaration of victory' and examines what it really means to be finished. The rich contextual experience from the case study and the observations of other industry members provides the basis for answers to several key questions: How far has the regulatory process for D and D really evolved, and in what direction? Are licensees generally satisfied or dissatisfied with the methods? What has not improved? Which improvements looked promising, but languished in recent years? How far have we really come and are we better off? What are the opportunities for further improvement? The summary answer to each question, using compendious engineering terms is... 'it depends'. (authors)

Conant, J. F. [ABB Inc., 2000 Day Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States); Woodard, R. C. [TLG Services/Entergy, 148 New Milford Road East, Bridgewater, CT 06752 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety September 20, 2012 Presenter: Commissioner George Apostolakis US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Management of (unquantified at the time) uncertainty was always a concern. Defense-in-depth and safety margins became embedded in the regulations. "Defense-in-Depth is an element of the NRC's safety philosophy that employs successive compensatory measures to prevent accidents or mitigate damage if a malfunction, accident, or naturally caused event occurs at a nuclear facility." [Commission's White Paper, February 1999] Design Basis Accidents are postulated accidents that a nuclear facility must be designed and built to withstand without loss to the

207

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1987  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Reactor Review Safety Research Program has continued under NRC Research funding since October 1986. In April 1987, as a result of an NRC reorganization, the Accident Analysis and Safety Review of Liquid Metal and High Temperature Gas Reactors (LMRs and HTGRs) Program was transferred from Regulation to Research. Both programs are discussed here under the title of Accident Analysis and Safety Review of Liquid Metal and High Temperature Gas Reactors (LMRs and HTGRs). The combined programs are focused to help NRC accomplish the review of advanced reactor (LMR and HTGR) designs over the next year. Technical assistance in the following areas is provided: (1) review, adaptation, and implementation of analytical tools and models for application to the design submittals, (2) independent analysis of specific accidents and plant conditions and characteristics for the designs, (3) developing and evaluating appropriate source terms, (4) reviewing DOE reports on safety issues, (5) review of those aspects of DOE's base technical program related to the areas described in (1) through (4), and (6) assistance in assessing PRAs submitted for review.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.); Bari, R.A.; Boccio, J.L.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.; Guppy, J.G.; Hall, R.E.; Higgins, J.C.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Application of Performance Assessment to Make Regulatory and Operational Changes in an Operating Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how performance assessment (PA) is used to support changes to the regulatory basis of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP, located near Carlsbad, New Mexico is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the nation's only deep geologic repository for the disposal of transuranic nuclear waste. In 1998, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP met the performance requirements of 40 CFR Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. A PA analysis of long term (10,000 year) repository performance successfully demonstrated that the probability and consequences of potential long-term releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment would be well below the established limits. These results were key in obtaining WIPP's initial certification, allowing the first shipment and disposal of nuclear waste in March of 1999. As disposal operations have taken place over the last eight years, changes have been identified in the regulatory and operational realms of the facility that would enhance waste disposal efficiency. Such changes, however, cannot be made without prior consent of the EPA. Therefore, changes planned by the DOE must be thoroughly described and supported by varying degrees of the same type of analyses that were conducted to demonstrate the WIPP's containment capabilities as presented in the initial compliance application submitted to EPA in 1996. Such analyses are used to identify the impacts or benefits of implementing the planned change. The DOE has successfully used performance assessment analyses for the approval of changes such as: 1) the disposal of super-compacted waste forms, and; 2) the adoption of new parameters and modeling assumptions In some cases the planned changes are simpler in nature than those listed above, and therefore only require targeted or simplified PA analyses to demonstrate the effect on performance. Targeted analyses have been used to successfully gain approval of the following: 1) a reduction in the amount of magnesium oxide (MgO) chemical buffer backfill that must be emplaced in the repository 2) a change in the repository mining/disposal horizon In addition to these approved changes, the DOE has used PA analyses to support the following planned change requests that await EPA's approval: 1) panel closure redesign 2) further reduction in the MgO-to-waste ratio Finally, this paper will discuss some of the changes that the DOE is currently preparing and plans to submit to the EPA for approval in the near future. This paper will describe how a set of analytical tools initially used to open the WIPP continues to have a role in making the repository more efficient and adaptable as variations in waste streams, operational demands, and other dynamic forces change the operating environment over time. (authors)

Patterson, R. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kirkes, R. [John Hart and Associates, P.A., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

USING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT PROACTIVE MANAGEMENT OF MATERIALS DEGRADATION FOR THE U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

SciTech Connect

The majority of the U.S. reactor fleet is applying for license renewal to extend the operating life from the current 40 years to 60 years, and there is now active interest in extending the operating life to beyond 60 years. Many plants are also applying for increases in power rating and both of these changes increases the need for an improved understanding of materials degradation. Many materials degrade over time and much is known about the degradation of materials under normal environmental conditions; however, less is known about the characteristics of materials degradation when the environment is subject to higher than normal radiological conditions over extended periods of time. Significant efforts are being made by industrial, academic and regulatory groups worldwide to identify, classify and mitigate potential problems arising from degradation of components in this context. From a regulatory perspective, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is very interested in being able to identify ways to insure their licensees proactively manage the identification of materials degradation and the mitigation of its effects. To date, the USNRC has consolidated generic programs for mitigating aging issues in the two volume Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report (NUREG-1801) [1][2], and have encouraged applicants for license renewal to use these programs where applicable in their plant when applying for renew of their reactors license. The USNRC has also published a comprehensive report entitled Expert Panel Report on Proactive Materials Degradation (NUREG/CR-6923) [3] that inventories the types of degradation mechanisms that could exist in each component of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) and each degradation mechanism is assessed regarding how much is known about mitigating its effects. Since the number of plant designs and materials used varies greatly within the U.S. fleet, there are many variations to implementing aging management programs (AMPs), requiring significant dialogs between the Licensee and the USNRC. These discussions are part of the licensing basis and as such are documented with up to multi-hundred page responses that are loosely coupled through the USNRC Agency-wide Document Access and Management System (ADAMS), which serves as an electronic records repository for the USNRC . These discussions have supported revisions to the GALL, including the revision that is being prepared as this paper is being written. The USNRC has sought the help of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to improve the staffs ability to navigate the significant numbers of documents that are generated in this process and to provide a forum for regulators, licensees and researchers to share knowledge in the efforts to improve the cyclic process for defining, applying, validating and re-defining AMPs. Work to date in this area is publicly accessible and this paper will describe that work and outline a potential path forward. The presenter will also demonstrate the capabilities of the PMMD information tools (http://pmmd.pnl.gov).

Taylor, W Boyd; Knobbs, Katherine J.; Carpenter, C. E. (Gene) [Gene; Malik, Shah

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Advanced Candu reactor annunciation system - Compliance with IEC standard and US NRC guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Annunciation is a key plant information system that alerts Operations staff to important changes in plant processes and systems. Operational experience at nuclear stations worldwide has shown that many annunciation implementations do not provide the support needed by Operations staff in all plant situations. To address utility needs for annunciation improvement in Candu plants, AECL in partnership with Canadian Candu utilities, undertook an annunciation improvement program in the early nineties. The outcome of the research and engineering development program was the development and simulator validation of alarm processing, display, and information presentation techniques that provide practical and effective solutions to key operational deficiencies with earlier annunciation implementations. The improved annunciation capabilities consist of a series of detection, information processing and presentation functions called the Candu Annunciation Message List System (CAMLS). The CAMLS concepts embody alarm processing, presentation and interaction techniques, and strategies and methods for annunciation system configuration to ensure improved annunciation support for all plant situations, especially in upset situations where the alarm generation rate is high. The Advanced Candu Reactor (ACR) project will employ the CAMLS annunciation concepts as the basis for primary annunciation implementations. The primary annunciation systems will be implemented from CAMLS applications hosted on AECL Advanced Control Centre Information System (ACCIS) computing technology. The ACR project has also chosen to implement main control room annunciation aspects in conformance with the following international standard and regulatory review guide for control room annunciation practice: International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 62241 - Main Control Room, Alarm Function and Presentation (International standard) US NRC NUREG-0700 - Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines, Section 4 - Alarm System (Regulatory review guide) In order for the ACR annunciation system to comply with IEC-62241 and NUREG-0700, the CAMLS concepts must satisfy their respective requirements and guidelines. This paper will provide a summary of how CAMLS complies with IEC-62241 and NUREG-0700. Overall, the CAMLS-based annunciation requirements conform to the intent of the recommended annunciation practices included in both these documents. However, there are minor differences in requirements interpretation and annunciation practice between CAMLS implementation concepts and the recommended practice in each document. Generally the differences with IEC-62241 revolve around definitions, the display properties of new alarms, and video display unit (VDU) alarm display organization. The differences with NUREG-0700 revolve around segregation of status alarms, the use of spatially dedicated, continuously visible displays, simultaneous display of high-priority alarms, audible signals for alarm states and reminder signals, blank lines in alarm message lists and manual silencing. These minor differences are discussed and rationales for the CAMLS implementation concepts are provided. (authors)

Leger, R.; Malcolm, S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ont. L5K 1B2 (Canada); Davey, E. [Crew Systems Solutions, Deep River, Ont. K0J 1P0 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Letter from Nuclear Energy Institute regarding Integrated Safety Analysis: Why it is Appropropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

082 l F: 202.533.0166 l rxm@nei.org l www.nei.org 082 l F: 202.533.0166 l rxm@nei.org l www.nei.org Rod McCullum DIRECTOR FUEL CYCLE PROJECTS NUCLEAR GENERATION DIVISION September 10, 2010 Ms. Catherine Haney Director Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, DC 20555-0001 Subject: Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities Project Number: 689 Dear Ms. Haney: Enclosed for your review is a Nuclear Energy Institute white paper on the use of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) at U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed recycling facilities. This paper is intended as an information source for the NRC and should serve as a foundation for discussion with industry representatives on the issue.

213

Nuclear Debate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Debate ... This month, the Senate will consider the nominations of two women to serve on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ... Svinicki is a nuclear engineer with experience in the Department of Energys nuclear energy programs. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

214

DOE Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application DOE Replies Support NRC Commissioners and Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application July 19, 2010 - 4:07pm Addthis In a reply brief filed with the NRC today, DOE explained that the arguments that it lacked authority to withdraw the pending Yucca Mountain license application are uniformly without merit. DOE's reply brief is available here. In a separate filing, DOE explained that there is no basis for arguments that two NRC Commissioners should recuse themselves from the Yucca proceeding. That brief is available here. Addthis Related Articles DOE Makes Filing with NRC in Support OF Authority to Withdraw Yucca Application DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application DOE Opposes Injunction Motion

215

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Requirements Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE requirements definition is to assess the activities that results in the specification, documentation, and review of the requirements that the software product must satisfy, including functionality, performance, design constraints, attributes and external interfaces. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIREs Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP).

Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Requirements Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE requirements definition is to assess the activities that results in the specification, documentation, and review of the requirements that the software product must satisfy, including functionality, performance, design constraints, attributes and external interfaces. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIREs Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP).

Kent Norris

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

219

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The applications reflect the intentions of those companies to build 21 new reactors, with some applications covering two reactors at the same site. All five reactor designs that have been certified, or are currently under review for possible certification, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are

220

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The applications reflect the intentions of those companies to build 21 new reactors, with some applications covering two reactors at the same site. All five reactor designs that have been certified, or are currently under review for possible certification, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are represented in the Part I applications. DOE also has received Part I

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

222

Environmental assessment proposed license renewal of Nuclear Metals, Inc. Concord, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) to evaluate environmental issues associated with the renewal of licenses issued by NRC for facilities operated by Nuclear Metals, Inc. (NMI) in Concord, Massachusetts. By renewing the licenses, NRC proposes to allow the continuation of ongoing operations involving radioactive materials at NMI`s facilities. This EA focuses on the potential impacts related to air emissions at NMI during normal (incident-free) operations and accidental releases. Findings indicate that there are only two areas of potential concern. First, modeling results for sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions from the boilers during normal operations indicate that the potential exists for exceeding the short-term National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). NMI is prepared to undertake mitigative action to prevent potential exceedances of the short-term SO{sub 2} NAAQS, and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection is prepared to resolve the issue via a permit/approval change or through a Consent Order. Second, in the unlikely event of a severe fire, predicted sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) concentrations based on conservative (upper bound) modeling exceed the Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) levels. NMI has committed to NRC to give a briefing for local emergency response officials regarding the potential for an accidental H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} release.

Miller, R.L.; Easterly, C.E.; Lombardi, C.E.; Treitler, I.E.; Winbow, R.T.; Zimmerman, G.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

224

QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JULY 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NRC Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (ASLB) has ruled that Toshiba's participation in Nuclear Innovation North America's South Texas Project does not violate federal rules on...

225

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities At the request of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Research Universities, the Council on Governmental Relations (COGR), the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) have assembled a set of ten recommendations for regulatory reform that would improve research universities' ability to carry out their missions without requiring a significant financial investment by the Federal government. Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations

227

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance Plan. The Software Quality Assurance Plan is intended to ensure all actions necessary for the software life cycle; verification and validation activities; documentation and deliverables; project management; configuration management, nonconformance reporting and corrective action; and quality assessment and improvement have been planned and a systematic pattern of all actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that a software product conforms to established technical requirements; and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kent Norris

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance Plan. The Software Quality Assurance Plan is intended to ensure all actions necessary for the software life cycle; verification and validation activities; documentation and deliverables; project management; configuration management, nonconformance reporting and corrective action; and quality assessment and improvement have been planned and a systematic pattern of all actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that a software product conforms to established technical requirements; and to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities January 21, 2011 Introduction At the request of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Research Universities, the Council on Governmental Relations (COGR), the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) have assembled a set of ten recommendations for regulatory reform that would improve research universities' ability to carry out their missions without requiring a significant financial investment by the Federal government. We firmly believe that compliance and regulatory oversight are essential to the conduct of federally-supported research. Rationalizing the Federal regulatory infrastructure is essential to

230

Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd Combined Construction & Operating License Application to the NRC Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting...

231

The Environmental Protection Agency's Safety Standards for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Potential Path Forward in Response to the Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future - 13388  

SciTech Connect

Following the decision to withdraw the Yucca Mountain license application, the Department of Energy created a Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future, tasked with recommending a national strategy to manage the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. The BRC issued its final report in January 2012, with recommendations covering transportation, storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); potential reprocessing; and supporting institutional measures. The BRC recommendations on disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) are relevant to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which shares regulatory responsibility with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC): EPA issues 'generally applicable' performance standards for disposal repositories, which are then implemented in licensing. For disposal, the BRC endorses developing one or more geological repositories, with siting based on an approach that is adaptive, staged and consent-based. The BRC recommends that EPA and NRC work cooperatively to issue generic disposal standards-applying equally to all sites-early in any siting process. EPA previously issued generic disposal standards that apply to all sites other than Yucca Mountain. However, the BRC concluded that the existing regulations should be revisited and revised. The BRC proposes a number of general principles to guide the development of future regulations. EPA continues to review the BRC report and to assess the implications for Agency action, including potential regulatory issues and considerations if EPA develops new or revised generic disposal standards. This review also involves preparatory activities to define potential process and public engagement approaches. (authors)

Forinash, Betsy; Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Halting_Title_XVII_Nuclear_Loan_Guarantees.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Friends of the Earth ♦ Greenpeace ♦ South Carolina Chapter-Sierra Club ♦ NC Waste Friends of the Earth ♦ Greenpeace ♦ South Carolina Chapter-Sierra Club ♦ NC Waste Awareness and Reduction Network ♦ Georgia Women's Action for New Directions ♦ Nuclear Information and Resource Service ♦ Beyond Nuclear ♦ NIRS-Southeast ♦ AP1000 Oversight Group October 19, 2009 Secretary of Energy Chu U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 Mr. Richard Frantz Director, Loan Guarantee Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 NRC Reveals AP1000 Nuclear Reactor Design Problems, DOE Must Halt Issuance of Conditional Loan Guarantees to Utilities Pursuing AP1000 Dear Secretary of Energy Chu and Director Frantz: In a surprise move with potentially serious impacts, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

233

Reovirus ?2 Protein Inhibits Interferon Signaling through a Novel Mechanism Involving Nuclear Accumulation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 9  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Novel Mechanism Involving Nuclear Accumulation of Interferon...University, Kyoto, Japan. 2 3 Geoffrey H. Holm...interfere with STAT1 or STAT2 nuclear translocation as has...M. Gadina, U. F. Power, and J. A. Johnston...function by sequestering nuclear import factors on the...

Jennifer Zurney; Takeshi Kobayashi; Geoffrey H. Holm; Terence S. Dermody; Barbara Sherry

2008-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

234

NRC Transportation Security (Part 73 SNF Update and Part 37 Category...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

NRC Transportation Security (Part 73 SNF Update and Part 37 Category 1 and 2 Materials) NRC Transportation Security (Part 73 SNF Update and Part 37 Category 1 and 2 Materials) NRC...

235

Development of a Consensus Standard for Verification and Validation of Nuclear System Thermal-Fluids Software  

SciTech Connect

With the resurgence of nuclear power and increased interest in advanced nuclear reactors as an option to supply abundant energy without the associated greenhouse gas emissions of the more conventional fossil fuel energy sources, there is a need to establish internationally recognized standards for the verification and validation (V&V) of software used to calculate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of advanced reactor designs for both normal operation and hypothetical accident conditions. To address this need, ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Standards and Certification has established the V&V 30 Committee, under the jurisdiction of the V&V Standards Committee, to develop a consensus standard for verification and validation of software used for design and analysis of advanced reactor systems. The initial focus of this committee will be on the V&V of system analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for nuclear applications. To limit the scope of the effort, the committee will further limit its focus to software to be used in the licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. In this framework, the Standard should conform to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other regulatory practices, procedures and methods for licensing of nuclear power plants as embodied in the United States (U.S.) Code of Federal Regulations and other pertinent documents such as Regulatory Guide 1.203, 'Transient and Accident Analysis Methods' and NUREG-0800, 'NRC Standard Review Plan'. In addition, the Standard should be consistent with applicable sections of ASME NQA-1-2008 'Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications (QA)'. This paper describes the general requirements for the proposed V&V 30 Standard, which includes; (a) applicable NRC and other regulatory requirements for defining the operational and accident domain of a nuclear system that must be considered if the system is to be licensed, (b) the corresponding calculation domain of the software that should encompass the nuclear operational and accident domain to be used to study the system behavior for licensing purposes, (c) the definition of the scaled experimental data set required to provide the basis for validating the software, (d) the ensemble of experimental data sets required to populate the validation matrix for the software in question, and (e) the practices and procedures to be used when applying a validation standard. Although this initial effort will focus on software for licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors, it is anticipated that the practices and procedures developed for this Standard can eventually be extended to other nuclear and non-nuclear applications.

Edwin A. Harvego; Richard R. Schultz; Ryan L. Crane

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

XXX VVV 000001 A A 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT WASTE COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 1 VVV XXX 03 31 2008 1 LD WASTE...

237

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

XXX XXX 000031 A M 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 4 1 31 20 -1405.00 -93.00 2 32 50...

238

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

A A 1 1 1 1 FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, COUNTRY CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 3 RRRR XXX 1 33 20 210.00 68.00 03 31 2008 1...

239

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

A B 1 1 1 1 FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, COUNTRY CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 3 RRRR XXX 1 33 20 210.00 68.00 04 05 2008 1...

240

Nuclear Material Transaction Report NRC 741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 A D 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 4 YYY XXX 1 31 20 -50397.00 -2335.00 2 31 20...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear Material Transaction Report NRC 741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

B 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 0 YYY XXX 04 01 2008 BASED ON SHIPPER'S VALUES Example...

242

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

A A 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 YYY RRRR 03 31 2008 1 AH31 1 EG 309 J...

243

Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

A B 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 YYY RRRR 04 05 2008 1 AH31 1 EG 309 J...

244

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

SciTech Connect

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Initiating Event Rates at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants 19882013  

SciTech Connect

Analyzing initiating event rates is important because it indicates performance among plants and also provides inputs to several U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) risk-informed regulatory activities. This report presents an analysis of initiating event frequencies at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants since each plants low-power license date. The evaluation is based on the operating experience from fiscal year 1988 through 2013 as reported in licensee event reports. Engineers with nuclear power plant experience staff reviewed each event report since the last update to this report for the presence of valid scrams or reactor trips at power. To be included in the study, an event had to meet all of the following criteria: includes an unplanned reactor trip (not a scheduled reactor trip on the daily operations schedule), sequence of events starts when reactor is critical and at or above the point of adding heat, occurs at a U.S. commercial nuclear power plant (excluding Fort St. Vrain and LaCrosse), and is reported by a licensee event report. This report displays occurrence rates (baseline frequencies) for the categories of initiating events that contribute to the NRCs Industry Trends Program. Sixteen initiating event groupings are trended and displayed. Initiators are plotted separately for initiating events with different occurrence rates for boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. p-values are given for the possible presence of a trend over the most recent 10 years.

John A. Schroeder; Gordon R. Bower

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198  

SciTech Connect

Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

Lowry, N.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094  

SciTech Connect

Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan for LightRegulatory Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licens- ing. Standard Review Plan.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nuclear Energy CFD Application Management System  

SciTech Connect

In modeling and simulation (M&S), it is virtually impossible to separately evaluate the effectiveness of the model from the data used because the results produced rely heavily on the interaction between the two. Both the data and the simulation are responsible for achieving the ultimate goal of providing defensible research and development (R&D) products and decisions. It is therefore vital that data verification and validation (V&V) activities, along with stringent configuration management, be considered part of the overall M&S accreditation process. In support of these goals is the Nuclear Energy CFD Application Management System (NE-CAMS) for nuclear system design and safety analysis. Working with Bettis Laboratory and Utah State University, a plan of action is being developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that will address the highest and most immediate needs to track and manage computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and experimental data in an electronic database. The database will intrinsically incorporate the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved policies and procedures for quality. The quality requirements will be such that the model and data must conform to the quality specifications outlined by the NRC before they can be entered into the database. The primary focus of this database is CFD V&V for nuclear industry needs and will, in practice, serve as the best practice guideline that will accommodate NRC regulations. Such a database, along with a prescriptive methodology for how to utilize it, will provide the NRC with accepted CFD results that could potentially be used for licensing. NE-CAMS will incorporate data V&V as key precursors to the distribution of nuclear systems design and safety data, ensuring that these data are appropriate for use in a particular M&S application. Verification will be conducted to provide a level of confidence that the data selected are the most appropriate for the simulation and are properly prepared, i.e., they are complete, correct and conform to predefined procedures and requirements. Validation will ensure that the data accurately represent the real world activity that is being simulated, ensuring the analytical quality of the data. The level of detail and stringency applied against the data V&V activities will be based on a graded approach principle; the higher the risk, the more rigorous the V&V activities. For the V&V activities to be complete, it will be necessary to scrutinize the physical and statistical properties of the extracted data during the overall process. Regardless of the specific technique or methodology, data V&V will be an important component of NE-CAMS.

Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nuclear materials 1993 annual report. Volume 8, No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1993. The report is published in two parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1993 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Note that the subtitle of No. 2 has been changed from ``Nonreactors`` to ``Nuclear Materials.`` Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1993.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Technical Letter Report - Analysis of Ultrasonic Data on Piping Cracks at Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant Before and After Applying a Mechanical Stress Improvement Process, JCN-N6319, Task 2  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing a position on the management of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in piping systems previously analyzed for leak-before-break (LBB). Part of this work involves determining whether inspections alone are sufficient or if inspections plus mitigation techniques are needed. The work described in this report addresses the reliability of ultrasonic phased-array (PA) examinations for inspection of cracks that have been subjected to the mitigation method of mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). It is believed that stresses imparted during MSIP may make ultrasonic crack responses in piping welds more difficult to detect and accurately characterize. To explore this issue, data were acquired, both before and after applying MSIP, and analyzed from cracked areas in piping at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. This work was performed under NRC Project JCN-N6319, PWSCC in Leak-Before-Break Systems.

Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Crawford, Susan L.

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

253

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Main report, draft report for comment. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Results of a Strategic Assessment of NRC's Low-Level Radioactive Waste Program  

SciTech Connect

NRC recently completed a strategic assessment of its low-level radioactive waste (LLW) regulatory program. In this paper, we provide the results of this assessment - a prioritized list of activities for our LLW program in the next several years - along with a description of the circumstances that required us to undertake this assessment and the process we used. We obtained ideas from a wide variety of stakeholders on activities we could undertake, and we evaluated them in light of our overall strategic objectives for ensuring safety and security, as well as a number of other factors. We ranked 7 of the 20 activities evaluated as high priority. Their completion in the next several years will help to ensure that LLW will continue to be managed and disposed of safely and securely. (authors)

Bradford, A.W.; Camper, L.W.; Flanders, S.C.; Kennedy, J.E.; Shaffner, J.A.; Tokar, M.; Whited, A.R. [NRC LLW Branch, Mail Stop T-8-F-5, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Regulatory Highlights  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It also described plans relating to the need to remove reference to wet chemical tests for heavy metals from all individual monographs. ... This was reviewed in detail in the previous regulatory review. ... A concept paper and business plan have been developed for an ICH guideline focused on technical and regulatory considerations for pharmaceutical product lifecycle management. ...

Andrew Teasdale

2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

256

NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation Name NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation Address 4250 Wesbrook Mall Place Vancouver, Canada Zip V6T 1W5 Number of employees 201-500 Phone number 604-221-3000 Coordinates 49.2460722°, -123.2326432° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":49.2460722,"lon":-123.2326432,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

PRESENTATION TO NRC BURNING PLASMA PANEL DR. STEPHEN O. DEAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 PRESENTATION TO NRC BURNING PLASMA PANEL DR. STEPHEN O. DEAN PRESIDENT FUSION POWER ASSOCIATES REACTORS ! FISSION PRODUCT DEACTIVATION ! HAZARDOUS WASTE PROCESSING ! RECYCLING OF MATERIALS ! FUSION ! UNRESOLVED WASTE DISPOSAL ISSUE EPRI DID PREPARE TWO REPORTS ON FUSION, IN 1992 AND 1994 ! Report of the 1992

258

Introduction To GIS Course Syllabus Introduction to GIS NRC585  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 ­ Introduction To GIS Course Syllabus Introduction to GIS ­ NRC585 Lecture: Tues. 11 Hours: by appointment Email: bbradley@eco.umass.edu Email: efusco@cns.umass.edu Website: http://people.umass.edu/bethanyb/gis.html Course Objective: To provide an understanding of the basic concepts and uses of GIS technology

Schweik, Charles M.

259

NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, July--September 1993: Volume 13, No. 3  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facilities throughout the country for the third quarter of 1993.

Struckmeyer, R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

DOE Makes Filing with NRC in Support OF Authority to Withdraw...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

today urged the NRC to conclude that DOE has the legal authority to withdraw the pending Yucca Mountain license application. DOE argued that the NRC should review and reverse the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities at the U.S. Nuclear...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Transportation Security Rulemaking...

263

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Byron and Braidwood nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Byron and Braidwood were selected for the fourth study in this program. The produce of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plants and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Byron/Braidwood plants. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.: Vo, T.V. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the H. B. Robinson nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. H. B. Robinson was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the H. B. Robinson plant.

Moffitt, N.E.; Lloyd, R.C.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Garner, L.W. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the McGuire nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. McGuire was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the McGuire plant.

Bumgardner, J.D.; Lloyd, R.C.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant.

Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Appendix B  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This report consists of Volume 2, which consists of the GALL literature review tables for the NUMARC Industry Reports reviewed for the report.

Kasza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Civilian Nuclear...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

(HLW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Management of Nuclear Materials and Non-HLW Nuclear Fuel Cycle Energy Research and Development Non-Proliferation Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

269

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Design and Interface Design Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE software design and interface design is to assess the activities that results in the development, documentation, and review of a software design that meets the requirements defined in the software requirements documentation. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIREs Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP) design specification.

Kent Norris

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Design and Interface Design Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE software design and interface design is to assess the activities that results in the development, documentation, and review of a software design that meets the requirements defined in the software requirements documentation. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIREs Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP) design specification.

Kent Norris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.  

SciTech Connect

The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on Americas Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Docket No. 50-293 License No. DPR-35 Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (PNPS) License Renewal Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information that supplemented the LRA as a result of operating experience (OE) and industry activities potentially relevant to aging management in several specific areas. This letter provides further clarification of that supplemental information to the LRA specific to the following areas which Entergy agreed to evaluate based upon communications with the NRC technical staff. 1. Aging management of neutron-absorbing materialsEntergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. Letter Number: 2.11.017 Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Page 2 2. Inspection of buried pipe and tanks 3. Aging management of low voltage cables 4. Inspection of containment coatings 5. Metal fatigue NUREG/CR-6260 A new regulatory commitment is provided in the PNPS License Renewal Commitment List as

Stephen J. Bethay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and Licensing Procedures for New Nuclear the safety regulation and the licensing of new nuclear power plants. The paper considers both design safety approval and issues of site licensing. Advice from international organisations is summarised. Nuclear power

Aickelin, Uwe

274

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 ORNLTM-2007147, Vol. 5 Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research...

275

NYPA, Entergy begin nuclear management services plan  

SciTech Connect

The New York Power Authority (NYPA) and Entergy Corp. of New Orleans, La., announced recently the signing of a memorandum of understanding as a step toward a contract for Entergy to provide management services to NYPA`s two nuclear power plants. The agreement is the first of its kind. NYPA is the nation`s largest state-owned electric utility and supplier of one-quarter of New York`s electricity. Its nuclear plants are Indian Point 3 (IP3) in Buchanan, Westchester County, and James A. FitzPatrick in Scriba, Oswego County. Entergy is a utility holding company and its subsidiary, Entergy Operations Inc., is widely recognized as one of the leading nuclear operators in the United States. {open_quotes}NYPA`s nuclear plants are assets that belong to the people of New York,{close_quotes} said C.D. {open_quotes}Rapp{close_quotes} Rappleyea, NYPA`s chairman and CEO. {open_quotes}Our alliance with Entergy can provide the people of this state with added assurance that these plants will operate with the highest level of safety and efficiency.{close_quotes} FitzPatrick, an 800 MW boiling water reactor, has operated since 1975 and IP3, a 980 MW pressurized water reactor, since 1976. Although both are currently running well, they have had problems in recent years, and IP3 is on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) list of plants requiring increased regulatory attention. Entergy operated both types of reactors, has three single-unit sites like NYPA`s and is experienced in operating plants for different utility owners.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Grand Gulf-prioritization of regulatory requirements  

SciTech Connect

As cost pressures mount, Grand Gulf nuclear station (GGNS) is relying increasingly on various prioritization approaches to implement, modify, eliminate, or defer regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements can be prioritized through the use of three measures: (1) safety (or risk) significance; (2) cost; and (3) public policy (or political) significance. This paper summarizes GGNS' efforts to implement solutions to regulatory issues using these three prioritization schemes to preserve a balance between cost and safety benefit.

Meisner, M.J. (Entergy Operations Inc., Port Gibson, MS (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Privatization of the gaseous diffusion plants and impacts on nuclear criticality safety administration  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) on July 1, 1993. The USEC is a government-owned business that leases those Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) facilities at the Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, sites from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that are required for enriching uranium. Lockheed Martin Utility Services is the operating contractor for the USEC-leased facilities. The DOE has retained use of, and regulation over, some facilities and areas at the Portsmouth and Paducah sites for managing legacy wastes and environmental restoration activities. The USEC is regulated by the DOE, but is currently changing to regulation under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The USEC is also preparing for privatization of the uranium enrichment enterprise. These changes have significantly affected the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) programs at the sites.

D`Aquila, D.M.; Holliday, R.T. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Dean, J.C. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

Nick A. Altic

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

279

United States Program on Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

The President signed the Congressional Joint Resolution on July 23, 2002, that designated the Yucca Mountain site for a proposed geologic repository to dispose of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is currently focusing its efforts on submitting a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in December 2004 for construction of the proposed repository. The legislative framework underpinning the U.S. repository program is the basis for its continuity and success. The repository development program has significantly benefited from international collaborations with other nations in the Americas.

Stewart, L.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

280

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

Mark Holbrook

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Review of NRC-funded programs on NDE at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

There are currently four major NDT related programs in progress at PNL which are funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These programs are Integration of NDE and Fracture Mechanics Program, Development of a Real-Time SAFT-UT System for the Inservice Inspection of LWRs, Acoustic Emission - Flaw Relationships for Inservice Monitoring of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Boundaries, and Steam Generator Integrity Program/Steam Generator Group Project. This paper will discuss and present an overview of each program and highlight the more significant accomplishments obtained to date. All of these programs have been funded for several years and are scheduled for completion in 1985 or 1986.

Doctor, S.R.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

CASL OLCF Early Science Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology NCSU North Carolina State University NPP nuclear power plant NRC Nuclear Regulatory Commission NSSS nuclear steam supply system ORNL Oak...

283

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactor Licens- ing. Standard Review Plan. Section 2.1.3. "Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan for Light Waterin the NRC's Standard Review PlanS and in supporting

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Microsoft PowerPoint - 8_Peter Habighorst_NRC_Act of 2012-status...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

General licenses 8 NRC Internal actions, cont. * Exports to power reactors in Canada, Germany and Japan were identified: - KNK, THTR, AVR, JOYO, FUGEN, Bruce * General licenses...

285

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2_Peter J. Habighorst_NRC Remarks 2013...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

General licenses 8 NRC Internal actions, cont. * Exports to power reactors in Canada, Germany and Japan were identified: - KNK, THTR, AVR, JOYO, FUGEN, Bruce * General licenses...

286

Microsoft Word - NMMSS Newsletter October 2014 Final-NRC 10-16...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to the DOENNSA-NRC NMMSS Community The NMMSS staff has updated the D-22, NMMSS Reports Description Directory. This directory provides complete, concise descriptions of...

287

Remarks by Administrator Thomas D'Agostino, National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on NRC International Regulators Conference on Nuclear on NRC International Regulators Conference on Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Speeches > Remarks by Administrator Thomas D'Agostino, National Nuclear ... Speech Remarks by Administrator Thomas D'Agostino, National Nuclear Security

288

Remarks by Administrator Thomas D'Agostino, National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on NRC International Regulators Conference on Nuclear on NRC International Regulators Conference on Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Speeches > Remarks by Administrator Thomas D'Agostino, National Nuclear ... Speech Remarks by Administrator Thomas D'Agostino, National Nuclear Security

289

Nuclear power after Chernobyl  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...admit in an intemational meeting that there was a weakness...generated from the Vienna meeting, focusing to a large...nuclear industry, and the public. NRC. The effect ofChernobyl...the percentage ofthe public in favor, and the bars...actions with respect to the Hanford graphite-core N-reactor...

JF Ahearne

1987-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

290

Regulatory Perspective on Potential Fuel Reconfiguration and Its Implication to High Burnup Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation - 13042  

SciTech Connect

The recent experiments conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on high burnup fuel cladding material property show that the ductile to brittle transition temperature of high burnup fuel cladding is dependent on: (1) cladding material, (2) irradiation conditions, and (3) drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature) [1]. The experiment results also show that the ductile to brittle temperature increases as the fuel burnup increases. These results indicate that the current knowledge in cladding material property is insufficient to determine the structural performance of the cladding of high burnup fuel after it has been stored in a dry cask storage system for some time. The uncertainties in material property and the elevated ductile to brittle transition temperature impose a challenge to the storage cask and transportation packaging designs because the cask designs may not be able to rely on the structural integrity of the fuel assembly for control of fissile material, radiation source, and decay heat source distributions. The fuel may reconfigure during further storage and/or the subsequent transportation conditions. In addition, the fraction of radioactive materials available for release from spent fuel under normal condition of storage and transport may also change. The spent fuel storage and/or transportation packaging vendors, spent fuel shippers, and the regulator may need to consider this possible fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the packages' ability to meet the safety requirements of Part 72 and Part 71 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is working with the scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the impact of fuel reconfiguration on the safety of the dry storage systems and transportation packages. The NRC Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation has formed a task force to work on the safety and regulatory concerns in relevance to high burnup fuel storage and transportation. This paper discusses the staff's preliminary considerations on the safety implication of fuel reconfiguration with respect to nuclear safety (subcriticality control), radiation shielding, containment, the performance of the thermal functions of the packages, and the retrievability of the contents from regulatory perspective. (authors)

Li, Zhian; Rahimi, Meraj; Tang, David; Aissa, Mourad; Flaganan, Michelle [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Wagner, John C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Proposed modifications of NRC's standard review plan for seismic analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper briefly describes the major changes in seismic analysis and design criteria proposed in the U.S. NRC Standard Review Plan. The changes to the SRP also reflect the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-40, Seismic Design Criteria. The proposed revision provides explicit guidelines for (1) developing site-specific spectra; (2) determination of suitable design time history (ies); (3) the location of seismic input motion; (4) developing floor response spectra; (5) soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis; (6) analysis of above-ground Seismic Category 1 tanks; and (7) analysis of buried piping and structures. The proposed revision, together with its background material, was issued for public comments on 19 May, 1988, together with a solicitation to address specific questions related to SSI analysis. These are discussed in the paper. The paper concludes with a note on the importance of the progress made and outlines the areas requiring further studies and research.

G. Bagchi; D. Jeng; H. Ashar

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A Review of Information for Managing Aging in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Age related degradation effects in safety related systems of nuclear power plants should be managed to prevent safety margins from eroding below the acceptable limits provided in plant design bases. The Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Pro- gram, conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, and other related aging management programs are developing technical information on managing aging. The aging management process central to these efforts consists of three key elements: 1) selecting structures, systems, and components (SSCs) in which aging should be controlled; 2) understanding the mechanisms and rates of degradation in these SSCs; and 3) managing degradation through effective inspection, surveillance, condition monitoring, trending, record keeping, mainten- ance, refurbishment, replacement, and adjustments in the operating environment and service conditions. This document concisely reviews and integrates information developed under the NPAR Program and other aging management studies and other available information related to understanding and managing age-related degradation effects and provides specific refer- ences to more comprehensive information on the same subjects.

WC Morgan; JV Livingston

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nuclear Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 30, 2002 September 30, 2002 NERAC Fall 2002 Meeting Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Major Program Developments Major Program Developments 6 June 2002: Department selects three U.S. electric utilities (Dominion Energy, Entergy, and Exelon) to participate in joint government/ industry projects to demonstrate NRC's Early Site Permit (ESP) process and seek NRC approval by mid-decade 6 July 2002: Secretary Abraham announces transition of management of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to Nuclear Energy and revitalization of its nuclear R&D mission 6 September 2002: Generation IV International Forum reaches agreement on six advanced reactor and fuel cycle technologies for joint development Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology

294

Development of a consensus standard for verification and validation of nuclear system thermal-fluids software  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the resurgence of nuclear power and increased interest in advanced nuclear reactors as an option to supply abundant energy without the associated greenhouse gas emissions of the more conventional fossil fuel energy sources, there is a need to establish internationally recognized standards for the verification and validation (V&V) of software used to calculate the thermalhydraulic behavior of advanced reactor designs for both normal operation and hypothetical accident conditions. To address this need, ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Standards and Certification has established the V&V 30 Committee, under the jurisdiction of the V&V Standards Committee, to develop a consensus standard for verification and validation of software used for design and analysis of advanced reactor systems. The initial focus of this committee will be on the V&V of system analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for nuclear applications. To limit the scope of the effort, the committee will further limit its focus to software to be used in the licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Although software verification will be an important and necessary part of the standard, much of the initial effort of the committee will be focused on the validation of existing software and new models that could be used in the licensing process. In this framework, the Standard should conform to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other regulatory practices, procedures and methods for licensing of nuclear power plants as embodied in the United States (U.S.) Code of Federal Regulations and other pertinent documents such as Regulatory Guide 1.203, Transient and Accident Analysis Methods and NUREG-0800, NRC Standard Review Plan. In addition, the Standard should be consistent with applicable sections of ASME NQA-1-2008 Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications (QA). This paper describes the general requirements for the proposed V&V 30 Standard, which includes: (a) applicable NRC and other regulatory requirements for defining the operational and accident domain of a nuclear system that must be considered if the system is to be licensed, (b) the corresponding calculation domain of the software that should encompass the nuclear operational and accident domain to be used to study the system behavior for licensing purposes, (c) the definition of the scaled experimental data set required to provide the basis for validating the software, (d) the ensemble of experimental data sets required to populate the validation matrix for the software in question, and (e) the practices and procedures to be used when applying a validation standard. Although this initial effort will focus on software for licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors, it is anticipated that the practices and procedures developed for this Standard can eventually be extended to other nuclear and non-nuclear applications.

Edwin A. Harvego; Richard R. Schultz; Ryan L. Crane

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Since greenhouse gases are a global concern, rather than a local concern as are some kinds of effluents, one must compare the entire lifecycle of nuclear power to alternative technologies for generating electricity. A recent critical analysis by Sovacool (2008) gives a clearer picture. "It should be noted that nuclear power is not directly emitting greenhouse gas emissions, but rather that lifecycle emissions occur through plant construction, operation, uranium mining and milling, and plant decommissioning." "[N]uclear energy is in no way 'carbon free' or 'emissions free,' even though it is much better (from purely a carbon-equivalent emissions standpoint) than coal, oil, and natural gas electricity generators, but worse than renewable and small scale distributed generators" (Sovacool 2008). According to Sovacool, at an estimated 66 g CO2 equivalent per kilowatt-hour (gCO2e/kWh), nuclear power emits 15 times less CO2 per unit electricity generated than unscrubbed coal generation (at 1050 gCO2e/kWh), but 7 times more than the best renewable, wind (at 9 gCO2e/kWh). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2009) has long recognized CO2 emissions in its regulations concerning the environmental impact of the nuclear fuel cycle. In Table S-3 of 10 CFR 51.51(b), NRC lists a 1000-MW(electric) nuclear plant as releasing as much CO2 as a 45-MW(e) coal plant. A large share of the carbon emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle is due to the energy consumption to enrich uranium by the gaseous diffusion process. A switch to either gas centrifugation or laser isotope separation would dramatically reduce the carbon emissions from the nuclear fuel cycle.

Strom, Daniel J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Transportation of Nuclear Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Transportation of Nuclear Materials Transportation of Nuclear Materials GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE on legal and regulatory requirements and standards for transportation of...

297

Sample Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms Sample Forms Sample Forms U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

298

Individualized Site Training | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Training Individualized Site Training Individualized Site Training U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

299

Code Tables | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms Code Tables Code Tables U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

300

NMMSS I Training | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

& Safeguards System Training NMMSS I Training NMMSS I Training U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Security Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms Security Forms Security Forms U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

302

The nuclear OXPHOS genes in insecta: a common evolutionary origin, a common cis-regulatory motif, a common destiny for gene duplicates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We identified and annotated in the MitoComp2 dataset the orthologs of 68 nuclear genes controlling oxidative phosphorylation in 11 Drosophilidae...Fugu rubripes, Danio rerio and Homo sapiens) and in the cnidarian...

Damiano Porcelli; Paolo Barsanti; Graziano Pesole

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Nuclear Safety » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Glenn Podonsky 1 of 13 Glenn Podonsky Glenn Podonsky (DOE Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer) provides his welcoming remarks. Daniel Poneman 2 of 13 Daniel Poneman DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman discusses maintaining our focus on nuclear safety. Akira Kawano 3 of 13 Akira Kawano Akira Kawano, Tokyo Electric Power Company, provides lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Bill Ostendorff 4 of 13 Bill Ostendorff NRC Commissioner Bill Ostendorff gives his perspective on the NRC's response to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Miroslav Lipar 5 of 13 Miroslav Lipar Miroslav Lipar, IAEA, provides an international perspective on the Fukushima nuclear accident. Dr. Sonja Haber 6 of 13

304

Summary of technical information and agreements from Nuclear Management and Resources Council industry reports addressing license renewal  

SciTech Connect

In about 1990, the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) submitted for NRC review ten industry reports (IRs) addressing aging issues associated with specific structures and components of nuclear power plants ad one IR addressing the screening methodology for integrated plant assessment. The NRC staff had been reviewing the ten NUMARC IRs; their comments on each IR and NUMARC responses to the comments have been compiled as public documents. This report provides a brief summary of the technical information and NUMARC/NRC agreements from the ten IRs, except for the Cable License Renewal IR. The technical information and agreements documented herein represent the status of the NRC staffs review when the NRC staff and industry resources were redirected to address rule implementation issues. The NRC staff plans to incorporate appropriate technical information and agreements into the draft standard review plan for license renewal.

Regan, C.; Lee, S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Reactor Program Management; Chopra, O.K.; Ma, D.C.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), NDE instrumentation development, universities, commercial NDE services and cable manufacturers, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The motivation for the R&D roadmap comes from the need to address the aging management of in-containment cables at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Brenchley, David L.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hashemian, Hash; Konnik, Robert; Ray, Sheila

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

307

DOE/EA-1386: Final Environmental Assessment for the Remote-handled...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Council on Radiation Protection NESHAP National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants NQA Nuclear Quality Assurance NRC Nuclear Regulatory Commission NWCF New Waste...

308

NRC Research Program on Plant Aging: Listing and summaries of reports issued through September 1993. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented engineering research program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear power plants. The NPAR program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. In addition, it provides recommendations for effective maintenance to manage aging and for implementation of the research results in the regulatory process. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through September 1993 and summaries of those reports. Each summary describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject.

Vora, J.P.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem).

Thomas, M.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Engineering Aspects of Heat Transfer in Multilayer Reflective Insulation and Performance of NRC Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

All types of high-performance insulation, often referred to as superinsulation, ... Carbide Corporation in October, 1958, or the insulation proposed and tested in 1951 by P. ... D. Little, Inc., or the NRC insulation

M. P. Hnilicka

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Microsoft PowerPoint - 4_JOHN_BALLARD_MARY_MCCDONNELL_NRC DOE...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Len Myers Special Requests (301) 903-2180 Len.Myers@nnsa.doe.gov Patricia Smith NRC Reconciliation (301) 903-6860 PatriciaR.Smith@nnsa.doe.gov Reasons to Call NMMSS -...

312

PUBLIC AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE OF BLENDING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE VS DILUTION  

SciTech Connect

On April 21, 2009, the Energy Facilities Contractors Group (EFCOG) Waste Management Working Group (WMWG) provided a recommendation to the Department of Energy's Environmental Management program (DOE-EM) concerning supplemental guidance on blending methodologies to use to classify waste forms to determine if the waste form meets the definition of Transuranic (TRU) Waste or can be classified as Low-Level Waste (LLW). The guidance provides specific examples and methods to allow DOE and its Contractors to properly classify waste forms while reducing the generation of TRU wastes. TRU wastes are much more expensive to characterize at the generator's facilities, ship, and then dispose at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) than Low-Level Radioactive Waste's disposal. Also the reduction of handling and packaging of LLW is inherently less hazardous to the nuclear workforce. Therefore, it is important to perform the characterization properly, but in a manner that minimizes the generation of TRU wastes if at all possible. In fact, the generation of additional volumes of radioactive wastes under the ARRA programs, this recommendation should improve the cost effective implementation of DOE requirements while properly protecting human health and the environment. This paper will describe how the message of appropriate, less expensive, less hazardous blending of radioactive waste is the 'right' thing to do in many cases, but can be confused with inappropriate 'dilution' that is frowned upon by regulators and stakeholders in the public. A proposal will be made in this paper on how to communicate this very complex and confusing technical issue to regulatory bodies and interested stakeholders to gain understanding and approval of the concept. The results of application of the proposed communication method and attempt to change the regulatory requirements in this area will be discussed including efforts by DOE and the NRC on this very complex subject.

Goldston, W.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Independent regulatory examination of radiation situation in the areas of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes storage in the Russian far east  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......submarines performing reception and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF...as well as for temporary storage and reloading of SNF after...seaweeds, bottom sediments, seawater, sea fish, mushrooms, local...for LRW treatment, the LRW storage facility, SRW storage facility......

N. K. Shandala; S. M. Kiselev; A. I. Lucyanec; A. V. Titov; V. A. Seregin; D. V. Isaev; S. V. Akhromeev

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Audit Report on "The Department's Management of Nuclear Materials Provided to Domestic Licensees"  

SciTech Connect

The objective if to determine whether the Department of Energy (Department) was adequately managing its nuclear materials provided to domestic licensees. The audit was performed from February 2007 to September 2008 at Department Headquarters in Washington, DC, and Germantown, MD; the Oak Ridge Office and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN. In addition, we visited or obtained data from 40 different non-Departmental facilities in various states. To accomplish the audit objective, we: (1) Reviewed Departmental and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for the control and accountability of nuclear materials; (2) Analyzed a Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) report with ending inventory balances for Department-owned nuclear materials dated September 30, 2007, to determine the amount and types of nuclear materials located at non-Department domestic facilities; (3) Held discussions with Department and NRC personnel that used NMMSS information to determine their roles and responsibilities related to the control and accountability over nuclear materials; (4) Selected a judgmental sample of 40 non-Department domestic facilities; (5) Met with licensee officials and sent confirmations to determine whether their actual inventories of Department-owned nuclear materials were consistent with inventories reported in the NMMSS; and, (6) Analyzed historical information related to the 2004 NMMSS inventory rebaselining initiative to determine the quantity of Department-owned nuclear materials that were written off from the domestic licensees inventory balances. This performance audit was conducted in accordance with generally accepted Government auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient, appropriate evidence to provide a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objective. We believe that the evidence obtained provides a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objectives. The audit included tests of controls and compliance with laws and regulations related to managing the Department-owned nuclear materials provided to non-Departmental domestic licensees. Because our review was limited it would not necessarily have disclosed all internal control deficiencies that may have existed at the time of our audit. We examined the establishment of performance measures in accordance with Government Performance and Results Act of 1993, as they related to the audit objective. We found that the Department had established performance measures related to removing or disposing of nuclear materials and radiological sources around the world. We utilized computer generated data during our audit and performed procedures to validate the reliability of the information as necessary to satisfy our audit objective. As noted in the report, we questioned the reliability of the NMMSS data.

None

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Seismic functionality of essential relays in operating nuclear plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The regulatory criteria for licensing of nuclear power plants require that certain safety-related equipment and systems be designed to function during and following a postulated, design basis earthquake. Demonstration of seismic adequacy must be performed and formally documented by shake-table testing, analysis or other specified methods. Since many older, operating nuclear power plants were designed and constructed prior to the issuance of the current seismic qualification criteria, the NRC has questioned whether the seismic adequacy of the essential equipment has been adequately demonstrated and documented. This concern is identified in Unresolved Safety Issue A-46, Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Nuclear Power Plants. In response to this concern, a group of affected plant owners, the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG), with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has undertaken a program to demonstrate the seismic adequacy of essential equipment by the use of actual experience with such equipment in plants which have undergone significant earthquakes and by the use of available seismic qualification data for similar equipment. An important part of this program is the development of data and the methodology for verifying the functionality of electrical relays used in essential circuits needed for plant shutdown during a seismic event. This paper describes this part of the Seismic Qualification Utility Group program. The relay functionality evaluation methodology is being developed under EPRI Project No. RP2849-1.

W.R. Schmidt; R.P. Kassawara

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Understanding the Challenges in the Transition from Film Radiography in the Nuclear Power Industry  

SciTech Connect

Nondestructive examination (NDE) applications in the nuclear power industry using film radiography are shrinking due to the advent of modern digital imaging technologies and advances in alternative inspection methods that do not present an ionizing radiation hazard. Technologies that are used routinely in the medical industry for patient diagnosis are being adapted to industrial NDE applications including the detection and characterization of defects in welds. From the user perspective, non-film inspection techniques provide several advantages over film techniques. It is anticipated that the shift away from the application of film radiography in the nuclear power industry represents an irreversible trend. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has noted this trend in the U.S. nuclear power industry and will be working to ensure that the effectiveness and reliability of component inspections is not compromised by this transition. Currently, specific concerns are associated with 1) obtaining a fundamental understanding of how inspection effectiveness and reliability may be impacted by this transition and 2) ensuring training standards and qualifications remain compatible with modern industrial radiographic practice. This paper discusses recent trends in industrial radiography and assesses their advantages and disadvantages from the perspective of nuclear power plant component inspections.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Moran, Traci L.; Nove, Carol A.; Pardini, Allan F.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update  

SciTech Connect

Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

NONE

1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT POWER MARKETS The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today ordered its staff to conduct investigators will find out if any technical or operational factors, federal or state regulatory prohibitions

Laughlin, Robert B.

319

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2  

SciTech Connect

This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately.

Weiss, A. J. [comp.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

NRC Monitoring of Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site - 13147  

SciTech Connect

As part of monitoring required under Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA), the NRC staff reviewed an updated DOE performance assessment (PA) for salt waste disposal at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The NRC staff concluded that it has reasonable assurance that waste disposal at the SDF meets the 10 CFR 61 performance objectives for protection of individuals against intrusion (chap.61.42), protection of individuals during operations (chap.61.43), and site stability (chap.61.44). However, based on its evaluation of DOE's results and independent sensitivity analyses conducted with DOE's models, the NRC staff concluded that it did not have reasonable assurance that DOE's disposal activities at the SDF meet the performance objective for protection of the general population from releases of radioactivity (chap.61.41) evaluated at a dose limit of 0.25 mSv/yr (25 mrem/yr) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE). NRC staff also concluded that the potential dose to a member of the public is expected to be limited (i.e., is expected to be similar to or less than the public dose limit in chap.20.1301 of 1 mSv/yr [100 mrem/yr] TEDE) and is expected to occur many years after site closure. The NRC staff used risk insights gained from review of the SDF PA, its experience monitoring DOE disposal actions at the SDF over the last 5 years, as well as independent analysis and modeling to identify factors that are important to assessing whether DOE's disposal actions meet the performance objectives. Many of these factors are similar to factors identified in the NRC staff's 2005 review of salt waste disposal at the SDF. Key areas of interest continue to be waste form and disposal unit degradation, the effectiveness of infiltration and erosion controls, and estimation of the radiological inventory. Based on these factors, NRC is revising its plan for monitoring salt waste disposal at the SDF in coordination with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). DOE has completed or begun additional work related to salt waste disposal to address these factors. NRC staff continues to evaluate information related to the performance of the SDF and has been working with DOE and SCDHEC to resolve NRC staff's technical concerns. (authors)

Pinkston, Karen E.; Ridge, A. Christianne; Alexander, George W.; Barr, Cynthia S.; Devaser, Nishka J.; Felsher, Harry D. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nuclear Deployment Scorecards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Nuclear Deployment Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Nuclear Deployment Scorecards Nuclear Deployment Scorecards October 31, 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2013 The scorecard includes news updates, regulatory status, reactor design certification, early site permits, new plant construction progress, and expected operation dates. August 8, 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2013 The scorecard includes news updates, regulatory status, reactor design certification, early site permits, new plant construction progress, and expected operation dates. May 1, 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Power Deployment Scorecard - April 2013 The scorecard includes news updates, regulatory status, reactor design certification, early site permits, and new plant construction progress.

322

2008 NMMSS Users Training Meeting | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Meeting U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System 2008 NMMSS Users Training Meeting NMMSS is sponsored by the...

323

U.S. Department of Energy Roadmap on Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies in Current and Future Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) recently sponsored the creation of a roadmap for instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) technology development. The roadmap represents the collective efforts of a group of subject matter experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, vendors, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and utilities. It is intended to provide the underpinnings to the government sponsored ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) performed in the United States for the next several years. A distinguishing feature of this roadmapping effort is that it is not limited to a technology progression plan but includes a detailed rationale, aimed at the nonspecialist, for the existence of a focused ICHMI RD&D program. Eight specific technology areas were identified for focused RD&D as follows: (1) sensors and electronics for harsh environments,(2) uncertainty characterization for diagnostics/prognostics applications, (3) quantification of software quality for high-integrity digital applications, (4) intelligent controls for nearly autonomous operation of advanced nuclear plants, (5) plant network architecture, (6) intelligent aiding technology for operational support, (7) human system interaction models and analysis tools, and (8) licensing and regulatory challenges and solutions.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL] [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary [partial] The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. A workshop was held to gather subject matter experts to develop the NDE R&D Roadmap for Cables. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, and NDE instrumentation development from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), universities, commercial NDE service vendors and cable manufacturers, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

Simmons, K.L.; Ramuhali, P.; Brenchley, D.L.; Coble, J.B.; Hashemian, H.M.; Konnick, R.; Ray, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Processes to Regulatory Processes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on AddThis.com... About History & Impacts Statutory Authorities & Rules Regulatory Processes Plans & Schedules Reports & Publications Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement Rulemakings & Notices Further Guidance ENERGY STAR® Popular Links Success Stories

326

Superfund Policy Statements and Guidance Regarding Disposition of Radioactive Waste in Non-NRC Licensed Disposal Facilities - 13407  

SciTech Connect

This talk will discuss EPA congressional testimony and follow-up letters, as well as letters to other stakeholders on EPA's perspectives on the disposition of radioactive waste outside of the NRC licensed disposal facility system. This will also look at Superfund's historical practices, and emerging trends in the NRC and agreement states on waste disposition. (author)

Walker, Stuart [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

Struckmeyer, R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Struckmeyer, R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey-Mission Concept Earth Sciences from the Astronomer's Perspective, a Deep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey-Mission Concept Earth Sciences from the Astronomer's Perspective Irina Melnikova #12;1 Earth Sciences from the Astronomer's Perspective 1.0 Mission Concept and Purpose Earth observations from satellites located in deep space offer the exciting opportunity to look

Christian, Eric

330

Types of Cost in Inductive Concept Learning Peter Turney PETER.TURNEY@NRC.CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Types of Cost in Inductive Concept Learning Peter Turney PETER.TURNEY@NRC.CA Institute of classes. In real-world applications of concept learning, there are many different types of cost involved. The majority of the machine learning literature ignores all types of cost (unless accuracy is interpreted

Weiss, Gary

331

Final Regulatory Impact Review/ Final Environmental Assessment/Initial Regulatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final Regulatory Impact Review/ Final Environmental Assessment/Initial Regulatory Flexibility................................................................................................. 1 2 REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW................................................................. 2 2 Analysis Amendment 97 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands

332

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT / REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW / FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT / REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW / FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS for Modifying existing Chinook and chum salmon savings areas AMENDMENT 84 to the Fishery Management Plan by the current regulatory closure regulations, as much higher salmon bycatch rates are reportedly encountered

333

Environmental Assessment/ Regulatory Impact Review/ Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRAFT Environmental Assessment/ Regulatory Impact Review/ Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Impact Review/Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis analyzes alternatives to include three species For Amendment 100 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands

334

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT AND FERC STAFF The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today accepted a settlement, valued at nearly $500 stemming from the 2000-2001 energy crisis in California and other Western states. The global settlement

Laughlin, Robert B.

335

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT POWER EXCHANGE MARKET The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a staff settlement calling-2-001 COMMISSION APPROVES $13.8 MILLION SETTLEMENT WITH RELIANT ENERGY OVER PHYSICAL WITHHOLDING IN CALIFORNIA

Laughlin, Robert B.

336

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today accepted an agreement between Nevada Power and Sierra Pacific. AGREEMENT ACCEPTED BETWEEN ENRON AND NEVADA COMPANIES SETTLING MATTERS STEMMING FROM WESTERN ENERGY CRISIS

Laughlin, Robert B.

337

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT FERC APPROVES SETTLEMENT WITH RELIANT IN CALIFORNIA CASES; PROCEEDS COULD TOTAL $50 MILLION The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a settlement between the Commission's enforcement staff

Laughlin, Robert B.

338

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT CRISIS The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a comprehensive settlement among APX Inc. Coral Power LLC, Puget Sound Energy Inc. and Avista are Supporting Parties. R-07-14 (30) #12;

Laughlin, Robert B.

339

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACTS al. COMMISSION ACCEPTS ENRON SETTLEMENT VALUED AT $1.5 BILLION The Federal Energy Regulatory-2001 Western energy crisis, said Commission Chairman Joseph T. Kelliher. "The parties are to be congratulated

Laughlin, Robert B.

340

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT-95-191 COMMISSION APPROVES TWO WESTERN POWER SETTLEMENTS The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved two markets during the Western energy crisis of 2000-2001. The first case involves a settlement agreement

Laughlin, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON,D.C.20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT JURISDICTION UNDER SECTION 1290 OF EPACT The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a settlement, collectively valued at $6.4 billion, which the Commission has approved stemming from the California energy

Laughlin, Robert B.

342

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOEs project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

REGIONAL BINNING FOR CONTINUED STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL WASTES  

SciTech Connect

In the Continued Storage Analysis Report (CSAR) (Reference 1), DOE decided to analyze the environmental consequences of continuing to store the commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at 72 commercial nuclear power sites and DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste at five Department of Energy sites by region rather than by individual site. This analysis assumes that three commercial facilities pairs--Salem and Hope Creek, Fitzpatrick and Nine-Mile Point, and Dresden and Moms--share common storage due to their proximity to each other. The five regions selected for this analysis are shown on Figure 1. Regions 1, 2, and 3 are the same as those used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in their regulatory oversight of commercial power reactors. NRC Region 4 was subdivided into two regions to more appropriately define the two different climates that exist in NRC Region 4. A single hypothetical site in each region was assumed to store all the SNF and HLW in that region. Such a site does not exist and has no geographic location but is a mathematical construct for analytical purposes. To ensure that the calculated results for the regional analyses reflect appropriate inventory, facility and material degradation, and radionuclide transport, the waste inventories, engineered barriers, and environmental conditions for the hypothetical sites were developed from data for each of the existing sites within the given region. Weighting criteria to account for the amount and types of SNF and HLW at each site were used in the development of the environmental data for the regional site, such that the results of the analyses for the hypothetical site were representative of the sum of the results of each actual site if they had been modeled independently. This report defines the actual site data used in development of this hypothetical site, shows how the individual site data was weighted to develop the regional site, and provides the weighted data used in the CSAR analysis. It is divided into Part 1 that defines time-dependent releases from each regional site, Part 2 that defines transport conditions through the groundwater, and Part 3 that defines transport through surface water and populations using the surface waters for drinking.

W. Lee Poe, Jr

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Phenylpropanoid related regulatory protein-regulatory region associations  

SciTech Connect

Materials and methods for identifying lignin regulatory region-regulatory protein associations are disclosed. Materials and methods for modulating lignin accumulation are also disclosed.

Apuya, Nestor (Culver City, CA); Bobzin, Steven Craig (Malibu, CA); Park, Joon-Hyun (Oak Park, CA); Doukhanina, Elena (Newbury Park, CA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fifth Annual RadWaste Summit - September 6-9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chernobyl Accident: 8)Tetiana Kilochytska, State Nuclear Regulatory Inspectorate of Ukraine Period of Performance in NRC's Disposal Regulations: 9) Rusty Lundberg, Executive...

346

Draft Supplement Analysis for Location(s) to Dispose of Depleted...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Policy Act of 1969 NRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NTS Nevada Test Site ORR Oak Ridge Reservation PCB polychlorinated biphenyl PEIS programmatic environmental impact...

347

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the country's 100+ pressurized water reactors, the team works with the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to detect...

348

Secretarial Review REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretarial Review REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT, AND INITIAL REGULATORY ............................................................................................................................1 2 Regulatory Impact Review FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS For proposed Amendment 88 to the Gulf of Alaska Fishery Management Plan CENTRAL GULF

349

SECRETARIAL REVIEW REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SECRETARIAL REVIEW REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW, FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT, AND INITIAL REGULATORY ..............................................................................................................................................1 2 REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS For proposed Amendment 88 to the Gulf of Alaska Fishery Management Plan CENTRAL GULF

350

Risk Informing the Commercial Nuclear Enterprise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Events V. The Path Forward #12;3 I. Managing Risk to the Business Each CENG nuclear plant Post-Fukushima Response New NRC Regulations EPA Cooling Water Intake regulation GSI 191 4 Cyber Level of Control Mitigation Fukushima Response High cost of studies, modifications, uncertainty

Bernstein, Joseph B.

351

Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Workshop on environmental assessment. [Regulation of applications of nuclear energy and related ancillary systems  

SciTech Connect

Objectives of the workshop were: to review and evaluate the state-of-the-art of environmental impact assessments as applied to the regulation of applications of nuclear energy and related ancillary systems; to identify areas where existing technology allows establishing acceptable methods or standard practices that will meet the requirements of the NRC regulations, standards and guides for both normal operations and off-standard conditions including accident considerations; to illuminate topics where existing models or analytical methods are deficient because of unverified assumptions, a paucity of empirical data, conflicting results reported in the literature or a need for observation of operation systems; to compile, analyze and synthesize a prioritized set of research needs to advance the state-of-the-art to the level which will meet all of the requirements of the Commission's regulations, standards and guides; and to develop bases for maintaining the core of regulatory guidance at the optimum level balancing technical capabilities with practical considerations of cost and value to the regulatory process. The discussion held in small group sessions on aquatic, atmospheric, and terrestrial pathways are presented. The following research needs were identified as common to all three groups: validation of models; characterization of source terms; development of screening techniques; basis for de minimis levels of contamination; and updating of objectives for environmental monitoring programs.

Watson, E.C. (comp.)

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

REGULATORY STATUS: AOC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

184 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble pile 129) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security south of C-611 Water Treatment Plant. Estimated to be less than 5 cubic feet....

355

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REGION I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REGION I REGION I 475 ALLENDALE ROAD KING OF PRUSSIA, PENNSYLVANIA 194061415 Docket No. 040-07123 JUL. 19 '996 License No. SUB-748 (Retired) United States -Department of Energy O ffice of EnvironmentalRestoration ATTN: W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D. EM-241 Cloverleaf Building 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, Maryland 20874-1290 SUBJECT: NL INDUSTRIES, ALBANY, NEW YORK Dear Dr. Williams: We are aware that DOE is responsible for the former National Lead Company (NL Industries) facility near Albany, New York. During a recent review of retired AEC License No. SUB-748, we found records which provide additional information concerning the use of source material at the facility. Copies of AEC documents which describe activities at that facility are enclosed. License No. SUB-00748 authorized possession of 38,000 pounds of uranium during

356

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, July 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, October 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

Not Available

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unclassified Non-Safeguards Information and Safeguards Information for Contention Preparation on a Combined

Laughlin, Robert B.

359

Calculation Method for the Projection of Future Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the calculation method developed for the projection of future utility spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharges in regard to their timing, quantity, burnup, and initial enrichment. This projection method complements the utility-supplied RW-859 data on historic discharges and short-term projections of SNF discharges by providing long-term projections that complete the total life cycle of discharges for each of the current U.S. nuclear power reactors. The method was initially developed in mid-1999 to update the SNF discharge projection associated with the 1995 RW-859 utility survey (CRWMS M&O 1996). and was further developed as described in Rev. 00 of this report (CRWMS M&O 2001a). Primary input to the projection of SNF discharges is the utility projection of the next five discharges from each nuclear unit, which is provided via the revised final version of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) 1998 RW-859 utility survey (EIA 2000a). The projection calculation method is implemented via a set of Excel 97 spreadsheets. These calculations provide the interface between receipt of the utility five-discharge projections that are provided in the RW-859 survey, and the delivery of projected life-cycle SNF discharge quantities and characteristics in the format requisite for performing logistics analysis to support design of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). Calculation method improvements described in this report include the addition of a reactor-specific maximum enrichment-based discharge burnup limit. This limit is the consequence of the enrichment limit, currently 5 percent. which is imposed as a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license condition on nuclear fuel fabrication plants. In addition, the calculation method now includes the capability for projecting future nuclear plant power upratings, consistent with many such recent plant uprates and the prospect of additional future uprates. Finally. this report summarizes the results of the 2002 Reference SNF Discharge Projection.

B. McLeod

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

Title list of documents made publicly available: February 1--28, 1995. Volume 17, Number 2  

SciTech Connect

This monthly publication contains descriptions of the information received and generated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (2) nondocketed material received and generated by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. As used here, docketed refers to the system by which NRC maintains its regulatory records. This series of documents is indexed by a Personal Author Index, a Corporate Source Index, and a Report Number Index. NRC documents that are publicly available may be examined without charge at the NRC Public Document Room (PDR).

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

rail regulatory matrix  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail and Highway Regulations Relative to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials AND Their Applicability to States, Tribes, Shippers, and Carriers SUBJECT AREA RAIL HIGHWAY STATE APPLICABILITY TRIBAL APPLICABILITY 1,2 SHIPPER 3 /CARRIER RESPONSIBILITY ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Packaging 10 CFR 71 10 CFR 71 Shipper, Carrier 10 CFR 71-Establishes requirements for packaging, preparation for shipment, and transportation of licensed material; as well as procedures for NRC approval of said activities 49 CFR 173, sub. I 49 CFR 173, sub I Shipper, Carrier 49 CFR 173, sub I-Sets forth requirements for the packaging and transportation of Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 49 CFR 174 4 4 Shipper, Carrier 49 CFR 174-Requirements applicable to acceptance and transport of radioactive materials packages by rail.

362

QUARTERLY NUCLEAR DEPLOYMENT SCORECARD - JULY 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QUARTERLY NUCLEAR DEPLOYMENT SCORECARD - JULY 2013 QUARTERLY NUCLEAR DEPLOYMENT SCORECARD - JULY 2013 QUARTERLY NUCLEAR DEPLOYMENT SCORECARD - JULY 2013 News Updates Dominion Resources, Inc. has informed the NRC that Dominion Virginia Power will amend its COL application (COLA) to reflect the ESBWR technology by the end of 2013. In 2009 Dominion dropped the ESBWR from its COLA after failing to reach a commercial agreement with General Electric-Hitachi (GEH). A COL is expected no earlier than late 2015. Dominion Virginia Power has not yet committed to building a new nuclear unit at North Anna. NRC has determined that the latest revision to the South Texas Project COLA does not alleviate foreign interest concerns; the staff found that despite having only a 10% ownership stake in Nuclear Innovation North America LLC (NINA), Toshiba American Nuclear Energy Corporation's

363

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos Addthis Glenn Podonsky 1 of 13 Glenn Podonsky Glenn Podonsky (DOE Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer) provides his welcoming remarks. Daniel Poneman 2 of 13 Daniel Poneman DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman discusses maintaining our focus on nuclear safety. Akira Kawano 3 of 13 Akira Kawano Akira Kawano, Tokyo Electric Power Company, provides lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Bill Ostendorff 4 of 13 Bill Ostendorff NRC Commissioner Bill Ostendorff gives his perspective on the NRC's response to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Miroslav Lipar 5 of 13 Miroslav Lipar Miroslav Lipar, IAEA, provides an international perspective on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

364

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on

365

Development of a Societal-Risk Goal for Nuclear Power Safety  

SciTech Connect

The safety-goal policy of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has never included a true societal-risk goal. The NRC did acknowledge that the original goal for the risk of latent cancer facilities was an individual risk goal not related to the number of people involved, and stated that a true societal risk goal would place a limit on the aggregate number of people affected. However, this limitation was never satisfactorily addressed. Moreover, the safety goal has historically focused primarily on fatalities and latent health effects, while experience with actual nuclear accidents has shown that societal disruption can be significant even in accidents that yield only small to modest numbers of fatalities. Therefore, we have evaluated the social disruption effects from severe reactor accidents as a basis to develop a societal-risk goal for nuclear power plants, considering both health effects and non-health concerns such as property damage and land interdiction. Our initial analysis considered six different nuclear power plant sites in the U.S. for Boiling Water Reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors. The accident sequences considered for these two reactor types were station blackout sequences (both short-term and long-term SBO) as well as an STSBO with RCIC failure for the BWR and a Steam Generator Tube Rupture for the PWR. The source term release was an input in a RASCAL calculation of the off-site consequences using actual site-based weather data for each of the six plant sites randomly selected over a two-year period. The source term release plumes were then compared to Geographical Information System data for each site to determine the population affected and that would need to be evacuated to meet current emergency preparedness regulations. Our results to date suggest that number of people evacuated to meet current protective action guidelines appears to be a good proxy for disruption -- and, unlike other measures of disruption, has the advantage of being relatively straightforward to calculate for a given accident scenario and a given geographical location and plant site. Revised safety goals taking into account the potential for societal disruption could in principle be applied to the current generation of nuclear plants, but could also be used in evaluating and siting new technologies, such as small modular light water reactors, advanced Gen-IV high-temperature reactors, as well as reactor designs with passive safety features such as filtered vented containments.

Vicki Bier; Michael Corradini; Robert Youngblood; Caleb Roh; Shuji Liu

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NRC Recommendations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis & Systems Integration For DOE Hydrogen R & D Messages from the Academies Hydrogen Study, Personal Experience Robert L. Hirsch Senior Energy Program Advisor, SAIC July 28, 2004 SAIC 2 Topics Academies findings / recommendations + Systems analysis & integration both needed Hydrogen's competition in the marketplace Hydrogen options varied / breakthroughs needed Academies study wide-ranging but limited Differences in systems analysis & system integration 3 ACADEMIES HYDROGEN STUDY COMPREHENSIVE CHALLENGING SUPPORTIVE OF DOE 4 ACADEMIES FINDINGS ACADEMIES FINDINGS Pathway to H 2 not straightforward Exploratory research is essential Extensive R&D needed Issues: Economic, social, & public acceptance, especially safety Hydrogen program management is far more

367

Analysis of dose consequences arising from the release of spent nuclear fuel from dry storage casks.  

SciTech Connect

The resulting dose consequences from releases of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) residing in a dry storage casks are examined parametrically. The dose consequences are characterized by developing dose versus distance curves using simplified bounding assumptions. The dispersion calculations are performed using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS2) code. Constant weather and generic system parameters were chosen to ensure that the results in this report are comparable with each other and to determine the relative impact on dose of each variable. Actual analyses of site releases would need to accommodate local weather and geographic data. These calculations assume a range of fuel burnups, release fractions (RFs), three exposure scenarios (2 hrs and evacuate, 2 hrs and shelter, and 24 hrs exposure), two meteorological conditions (D-4 and F-2), and three release heights (ground level - 1 meter (m), 10 m, and 100 m). This information was developed to support a policy paper being developed by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff on an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) and monitored retrievable storage installation (MRS) security rulemaking.

Durbin, Samuel G.; Morrow, Charles W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Dry Storage Demonstration for High-Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel-Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

Initially, casks for dry storage of spent fuel were licensed for assembly-average burnup of about 35 GWd/MTU. Over the last two decades, the discharge burnup of fuel has increased steadily and now exceeds 45 GWd/MTU. With spent fuel burnups approaching the licensing limits (peak rod burnup of 62 GWd/MTU for pressurized water reactor fuel) and some lead test assemblies being burned beyond this limit, a need for a confirmatory dry storage demonstration program was first identified after the publication in May 1999 of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC) Interim Staff Guidance 11 (ISG-11). With the publication in July 2002 of the second revision of ISG-11, the desirability for such a program further increased to obtain confirmatory data about the potential changes in cladding mechanical properties induced by dry storage, which would have implications to the transportation, handling, and disposal of high-burnup spent fuel. While dry storage licenses have kept pace with reactor discharge burnups, transportation licenses have not and are considered on a case by case basis. Therefore, this feasibility study was performed to examine the options available for conducting a confirmatory experimental program supporting the dry storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel with burnups well in excess of 45 GWd/MTU.

McKinnon, Mikal A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Cunningham, Mitchel E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

369

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2012 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2012 October 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2012 News Updates On August 7, NRC issued an order halting issuance of any new construction licenses or license renewals until the Commission can respond to a June 8 court ruling striking down the NRC's waste confidence rule, which assumes that a waste repository will be available "when necessary"; reviews of license applications will continue and the order does not apply to design certifications. On September 6, NRC directed the agency's staff to develop an environmental impact statement (EIS) and a revised waste confidence decision and rule on the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel. The EIS and rule are to be completed within 24 months. Due to low natural gas prices and unfavorable economic conditions,

370

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, October 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2012 October 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, October 2012 October 30, 2012 - 8:58am Addthis Quarterly Updates On August 7, NRC issued an order halting issuance of any new construction licenses or license renewals until the Commission can respond to a June 8 court ruling striking down the NRC's waste confidence rule, which assumes that a waste repository will be available "when necessary"; reviews of license applications will continue and the order does not apply to design certifications. On September 6, NRC directed the agency's staff to develop an environmental impact statement (EIS) and a revised waste confidence decision and rule on the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel. The EIS and rule are to be completed within 24 months. Due to low natural gas prices and unfavorable economic conditions,

371

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

373

Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Connolly, T.J. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.0 REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW: ECONOMIC AND SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES FOR AMENDMENT 47 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE GROUNDFISH FISHERY OF THE BERING SEA AND ALEUTIAN

375

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ INITIAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ INITIAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS to the Fisheries Management Plan (FMP) for the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) area, approved on March 4. The structure of the FMP allows certain measures to be changed by regulatory amendments without amending the FMP

376

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT & REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/INITIAL REGULATORY IMPACT ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT & REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/INITIAL REGULATORY IMPACT ANALYSIS OF A REGULATORY AMENDMENT TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLANS FOR GROUNDFISH OF THE GULF OF ALASKA and the GROUNDFISH Islands Area (BSAI) are managed under the Fishery Management Plans for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska

377

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT / REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW / FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT / REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW / FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area October 2007 Prepared that bycatch may be exacerbated by the current regulatory closure regulations, as much higher salmon bycatch

378

Proposed risk evaluation guidelines for use by the DOE-AL Nuclear Explosive Safety Division in evaluating proposed shipments of nuclear components  

SciTech Connect

The licensing requirements of 10 CFR 71 (US Code of Federal Regulations) are the primary criteria used to license proposed US Department of Energy (DOE) shipments of nuclear components. However, if a shipment cannot meet 10 CFR 71 requirements, a Transportation System Risk Assessment (TSRA) is prepared to document: (1) the degree of compliance of proposed DOE shipments of nuclear components with applicable federal regulations, and (2) the risk associated with the proposed shipments. The Nuclear Explosive Safety Division (NESD) of the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Area Office (DOE-AL) is responsible for evaluating TSRAs and for preparing Safety Evaluation Reports (SERs) to authorize the off-site transport. Hazards associated with the transport may include the presence of fissile material, chemically and radiologically toxic uranium, and ionizing radiation. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has historically considered only radiological hazards in licensing the transport of radiological material because the US Department of Transportation considers licensing requirements of nonradiological (i.e., chemically toxic) hazards. The requirements of 10 CFR 71 are based primarily on consideration of radiological hazards. For completeness, this report provides information for assessing the effects of chemical toxicity. Evaluating the degree of compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 71 is relatively straightforward. However, there are few precedents associated with developing TSRA risk assessments for packages that do not comply with all of the requirements of 10 CFR 71. The objective of the task is to develop Risk Evaluation Guidelines for DOE-AL to use when evaluating a TSRA. If the TSRA shows that the Risk Evaluation Guidelines are not exceeded, then from a risk perspective the TSRA should be approved if there is evidence that the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle has been applied.

Just, R.A.; Love, A.F.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Depleted Uranium Uses: Regulatory Requirements and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Depleted Uranium Uses Depleted Uranium Uses Regulatory Requirements Regulatory Requirements and Issues and Issues Nancy L. Ranek Nancy L. Ranek Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory August 5, 1998 August 5, 1998 Beneficial Reuse '98 Beneficial Reuse '98 Knoxville, TN Knoxville, TN NOTES Work Performed for: Office of Facilities (NE-40) Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed by: Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory 955 L'Enfant Plaza North, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Phone: 202/488-2417 E-mail: ranekn@smtplink.dis.anl.gov 2 2 2 Programmatic Environmental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Impact Statement (PEIS) Draft PEIS Published 12/97 * Preferred Alternative = 100% Use

380

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Juneau, AK 99802 (907) 586-7228 Abstract: This Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review For Amendment 89 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

PAVAN: an atmospheric-dispersion program for evaluating design-basis accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a user's guide for the NRC computer program, PAVAN, which is a program used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to estimate downwind ground-level air concentrations for potential accidental releases of radioactive material from nuclear facilities. Such an assessment is required by 10 CFR Part 100 and 10 CFR Part 50. The program implements the guidance provided in Regulatory Guide 1.145, Atmospheric Dispersion Models for Potential Accident Consequence Assessments at Nuclear Power Plants. Using joint frequency distributions of wind direction and wind speed by atmospheric stability, the program provides relative air concentration (X/Q) values as functions of direction for various time periods at the exclusion area boundary (EAB) and the outer boundary of the low population zone (LPZ). Calculations of X/Q values can be made for assumed ground-level releases (e.g., through building penetrations and vents) or elevated releases from free-standing stacks. Various options may be selected by the user. They can account for variation in the location of release points, additional plume dispersion due to building wakes, plume meander under low wind speed conditions, and adjustments to consider non-straight trajectories. It computes an effective plume height using the physical release height which can be reduced by inputted terrain features. It cannot handle multiple emission sources. A description of the main program and all subroutines is provided. Also included as appendices are a complete listing of the program and two test cases with the required data inputs and the resulting program outputs.

Bander, T.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ INITIAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS: This Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (EA For Amendments to the Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands

384

Hydration Aging of Nuclear Waste Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Nuclear Waste Glass 10...STEINDLER Chemical Engineering...60439 The aging of simulated nuclear waste glass by...nuclear waste forms can meet...simulated aging reac-tions...whether a waste formn can...pro-jected Nuclear Regulatory...STEINDLEt Chemical Engineering...Basisfor Waste Form Integrity...

J. K. BATES; L. J. JARDINE; M. J. STEINDLER

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

FPCC Regulatory Barriers Submittal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barriers Submittal FPCC Regulatory Barriers Submittal The Federal Performance Contracting Coalition (FPCC) appreciates the opportunity to comment on reducing regulatory...

386

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Generation Projects on Federal Lands Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands Presentation covers regulatory considerations for developing...

387

International | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International | National Nuclear Security Administration International | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog International Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > International International U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

388

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package; and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstate the suitability of the site for a repository, to desin the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next; it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

India's Nuclear Energy Program : prospects The talk will begin with a brief introduction to nuclear fission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

India's Nuclear Energy Program : prospects The talk will begin with a brief introduction to nuclear posed by reactors, the accident liability laws and regulatory structure governing nuclear energy, Wednesday, Oct 29th 4:00 PM (Tea/Coffee at Seminar Hall, TCIS Colloquium India's Nuclear Energy Program

Shyamasundar, R.K.

392

NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Volume 15, No. 4: Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1995. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

Struckmeyer, R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 54(Suppl. 1): 6880 (1997). 1997 NRC Canada Comparison of hydrography and circulation on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 54(Suppl. 1): 68­80 (1997). © 1997 NRC Canada 68 Comparison 1990s caused below-normal air temperatures in eastern Canada, resulting in increased ice growth during spring. The reduced solar flux onto the ocean surface resulted in a 3- to 4-wk delay in the annual

deYoung, Brad

394

Secretarial Review Draft Regulatory Impact Review / Initial Regulatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretarial Review Draft Regulatory Impact Review / Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Proposed Amendment 42 to the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands King and Tanner � Public review Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands Crab Fisheries October 2012 ii #12;Modification of economic

395

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6. Admin Chg 1, 8-3-11.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

396

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR FISHERY PLAN AMENDMENTS TO PROHIBIT USE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.0 REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW: SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES / Aleutian Islands Plan Amendment 33 and Gulf of Alaska Plan Amendment 37 Prepared by Staff of the North

397

CONCENTRATES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GAO faults NRC for oversight of nuclear plant security plansThe Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is relying too heavily on nuclear power plant owners to verify the adequacy of their terrorism security plans, says a recent report by the Government ...

2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

Development, analysis, and evaluation of a commercial software framework for the study of Extremely Low Probability of Rupture (xLPR) events at nuclear power plants.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) participated in a Pilot Study to examine the process and requirements to create a software system to assess the extremely low probability of pipe rupture (xLPR) in nuclear power plants. This project was tasked to develop a prototype xLPR model leveraging existing fracture mechanics models and codes coupled with a commercial software framework to determine the framework, model, and architecture requirements appropriate for building a modular-based code. The xLPR pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed developmental process and framework for a probabilistic code to address degradation mechanisms in piping system safety assessments. The pilot study includes a demonstration problem to assess the probability of rupture of DM pressurizer surge nozzle welds degraded by primary water stress-corrosion cracking (PWSCC). The pilot study was designed to define and develop the framework and model; then construct a prototype software system based on the proposed model. The second phase of the project will be a longer term program and code development effort focusing on the generic, primary piping integrity issues (xLPR code). The results and recommendations presented in this report will be used to help the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) define the requirements for the longer term program.

Kalinich, Donald A.; Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Mattie, Patrick D.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300 Arlington are pleased to transmit a technical report prepared by the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (Board. Based on its review of data gathered by the DOE and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

400

SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW / INITIAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS....................................................................................................................................... 1 2 Regulatory Impact Review For a proposed Amendment to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska to Remove

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Regulatory Functional Review: Primary Roles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The regulatory professional will review the study design and the clinical plan for regulatory approval, and ensure that it will support ... described and in populations acceptable to the relevant regulatory agenc...

Raymond A. Huml

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Secretarial Review Draft Regulatory Impact Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretarial Review Draft Regulatory Impact Review For Amendment 99 to the Fishery Management Plan ..................................................................................................... iii 1.0 REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW................................................................................................................1 1.1.1 What is a Regulatory Impact Review

403

QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JULY 2013 News Updates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 News Updates  Dominion Resources, Inc. has informed the NRC that Dominion Virginia Power will amend its COL application to reflect the ESBWR technology by the end of 2013. In 2009 Dominion dropped the ESBWR from its COLA after failing to reach a commercial agreement with General Electric-Hitachi (GEH). A COL is expected no earlier than late 2015. Dominion Virginia Power has not yet committed to building a new nuclear unit at North Anna.  NRC has determined that the latest revision to the South Texas Project COLA does not alleviate foreign interest concerns; the staff found that despite having only a 10% ownership stake in Nuclear Innovation North America LLC (NINA), Toshiba American Nuclear Energy Corporation's financing of all project costs effectively resulted in control and domination of NINA. The COL review remains active while NINA considers its options

404

Notes On Nuclear Energy Regulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Notes On Nuclear Energy Regulation ... Geology matters is a key lesson from the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that hit the coast of Japan, resulting in the meltdown of three nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant complex, said Allison M. Macfarlane, new head of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, at her first press briefing last week. ... In her address to energy reporters, she focused on her top priorities for the commission. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

Regulatory Drivers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Statutes and Regulations Relating to Legacy Management Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 10: Energy "Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste," 10 CFR 61 "Occupational Radiation Protection," 10 CFR 835 Title 40: Protection of Environment "National Primary Drinking Water Regulations," 40 CFR 141 "Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities," 40 CFR 264 "National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan," 40 CFR 300 Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) "Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability

406

Nuclear Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy ... A brief summary of the history and key concepts of nuclear energy. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Charles D. Mickey

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Nuclear batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear batteries ... Describes the structure, operation, and application of nuclear batteries. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Alfred B. Garrett

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JANUARY 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Updates available at: www.energy.gov/ne NEXT UPDATE - April 2014 Page 1 News Updates  Luminant has requested a suspension of the NRC's review of its Comanche Peak Combined Construction and Operating License (COL) application. The company cited impacts to the review schedule of the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries US Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (US- APWR) due to the vendor's desire to refocus its resources to reactor restarts in Japan as well as low electricity prices driven by low natural gas prices as reasons for the suspension.  Unistar Nuclear Operating Co. has formally withdrawn its COL application from the NRC to build and operate Areva's U.S. EPR at its Nine Mile

409

Nuclear Energy University Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Status 1 Status Presentation to Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC) June 15, 2011 Michael Worley, NEUP Program Manager NEUP Funding is Program Driven Program Directed Funding Program Supported Funding Mission Supported Funding Natl. Labs Universities DOE-NE HQ Peer Review DOE NE Program Drivers 2 3 Summary of Improvements and New Programs for FY 2011 * Expand "Blue Sky" Research and Development (R&D) * Initiate Integrated Research Projects (IRP) * Expand and improve peer review data base * Evaluate adoption of NRC and NNSA Metrics as appropriate to NEUP * Conduct peer review at pre-application stage for R&D 2011 Proposed NEUP Budget - $61.8M * Program Directed Integrated Research Projects (IRP) - $12.0M (NEW)

410

Powerplant productivity improvements and regulatory incentives  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to examine the benefits to be gained from increased powerplant productivity and to validate and demonstrate the use of incentives within the regulatory process to promote the improvement of powerplant productivity. The system-wide costs savings to be gained from given productivity improvement scenarios are estimated in both the short and long term. Numerous reports and studies exist which indicate that productivity improvements at the powerplant level are feasible and cost effective. The efforts of this study widen this focus and relate system-wide productivity improvements with system-wide cost savings. The initial thrust of the regulatory section of this study is to validate the existence of reasonable incentive procedures which would enable regulatory agencies to better motivate electric utilities to improve productivity on both the powerplant and system levels. The voluntary incentive format developed in this study was designed to facilitate the link between profit and efficiency which is typically not clear in most regulated market environments. It is concluded that at the present time, many electric utilities in this country could significantly increase the productivity of their base load units, and the adoption of an incentive program of the general type recommended in this study would add to rate of return regulation the needed financial incentives to enable utilities to make such improvements without losing long-run profit. In light of the upcoming oil import target levels and mandatory cutbacks of oil and gas as boiler fuels for electric utilities, the use of incentive programs to encourage more efficient utilization of coal and nuclear base load capacity will become far more inviting over the next two decades.

Hardy, D; Brown, D

1980-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

411

Regulatory Compliance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory Compliance Regulatory Compliance Regulatory Compliance This photo shows the inside the K West Basin facility, where workers are retrieving highly radioactive sludge material under 17 feet of water. This photo shows the inside the K West Basin facility, where workers are retrieving highly radioactive sludge material under 17 feet of water. The Department of Energy is not a regulatory agency; however it does self-regulate its own radioactive waste. DOE is also affected by a variety of statutes, legislation, regulations, directives and guidance. Many of the current compliance-related actions revolve around waste and material disposition. These include National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Impact Statements and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Records of Decision. Links, below,

412

European Regulatory Issues in Nanomedicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper is intended to focus on peculiarities of nanomedicine and the importance of social concerns implicated,...ad hoc regulatory framework is needed. Consideration of social challenges will underline the cru...

Giorgia Guerra

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Regulatory facility guide for Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

414

Appendix A U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendices Appendices 37 #12;#12;Appendix A Appendix A U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board as chair, on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Advisory Commit tee on Nuclear Waste. His areas to the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board on June 26, 2002, by President George W. Bush. Dr. Abkowitz

415

Appendix A U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendices Appendices 31 #12;#12;Appendix A Appendix A U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board as Chairman on September 10, 2004, by President George W. Bush. Dr­2004), 4 years as chair, on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste

416

What Will it Take to Revive Nuclear Energy ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What Will it Take to Revive Nuclear Energy ? [Assuming you want to] Andrew C. Kadak Professor;Present Situation · It doesn't get any better than this for nuclear energy! ­ Very Good Nuclear Regulatory rhetoric from the President and Congress about need for nuclear energy for environment, security

417

Proceedings of GLOBAL 2013: International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Conference - Nuclear Energy at a Crossroads  

SciTech Connect

The Global conference is a forum for the discussion of the scientific, technical, social and regulatory aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. Relevant topics include global utilization of nuclear energy, current fuel cycle technologies, advanced reactors, advanced fuel cycles, nuclear nonproliferation and public acceptance.

NONE

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC`s current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC's current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nuclear Forensics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Peach Bottom and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A dramatic and extraordinary instance of state and local government control of nuclear power, the purchase by New York of the Shoreham plant is nonetheless indicative of the political demands that some states confront for additional involvement in the regulation of the radiological hazards associated with commercial nuclear power plants. Although the Supreme Court has appeared to expand, in the eight years since PG&E and Silkwood, the acceptable extent of state regulation, some states, in addition to New York, have acquired, with the acquiescence of the NRC, a degree of involvement that exceeds the role for state and local governments provided by the Court. For example, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania concluded with the Philadelphia Electric Company (PECO) in June 1989 an agreement that commits PECO to various initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, for the safe operation of the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania. In July 1991 the State of Vermont and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corporation (Vermont Yankee) concluded an agreement similar to that concluded between Pennsylvania and PECO. The agreement also commits Vermont Yankee to certain initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, related to its operation of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in Vermont. The agreement was precipitated by a challenge to an application, submitted to the NRC by Vermont Yankee in April 1989, to amend the Vermont Yankee plant license to extend its expiration date from December 11, 2007 to March 21, 2012. The amendment would allow the Vermont Yankee plant to operate for forty full years.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office manages

423

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Key Federal Statutes to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on AddThis.com... Home About Contacts Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Key Federal Statutes These are excerpts from federal statutes that established key Energy Policy Act (EPAct) transportation regulatory activities.

424

Frequently Asked Questions | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms > Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) User Frequently Asked Questions What is the History of NMMSS? What Are the Other Uses of NMMSS? NMMSS is sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Materials Integration within the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr Learn More Users Frequently Asked Questions What Are the Other Uses of NMMSS?

425

NMMSS Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog NMMSS Reports Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms > NMMSS Reports NMMSS Reports U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

426

SAMS Overview | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

SAMS Overview | National Nuclear Security Administration SAMS Overview | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog SAMS Overview Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > SAMS Overview SAMS Overview U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

427

An Empirical Study on Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for inspecting nuclear power plant (NPP) components. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate UT techniques to assess their ability to detect, locate, size, and characterize fabrication flaws in typical NPP weldments. This particular study focused on the evaluation of four carbon steel pipe-to-pipe welds on specimens that ranged in thicknesses from 19.05 mm (0.75 in.) to 27.8 mm (1.094 in.) and were 355.6 mm (14.0 in.) or 406.4 mm (16.0 in.) in diameter. The pipe welds contained both implanted (intentional) fabrication flaws as well as bonus (unintentional) flaws throughout the entire thickness of the weld and the adjacent base material. The fabrication flaws were a combination of planar and volumetric flaw types, including incomplete fusion, incomplete penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array UT (PA UT) techniques applied primarily for detection and length sizing of the flaws. Radiographic examinations were also conducted on the specimens with RT detection and length sizing results being used to establish true state. This paper will discuss the comparison of UT and RT (true state) detection results conducted to date along with a discussion on the technical gaps that need to be addressed before these methods can be used interchangeably for repair and replacement activities for NPP components.

Moran, Traci L.; Pardini, Allan F.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Prowant, Matthew S.; Mathews, Royce

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Feasibility of lateral emplacement in very deep borehole disposal of high level nuclear waste .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The U.S. Department of Energy recently filed a motion to withdraw the Nuclear Regulatory Commission license application for the High Level Waste Repository at Yucca (more)

Gibbs, Jonathan Sutton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Evaluation of offsite dose assessment methodologies used in the nuclear industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" (NRC 1977b). A general review of the methods recommended by the NRC staff for the preparation of proposed Radiological Effluents Technical Specifications (RETS) is contained in NUREG-0133, "Preparation of Radiological Effluent Technical... EFFLUENTS NUCLEAR FACILITY O CD 'O O CD O CI DI O III O. PO CP O 9 0 O O acr ere eo' 'ars ~P, ~C crc G = Irrigation (a C c~ LIQUID EFFLUENTS D irect FUEL TRANSPORT stater trn rne ?on any +ater g Vita Ce S hore( /ne &xylo svre O...

Berry, Robert Orwell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, April 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, April 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, April 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, April 2012 April 30, 2012 - 12:31pm Addthis Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary The U.S. NRC voted to approve the issuance of the COLs for Southern Nuclear's Vogtle Units 3 and 4 on February 9, 2012. The issuance marks the first COL ever to be issued and the construction of a new nuclear power plant in more than 30 years. SCE&G's V.C Summer Units 2 and 3 received approval for COLs on March 30, 2012, making them the second US new-build in 30 years. The Tennessee Valley Authority has revised the cost and time estimates of Unit 2 at the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant. The new schedule estimates the cost to be in the range of $4 billion with a completion date of late 2015. South Mississippi Electric Power Association (SMEPA) has signed a

431

Fresh nuclear fuel measurements at Ukrainian nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

In 2005, the Provisions on Nuclear Material Measurement System was enacted in Ukraine as an important regulatory driver to support international obligations in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. It defines key provisions and requirements for material measurement and measurement control programs to ensure the quality and reliability of measurement data within the framework of the State MC&A System. Implementing the Provisions requires establishing a number of measurement techniques for both fresh and spent nuclear fuel for various types of Ukrainian reactors. Our first efforts focused on measurements of fresh nuclear fuel from a WWR-1000 power reactor.

Kuzminski, Jozef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ewing, Tom [ANL; Dickman, Debbie [PNNL; Gavrilyuk, Victor [UKRAINE; Drapey, Sergey [UKRAINE; Kirischuk, Vladimir [UKRAINE; Strilchuk, Nikolay [UKRAINE

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT / FINAL REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW / INITIAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT / FINAL REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW / INITIAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ..............................................................................................16 2 REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW ANALYSIS for Amendment 83 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska ALLOCATION

433

Regulatory aspects of radiation protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......necessary to face the challenges ahead. Safety...quality of life and sustainable development...int/comm/energy/nuclear/radioprotection...Directorate of Nuclear Energy of Direction General Energy and Transport...for 2005 is the integration of the new Member......

A. Janssens; M. Sarro Vaquero

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Processes Regulatory Processes Beginning with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, Congress has enacted a series of laws establishing federal appliance and equipment standards and the Department of Energy's (DOE) authority to develop, amend, and implement standards. To implement these laws, the Appliance and Equipment Standards program manages the regulatory processes described below. Standards Development and Revision Standards for a given product may be mandated by Congress or established by DOE pursuant to statutory authority. Standards established by DOE are developed through a multi-step rulemaking process that includes public participation. Test Procedure Development and Revision Most standards rulemakings are accompanied by a concurrent test procedure rulemaking. Test procedures detail how manufacturers must test their products to certify that they comply with the applicable energy conservation standards. (42 U.S.C. 6293; 6314) DOE also uses the test procedures to determine compliance with the applicable standards. (42 U.S.C. 6295(s))

435

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Terms Key Terms to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Guidance Documents Statutes & Regulations Program Annual Reports Fact Sheets Newsletter Case Studies Workshops Tools Key Terms FAQs Key Terms The Energy Policy Act (EPAct) includes specific terminology related to

436

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory

437

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel Petitions to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Alternative Fuel Petitions Section 301(2) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct 1992) defines

438

Office of Enforcement - Regulatory Assistance Reviews  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Assistance Reviews Regulatory Assistance Reviews Office of Enforcement and Oversight (formerly Program Reviews) Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Reviews evaluate contractor programs for identifying, evaluating, reporting and correcting noncompliances. The objective of these reviews is to work collaboratively with sites to identify areas where program effectiveness can be improved and ensure that noncompliances are being proactively self-identified. 2013 Office of Security Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of Battelle at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, July 18, 2013 Office of Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of L ATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, February 11, 2013 Office of Security Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of

439

Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alton Strategic Environmental Group Alton Strategic Environmental Group New Port Richey, FL charles.alton@earthlink.net April 4, 2011 Daniel Cohen, Assistant General Counsel Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency Office of the General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Cohen: I have reviewed the Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory Reform issued

440

Emerging principles of regulatory evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...principles of regulatory evolution 10.1073/pnas.0700488104 Benjamin Prud'homme Nicolas Gompel Sean B. Carroll *Howard Hughes...1873 . 48 Protas ME Hersey C Kochanek D Zhou Y Wilkens H Jeffery WR Zon LI Borowsky R Tabin CJ ( 2006 ) Nat Genet 38 : 107...

Benjamin Prud'homme; Nicolas Gompel; Sean B. Carroll

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Threat Insight Quarterly Regulatory Compliance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-Force ® Threat Insight Quarterly Regulatory Compliance www.iss.netwww.iss.net October 2006 #12 Risk Index ..............................................11 Future X-Force Threat Insight Quarterly Internet Security Systems X-Force® Threat Insight Quarterly > October 2006 ©2006 Internet Security Systems

442

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6, Admin Chg 1, 8-26-05. Admin Chg 2, dated 11-19-12, cancels DOE M 474.2 Admin Chg 1.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nuclear power gets a second look  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The last nuclear power plant built in the United States was ordered in 1978, the year before the Three Mile Island accident stopped the growth of the US industry in its tracks. But, just in the past year: the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission extended ...

T. S. Perry

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Secretarial Review Draft Regulatory Impact Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretarial Review Draft Regulatory Impact Review for Proposed Amendment 102 to the Fishery....................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Regulatory Impact Review Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Establishing a Community Quota Entity

445

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT INITIAL REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND INITIAL REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR PACIFIC COAST SALMON PLAN AND ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES, AND DE MINIMIS FISHING PROVISIONS REGULATORY IDENTIFIER NUMBER 0648-BA55 PREPARED........................................................................................................1 1.3 Plan Development Schedule and Council Advisory Committee Participation

446

Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License &  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report The Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010) Construction and Operating License/Design Certification (COL/DC) Demonstration program together with the financial incentives provided by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 are the two primary reasons why a number of license applications for new nuclear construction are before the NRC today, and why the first new nuclear plants in over 30 years are under construction in the United States. As with all significant endeavors, there are lessons to be learned from the

447

EVALUATION REPORT The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2 Attachment OBJECTIVE, SCOPE AND METHODOLOGY OBJECTIVE To determine whether the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) unclassified cybersecurity program adequately...

448

Questions and answers based on revised 10 CFR Part 20  

SciTech Connect

NUREG/CR-6204 is a collection of questions and answers that were originally issued in seven sets and which pertain to revised 10 CFR Part 20. The questions came from both outside and within the NRC. The answers were compiled and provided by NRC staff within the offices of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, Nuclear Regulatory Research, the Office of State Programs, and the five regional offices. Although all of the questions and answers have been reviewed by attorneys in the NRC Office of the General Counsel, they do not constitute official legal interpretations relevant to revised 10 CFR Part 20. The questions and answers do, however, reflect NRC staff decisions and technical options on aspects of the revised 10 CFR Part 20 regulatory requirements. This NUREG is being made available to encourage communication among the public, industry, and NRC staff concerning the major revisions of the NRC`s standards for protection against radiation.

Borges, T.; Stafford, R.S.; Lu, P.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Worker Safety and Health Regulatory Assistance Reviews | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Worker Safety Worker Safety and Health Regulatory Assistance Reviews Worker Safety and Health Regulatory Assistance Reviews Documents Available for Download July 17, 2001 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC - EA-2001-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC, related to Nuclear Safety, Work Control, and Radiation Protection Deficiencies at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site March 19, 2000 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC - EA-2000-05 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC, related to an Unplanned, Radioactive Material Uptake at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, (EA-2000-05) September 21, 1998 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA

450

Secretarial Review Draft REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretarial Review Draft REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW and FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS For a proposed Regulatory Amendment to Implement Amendment 78 to the Fishery Management Plan for Gulf of Alaska Groundfish June 2009 #12;Post-delivery Transfers ­ Secretarial review draft June 2009 Central Gulf of Alaska

451

Title list of documents made publicly available: April 1--30, 1996. Volume 18, Number 4  

SciTech Connect

This publication describes the information received and published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (2) non-docketed material received and published by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. As used here, docketed does not refer to Court dockets; it refers to the system by which NRC maintains its regulatory records. This series of documents is indexed by a Personal Author Index, a Corporate Source Index, and a Report Number Index.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Title list of documents made publicly available: May 1--31, 1997. Volume 19, Number 5  

SciTech Connect

The Title List of Documents Made Publicly Available is a monthly publication. It describes the information received and published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (2) non-docketed material received and published by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. As used here, docketed does not refer to Court dockets; it refers to the system by which NRC maintains its regulatory records. This series of documents is indexed by a Personal Author Index, a Corporate Source Index, and a Report Number Index.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Title list of documents made publicly available, March 1--31, 1998. Volume 20, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

The Title List of Documents Made Publicly Available is a monthly publication. It describes the information received and published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (2) nondocketed material received and published by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. As used here, docketed does not refer to Court dockets; it refers to the system by which NRC maintains its regulatory records. This series of documents is indexed by a personal author index, a corporate source index, and a report number index.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Title list of documents made publicly available, December 1--31, 1993, Volume 15, No. 12  

SciTech Connect

The Title List of Documents Made Publicly Available is a monthly publication. It contains descriptions of the information received and generated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (2) nondocketed material received and generated by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. As used here, docketed does not refer to Court dockets; it refers to the system by which NRC maintains its regulatory records. This series of documents is indexed by a Personal Author Index, a Corporate Source Index, and a Report Number Index.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Title list of documents made publicly available. Volume 17, No. 5  

SciTech Connect

The Title List of Documents Made Publicly Available is a monthly publication. It contains descriptions of the information received and generated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (3) nondocketed material received and generated by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. As used here, docketed does not refer to Court dockets; it refers to the system by which NRC maintains its regulatory records. This series of documents is indexed by a Personal Author Index, a Corporate Source Index, and a Report Number Index.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Title list of documents made publicly available. Volume 17, No. 7  

SciTech Connect

The Title List of Documents Made Publicly Available is a monthly publication. It contains descriptions of the information received and generated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (2) nondocketed material received and generated by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. As used here, docketed does not refer to Court dockets; it refers to the system by which NRC maintains its regulatory records. This series of documents is indexed by a Personal Author Index, a Corporate Source Index, and a Report Number Index.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Poster Thur Eve 02: Regulatory oversight of the robotic radiosurgery facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following a recent review of the Class II Nuclear Facilities and Prescribed Equipment Regulations and regulatory oversight of particle accelerators the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has changed its policy concerning the regulation of particle accelerators. In November 2011 the CNSC began to exercise its regulatory authority with respect to all particle accelerators operating at a beam energy of 1 (one) MeV or greater. The CNSC already licences and inspects particle accelerators capable of operating at or above 10 MeV. The decision to now include low energy particle accelerators (i.e. those operating at or above 1 MeV) ensures adequate uniform and consistent regulatory oversight for all Class II accelerators. The CNSC expects these facilities to comply with CNSC requirements by December 2013. Besides conventional linear accelerators of lower energy (6 MeV or below) typically found in cancer clinics two types of equipment now fall under the CNSC's regulatory oversight as a result of the above change: roboticradiosurgery and tomotherapy equipment and facilities. A number of clinics in Canada already operates these types of equipment and facilities. The safety aspects of radiosurgery equipment differ slightly from those for conventional linear accelerators. This poster aims to present an approach taken by the CNSC to regulate roboticradiosurgery equipment and facilities. The presentation will explain how to meet regulatory requirements of the Class II Nuclear Facilities and Prescribed Equipment Regulations by licensees operating or planning to acquire these types of equipment and facilities.

K Broda

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A description of dynamical graphs associated to elementary regulatory circuits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......regulatory networks (regulatory graphs), as...for recent reviews, De Jong (2002...notion of cross-regulatory modules and a...2003)). We plan to study the...simulation of genetic regulatory systems: a literature review. J. Comput......

E. Remy; B. Moss; C. Chaouiya; D. Thieffry

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Building Regulatory Capacity for Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Capacity for Regulatory Capacity for Change PRESENTED BY Sarah Spencer-Workman, LEED AP July 27, 2011 "How to identify and review laws relevant to buildings and find places and opportunities that can accept changes that would support building energy objectives" Presentation Highlights Rulemaking Community and Stakeholder Identification To Support Code Changes Engagement: Building Capacity for Change Pay It Forward RULEMAKING : Plan Development and Research of Laws Relevant to Buildings How is it conducted? 'Landscape' Review Key words or phrases to look for Identify "home rule" jurisdictions Update and review cycle built in 'Landscape' Review:

460

Pregnant Worker Policy It's the policy of California State University, Fullerton is to keep radiation doses to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pregnant Worker Policy It's the policy of California State University, Fullerton is to keep and Students As part of a revision of regulations in January, 1994, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC

de Lijser, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nrc nuclear regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

This week's section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...India's science minister, Jitendra Singh. http://scim.ag/Indiastipend Nye County, Nevada Yucca Mountain passes hurdle Remember Yucca Mountain? A 781-page report, published 16 October by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on the...

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

462