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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

SERC Grants Interactive Map  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

View SERC Grants in a larger map. To report corrections, please email SustainableEnergyWAP@ee.doe.gov.

2

NPCC emphasizes that the DOE 2012 congestion analysis should...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the applicable: NERC Reliability Standards (see: http:www.nerc.compage.php?cid2|20 ) NPCC Regional Standards and Criteria (see: https:www.npcc.org...

3

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - GeothermalGround-Source Heat Pumps Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - GeothermalGround-Source Heat Pumps...

4

Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies- Solar Photovoltaics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document provides a transcript of the of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics webinar, presented on 10/20/2011 by Peter McNutt.

5

Property:EIA/861/NercNpcc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed JumpMoverNercErcot Jump to: navigation,NercNpcc

6

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011-11-03 09.59 Monitoring SERC TechnologiesGround Source Heat Pumps Page 1 of 22 Am Amy y Ho Hol ll la an nd de er r, , Da Dav vi id d P Pe et te er rs so on n Amy Hollander:...

7

SAS Output  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 Transformer Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP...

8

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Vermont's innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through its Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. sercvthighlight.pdf More...

9

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Income Weatherization Efforts. sercmthighlight.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy...

10

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- Solar Photovoltaics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Solar Photovoltaics.

11

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transcript of a presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps.

12

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps.

13

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters.

14

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Case study on Vermont's innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through its Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. The DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) granted Vermont to give its weatherization clients access to solar energy systems and one-on-one assistance from energy efficiency coaches to help clients achieve meaningful and long-lasting reductions in their energy bills. Vermont-SERC is administered by the Vermont Office of Economic Opportunity and is carried out by five local weatherization agencies. The purpose of the program is to identify technologies and new approaches-in this case, solar energy and energy efficiency coaches-that can improve weatherization services to low-income clients. The program selects households that have previously received weatherization services. This has several advantages. First, the clients already understand how weatherization works and are willing to strive for additional energy savings. Second, the weatherization agencies are working with clients who have previously had weatherization and therefore have complete energy usage data from utility bills collected during the first energy upgrade installation. This allows the agencies to select the best potential candidates for solar energy. Agencies have existing knowledge of the homes and can pre-screen them for potential structural problems or lack of south-facing exposure.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Analysis of Unit-Level Changes in Operations with Increased SPP Wind from EPRI/LCG Balancing Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The Department of Energy funded the project 'Integrating Midwest Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' to be led by EPRI in coordination with the main authorities for the regions: SPP, Entergy, TVA, Southern Company and OPC. EPRI utilized several subcontractors for the project including LCG, the developers of the model UPLAN. The study aims to evaluate the operating cost benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of regional cooperation for integrating mid-western wind energy into southeast electricity markets. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. DOE funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide additional support to the project, including a review of results and any side analysis that may provide additional insight. This report is a unit-by-unit analysis of changes in operations due to the different scenarios used in the overall study. It focuses on the change in capacity factors and the number of start-ups required for each unit since those criteria summarize key aspects of plant operations, how often are they called upon and how much do they operate. The primary analysis of the overall project is based on security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) and economic dispatch (SCED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The SCUC/SCED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as best as possible in the model. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Monitoring SERC Technologies — Solar Photovoltaics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Market Transformation Center electrical engineer Peter McNutt about Solar Photovoltaics and how to properly monitor its installation.

17

SERC Projects | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the Gridwise Global Forum Round-Up fromORDER 3252Economy |TechnicalMarch 16,

18

Solar Energy Research Center (SERC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment ofat HomeAssurance:DesigningDeployment -

19

anopheles spp diptera: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Pongo spp.) on Borneo and Sumatra Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Review Distribution and conservation status of the orang-utan (Pongo spp.) on Borneo and...

20

An Examination of Temporal Trends in Electricity Reliability Based on Reports from U.S. Electric Utilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAIDI SAIFI SERC SPP TRE WECC Alaska Systems CoordinatingElectricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Midwest ReliabilityCoordinating Council (WECC). Completeness of reported

Eto, Joseph H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Monitoring SERC Technologies — Solar Hot Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory analyst Eliza Hotchkiss on Solar Hot Water systems and how to properly monitor their installation.

22

SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving Loan FundsDepartment ofNO.FEVerySEPDepartment of

23

SERC Grant Webinar | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN7 Roadmap forDKT. NO.Pennsylvaniasepa/press-releasesGrant

24

The influence of Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp. and Pediococcus spp. on production of volatile sulfhydryl compounds in Cheddar cheese slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. There was a decrease in production of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, and dimethyl sulfide in slurries prepared from Cheddar cheese manufactured from pasteurized milk when compared to slurries prepared from Cheddar cheese manufactured from raw milk.... . 3. Standard curve for carbonyl sulfide. . 4. Standard curve for methanethiol. 32 33 34 5. Standard curve for dimethyl sulfide. . 35 6. Hydrogen sulfide production in Cheddar cheese slurries. . . . . . . . . . 37 7. ~~~ill spp. growth...

Dagerath, Michael Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

SPP Frequently Asked Questions | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,#2446Smalln n u aSPP Frequently Asked

26

The glass beakers of the eleventh-century Serc?e Limani shipwreck: a preliminary study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE GLASS BEAKERS OF THE ELEVENTH-CENTURY SERGE LIMANI SHIPNRECK-- A PRELIMINAR1' STUDY A Thesis by JOY JOAN KITSON-MINMACK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF ARTS August 198B Major Subject: Anthropology THE GLASS BEAKERS OF THE ELEVENTH-CENTURY SERPE LIMANI SHIPWRECK-- A PRELIMINARY STUDY A Thesis by JOY JOAN KITSON-MIMMACK Approved as to style and content by: Geor F. Bass (Chairman...

Kitson-MimMack, Joy Joan

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Genomics and Transcriptomics of Plant Beneficial Serratia spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genomics and Transcriptomics of Plant Beneficial Serratia spp. Saraswoti Neupane Faculty of Natural. proteamaculans S4 (photo: S. Neupane) #12;Genomics and transcriptomics of plant beneficial Serratia spp. Abstract, and have potential as possible biocontrol agents in agriculture. This thesis provides the detailed genomic

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - acinetobacter spp aspectos Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the University of Hawaii's Summary: majuscula Seagrass: Halophila spp. ChlorophytaGreen Algae: Ulva fasciata Cladophora sericea Bryopsis spp... cavernosa Dictyosphaeria...

29

The relationship between iron and nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trichodesmium spp. are considered the dominant nitrogen (N) fixing cyanobacteria in tropical and subtropical oceans, regimes frequently characterized by low iron (Fe). Limited information exists about what levels of Fe ...

Chappell, Phoebe Dreux

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ecological analysis of secondary metabolite production in Aspergillus spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A complex and fascinating aspect of fungal development is the production of secondary metabolites. One of the best characterized secondary metabolite pathway is the aflatoxin (AF) and sterigmatocystin (ST) pathway, found in many Aspergillus spp...

Ramaswamy, Anitha

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Antimicrobial Interventions to Reduce Listeria spp. Contamination on Shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of selected antimicrobials, applied singularly or in combination, and frozen or refrigerated storage conditions on the survival of Listeria spp. on inoculated shrimp was evaluated in this study. A combination of 0.5% CPC (Cetylpyridinium...

Wong, Tsui-Yin

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

32

Property:EIA/861/RtoSpp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed JumpMoverNercErcot Jump to:NercSppRtoSpp Jump

33

Request for Addition or Change to SPP Submitted By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Request for Addition or Change to SPP UM AEC Submitted By: Phone: E-mail: General Product Information Manufacturer/Product Name List of Installations within 50 Miles of Ann Arbor Years Product in Use Certification Certified wood Green Seal Standard GS-11 and Green Seal Plus (iaq) Greenguard Primarily indoor air

Kamat, Vineet R.

34

ECOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF PHASEOLUS SPP. (FABACEAE) IN BOLIVIA 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF PHASEOLUS SPP. (FABACEAE) IN BOLIVIA 1 ROSANNAFREYRE PairumanL Cochabamba, Bolivia), and Daniel G. Debouck (CIAT, Apartado Adreo 6713, Cali, Colombia America. Previous to this study, only four accessions of wild P. vulgaris beans from Bolivia had been

Gepts, Paul

35

Overview of Avista GHG Modeling NPCC Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas CO2 Emissions A Bridge to a Low Carbon Future, or the Future? 815 1,190 lbs/MWh Gas CCCT has ~35% of coal emissions on a per-MWh basis Gas CT has ~50% of coal emissions on a per-MWh basis 119 119 210 CCCT CT Colstrip 3/4 #12;6/5/2013 2 Avista CO2 Emissions Forecast Rising emissions overall

36

Monitoring SERC Technologies —Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory Project Leader Dave Peterson about Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps and how to properly monitor its installation.

37

Monitoring SERC Technologies: On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A webinar by Ethan MacCormick, VP for Services to Energy Businesses at Performance Systems Development, about On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters and how to properly monitor the installation.

38

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

upgrade measures to maximize savings. sercmdhighlight.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Fact Sheet July 2011 Building America Webinar:...

39

The history of the anchorage at Serce Liman, Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the shore resumes its normal hill profile. The recess ends in a ridge, extending underwater several tens of meters toward the center of the bay; this ridge figured largely in the survey. Beyond the ridge, the shoreline curves back convexly to the dog...-leg. It was in this section that the slope floor was sur- veyed extending from the. ridge into the harbor for 56 meters. That this area was used as an anchorage in antiquity is testified by the number of anchors recovered: Figure 2. Serge Liman harbor. a stone anchor, a...

Slane, Dorothy Anne

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

SERC Community-Based Social Marketing for Weatherization Programs Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A presentation sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy about fostering sustainable behaviors in a community for saving energy.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspect and CounterfeitNateAlgae

42

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspect and CounterfeitNateAlgaeDepartment

43

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Idaho Highlight  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspect and CounterfeitNateAlgaeDepartment

44

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Maryland  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspect and CounterfeitNateAlgaeDepartment

45

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspect and

46

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Idaho Highlight |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of Energy U.S.Improve Emitter4-0140, 2014ADepartmentDepartment

47

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of Energy U.S.Improve Emitter4-0140, 2014ADepartmentDepartmentDepartmentSheet),

48

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Maryland |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof theRestoration at YoungSuspect andAcquisitionImprovements,

49

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof theRestoration at YoungSuspect andAcquisitionImprovements,Department

50

Property:EIA/861/NercSerc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug PowerAddressDataFormat JumpNercMro Jump to:

51

The glass lamps from the 11th-century shipwreck at Serc?e Liman, Turkey: a thesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- SUSPENDED LAMPS ~Pa e 10 11 12 16 18 18 20 29 Type lA- Type 18- Type 1C- Type 1D- Type 1E- Type 1F- Type 1G- Type 1H? The Standard Straight Stemmed Inverted Cup Base Double Pinched Stem Triple Pinched Stem Short Stem No Stem Solid...:1) ? Suspended Lamp without Stem (1:1) - Suspended Lamp with Solid Stem (1:1) of Type Two - Kickbase Standing Lamps (1:1) - Ringbase Standing Lamp (1:1) 37 38 39 40 41 43 44 Illustration LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (Cont. ) Pacae 23. Type 3 - Mosque Lamp...

Morden, Margaret Elizabeth

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao eucalyptus spp Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chinensis) and Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.). Bocconia was encountered across 209 ha of alien forest... , Eucalyptus plantations, farm lots, gulches and native forest including...

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeromonas spp isoladas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantification of Toxic Microcystis spp. during the 2003 and 2004 Blooms in Western Lake Erie using... In August of 2003 and August of 2004, blooms of potentially toxic...

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeromonas spp aisladas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantification of Toxic Microcystis spp. during the 2003 and 2004 Blooms in Western Lake Erie using... In August of 2003 and August of 2004, blooms of potentially toxic...

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeromonas spp como Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantification of Toxic Microcystis spp. during the 2003 and 2004 Blooms in Western Lake Erie using... In August of 2003 and August of 2004, blooms of potentially toxic...

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - arachis spp silvestres Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chickpea Cicer arietinum), peanut (Arachis hypogaea... forages in temperate (e.g. alfalfa, clover Trifolium spp.) and tropical (Stylosanthes sp., Desmo- dium... and Arachis...

57

Property:EIA/861/NercSpp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed JumpMoverNercErcot Jump to:NercSpp Jump to:

58

DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

59

Demography of auklets Aethia spp. in relation to introduced Norway rats Rattus norvegicus at Kiska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demography of auklets Aethia spp. in relation to introduced Norway rats Rattus norvegicus at Kiska................................................................................................4 Norway Rat Abundance and Distribution .........................................................5................................................................................................6 Norway Rat Abundance and Distribution.........................................................7

Jones, Ian L.

60

Three-Step Review Process. NPCC, November 2006, document 2006-21 Three-Step Review Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly the number of fish being introduced; (d) change stocks or the number of stocks, and/or (e) change to take place, so that efforts are not restrictive, and still close enough to provide choices to be made

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Managing scab diseases of potato and radish caused by Streptomyces spp. using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BAC03 and other biomaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing scab diseases of potato and radish caused by Streptomyces spp. using Bacillus Field evaluation Biomaterials a b s t r a c t Streptomyces spp. cause scab in plants like potato ) significantly reduced the severity of common scab in potato and/or radish. In two Michigan fields in 2011

Douches, David S.

62

A review of the effects of catch-and-release angling on black bass, Micropterus spp.: implications for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bass, Micropterus spp., to facilitate management and conservation of these fish. Traditionally million days fishing for black bass each year (US Fish and Wildlife Service 2002). In addition, more thanA review of the effects of catch-and-release angling on black bass, Micropterus spp.: implications

Cooke, Steven J.

63

Effect of Temperature on Photosynthesis and Growth in Marine Synechococcus spp.1[C][OPEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of temperatures by using state transitions and altering the abundance of photosynthetic proteins. These strategies in the abundance of PBS pigment proteins, as well as higher abundance of subunits of the PSII, photosystem I underlie the larger geographic range of this group relative to Prochlorococcus spp., which lack a PBS

Paytan, Adina

64

Aurapex penicillata gen. sp. nov. from native Miconia theaezans and Tibouchina spp. in Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aurapex penicillata gen. sp. nov. from native Miconia theaezans and Tibouchina spp. in Colombia in Colombia. Fruiting structures of the fungus could be distinguished from those of C. cubensis by their distinctly orange conidiomatal necks. This fungus also was found on several plant species native to Colombia

65

A study of the developmental morphology, structure and quality of prickly pear fruit, Opuntia spp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL MORPHOLOGY, ' STRUCTURE AND QUALITY OF PRICKLY PEAR FRUIT, OPUNTIA SPP ~ By MOHAMMAD ABDUL HANNAH Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A8eM University in partis1 fu1fillment of the re...

Hannan, Mohammad Abdul

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A clinical, histopathological, and immuno-fluorescent study of Babesia spp. infection in white-tailed deer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CLINICAL, HISTOPATHOLOGICAL, AND IMMUNOFLUORESCENT STUD Y OF BABESIA SPP. INFECTION IN WHITE- TAILED DEER A Thesis by HAROLD RAY EMERSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1969 Major Subject: Veterinary Pathology A CLINICAL, HISTOPATHOLOGICAL, AND IMMUNOFLUORESCENT STUDY OF BABESIA SPP. INFECTION IN WHITE- TAILED DEER A Thesis by HAROLD RAY EMERSON Approved as to style...

Emerson, Harold Ray

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Supraoptimal root-zone temperature effects on water use of three Cercis spp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Horticulture SUPRAOPTIMAL ROOT-ZONE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON WATER USE OF THREE CERCIS SPP. A Thesis BETH JEZ LAWRENCE Approved as to style and content by: yneM. Z i e (C irof Co tt ) Malcolm Drew (Member) J s L..., flowering, and fruiting. When a plant is subjected to supraoptimal root- zone temperature conditions, these responses are typically deleterious (Gur et al. , 1976b; Gur et al, 1976c; Martin et al. , 1989; Nightingale and Blake, 1935; Wong et al. , 1971...

Lawrence, Beth Jez

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

SPP Staff appreciates the opportunity to provide input regarding the Draft Conge  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartmentRestrictions onSBBiodiesel |Energy October 9, AdvancedU.S.SPP

69

SPP Membership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORTSORN Template and1 THIS PAGE2

70

U(VI) reduction to mononuclear U(VI) by desulfitobacterium spp.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) affects uranium mobility and fate in contaminated subsurface environments and is best understood in Gram-negative model organisms such as Geobacter and Shewanella spp. This study demonstrates that U(VI) reduction is a common trait of Gram-positive Desulfitobacterium spp. Five different Desulfitobacterium isolates reduced 100 {mu}M U(VI) to U(IV) in <10 days, whereas U(VI) remained soluble in abiotic and heat-killed controls. U(VI) reduction in live cultures was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis. Interestingly, although bioreduction of U(VI) is almost always reported to yield the uraninite mineral (UO{sub 2}), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in the Desulfitobacterium cultures was not UO{sub 2}. The EXAFS data indicated that the U(IV) product was a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms closely surrounded by light element shells. This atomic arrangement likely results from inner-sphere bonds between U(IV) and C/N/O- or P/S-containing ligands, such as carbonate or phosphate. The formation of a distinct U(IV) phase warrants further study because the characteristics of the reduced material affect uranium stability and fate in the contaminated subsurface.

Fletcher, K. E.; Boyanov, M. I.; Thomas, S. H.; Wu, Q.; Kemner, K. M.; Loffler, F. E. (Biosciences Division); (Georgia Inst. of Tech.)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

The gaming pieces from the glass wreck at Serce Limani, Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the surrounding hills, or trapped and sunk by a pirate craft, we may never know. We do know that within a few hundred meters of shore, not far from the harbor's entrance, and probably with very little warning, ~ she sank quickly to the seabed 35 meters below...

Cassavoy, Kenneth Albert

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The rig of the eleventh-century ship at Serce Liman, Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was designed for maximum cargo capacity. The hydrostatic properties of this hull were such that it probably would have retained sufficient righting ability and speed with a double-lateen rig. Thus, the proposed two-masted lateen rig for this ship would have... and Recording Procedures Off-Site Recording Procedures Preliminary Hull Reconstruction Hull Remains Ship's Gear: Anchors Ship's Gear: Rigging Elements Ship's Cargo: Date and Nationality of the Vessel 1 3 8 9 11 16 16 19 CHAPTER II. MEDIEVAL RIGS...

Matthews, Sheila Diane

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet), Weatherization And Intergovernmental Programs (WIP)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspect andCoaches Aim for Long-Lasting

74

Comparative Genomics of Gossypium spp. through GBS and Candidate Genes – Delving into the Controlling Factors behind Photoperiodic Flowering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARATIVE GENOMICS OF GOSSYPIUM SPP. THROUGH GBS AND CANDIDATE GENES ? DELVING INTO THE CONTROLLING FACTORS BEHIND PHOTOPERIODIC FLOWERING A Dissertation by CARLA JO LOGAN YOUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A.../Deletion Polymorphism IPGB Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology Ka Non-synonymous Nucleotide Substitution Rate kb Kilobase(s) kDa KiloDalton Ks Synonymous Nucleotide Substitution Rate LD Long Day LD Linkage Disequilibrium MAS Marker Assisted...

Young, Carla Jo Logan

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Demonstration of the economic feasibility of plant tissue culture for jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economic feasibility of plant tissue culture was demonstrated as applied to two plants: jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp. The gopher weed (Euphorbia lathyris) was selected as the species of Euphorbia to research due to the interest in this plant as a potential source of hydrocarbon-like compounds. High yield female selections of jojoba were chosen from native stands and were researched to determine the economic feasibility of mass producing these plants via a tissue culture micropropagation program. The female jojoba selection was successfully mass produced through tissue culture. Modifications in initiation techniques, as well as in multiplication media and rooting parameters, were necessary to apply the tissue culture system, which had been developed for juvenile seedling tissue, to mature jojobas. Since prior attempts at transfer of tissue cultured plantlets were unsuccessful, transfer research was a major part of the project and has resulted in a system for transfer of rooted jojoba plantlets to soil. Euphorbia lathyris was successfully cultured using shoot tip cultures. Media and procedures were established for culture initiation, multiplication of shoots, callus induction and growth, and root initiation. Well-developed root systems were not attained and root initiation percentages should be increased if the system is to become commercially feasible.

Sluis, C.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cerne, Lavras, v. 18, n. 1, p. 105-116, jan./mar. 2012 105Structural characterization of canopies ...STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CANOPIES OF Eucalyptus spp. USING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on which date data were acquired. Results indicated a significant difference between models based, reflectância de dosséis. CARACTERIZA��O ESTRUTURAL DE DOSS�IS DE Eucalyptus spp. MEDIANTE DADOS RADIOM�TRICOS estabelecimento de conexões lógicas entre variáveis radiométricas provenientes de dados remotamente coletados e

Hammerton, James

77

AUTOMATED DEAD-END ULTRAFILTRATION FOR ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE OF LEGIONELLA 2 PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA SPP. IN COOLING TOWER WATERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detection of Legionella pneumophila in cooling towers and domestic hot water systems involves concentration by centrifugation or membrane filtration prior to inoculation onto growth media or analysis using techniques such as PCR or immunoassays. The Portable Multi-use Automated Concentration System (PMACS) was designed for concentrating microorganisms from large volumes of water in the field and was assessed for enhancing surveillance of L. pneumophila at the Savannah River Site, SC. PMACS samples (100 L; n = 28) were collected from six towers between August 2010 and April 2011 with grab samples (500 ml; n = 56) being collected before and after each PMACS sample. All samples were analyzed for the presence of L. pneumophila by direct fluorescence immunoassay (DFA) using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies targeting serogroups 1, 2, 4 and 6. QPCR was utilized for detection of Legionella spp. in the same samples. Counts of L. pneumophila from DFA and of Legionella spp. from qPCR were normalized to cells/L tower water. Concentrations were similar between grab and PMACS samples collected throughout the study by DFA analysis (P = 0.4461; repeated measures ANOVA). The same trend was observed with qPCR. However, PMACS concentration proved advantageous over membrane filtration by providing larger volume, more representative samples of the cooling tower environment, which led to reduced variability among sampling events and increasing the probability of detection of low level targets. These data highlight the utility of the PMACS for enhanced surveillance of L. pneumophila by providing improved sampling of the cooling tower environment.

Brigmon, R.; Leskinen, S.; Kearns, E.; Jones, W.; Miller, R.; Betivas, C.; Kingsley, M.; Lim, D.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

A dynamic focusing x-ray monochromator for a wiggler beam line at the SRS of the SERC Daresbury Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Si(220) double-crystal monochromator for the energy range 10--30 keV is presented. It will be used for EXAFS as well as powder diffraction measurements. To determine the requirements for this monochromator we looked, apart from mean considerations, at the requirements dictated by EXAFS in transmission mode. For good data analyses the proper shape, amplitude, and location at the energy axis of each wiggle is required. Moreover it is essential to separate the wiggles from background and noise. For the latter a high flux through the sample is desirable, which can be achieved by horizontal focusing of the beam. For that we have chosen to bend the second crystal sagitally. The sagittal bending radius is adjustable between 50 and 0.8 m, because for different energies different sagittal radii are necessary to focus the beam on the sample. The mean meridional radius of the second crystal is fixed at 130 m, which is an optimization for 20 keV. The meridional radius of the first crystal can be tuned between 100 and 500 m. When this radius is set to 130 m the energy resolution is calculated to be 6, 3, and 35 eV for 10, 20, and 30 keV (for perfectly bent crystals). By changing the meridional radius of the first crystal, future users of this monochromator can make the trade off between resolution and intensity. Movement of the monochromator exit beam, during a scan, will occur due to the monochromator geometry, but is reduced as much as possible by using an asymmetrically cut second crystal, with an asymmetry angle of 2.5{degree}. The average exit beam movement of the monochromator for a 1-keV scan is 20 {mu}m. For 40% of the energy range (10--30 keV) the exit beam position remains within 10 {mu}m. For the second crystal no translation stage is used.

De Bruijn, D.; Van Zuylen, P. (TNO Institute of Applied Physics, P.O. Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands)); Kruizinga, G. (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), P.O. Box 93138, 2509 AC Den Haag (Netherlands) State University of Utrecht, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3508 TB Utrecht (Netherlands))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The effectiveness of chemical herbicides for the control of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia spp.) in the vicinity of the Sonora Ranch Experiment Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sodium tricrcloroacetate and 2, 4, 5-T esters 22 VI Percentages of kill and regrowth of prickly pear cactus obtained from applications of various oils and mixtures of oils and 2, 4, 5-T eaters VII. The number of points affected by applications...THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CHEHICAL HERMCIDES FOR THE CONTROL OF PRICKLY PEAR CACTUS (~tia spp. ) IN THE VICINITY OF THE SONORA RANCH EXPERINENT STATION A Thesis LONELL S ~ GLEASCN Approved as to style and content bF Chairaan of Cosssittee August...

Gleason, Lowell S

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

expanding_chp_in_your_state.doc | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CHP in Your State Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - GeothermalGround-Source Heat Pumps...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Questions Asked during the Financing Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar...

82

Rates of consumption of juvenile salmonids and alternative prey fish by northern squawfish, walleyes, smallmouth bass, and channel catfish in John Day Reservoir, Columbia River. [Ptychocheilus oregonensis; Stizostedion vitreum; Micropterus dolomieu; Ictalurus punctatus; Oncorhynchus spp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adult northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonesis, walleyes Stizostedion vitreum, smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus were sampled from four regions of John Day Reservoir from April to August 1983-1986 to quantify their consumption of 13 species of prey fish, particularly seaward-migrating juvenile Pacific salmon and steelhead (Oncorhynchus spp.). Consumption rates were estimated from field data on stomach contents and digestion rate relations determined in previous investigations. For each predator, consumption rates varied by reservoir area, month, time of day, and predator size or age. The greatest daily consumption of salmonids by northern squawfish and channel catfish occurred in the upper end of the reservoir below McNary Dam. Greatest daily predation by walleyes and smallmouth bass occurred in the middle and lower reservoir. Consumption rates of all predators were highest in July, concurrent with maximum temperature and abundance of juvenile salmonids. Feeding by the predators tended to peak after dawn and near midnight. Northern squawfish below McNary Dam exhibited this pattern, but fed mainly in the morning hours down-reservoir. The daily ration of total prey fish was highest for northern squawfish over 451 mm fork length, for walleyes 201-250 mm, for smallmouth bass 176-200 mm, and for channel catfish 401-450 mm. Averaged over all predator sizes and sampling months (April-August), the total daily ration (fish plus other prey) of smallmouth bass was about twice that of channel catfish, northern squawfish, and walleyes. However, northern squawfish was clearly the major predator on juvenile salmonids.

Vigg, S.; Poe, T.P.; Prendergast, L.A.; Hansel, H.C. (Fish and Wildlife Service, Cook, WA (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Introduction The quahog, Mercenaria spp., rang-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's southern State of Campeche, Quahogs in Eastern North America: Part II, History by Province and State CLYDE, Ciudad del Carmen, Campeche, Mexico C.P. 24120. Mention of trade names or commer- cial firms

84

Introduction The quahog, Mercenaria spp., rang-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's southern State of Campeche, has long provided NorthAmericans with Quahogs in Eastern North America: Part I, Campeche, Mexico C.P. 24120. Mention of trade names or commercial firms in this paper does not imply

85

Statewide Pricing Pilot (SPP) Overview and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a function of appliances, weather and notification period · Evaluate customer use and acceptance of Advanced and industrial customers understand and overwhelmingly prefer dynamic rates to existing inverted tier rates

86

Symmetric and asymmetric hybridization in citrus spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The United States is the second largest producer of oranges and grapefruit. However, the US citrus industry experiences constraints in production due to pests, diseases and environmental concerns. Furthermore, due to the low diversity in current...

Bona, Claudine M.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Springfield Processing Plant (SPP) Facility Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Springfield Processing Plant is a hypothetical facility. It has been constructed for use in training workshops. Information is provided about the facility and its surroundings, particularly security-related aspects such as target identification, threat data, entry control, and response force data.

Leach, Janice; Torres, Teresa M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849| OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office

89

Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Council, Inc. (NPCC) submits its Motion to Intervene the New England Clean Power Link Project pursuant to Rules 212 and 214 of the Rules of Practice and Procedures of the...

90

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - GeothermalGround-Source Heat Pumps Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Overview Transcript.doc Residential...

91

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photovoltaic Produced Water Renewable Fuels Association ReliabilityFirst Corporation Reverse Osmosis Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage Soybean Meal Synthetic Crude Oil SERC Reliability

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This report covers the states that largely fall into the Southeastern Reliability Corporation (SERC) region: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

93

Building America Final Expert Meeting Report: Simplified Space...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Maryland Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive Room-to-Room Air Transfer, Fresno, California...

94

The same or just much the same? Problems with coreference from the reader's perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

". The poet handed over part of the prize to the "SERCE" Foundation. the first task should identify precision cz nagrody ­ part of the prize nagrody ­ the prize poetka ­ the poet Fundacji ,,SERCE, poetk ­ Wislawa Szymborska, her, the poet Nagrod Nobla, nagrody ­ the Nobel Prize, the prize. All

95

Timeline Variability The Variability of Binding Time of Variation Points  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eelco Visser Technical Report UU-CS-2003-052 Institute of Information and Computing Sciences Utrecht-3275 Address: Eelco Dolstra Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands eelco@cs.uu.nl Gert Florijn SERC, P.O. Box 424, 3500 AK Utrecht, The Netherlands florijn@serc.nl Eelco Visser Utrecht

Utrecht, Universiteit

96

alternative neisseria spp: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in pure culture and in inoculated (more) Hu, Xiaopei 2005-01-01 53 November 2008 Alternative Energy Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: November 2008...

97

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Histoplasma capsulatum and Pneumocystis spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a probable reservoir and disperser; however, the co-infection of bats with both of these microorganisms has found in bat guano accumulated in confined spaces such as caves and abandoned mines and buildings

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

98

Comparative efficiency of four insect predators of Heliothis spp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the effects of each species in the naturally occurring predator complex on the The citations on the following pages follow the style of the J t f E ' ~EfE t JJ bollworm and tobacco budworm. This understanding would be enhanced by data from comparative... the predators and prey were f dt't t I. 1 f 2dy, dlt f G ' ~ ~t' fgy)d2d' t I f~chgphddh number of tobacco budworm eggs by 78X and 88X, respectively. Field cage and field studies have been conducted to detezmine the effect of predator releases on Heliothis...

Lopez, Juan De Dios

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

acinetobacter spp isolates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

???, ????? 1996-01-01 2 Diversity of acinetobacter baumannii isolates from Egypt Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: Acinetobacter baumannii is an...

100

Phylogenetic analyses of phytopathogenic isolates of Verticillium spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

26 to 50% vascular area discolored, 3 = 51 to 75%, 4 = 76 toto 50% vascular area discolored, 3 = 51 to 75% vascular area

Qin, Q M; Vallad, G E; Wu, B M; Subbarao, K V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

BEHAVIOR, CHEMICAL ECOLOGY Lutzomyia spp. (Diptera: Psychodidae) Response to Olfactory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- and Light Emitting Diode-Modified Mosquito Magnet X (MM-X) Traps RAJINDER S. MANN,1 PHILLIP E. KAUFMAN-green- red light-emitting diodes and olfactory attractants to determine the response of Lutzomyia shannoni

Kaufman, Phillip E.

102

Molecular characterization of Theileria spp. using ribosomal RNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Chair of Committee) (Member) ____________________________ _____________________________ Pete D. Teel Ann B. Kier (Member) (Head of Department) August 2004 Major: Veterinary Parasitology iii... of the variable (V4) region the SSU rRNA gene. The Theileria isolates came from different geographic locations including Korea, Japan and several locations in North America. Types A, B, C, D and E were found in parasites from cattle, type E in parasites from...

Bendele, Kylie Gayle

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The parabiotic relationship between Phymatotrichum omnivorum and Gossypium spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if td tto ts. I U. ~h Dogridge the only anatomical feature distinguishing it from more susceptible cultivars is the increased number of raphides. Raphides are typically formed from the calcium salt of oxalic acid. Perry (40) observed that expression... this type of pathogenic action. Oxalic acid has been suggested as the toxic substance (40). Oxalic acid has been shown to participate in the pathogenic complex of several fungi such as Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (31, 35) and Endothia 2 iti (22). As yet th...

Kruse, David Howard

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Formation, regeneration and fusion of protoplasts from Gliocladium spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of digestion (Fig. 2a, b). Protoplast Regeneration Several regeneration media (Garcia-Ache, Lopez- Bellmonte, Villanueva, 1966; Anne, Essyen, De Somer, 1974; Hashibi & Yamada, 1982; Yabuki et al. , 1984; Kiguchi & Yanagi, 1985) were tested prior to the use.... , Essyen, H. & De Somer, P. (1974). Formation and g tt f P \\ tilt ~h, p t pl t A ht f ~Mt bt I 98, 159-166. 8 11, 0. (1984). 911 t f gt I . G ti d ~gdt of Industrial Microor anisms. (ed. C. Ball), pp. 520- 327. Boca Raton, Florida, U. S. A. : CRC Press...

Seh, Monica Leigh

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Microsoft PowerPoint - spp_presentation.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping RichlandScattering PropertiesTechniqueresultsReviewProduced

106

amphibians rana spp: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

individuals in aquatic and ter- restrial environments (Werner 1986). Agricultur- al cultivation (i.e., arable 79409, USA Abstract: Agricultural land use may indirectly affect the...

107

Identification of Saprolegnia Spp. Pathogenic in Chinook Salmon : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has developed procedures to assess the role of the fungal parasite, Saprolegnia in the biology of salmon, particularly adult Chinook, in the Columbia River Basin. Both morphological and DNA ``fingerprinting`` surveys reveal that Saprolegnia parasitica (=S. diclina, Type I) is the most common pathogen of these fish. In the first phase of this study 92% of 620 isolates, from salmon lesions, conformed to this taxa of Saprolegnia. In the current phase, the authors have developed variants of DNA fingerprinting (RAPD and SWAPP analysis) that permit examination of the sub-structure of the parasite population. These results confirm the predominance of S. parasitica, and suggest that at least three different sub-groups of this fungus occur in the Pacific N.W., USA. The use of single and paired primers with PCR amplification permits identification of pathogenic types, and distinction from other species of the genus considered to be more saprophytic in character. A year`s survey of saprolegniaceous fungi from Lake Washington indicated that the fish-pathogen was not common in the water column. Where and how fish encounter this parasite can be approached with the molecular tags identified in this project.

Whisler, Howard C.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Modeling Interregional Transmission Congestion in the National Energy Modeling System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 Figure 1-4 Four-Node Example Based on the WECC6 Figure 1-5 Four-Node Example Based on the WECCPAE PBA RA RON SERC TWh WECC Annual Energy Outlook U.S.

Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Lesieutre, Bernard; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MISO MP MRO MWDRI M&V NYISO PJM PUC RAP RFC RTO RTP SERC AirRTOs such as New England or PJM. In 2005 MISO became theEdison is a member of PJM). Interruptible (Total = 3398, N =

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Modeling Interregional Transmission Congestion in the National Energy Modeling System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration. 2005a. Annual Energy Outlook 2005. EIA/DOE.RON SERC TWh WECC Annual Energy Outlook U.S. Department ofAccording to the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2004 Reference

Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Lesieutre, Bernard; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

FY 2007-09 Project Selection, Section 10 1 Project ID: 1991-019-01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FY 2007-09 Project Selection, Section 10 1 Project ID: 1991-019-01 Title: Hungry Horse Mitigation/Flathead Lake Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes A. Abstract This project was initiated in 1992 after NPCC annual funding since that time. This project specifically addresses the losses on the Flathead Indian

112

ISRP Retrospective Report:ISRP Retrospective Report: 19971997 20052005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.D., NPCC #12;ISRP RetrospectiveISRP Retrospective ·· Presents an overview of ISRP activities from 1997 toPresents an overview of ISRP activities from 1997 to 2005 and evaluates the cumulative effect of our2005 and evaluates

113

DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN APPENDIX A-1 Contract Entities and Plan Participants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Province (USP) Plan in addition to those contracted by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC of three primary elements: Part I. An Assessment of the current and potential physical and biological AND PLAN PARTICIPANTS BOI043620001.DOC/KG A1-2 IDFG organized a technical team of natural resource

114

PERFORMANCE OF A SPECTRAL ELEMENT ATMOSPHERIC MODEL SEAM ON THE HP EXEMPLAR SPP2000.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discretization strategy taken from NCAR's Community Climate Model Version 3 (CCM3) [9]. Spectral elements have avoiding clustering points at the poles. Secondly, by using a local coordinate system within each element Fournier for helpful comments. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy; Oce

Baer, Ferdinand

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - arcobacter spp isolated Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the research in marine molecular ... Source: Meyers, Steven D. - Ocean Modeling and Prediction Laboratory, University of South Florida Collection: Geosciences 9 Bacterial...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternaria spp growth Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrolases in Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici and Their Relationship to Medium Composition and Host... 95616 Received 7 December 1998Accepted 23 March 1999 The...

117

IDENTIFICATION OF DROUGHT-RELATED QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI (QTLs) IN SUGARCANE (Saccharum spp.) USING GENIC MARKERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Population based association studies in crops that were established by domestication and early breeding can be a valuable basis for the identification of QTLs. A case control design in a population is an ideal way to identify maximum candidate sites...

Sharma, Vivek

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

118

Identification and genetic diversity of Rosellinia spp. associated with root rot of coffee in Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Colombia Bertha L. Castro & Angela J. Carreño & Narmer F. Galeano & Jolanda Roux & Michael J. Wingfield rot on a wide range of herbaceous and woody hosts. In Colombia, these fungi cause serious diseases (Fernández and López 1964; Castro and Esquivel 1991). Other than in Colombia, these pathogens are known

119

Wide Hybridization, Genomic, and Overwintering Characterization of High-Biomass Sorghum Spp. Feedstocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development for lignocellulosic feedstocks incentivizes the development of versatile biomass products with greater end- use possibilities, as in either a forage or bioenergy system. High-biomass, perennial grasses offer dual-use potential in either forage... and S. bicolor ssp. drummondii have been used as a source of high biomass forage and hay in the U.S. for decades (Armah-Agyeman et al., 2002). Recently Sorghum species have been evaluated as bioenergy feedstocks with ethanol being produced from grain...

Whitmire, David Kyle

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - alexandrium spp samples Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 4 5 > >> 1 Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 25932602 Diel vertical distributions of the red tide dinoflagellate Summary: populations. Holligan et al. (1984) found that Alexandrium...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

HELMINTHS OF MURRES (ALCIDAE: URIA SPP.): MARKERS OF ECOLOGICAL CHANGE IN THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, College of Science, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17551, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates 3

Jones, Ian L.

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspergillus spp contamination Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biolgica de Doana, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Summary:...

123

A survey of Meloidogyne spp. parasitizing peaches in Texas and their effects on four peach rootstocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nit ~inc lta, although stunted, were still alive and producing new growth at the end of three years. The locations of M. T ntca samples are given ln plgure 4. 1 listing s to th *unties ln hl h N. ~avanlea was found and the number of samples found...

Johnson, Jerral D

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Market Protocols for SPP Integrated Marketplace Version 2.0 7/12/2011 584  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into or out of CBA or SA OCL Over Collected Losses Settlement surplus related to marginal loss pricing, which Response Load reduction which can be metered DRL Demand Response Load A meter location discretely representing the load behind which a demand response resource is located. A DRL is not necessarily associated

Tesfatsion, Leigh

125

The Association of Virulent Vibrio Spp. Bacteria on Gafftopsail and Hardhead Catfish in Galveston Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................... 21 II. 5. Distribution of V. parahaemolyticus tlh by A) fish length, B) sub-bay, and C) species of fish ................................................................................ 26 II. 6. Correlation of V. parahaemolyticus tlh... comparison .................................................... 19 II. 4. Kolmogorov-Smirnov results for V. vulnifiucs .......................................... 21 II. 5. ANOVA results for quantity of V. vulnifiucs versus length of fish...

Gilbert, Leslie Deanne

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

Candidate Species for Florida Aquaculture: Discus Symphysodon spp., a Profitable but Challenging Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organic matter. These acids impart the dark brown color to the water and make itacidic (pH usually below 5, their body base colors usually range from dark brownish to blue and green hues. They are spotted and striated for the aquarium trade from the wild in water tributaries belonging to the Amazon River of Brazil, Colombia

Watson, Craig A.

127

Summary Cottonwoods (Populus spp.) are dioecious phre-atophytes of hydrological and ecological importance in ripar-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlation between Amax and gs (r2 = 0.89), so that photosynthetic wa- ter-use efficiency (WUE; Amax/E depth (Zgw) declined by 1.6 m, but neither mean daily light-sat- urated net photosynthetic rate (Amax) nor stomatal conductance (gs) was correlated with this change. Both Amax and gs followed a parabolic

Letts, Matthew

128

Identification and distribution of Botryosphaeria spp. associated with grapevine cankers in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

grapevine decline in Western Australia. Aust. Plant Pathol.Australia (2,37). In Western Australia, B. australis and B.grapevine cuttings in Western Australia (37). Several

Urbez-Torres, J R; Leavitt, G M; Voegel, T M; Gubler, W D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

An antigenic and serologic study of six strains of Trichomonas SPP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERATURE CITED 99 VITA 103 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Summary of virulence studies using "non-immune" pigeons 39 Summary of virulence studies using a modified mouse assay 41 III. IV. VI . Summary of AT strain agglutination reactions Summary of SB... strain agglutination reactions Summary of ZM strain agglutination reactions Summary of CS strain agglutination reactions 69 70 71 72 VII . Summary of JB VI strain agglutination reactions . . 73 VIII. IX, XI. XII . Summary of AT strain IFA...

Speights, Stephen Ryan

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinomyces spp em Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface plasmonpolariton mediated emission of light from top-emitting organic light-emitting diode type structures Summary: ; accepted 7 July 2006 Available online 10 August 2006...

131

Bioaccumulation of Organic Contaminants by Diporeia spp.: Kinetics and Factors Affecting Bioavailability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data will help confirm the preliminary comparison. Figure 1: Biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - aflatoxin-producing aspergillus spp Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aflatoxin, produced from infection with Aspergillus flavus. In field experiments... where plants were inoculated with Aspergillus flavus, hybrids made with Tx736, Tx739, and Tx740...

133

Phytochemical analyses and inheritance of resistance to TEV (Tobacco Etch Virus) in pepper (Capsicum spp.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 9. 46f 14 26. 90cd 9 9 52. 15cdef 6 11. 19d 11 C127 Fidel 22. 33a 2 20. 14ef 12 11. 06d 12 23. 66a 1 8. 74f 15 9. 04d 13 Grande Jaloro Jupiter 8. 50b 4. 97b Golden peproncini 263 14. 23a 3 16. 89ef 13 Nde 5 25, 20def 11 Nde 10 30. 62...def 7 Nde 5. 70f 17 Nde MJ201 12. 42a 4 29. 42def 8 99. 58a 1 MJ222 Orange Habanero PI 357509 Rio Grande Gold Sweet Jalapeho 82 Tropic Bell 6. 64b Yellow Jalapeno 244 NDc 6. 08f 16 11. 91d 10 92. 21acb 3 34. 28cd 8 69. 72bcd 4 37. 17cd 6...

Lee, Jinsuk

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeromonas spp isolated Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

may represent important... microflora of five species of sharks obtained in the Indian Ocean; and Yap (1979) reported on skin isolates... sequentially with a sterile wire loop...

135

Microbial interactions associated with biofilms attached to Trichodesmium spp. and detrital particles in the ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quorum sensing (QS) via acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) was discovered in the ocean, yet little is known about its role in the ocean beyond its involvement in certain symbiotic interactions. The objectives of this ...

Hmelo, Laura Robin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - alicyclobacillus spp spores Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Marine Benthic Ecology and Evolution, Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 A polycyclic terpenoid that alleviates oxidative stress ,...

137

Species differences in courtship acoustic signals among five Lake Malawi cichlid species (Pseudotropheus spp.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ao em Eco-Etologia, ISPA, Rua Jardim do Tabaco 34, 1149-041 Lisboa, Portugal, Departamento de Biologia of the sounds produced in the early stage of court- ship by males of three closely related species from Lake

138

Investigating the role of Trichodesmium spp. in the oceanic nitrogen cycle through observations and models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work concerns the nitrogen fixation and abundance of Trichodesmium colonies in the western subtropical-tropical North Atlantic and their connections with physical processes. Data were collected in fall 2010 and spring ...

Olson, Elise Marie Black

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Effects of Cutting Time, Stump Height, and Herbicide Application on Ash (Fraxinus Spp.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or cutting heights. Keywords: Buprestidae, control, coppice, eradication, triclopyr E merald ash borer (EAB

140

IntroductionIntroduction Fragaria spp (Strawberry) contains appreciable amounts of polyphenolic phytonutrients that have high  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety & Technology, Illinois Institute of Technology, Moffet Campus, Summit-Argo, IL 60501 Investigate Phenols: 12645 ± 920 µg/g Total Anthocyanins: 8165 ± 590 µg/g Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC

Heller, Barbara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microsoft PowerPoint - MISO-SPP Market Impacts HydPwrConf 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping Richland OperationsU.S. CommercialIn this paper, weSchool

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeromonas spp strains Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Escherichia coli Strains Summary: acid by fed-batch culture of a newly isolated Aeromonas hydro- phila strain. Recombinant Escherichia... the Aeromonas orf1 gene on the copolymer...

143

The effects of management practices on thatch accumulation in a Tifgreen bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) putting green  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and (3)control-- clippings collected and no fungicide. Fertilizer treatments, randomized within each main plot, comprised the eight subplots, each 1. 8 x 2. 1 meters. Two sources of nitrogen ? ammonium sulfate and Milorganite (activated sewage sludge.../100 m every 4 weeks, showed no influence on any of the three measurements. Two sources of N ? (NHq)2SOq and Milorganite (activated sewage sludge) ? were applied at two levels ? . 25 and . 75 kg of N/100 m every 2 weeks . The higher level of N...

Meinhold, Vaun Harold

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The comparison of three methods for isolation of Arcobacter spp. in raw ground pork  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

30 minutes, then are inverted and incubated aerobically for 48 hr at 30'C. This filter step is reminiscent of the standard Steele and McDermott method for isolating Campylobacterj ejuni using cellulose triacetate membrane filters (59). Promising... or the family Spi rillaceae based on its cell shape. In this study, Ellis excluded the organism from the family Campylobacteraceae based on its rapid development on agar under aerobic conditions, optimum growth at 30'C, and failure to grow on standard...

Ohlendorf, Dawn Suzanne

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The development of an improved methodology for the detection of Arcobacter spp. in foods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

negative rods were examined for their effect on growth of these organisms. Components were evaluated for their ability to recover Arcobacter on a solid medium when incubated aerobically at 30OC for up to 7z11rs. After initial evaluations, five formulas...

Johnson, Lee Graydon

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Conventional Breeding and Molecular Techniques to Improve Phytochemical Concentrations in Pepper (Capsicum spp.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the exception being C. frutescens (Tabasco? pepper) (Huffman, 1977). Due to their environmental specifications, peppers require warm climates for effective growth and have been found to grow best in a medium-textured, well-drained sandy loam soil (Simon et...

Butcher, Justin

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

Bistability in Communication Networks R.J. Gibbens 1 , P.J. Hunt 1 , and F.P. Kelly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bistability in Communication Networks R.J. Gibbens 1 , P.J. Hunt 1 , and F.P. Kelly 1. Introduction technique, known as trunk reservation. 1 Supported by the SERC. #12; 114 Gibbens, Hunt, and Kelly Akinpelu others, Krupp (1982) and Kelly (1986), emerge naturally as fixed points of the integral equations we

Grimmett, Geoffrey

148

Cornell University, Office of Sponsored Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRAINING DARK ENERGY AND MODIFIED GRAVITY WITH EUCLID: RSA #1478527 70095 $ 5,000.00 BONNEY, RICHARD E CALS Lab of O - Programs SERC BUILDING THE FIELD OF PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 68149 $ 22 of O - Administration NSF BIO PRELIMINARY PROPOSAL: GENOME-WIDE DYNAMICS OF NEUTRAL AND FITNESS

149

Chile-Japan Joint Workshop for Non-ferrous Mining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Chile Director, Energy Center, Solar Energy Research Center (SERC-Chile), University of Chile break 16:00­18:00 Session-III Chair: Prof. Leandro A. Voisin (University of Chile) Energy Challenges materials under strict environmental regulations to preserve mineral resources. is endowed unit develops new

Tokyo, University of

150

Accumulation of Am-241 and Cm-244 from water and sediments by Hyalella sp. and Tubifex spp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the bioaccumulation of americium and curium by freshwater invertebrates in laboratory experiments. Uptake by benthic invertebrates will affect both the biogeochemical cycling of these elements and the potential exposure of man through accumulation in aquatic food chains. Am and Cm isotopes are produced by nuclear reactions in commercial reactors and are major components of high level wastes. Both elements bind strongly to sediments which may be the principal source for uptake by benthic organisms in freshwater and marine environments. The principal objectives of this research were: (1) to determine the extent of bioaccumulation of Am and Cm for freshwater species; (2) to compare bioaccumulation from water with bioaccumulation from various types of sediment particles; and (3) to evaluate the similarities and differences in the behavior of Am and Cm.

Sibley, T.H.; Stohr, J.S. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ASPERGILLUS SPP. USING A PCR BASED MELTING CURVE METHOD AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Jeff Wilkinson, Dr. Ashli Brown and Dr. Paul Williams for their continuing guidance, support) ________________________ Paul Williams Adjunct Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences (Committee Member this dissertation possible. I offer my sincerest appreciation to Dr. Williams for financial support received from

Ray, David

152

Effects of Tissue Nitrogen and Media Nitrate on Trace Metal Uptake and Trophic Transfer by Ulva spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research 47: 175-184. Bruland, K. W. , E. L. Rue and G. J.this region via upwelling (Bruland et al. 2001; Chase et al.

Sankaran, Sonya Meenakshi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Leptospirosis: time to move to molecular epidemiology Comments on "Reassessment of MLST schemes for Leptospira spp. typing worldwide" by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

animal reservoirs) both by abandoning the time- consuming and fastidious culture and strain isolation as animal reservoir studies most frequently identified the putative infecting strain using the reference molecular epidemiology data is a real need until animal reservoir studies also move to molecular approaches

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

154

Prevalence and abundance of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia spp. in wild rural rodents from the Mazury Lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species of rodents from forests and abandoned agricultural fields in N.E. Poland (Clethrionomys glareolus rodents as reservoir hosts and sources of infection for local human communities. Key words: Clethrionomys (Griffiths, 1998; de Graaf et al. 1999). A wide range of natural reservoir hosts has been reported for C

Nottingham, University of

155

Pseudacteon spp. (Diptera: Phoridae) Effect on Foraging Strategies of Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and Spatiotemporal Monitoring in Urban Habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prairie, WI) contained the bait cups containing an experimental lab made bait containing 1:1 protein to carbohydrate ratio (EB1:1) and an industry provided bait (TC-206 Advance Granular Carpenter Ant Scatter Bait, BASF, St. Louis, MO), (CABB) offered... Ant Scatter Bait, BASF, St. Louis, MO). This bait will be referred to as CABB, carpenter ant bait blank in this dissertation. This was compared to a 1:1 protein to carbohydrate experimental bait (Cook et al. 2010). This experimental bait...

Reed, Janis Johnson

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

156

A rapid, nondestructive method for screening rootstocks of stone fruits and almonds (Prunus spp.) for salt tolerance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Displacements Weekly Visual Ratings Relative Salt Tolerance Conclusions LITERATURE CITED APPENDIX A PREPARATION OF TREATMENT SOLUTIONS VITA 78 79 80 83 90 92 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Definition of weekly visual rating scores. . 2 Average soil... plum rootstocks, Myrobalan 3-J and Marianna 2624 (39). When the two plum cultivars were compared under equal osmotic stress from hydroponic solutions of either D-mannitol (which does not enter the roots) or NaC1 over 12 days, both plum cultivars...

Ottman, Yvonne

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The distribution and relative abundance of Nematopsis spp., as found in Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin) in the Galveston Bay area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISCUSSION Because of the economic importance of the American oyster, c. ~l' ', 't' yt d t d ayat 't fta' ll ja id it* t d *d. N f*tt t. ly, ta t j ty f~Nt work has centered around its possible role in loss of condition or death of the oyster. There is a...

Anderson, Roger Dean

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Evaluating the Ocurrence, Seasonal History, Species Composition and Impact of Phyllophaga and Cyclocephala Grubs Infesting Bermudagrass (Cynodon Spp.) in Oklahoma.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In many regions of the United States, the species of Phyllophaga important to turfgrass quality have not been identified. Relatively few studies have been conducted… (more)

Doskocil, Joseph Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Morphological and Genetic Comparisons between Babesia bovis and Trypanosoma spp. Found in Cattle and White-tailed Deer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of TAMU-Kingsville, Dr. S Cooper of TAMU-Uvalde, and Dr. A Peréz de León for providing blood samples and Dr. A Blue-McLendon for providing white-tailed deer serum. Finally, thanks to my mother and father for their encouragement. vi NOMENCLATURE... still able to pass the parasite to their larval offspring. The larval stage is the only stage of the tick life cycle that can infect a host with Babesia (Smeal, 1995) and the parasite does not persist beyond this stage in the tick’s life cycle...

Fisher, Amanda

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

160

Molecular detection and speciation of pathogenic Leptospira spp. in blood from patients with culture-negative leptospirosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.00 1.05 7 L. alexanderi 0.99 0.89 0.63 1.06 1.23 0.92 8 L. alstonii 0.89 0.83 1.08 0.81 1.42 1.28 1.24 9 L. kmetyi 0.95 0.89 0.99 0.80 1.35 1.21 1.27 0.53 10 L. fainei 4.93 4.81 4.86 4.86 5.09 5.22 5.24 5.11 4.62 11 L. inadai 4.84 4.71 4.79 4.90 4.86 5...

Boonsilp, Siriphan; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Amornchai, Premjit; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Day, Nicholas P; Peacock, Sharon J

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

18 2010 Proceedings Symposium on Ash in North America GTR-NRS-P-72 GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF FRAXINUS SPP. FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in cold storage. This regeneration system provided a foundation for developing a genetic modification, the nursery and forest products industries, and the U.S. foreign trade of ash lumber and logs. This research

162

Rhizoctonia spp. associated with brown patch of St. Augustinegrass: isolate characterization, host range, and screening for resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resistance CONCLUSION LITERATURE CITED 13 13 18 18 25 27 34 41 45 VITA 50 LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE 1. Dates St. Augustinegrsss displaying brown patch symptoms was collected, location of the collection sites, and type of host tissue from..., drained, and placed under a laminar- flow hood on paper towels for 10 min to remove excess water. The cut end of each tip was dipped in molten Paraplast (Lancer Co. , St. Louis, NO. , 63103) to seal the wound. One tip was placed in each of the WA...

Hurd, Bernadette Murphy

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Coexistence of congeneric native and invasive species: The case of the green algae Codium spp. in northwestern Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological invasions have increased in number in coastal eco- systems in recent decades, although until are carried with the sand and rock ballast of ships, such as seaweeds, molluscs and arthro- pods (Carlton

Provan, Jim

164

Prospects for Photovoltaics in Sunny and Arid Regions: A Solar Grand Plan for Chile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

people17 million people GDP per capita $16,000 LCOE 3-56 ¢/kWh SIC Typical Daily LoadSING Typical Daily National Laboratory, 3Fundación Chile, 4University of Antofagasta, 5Solar Energy Research Center (SERC,000-40,000 2,000-14,000 2,000-21,000 302 323 442 Installed capacity of renewable energies 1236 [MW] Potential

165

Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Cycle) IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) LHV (Low Heating Value) Local EPA (Local Environment Protection Administration in China) MLR (Ministry of Land and Resource in China) MOF (Ministry of Finance in China) 2 NPV (Net... Fired Power Plant) SEPA (State Environment Protection Administration in China) SERC (State Electricity Regulatory Commission in China) Solar PV Power (Solar Photovoltaic Power) Std Dev (Standard Deviation) USC-PC Power Plant (Ultra Supercritical...

Liang, Xi; Reiner, David; Gibbons, Jon; Li, Jia

166

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

Sampson, Melvin R. [The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

167

The role of grain sorghum in conservation of predatory arthropods of Texas cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loewii Mulsant), genus (Orius spp., Notoxus spp., Collops spp., Geocoris spp., Nabis spp.), family (Chrysopidae) and order (Araneae) level groupings were used as needed, and all predators were separated as individual samples. Predators were... Collops spp. 78 25 30 8 Geocoris spp. 36 1 24 0 Nabidae 12 3 18 2 23 Sorghum phenology Soft-dough Hard-dough Physiological maturity SE 0 20 40 60 80 Into cotton Into sorghum Fig. 3. Mean number of predators (± SE) moving into cotton...

Prasifka, Jarrad Reed

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evaluation and integration of ancillary datasets for coastal wetland landcover classification using Landsat TM Imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

romeri anus Spartina spartinae Scirpus mari timus Typha spp. Phragmi tes australis other common species Borrichia frutescens Eleochari s parvula Typha spp. Scirpus olneyi Monanthochloe li ttoralis Iva frutescens Limonium nashii Suaeda spp...

Hinson, James Mithland

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

86 S. Afr. J. Bot. 1996,62(2); 86-88 Sphaeropsis sapinea and Botryosphaeria dothidea endophytic in Pinus spp. and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

86 S. Afr. J. Bot. 1996,62(2); 86-88 Sphaeropsis sapinea and Botryosphaeria dothidea endophytic these fungi as symptomless endophytes in healthy pine and eucalypt tissue was demonstrated. $phaeropsis in stressed or damaged trees might therefore be explained by their endophytic habit. *To whom correspondence

170

The Interaction of Propanil+Thiobencarb with Imazethapyr and Imazamox for Enhanced Red Rice (Oryza spp.) Control in Imidazolinone-Tolerant Rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on imidazolinone-tolerant crops. BASF Corporation. 26 2 Newpath, Clearpath, Beyond. Imidazolinone herbicides utilized in Clearfield Production Systems. BASF Corporation. 26 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. 5 5-ethyl-3-pyridinecarboxylic... part of BASF’s Clearfield production system. The imidazolinone family’s mode of action is acetolactate synthase inhibition (ALS) (Senseman, 2007). Newpath provides excellent control of many grasses and is therefore an effective tool in the control...

Jones, Trevor Nelson

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

171

Biological and Ecological Aspects of Field Released Fire Ant Decapitating Flies Pseudacteon spp. (Diptera: Phoridae), Parasitoids of Red Imported Fire Ants Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

patterns and caste ratios. PTS Traps (developed for this research) are significantly more effective than previous sampling methods in terms of mean number of flies collected, efficiency of use and % trap success. Data collected with these traps allowed...

Puckett, Robert T.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

A study of physical and chemical fruit qualities of O?p?u?n?t?i?a? s?p?p?.?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 . . 36 CS ' 1 Att 'O t of ~dt Fruits 39 Correlations of Attributes of Native F O~t. F t Correlations of Attributes of Commercial ~dt' . F 't . (G, 0 g d Red fleshed types) O~t' . F 't C ot 'd d Ascorbic Acid Values 41 42 50 Vitamin...-indica. Rojas also stated that the tunas are generally higher in Ca, P and ascorbic acid than other fruits. Nagy and Shaw (1980) reported the vitamin C content of 0. ficus-indica is 31. 7 mg/100 gm and ~D. 1 ' 22 9 g/lgg g . USDA. H dh k N . 9 9 12 (1982...

Stalling, Max Brown

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

173

Auklet (Charadriiformes: Alcidae, Aethia spp.) chick meals from the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, have a very low incidence of plastic marine debris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, have a very low incidence of plastic marine debris Alexander L. Bond a,*, Ian L. Jones a , Jeffrey C t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Plastic Marine debris North Pacific Ocean Auklet Aethia Aleutian Islands a b s t r a c t The ingestion of plastic marine debris is a chronic problem for some of the world

Jones, Ian L.

174

Factors influencing the suppression of Heliothis spp. and Anthonomous grandis Boheman by the predator, Solenopsis invicta Buren, in a cotton agroecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e h a by the p edato, ~S1 o sis invicta Buren, in a Cotton Agroecosystem. (Nay 1981) Charles William Agnew, B. S. , Purdue University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Winfield Sterling Th1s study is concerned with evaluating the role... to my major advisor, Dr. W. L. Sterling for hi s time, advice, patience and cr1ticism during the course of this study and to the members of my consnittee for their service. Special thanks to Mr. Al len Dean for all types of assistance including...

Agnew, C. W

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Phase-Trafficking Methods in Natural Products, Modulators of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides from Rollinia emarginata, and Pregnane and Cardiac Glycosides from Asclepias spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-aldosterone, the cardiac glycoside core was built up using a microwave-promoted allylic oxidation using SeO2 (Riley oxidation). In addition, a microwave-promoted Miyaura-Suzuki cross-coupling was utilized to obtain the desired 17?-aryl analogs....

Araya Barrantes, Juan Jose

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

A comparison of diagnostic techniques for detecting salmonella spp in equine fecal samples using culture methods, gel-based pcr, and real-time pcr assays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for improved diagnostic methods for detecting Salmonella in equine fecal samples. 120 fecal samples submitted to the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at Texas A&M University (CML, VMTH, TAMU) were tested...

Smith, Shelle Ann

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

Science and Public Policy, 34(2), March 2007, pages 109116 DOI: 10.3152/030234207X190964; http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/beech/spp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science and Public Policy, 34(2), March 2007, pages 109­116 DOI: 10.3152/030234207X190964; http and policy circles. This paper reviews the literature on climate forecasting information and explores three, flooding in Peru and Ecuador and drought- related famine in southern Africa and India, revealed

Neff, Jason

178

Utilization of DNA as a Sole Source of Phosphorus, Carbon, and Energy by Shewanella spp.: Ecological and Physiological Implications for Dissimilatory Metal Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a constituent of dissolved organic matter, DNA may be consumed by microorganisms inhabiting various freshwater and marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that dissolved extracellular DNA can serve as a sole source of carbon, energy, nitrogen, and phosphorus for microorganisms residing in the upper layer of Columbia River (WA, USA) water column as well as a sole source of phosphorus for the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens and for Bacillus subtilis ATCC 49760. Our results suggest that DNA assimilation by S. oneidensis is linked to the activity of Ca2+-dependent nuclease(s) and extracellular phosphatase(s). The ability to use DNA as the sole source of phosphorus may be of particular ecological advantage for microorganisms living under Fe(III)-reducing conditions where bioavailability of inorganic phosphate may be limited by the formation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8H20].

Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Ammons, Christine G.; Culley, David E.; Li, Shu-Mei; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Some Fungi and Water Molds in Waters of Lake Michigan with Emphasis on Those Associated with the Benthic Amphipod Diporeia spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from Lake Michigan water. When dead Diporeia and other organic sub- strates (snake skin and hemp seeds

180

The effect of resource provisioning and sugar composition of foods on longevity of three Gonatocerus spp., egg parasitoids of Homalodisca vitripennis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hymenoptera Conference, Canberra, Australia, January 1999.CSIRO, Canberra, Australia, pp. 396–403. Irvin, N.A. ,

Irvin, Nicola A; Hoddle, M S; Castle, S J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Packs (FC-SPP) Frank Elefsen, Centre Manager, Ph.D., and Sten Frandsen, Head of Section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology is receiving a great deal of attention. Hydrogen and fuel cells have the potential to replace and the transportation sector. To promote this synergy, there is a strong need to illustrate hydrogen and fuel cell, a fuel cell, and an electrical mo- tor (Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Pack). The hydrogen will mostly come from

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - algas verdes chlorophyta Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the University of Hawaii's Summary: majuscula Seagrass: Halophila spp. ChlorophytaGreen Algae: Ulva fasciata Cladophora sericea Bryopsis spp... Quantitative Underwater...

183

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Midwest, Mountain, Texas, PJM, SPP, and Northwest regions.the The queues surveyed include PJM Interconnection, MidwestMidwest, Mountain, Texas, PJM, SPP, and Northwest regions:

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - alga ascophyllum nodosum Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ruscifolium; Asco nod - Ascophyllum nodosum; Aspe bul - Asperococcus bullosus; Aspe fis... spp., Laminaria spp., Halidrys siliquosa and Ascophyllum nodosum (Figure 9h) showed...

185

Distribution, abundance and persistence of species of Orasema (Hym: Eucharitidae) parasitic on fire ants in South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sites with Orasema spp. in Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay.Country Locality Bolivia Trinidad Paraguay Asuncion UruguaySolenopsis spp. in Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay.

Varone, L.; Heraty, J.M.; Calcaterra, L.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

skipjack tuna, Katsuwonnus pelamis, in an offshore area oflittle tuna), Katsuwonus pelamis (skipj ack), spp. ,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The Prairie Naturalist 29(1): March 1997 53 FIRST RECORD OF COMMON MOORHEN NESTING IN SOUTH DAKOTA-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was constructed of common reed (Phragmites australis) and cattail (Typha spp.) stems. Several attempts were made

189

The effects of washing upon the bacterial flora of the stallion prepuce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~soasarg s ( pfg t*d) ~v ~~t Pseudomonas spp. ~tpy pp. ( g 1 s p ltl ) ~tpy ?pp. ( gl s gtl ) Streptococcus e uisimilis ~tr*pt* oc s spp. non ta h olytlc) ~St p ?pp. (gt h lytl) ( tld ttflhl) St pt ? ~ale 5 ~py * *pg. * API identification system... pp. tttaspp. Klebsiella pneumoniae g ? ?s spp. Proteus snconstans Proteus mi rabi li s l)roteus spp. Proteus vulgaris p d ~* ~ooas * g a( aplgm td) ~p* as ~top Pseudomonas spp. ~p y ? spp, ( q l s* p*sltlv*) ~st py o*?spp. ( aq las gtl...

Tobin, Nancy Batterton

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Data Management System  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The DOE Biological and Environmental Research Program (BER) is responsible for four "core" FACE sites and projects. These are known as Aspen FACE, Duke FACE, ORNL FACE, and Nevada Deseret FACE. Brookhaven provides operational support to some of these sites, while The FACE Data Management System at ORNL and CDIAC serves as a data repository. In addition, DOE supports OTC experiments in conjunction with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in Maryland and Florida. There are also FACE experiments ongoing in other countries. [Quoted from the home page of the FACE Data Management System and other pages within the web site.] The FACE Data Management System at ORNL provides links to all the FACE and SERC sites and to the data (both the data archived at CDIAC and data still residing on site-specific pages). Users are also given in-depth information on the concept, provided with a full, linked list of international projects, and guided to related research. The FACE projects were part of the CO2 research network fostered by the Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. Results from the experiment contribute to the Terrestrial Ecosystem Response to Atmospheric and Climatic Change (TERACC) project, a 5-year initiative integrating experimental data and global change modeling.

191

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water SamplesNo. 12 Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Effectiveness of Ultrasound in Desoiling Bacillus spp spores Embedded in Complex Food Matrices Attached to Various Contact Surfaces Pamarthi, S. R., Cooper, K.C., Wang, L., Fleischman, G.J., Rodriguez, C. P., Lee, A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, C. P., Lee, A. National Center for Food Safety and Technology / Illinois Institute of Technology into food. Previous studies that optimized clean-in-place (CIP) and clean-out of-place (COP) sanitizing total CFUs. Overall, the Bacillus anthracis sterne strain was more resistant to cleaning when compared

Heller, Barbara

197

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

198

Bacterial and fungal organisms in the vagina of normal cows and cows with vaginitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequent aerobic isolates included Acinetobacter lwoffii, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium spp., and Streptococcus spp. These organisms were isolated from both groups of cows, but more frequently from the vaginitis group...

Husted, James Ross

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

Cavity availability and use in hardwood forests with emphasis on wood ducks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-oak (Pinus spp.-Quercus spp.) forest stands, respectively. Cavities with entrance dimensions suitable for entry by wood ducks (Aix sponsa) were inspected for suitability as wood duck nesting sites. Total cavity densities were similar between forest stands...

Wolter, Derrick Wayne

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Summary Xylem vulnerability to cavitation is a promising criterion for identifying trees with high drought tolerance, but  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary Xylem vulnerability to cavitation is a promising criterion for identifying trees with high drought tolerance, but traditional techniques for measuring cavitation resistance are unsuitablefor throughput screening of cavitation resistance in five poplar (Populus spp.) andfour willow (Salix spp

Mencuccini, Maurizio

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Historical Logbook Databases from California's Commercial Passenger Fishing Vessel (Partyboat) Fishery, 1936-1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tuna, longtail Katsuwonus pelamis Tuna, skipjack Euthynnusthresher Katsuwonus pelamis Tuna, skipjack Leptocottusmarmoratus Katsuwonus pelamis Citharichthys spp. Sebastes

Hill, Kevin T.; Schneider, Niklas

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Wetland Plant Influence on Sediment Ecosystem Structure and Trophic Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy and structure Spartina foJiosa, Sarcocornia pacifica (aka Saäcorma wgmręa) Tamarix spp 7 / » X microalgae

Whitcraft, Christine R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Published by ORNL's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program (www.ornl.gov/Energy_Eff) November 1998 ORNL Reaches Out to State Energy AgenciesORNL Reaches Out to State Energy AgenciesORNL Reaches Out to State Energy AgenciesORNL Reaches Out to State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published by ORNL's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program (www.ornl.gov/Energy. By Kathi Vaughan, 423-241-4292, vhk@ornl.gov SPP Projects Cross All Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy SectorsSPP Projects Cross All Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy SectorsSPP Projects Cross All Energy

Pennycook, Steve

204

Human Capacity Building in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Maintenance for the Yurok Tribe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From July 2005 to July 2007, the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in the implementation of a program designed to build the Tribe’s own capacity to improve energy efficiency and maintain and repair renewable energy systems in Tribal homes on the Yurok Reservation. Funding for this effort was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Program under First Steps grant award #DE-FG36-05GO15166. The program’s centerpiece was a house-by-house needs assessment, in which Tribal staff visited and conducted energy audits at over fifty homes. The visits included assessment of household energy efficiency and condition of existing renewable energy systems. Staff also provided energy education to residents, evaluated potential sites for new household renewable energy systems, and performed minor repairs as needed on renewable energy systems.

Engel, R. A.' Zoellick, J J.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Current status of the development of high density LEU fuel for Russian research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main directions of the Russian RERTR program is to develop U-Mo fuel and fuel elements/FA with this fuel. The development is carried out both for existing reactors, and for new advanced designs of reactors. Many organizations in Russia, i.e. 'TVEL', RDIPE, RIAR, IRM, NPCC participate in the work. Two fuels are under development: dispersion and monolithic U-Mo fuel, as well two types of FA to use the dispersion U-Mo fuel: with tubular type fuel elements and with pin type fuel elements. The first stage of works was successfully completed. This stage included out-pile, in-pile and post irradiation examinations of U-Mo dispersion fuel in experimental tubular and pin fuel elements under parameters similar to operation conditions of Russian design pool-type research reactors. The results received both in Russia and abroad enabled to go on to the next stage of development which includes irradiation tests both of full-scale IRT pin-type and tube-type fuel assemblies with U-Mo dispersion fuel and of mini-fuel elements with modified U-Mo dispersion fuel and monolithic fuel. The paper gives a generalized review of the results of U-Mo fuel development accomplished by now. (author)

Vatulin, A.; Dobrikova, I.; Suprun, V.; Trifonov, Y. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise, A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), 123060 Rogov 5a, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kartashev, E.; Lukichev, V. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise RDIPE, 101000 P.O. Box 788, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - americana linnaeus rheiformes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Tilia americana Linnaeus) et Tilia spp., les tilleuls (anglais: American Linden) Infusion des... 'Amrique (Sorbus americana Marshall et S. aucuparia Linnaeus) (anglais:...

208

Systematics and Ethnobotany of Salvia Subgenus Calosphace and Origins of the Hallucinogenic Sage, Salvia divinorum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

endemic to the island of Hispaniola (10 spp), for which weupon the islands of Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominicanendemic to the island of Hispaniola. Staminal Evolution in

Jenks, Aaron Allon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

CONTACT: Randy Wilkerson, 720-962-7050, PublicAffairs@wapa.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

approval is contingent upon Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approval of the SPP tariff changes without significant modification to the negotiated provisions that allow...

210

Distribution, abundance and persistence of species of Orasema (Hym: Eucharitidae) parasitic on fire ants in South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sp. Cnia. Hughes C. del Uruguay S. quinquecuspis Buenossites with Orasema spp. in Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay.Trinidad Paraguay Asuncion Uruguay Atlantida Paysandu

Varone, L.; Heraty, J.M.; Calcaterra, L.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosolized salmonella campylobacter Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the probability... resistance of Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella ... Source: Singer, Randall - College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota Collection: Biology and...

212

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - arthrobacter sp bp Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beutenbergia spp. were initially discovered as anaerobes isolated from... , and media Bioenerg. Res. (2010) 3:146-158 149Author's personal copy 12;reverse primer included a...

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe barbadensis miller Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - alo tnavots aarne Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

217

Texas Plants Poisonous to Livestock.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, jimmyweed 52 Photosensitization Jatroplla cathartics, Berlandier nettlespurge Jatropha dioica, Lea therstem Kallstroemia spp., Caltrops Karwinskia hum boldtiana, Coyotillo k'ochia scoparia, Summercypress Lantana camara, Largeleaf lantana Lobelia...

Sperry, Omer Edison

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - alo vanatoa peeter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - alo tnavots elmo Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe barbadensis contra Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe barbadensis inyectable Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - alo peets maarja Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe andongensis leaf Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - alo tnavots olev Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe arborescens miller Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe vera aloe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe vera calendula Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe arborescens mill Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu Summary: calipensis cold chamber 1005 Arid House Jatropha podagrica tartogo warm chamber 1005 Arid House Aloe... South Africa Aloe spp. aloe...

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - apple cultivars malus Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, o Summary: of cultivars in the trade. A crabapple (Malus spp.) has fruits that are 2 inches in diameter; plants... State,...

230

arctic national wildlife: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Refuge flora. Aggressive species such as narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia), common reed (Phragmites australis), and willow (Salix spp.), all prevalent on the Refuge,...

231

auklet ptychoramphus aleuticus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to nestlings in order 9 Demography of auklets Aethia spp. in relation to introduced Norway rats Rattus norvegicus at Kiska Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

232

Southwestern Power Administration Update, October- December 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On October 29, 2004, Southwestern and Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP) reached agreement on interim arrangements to be implemented after the October 31, 2004, expiration of the membership agreement between the two parties. According to Jim McDonald, Director of Southwestern’s Division of Customer Service, the interim agreement forged between Southwestern and SPP seeks to minimize impacts to SPP as well as to Southwestern and its customers while Southwestern and SPP work on a seams/coordination agreement to succeed the expired membership agreement.

none,

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little Rock,GE Energy. 2011a. Oahu Wind Integration Study Final Report.PacifiCorp. 2010. 2010 Wind Integration Study. Portland,

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little Rock,an Order Revising the Wind Integration Rate for Wind PoweredPacifiCorp. 2010. 2010 Wind Integration Study. Portland,

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CRA (2010) SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Charles Riverresponse and wind integration in Germany's electricity2010) Western Wind and Solar Integration Study. National

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

North American Energy Work Group Releases Updated Trilateral...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

efficiency, regulatory cooperation, and hydrocarbons. The SPP strengthens North America's energy markets by working together, according to our respective legal frameworks, to...

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash fraxinus excelsior Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

we planted green ash trees... Identification of a Biomarker Gene for Fraxinus spp. Darla French and ... Source: Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources,...

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - amoreira morus alba Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnoliaceae Morus spp... Rosaceae Prunus virginiana chokecherry Rosaceae Quercus alba white oak Fagaceae Quercus rubra northern red Source: Kalisz, Susan - Department of...

239

adapted swimming pool reactor austria: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: participation in wholesale energy markets; and sponsored abe indexed to wholesale energy market prices (i.e. eitherWholesale Markets in the Southwest Power Pool SPP...

240

area southwest wyoming: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to wholesale energy market prices (i.e. eitherWholesale Markets in the Southwest Power Pool SPP administers an Energy Imbalance Service (EIS) market; Bharvirkar, Ranjit...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - artocarpus altilis starch Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ufi yam Dioscorea spp. ulu breadfruit Artocarpus... altilis Parkinson umala sweet potato Ipomoea batatas L. vi Polynesian plum Spondias dulcis Forst Source: Duffy, David...

242

Evolution of shell loss in Opisthobranch gastropods: sea hares (Opisthobranchia, Anaspidea) as a model system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Seventeenth Slovenian-Croatian Crystallographic Meeting.spp. in Sixteenth Croatian-Slovenian CrystallographicMeeting. . 2007. Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts,

Vue, Zer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - aurutab haiged mandlid Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , Cayford and Haig 1961, Jokela and Lorenz 1959, Heidmann 1972, and Williston 1974). Although most field... - ferred to feed on pine (Pinus spp.) and fir (Abies...

244

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Informationen fr die Wissenschaft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Informationen fĂĽr die Wissenschaft Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft "Homotopy Theory and Algebraic Geometry" (SPP 1786) In March 2014 the Senate of Deutsche

Richter, Birgit

245

Beneficial Bees and Pesky Pests: Three Essays on Ecosystem Services to Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and genetically modi?ed canola. Ecological Applications,useful insecticides for canola agroecosystems on bombusand Kremen, 2006b) and canola Brassica spp. (Morandin and

Gross, Brian James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Distribution and Invasion Potential of Limonium ramosissimum subsp. provinciale in San Francisco Estuary Salt Marshes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on identification of Limonium spp. in the Carpinteria SaltMarsh Reserve (Carpinteria, CA). Traut BH. 2005. The role ofclimate estuarine wetland at Carpinteria, California: plant

Archbald, Gavin; Boyer, Katharyn E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER INSTRUMENTATION FACILITY The mission of the Solar Energy Research Center (UNC SERC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is to establish a world leading effort in solar fuels research and to develop the materials and methods needed to fabricate the next generation of solar energy devices. We are addressing the fundamental issues that will drive new strategies for solar energy conversion and the engineering challenges that must be met in order to convert discoveries made in the laboratory into commercially available devices. The development of a photoelectrosynthesis cell (PEC) for solar fuels production faces daunting requirements: (1) Absorb a large fraction of sunlight; (2) Carry out artificial photosynthesis which involves multiple complex reaction steps; (3) Avoid competitive and deleterious side and reverse reactions; (4) Perform 13 million catalytic cycles per year with minimal degradation; (5) Use non-toxic materials; (6) Cost-effectiveness. PEC efficiency is directly determined by the kinetics of each reaction step. The UNC SERC is addressing this challenge by taking a broad interdisciplinary approach in a highly collaborative setting, drawing on expertise across a broad range of disciplines in chemistry, physics and materials science. By taking a systematic approach toward a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of each step, we will be able to gain unique insight and optimize PEC design. Access to cutting-edge spectroscopic tools is critical to this research effort. We have built professionally-staffed facilities equipped with the state-of the-art instrumentation funded by this award. The combination of staff, facilities, and instrumentation specifically tailored for solar fuels research establishes the UNC Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility as a unique, world-class capability. This congressionally directed project funded the development of two user facilities: TASK 1: SOLAR DEVICE FABRICATION LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT The space allocated for this laboratory was �¢����shell space�¢��� that required an upfit in order to accommodate nano-fabrication equipment in a quasi-clean room environment. This construction project (cost $279,736) met the non-federal cost share requirement of $250,000 for this award. The central element of the fabrication laboratory is a new $400,000+ stand-alone system, funded by other sources, for fabricating and characterizing photovoltaic devices, in a state-of-the-art nanofabrication environment. This congressionally directed project also included the purchase of an energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) detector for a pre-existing transmission electron microscope (TEM). This detector allows elemental analysis and elemental mapping of materials used to fabricate solar energy devices which is a key priority for our research center. TASK 2: SOLAR ENERGY SPECTROSCOPY LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT (INSTRUMENTATION) This laboratory provides access to modern spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation for characterizing devices, materials and components on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and for elucidating mechanisms. The goals of this congressionally directed project included the purchase and installation of spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation that would substantially and meaningfully enhance the capabilities of this laboratory. Some changes were made to the list of equipment proposed in the original budget. These changes did not represent a change in scope, approach or aims of this project. All of the capabilities and experiments represented in the original budget were maintained. The outcome of this Congressionally Directed Project has been the development of world-class fabrication and spectroscopy user facilities for solar fuels research at UNC-CH. This award has provided a significant augmentation of our pre-existing instrumentation capabilities which were funded by earlier UNC SERC projects, including the Energy Frontier

Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

248

A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

Costello, Ronald J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. • Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

LJournal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 240 (1999) 161178  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21 ration of kelp (Laminaria spp., 6 days week ) supplemented with mussel flesh (Mytilus spp., 1 21 21 day week ) (KM), or a low ration of kelp (1 day week ) (KL). Larvae were fed either a high 21 21 (such as kelp beds) may metamorph- ose sooner than those of adults from nutritionally poor habitats

Scheibling, Robert Eric

251

2013 Annual Report for the Clemson University Commercial Turfgrass Clinic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 0 2 0 0 Cereal/ Grass Disease (Bipolaris sp./spp.) 3 0 0 0 Chemical; Environmental Injury (Abiotic golf has such a big presence in South Carolina, it follows that plant diseases and other problems Environmental Stress; Problem (Abiotic disorder) 0 0 1 0 Bermudagrass (Cynodon sp./spp.) 110 Algae (General) 4 0

Duchowski, Andrew T.

252

Establishment phase greenhouse gas emissions in short rotation woody biomass plantations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to short-rotation woody biomass crops (SRWC) for bioenergy in the Northern U.S. Lake States. GHG debts-rotation woody bio- energy crops (SRWC), specifically hybrid-poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.), being in the Northern Lake States, USA Marin M. Palmer a, *, Jodi A. Forrester a , David E. Rothstein b , David J

Turner, Monica G.

253

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy in the United States: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kV JCSP 765 kV and 800 kV HVDC Southern California Edison (2 345 kV ERCOT - TOS - 3 345 kV and HVDC ERCOT - TOS - 4345 kV and HVDC Southwest Power Pool (SPP) SPP - 2 345 kV

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which are similar in description and life cycle. While small numbers of these organisms on a fish gen and ultimately, death of fish. Small fish and fry are espe- cially susceptible, and mortality can occur quickly if undiagnosed. How does Trichodina spp. affect the fish? Trichodina spp. cause irritation by feeding on the epi

Liskiewicz, Maciej

255

ASPRS 2006 Annual Conference Reno, Nevada May 1-5, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of primary interest include Phragmites australis, Typha spp. and Spartina patens. These three plant species to mid twentieth century, Phragmites australis, or common reed, rapidly began to expand its range within. australis = 3.01m; Typha spp. = 1.37m; S. patens = 0.64m. The data also are being examined to learn how

Royer, Dana

256

Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hydrogen Technology and Energy Curriculum (HyTEC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Hall of Science of the University of California, Berkeley has collaborated with scientists and engineers, a local transit agency, school districts, and a commercial curriculum publisher to develop, field-test nationally, and publish a two-week curriculum module on hydrogen and fuel cells for high school science. Key partners in this project are the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) of Humboldt State University, the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), FilmSight Productions, Lab-Aids, Inc., and 32 teachers and 2,370 students in field-test classrooms in California, Connecticut, Ohio, New York, South Carolina, and Washington. Field-test teachers received two to three days of professional development before teaching the curriculum and providing feedback used for revision of the curriculum. The curriculum, titled Investigating Alternative Energy: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells and published by Lab-Aids, Inc., includes a teachers guide (with lesson plans, resources, and student handout pages), two interactive computer animations, a video, a website, and a laboratory materials kit. The project has been disseminated to over 950 teachers through awareness workshops at state, regional, and national science teacher conferences.

Nagle, Barbara

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicago. The strategy was implemented at a free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area. High heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability. Uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies also have a strongly detrimental impact on comfort. Significant changes to the performance of masonry wall assemblies is generally beyond the reach of typical weatherization (Wx) program resources. The Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This grant provides CEDA the opportunity to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The exterior insulation and over-clad strategy implemented through this project was designed to allow implementation by contractors active in CEDA weatherization programs and using materials and methods familiar to these contractors. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

Neuhauser, K.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Methods of propagation for selected native Texas woody plant species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. vation. Native plants placed in a common, static contrived design which does not relate to the region or site amounts to mere substitution oi' plant material. With this idea in mind, the design of' a nedge or windbreak can not only respond to the site.... quadrifidur. Lyon'a. spp. Magnolia spp. Mimosa spp. Morus sop. 112 -"1 s 118 12j 122 j24 125 133 136 144 14~ 147 152 1"4 1"5 lwP, 160 162 158 171 j7@ 'l 7 180 184 1. 88 193 199 200 202 205 213 n14 217 219 222 223 22"- 228 P...

Senior, Jill Ellen

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Experimental demonstration of tunable directional excitation of surface plasmon polaritons with a subwavelength metallic double slit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate experimentally the directional excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on a metal film by a subwavelength double slit under backside illumination, based on the interference of SPPs generated by the two slits. By varying the incident angle, the SPPs can be tunably directed into two opposite propagating directions with a predetermined splitting ratio. Under certain incident angle, unidirectional SPP excitation can be achieved. This compact directional SPP coupler is potentially useful for many on-chip applications. As an example, we show the integration of the double-slit couplers with SPP Bragg mirrors, which can effectively realize selective coupling of SPPs into different ports in an integrated plasmonic chip.

Li Xiaowei [Department of Precision Instruments, State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tan Qiaofeng; Jin Guofan [Department of Precision Instruments, State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Bai Benfeng [Department of Precision Instruments, State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Information Network, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

StreamNet is a cooperative data compilation, development, and distribution project involving the state, tribal and federal fish and wildlife agencies in the Columbia River basin. It is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), and is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). The project is organized to perform three broad functions: Agency support: The project supports staff in the Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington state fish and wildlife agencies; the Columbia River Inter Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC); and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) who locate, obtain, quality check and format specific types of fish related data. They convert these data into a standard data exchange format (DEF) and submit them, with references, to the regional StreamNet office. Regional Support: The regional component of StreamNet at PSMFC administers the project, coordinates with the FWP and other regional entities, and disseminates data regionally. As data are received from cooperators they are again quality checked then imported into the StreamNet database. Access to the data is provided on-line via a tabular data query system and interactive map applications at www.streamnet.org. The web site also provides access to independent data sets from other projects, pre-sorted data sets useful for specific purposes (such as for a recent pesticide spraying ruling or subbasin assessments), and general fish information for education purposes. Reference Support: The StreamNet Library, located at CRITFC, maintains access to all reference documents supporting the data in the StreamNet database, and provides full library services for patrons interested in fish and wildlife in the Pacific Northwest. The StreamNet Library also maintains probably the largest collection of agency gray literature related to fish and wildlife resources in the basin. The library participates in the Inter Library Loan program, and can exchange literature worldwide. This report summarizes StreamNet Project activities during fiscal year 2004 (FY-04). Detailed descriptions of accomplishments by individual objective and task are provided in the Project's quarterly progress reports, available on the reports and publications page of the StreamNet web site.

Schmidt, Bruce (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland, OR); Roger, Phil (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Butterfield, Bart (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult bernese mountain Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EAB entered the U.S. in infested Summary: to occur. EAB attacks black, green and white ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Mountain ash, not a true ash... "suckering" at base "D" shaped...

263

ORIGINAL PAPER Molecular identification of two species of the carnivorous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

along the open coast. Voracious predators that secrete acid, Philine spp. have few natural enemies % of the invasive marine invertebrate and algal species known from western North America (Cohen and Carlton 1995

Krug, Patrick J.

264

Resonant scattering of surface plasmon polaritons by dressed quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The resonant scattering of surface plasmon-polariton waves (SPP) by embedded semiconductor quantum dots above the dielectric/metal interface is explored in the strong-coupling regime. In contrast to non-resonant scattering by a localized dielectric surface defect, a strong resonant peak in the spectrum of the scattered field is predicted that is accompanied by two side valleys. The peak height depends nonlinearly on the amplitude of SPP waves, reflecting the feedback dynamics from a photon-dressed electron-hole plasma inside the quantum dots. This unique behavior in the scattered field peak strength is correlated with the occurrence of a resonant dip in the absorption spectrum of SPP waves due to the interband photon-dressing effect. Our result on the scattering of SPP waves may be experimentally observable and applied to spatially selective illumination and imaging of individual molecules.

Huang, Danhong; Cardimona, Dave [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Easter, Michelle [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, 1 Castle Point Terrace, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States); Gumbs, Godfrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Maradudin, A. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Lin, Shawn-Yu [Department of Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Zhang, Xiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, 3112 Etcheverry Hall, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

265

Fishery Bulletin Index Volume 100(14), 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. James Blick and Peter T. Hagen. 11 Local distribution and abundance of swimming crabs (Callinectes spp nell, Michael Arendt, Jon Lucy, Cheryl Watson, and David Foley 168 Differences in diet of Atlantic

266

V.1 AN ANALYSIS OF SIX GROUPS OF ZOOPLANKTON IN SAMPLES TAKEN IN 1978/79 AT THE PROPOSED OTEC SITE IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO OFF TAMPA BAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions at a potential OTEC site in the Gulf of Mexico;in the upper 1000 m at the OTEC station off Tampa Bay. + = OTEC site. Taxon Ahyla spp.

Flock, Mark E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Emerging Pests and Diseases A Global Crisis ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Fusarium circinatum) in Spain since late 2000's Origin probably Central America Impact on Pinus radiata in N. Spain but European pine spp. at risk Spread internationally via transport of contaminated seed

268

Evidence for a Structural Role for Acid-Fast Lipids in Oocyst Walls of Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, and Eimeria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coccidia are protozoan parasites that cause significant human disease and are of major agricultural importance. Cryptosporidium spp. cause diarrhea in humans and animals, while Toxoplasma causes disseminated infections in ...

Bushkin, G. Guy

269

Improving chemical aqueous based intervention methods for microorganism elimination from fresh produce surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Fragaria spp.), tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum var. roma) curly parsley (Petroselinum crispum) and Italian parsley (Petroselinum crispum var. neapolitanum) were purchased from a local market, while non-waxed coated oranges (Citrus sinensis var. navel...

Puerta-Gomez, Alex Frank

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

270

Beth Aubuchon MS Candidate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

its exact modes of dispersal · Distance travels byy wind · Potting substances Continuing monitoring.M., Slaughter, G.W., Koike, S.T. 2002. Phytophthora ramorum as the cause of extensive mortality of Quercus spp

Gray, Matthew

271

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ET2/TL-08-1474. May 19, 2010 Wind Technologies Market ReportAssociates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little10, 2010. David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Trade

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Associates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. LittlePool. David, A. 2011. U.S. Wind Turbine Trade in a Changing2011. David, A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Business Plan for a New Engineering Consulting Firm in the Electrical Utility Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has been experiencing steady growth for more than ten years. Along with energy market regulatory agencies such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Southwest Power Pool (SPP), electrical utilities must ensure that the electricity...

Gois, Roberto Cavalcanti

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

The role of two predators, Doru taeniatum Dorhn and Solenopsis gegminata F., as control agents of Spodoptera frugiperda in Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Pair and Gross Jr. 1984). Ants are among the most important predators in the world (Whitcomb 1971). So1enopsis spp. ants are reportedly important predators of the cotton bollweevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, (Sterling et al. 1984, Stansley 1985...

Lastres Schindler, Mariana Lorena

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Soil seed bank reproductive properties of selected graminoids as influenced by microtopographic variation within a San Antonio Prairie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brittoniana Carex microdonta C erus acuminatus C erus esculentus 0 erus ovularis Dichanthelium oli osanth Dichanthelium s haerocar Eleocharis com ressa Era rostis intermedia Fimbrist lis uberula Juncus spp. Pas alum dilatatumm Setaria eniculata...

Toledo, Mercily

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Midwest, Texas, Southwest, and PJM regions: wind in the52 GW), SPP (48 GW), and PJM (43 GW) account for over 70% ofThe queues surveyed include PJM Interconnection, Midwest

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterieller verschlusskrankheit pavk Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

P... is the sum of the spins of its ribbons, and the cospin is the associated co-statistic into Pavk(), i... .e: cosp(P) maxsp(U), U Pavk() - sp(P). Ribbon tableaux...

278

Intertidal Ecology of Riprap Jetties and Breakwaters: Marine Communities Inhabiting Anthropogenic Structures along the West Coast of North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spp. Unid green crust (microalgae) Unid Red Watersipora sp.Crust Unid Green Crust (Microalgae) Unid Orange Crust UnidCrust Unid Green Crust (Microalgae) Yellow Mite H1-1 H1-2

Pister, Benjamin A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Intertidal ecology of riprap jetties and breakwaters : marine communities inhabiting anthropogenic structures along the west coast of North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spp. Unid green crust (microalgae) Unid Red Watersipora sp.Crust Unid Green Crust (Microalgae) Unid Orange Crust UnidCrust Unid Green Crust (Microalgae) Yellow Mite H1-1 H1-2

Pister, Benjamin Alan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent System Operator (MISO) and Southwest PowerTo help inform the debate at MISO and SPP concerning how tosettled using the EIS market. MISO administers a day-ahead

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nesting ecology of dickcissels on reclaimed surface-mined lands in Freestone County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were selected and bunchgrasses were avoided. Oak (Quercus spp.) saplings remained an important nesting substrate throughout the breeding season. On a larger scale, nest-site selection was likely to occur farther from wooded riparian areas and closer...

Dixon, Thomas Pingul

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

Enhanced light emission from top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes by optimizing surface plasmon polariton losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate enhanced light extraction for monochrome top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The enhancement by a factor of 1.2 compared to a reference sample is caused by the use of a hole transport layer (HTL) material possessing a low refractive index (1.52). The low refractive index reduces the in-plane wave vector of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excited at the interface between the bottom opaque metallic electrode (anode) and the HTL. The shift of the SPP dispersion relation decreases the power dissipated into lost evanescent excitations and thus increases the outcoupling efficiency, although the SPP remains constant in intensity. The proposed method is suitable for emitter materials owning isotropic orientation of the transition dipole moments as well as anisotropic, preferentially horizontal orientation, resulting in comparable enhancement factors. Furthermore, for sufficiently low refractive indices of the HTL material, the SPP can be modeled as a propagating plane wave within ot...

Fuchs, Cornelius; Wieczorek, Martin; Gather, Malte C; Hofmann, Simone; Reineke, Sebastian; Leo, Karl; Scholz, Reinhard

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Water-wise bee garden plants for the Sacramento region Christine Casey, UC Davis Hagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water-wise bee garden plants for the Sacramento region Christine Casey, UC Davis Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven This is a suggested list of water Purple Manzanita Arctostaphylos spp. Heather (Ericaceae) December to April; varies

Ferrara, Katherine W.

284

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PJM POU PPA PSCo PTC REC RGGI RPS RTO SPP SPS USITC W WAPAGreenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) cap-and-trade policy, forpricing seen to date under RGGI has been too low to drive

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Original article Silviculture of high-quality oaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and natural regeneration meth- ods are being sought. Coppice forests are being replaced by forests of seed- vicultural systems and oak decline. Quercus spp / silviculture I ecology I coppice I high forest / Central

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

286

NAUERT ET AL. VOL. XXX ' NO. XX ' 000000 ' XXXX www.acsnano.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Furthermore, NWs show great promise as a sensing platform for remote-excitation surface-enhanced Raman through both radiative (scattering) and nonradiative (Joule heating) pathways, limiting the SPP

Zubarev, Eugene

287

Special Publication No. 3, Ticks and Tickborne Diseases, II. Hosts, Part 2. G-P  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species Amblyomma auriculare (AragSo, H. de ?. , (1936A), 759-844) (Argentina, Brasil, Venezuela) Amblyomma striatum fossum (Reyne, ?. , (1923A), 32-39) (Suriname) Galictis allamandi Amblyomma spp. (Fairchild, G. ?., Kohls, G. ?. , & Tipton, V. J...

Doss, Mildred A.; Farr, Marion M.; Roach, Katharine F.; Anastos, George

288

Simultaneous estimation of actual litter enzymatic catalysis and respiration rates with a simple model of C dynamics in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

caerulea, Betula spp, soluble carbohydrates, Water Extractable Organic Carbon. insu-00852055,version1-19Aug and decomposition, leading to organic matter (OM) accumulation and long-term C-sequestration in peat (Clymo, 1984

Boyer, Edmond

289

Bacteria recovered from endometritis and pyometra in the beef cow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One hundred and one uteri from beef cows with pyometra were collected from a slaughterhouse. Samples of uterine exudate were cultured for aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic bacteria, and also tested for Trichomonas spp. A section of uterine...

Mikulec, Rashel Thi

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Object-oriented classification and mapping of salt marsh vegetation using in situ radiometry and multi-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Connecticut River. The dominant marsh species, Spartina patens, Phragmites australis and Typha spp., have been by monocultures of the non- native genotype of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud (common reed

Royer, Dana

291

S. K. Meidel R. E. Scheibling Effects of food type and ration on reproductive maturation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in which we fed sea urchins four diets: (1) kelp (Laminaria spp.) for 6 d wkA1 and mussel (Mytilus spp.) ¯esh for 1 d wkA1 (KM); (2) kelp for 7 d wkA1 (high ration, KH); (3) kelp for 1 d wkA1 (low ration, KL% in all fed sea urchins but sig- ni®cantly lower in unfed ones. The feeding rate on kelp was signi

Scheibling, Robert Eric

292

Multi mode nano scale Raman echo quantum memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low loss magnetic surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes characterized by enhanced electrical field component and subwavelength confinement on the dielectric and negative-index metamaterial interface are presented. We demonstrate a possibility of storage and perfect retrieval of the low loss magnetic SPP fields by using a photon echo quantum memory on Raman atomic transition. We describe specific properties of the proposed technique which opens a possibility for efficient nano scale multi-mode quantum memory.

S. A. Moiseev; E. S. Moiseev

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Characterization of the Deltaproteobacteria in contaminated and uncontaminated stream sediments and identification of potential mercury methylators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial communities were examined in surface stream sediments at 5 contaminated sites and 1 control site near Oak Ridge, TN, USA, to identify bacteria that could be contributing to mercury (Hg) methylation. The phylogenetic composition of the sediment bacterial community was examined over 3 quarterly sampling periods (36 samples) using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Only 3064 sequences (0.85% of the total community) were identified as Deltaproteobacteria, the only group known to methylate Hg, using the Ribosomal Database Project classifier at the 99% confidence threshold. Constrained ordination techniques indicated statistically significant positive linear correlations between Desulfobulbus spp., Desulfonema spp. and Desulfobacca spp. and methyl-Hg concentrations at the Hg-contaminated sites. In contrast, the distribution of organisms related to Byssovorax spp. was significantly correlated to inorganic carbon, nitrate and uranium concentrations but not to Hg or methyl-Hg. Overall, the abundance and richness of Deltaproteobacteria sequences were higher in uncontaminated sediments, while the majority of the members present at the contaminated sites were either known potential metal-reducers/methylators or metal tolerant species. Given the abundance relative to other known Hg methylators and the association with methyl-Hg, Desulfobulbus spp. is considered a prime candidate for involvement in Hg methylation in these streams.

Mosher, Jennifer [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Characterization of the Deltaproteobacteria in Contaminated and Uncontaminated Surface Stream Sediments and Identification of Potential Mercury Methylators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial communities were examined in surface stream sediments at five contaminated sites and one control site near Oak Ridge, TN in order to identify bacteria that could be contributing to mercury methylation. The phylogenetic composition of the sediment bacterial community was examined over three quarterly sampling periods (36 samples) using 16s rRNA pyrosequencing. Only 3064 sequences (0.85 % of the total community) were identified as Deltaproteobacteria by the RDP classifier at the 99% confidence threshold. Constrained ordination techniques indicated significant positive correlations between Desulfobulbus spp., Desulfonema spp. and Desulfobacca spp. and methyl mercury concentrations in the contaminated sites. On the contrary, the distribution of organisms related to Byssovorax was significantly correlated to inorganic carbon, nitrate and uranium concentrations. Overall, the abundance and richness of Deltaproteobacteria sequences were higher in the sediments of the site, while the majority of the members present at the contaminated sites were either known metal reducers/methylators or metal tolerant species.

Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110?nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

297

Electrically tunable graded index planar lens based on graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The realization of electrically tunable beam focusing using a properly designed conductivity pattern along a strip on a background single graphene flake with operation in the terahertz regime is proposed and numerically investigated. The strip is illuminated with a guided surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) plane wave and the physical origin of the design procedure is evaluated from the phase of effective mode index of propagating SPP wave on graphene. Upon tuning a gate voltage between the graphene sheet and the substrate, the focus tuning is achieved. Finite- difference time-domain numerical technique is employed to explore the propagation characteristic of SPP wave and the performance parameters of the lens include the focal length, full-width half-maximum, and focusing efficiency. Such a one atom thick planar lens with the capability of electrical focus tuning besides the compatibility with current planar optoelectronic systems can find valuable potential applications in the field of transformational plasmon optics.

Nasari, H., E-mail: Hadiseh-Nasari@ee.kntu.ac.ir; Abrishamian, M. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 16314 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

Efficient out-coupling and beaming of Tamm optical states via surface plasmon polariton excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present evidence of optical Tamm states to surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupling. We experimentally demonstrate that for a Bragg stack with a thin metal layer on the surface, hybrid Tamm-SPP modes may be excited when a grating on the air-metal interface is introduced. Out-coupling via the grating to free space propagation is shown to enhance the transmission as well as the directionality and polarization selection for the transmitted beam. We suggest that this system will be useful on those devices, where a metallic electrical contact as well as beaming and polarization control is needed.

Lopez-Garcia, M.; Ho, Y.-L. D.; Taverne, M. P. C.; Chen, L.-F.; Rarity, J. G.; Oulton, R. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Bristol, Faculty of Engineering, Queen's Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Murshidy, M. M. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, HU6 7RX Hull (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Helwan (Egypt); Yousef Jameel Science and Technology Research Center, The American University in Cairo (Egypt); Edwards, A. P.; Adawi, A. M. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, HU6 7RX Hull (United Kingdom); Serry, M. Y. [Yousef Jameel Science and Technology Research Center, The American University in Cairo (Egypt)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

299

Property:EZFeed/ExpectedCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed JumpMoverNercErcot Jump to:NercSppRtoSpp

300

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

Spinning Reserve From Responsive Loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Responsive load is the most underutilized reliability resource available to the power system today. It is currently not used at all to provide spinning reserve. Historically there were good reasons for this, but recent technological advances in communications and controls have provided new capabilities and eliminated many of the old obstacles. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC), New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC), and New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) rules are beginning to recognize these changes and are starting to encourage responsive load provision of reliability services. The Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostats provide an example of these technological advances. This is a technology aimed at reducing summer peak demand through central control of residential and small commercial air-conditioning loads. It is being utilized by Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), Consolidated Edison (ConEd), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). The technology is capable of delivering even greater response in the faster spinning reserve time frame (while still providing peak reduction). Analysis of demand reduction testing results from LIPA during the summer of 2002 provides evidence to back up this claim. It also demonstrates that loads are different from generators and that the conventional wisdom, which advocates for starting with large loads as better ancillary service providers, is flawed. The tempting approach of incrementally adapting ancillary service requirements, which were established when generators were the only available resources, will not work. While it is easier for most generators to provide replacement power and non-spinning reserve (the slower response services) than it is to supply spinning reserve (the fastest service), the opposite is true for many loads. Also, there is more financial reward for supplying spinning reserve than for supplying the other reserve services as a result of the higher spinning reserve prices. The LIPAedge program (LIPA's demand reduction program using Carrier ComfortChoice thermostats) provides an opportunity to test the use of responsive load for spinning reserve. With potentially 75 MW of spinning reserve capability already installed, this test program can also make an important contribution to the capacity needs of Long Island during the summer of 2003. Testing could also be done at ConEd ({approx}30 MW), SCE ({approx}15 MW), and/or SDG&E ({approx}15 MW). This paper is divided into six chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the contingency reserve ancillary services, their functions in supporting power system reliability, and their technical requirements. It also discusses the policy and tariff requirements and attempts to distinguish between ones that are genuinely necessary and ones that are artifacts of the technologies that were historically used to provide the services. Chapter 3 discusses how responsive load could provide contingency reserves (especially spinning reserve) for the power system. Chapter 4 specifically discusses the Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostat technology, the LIPAedge experience with that technology, and how the technology could be used to supply spinning reserve. Chapter 5 discusses a number of unresolved issues and suggests areas for further research. Chapter 6 offers conclusions and recommendations.

Kirby, B.J.

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

303

Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) - Year 5 : Annual Report for FY 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) is a coordinated effort to improve the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key monitoring and evaluation questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP was initiated by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) in October 2003. The project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC). CSMEP is a major effort of the federal state and Tribal fish and wildlife managers to develop regionally integrated monitoring and evaluation (M&E) across the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP has focused its work on five monitoring domains: status and trends monitoring of populations and action effectiveness monitoring of habitat, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem. CSMEP's specific goals are to: (1) interact with federal, state and tribal programmatic and technical entities responsible for M&E of fish and wildlife, to ensure that work plans developed and executed under this project are well integrated with ongoing work by these entities; (2) document, integrate, and make available existing monitoring data on listed salmon, steelhead, bull trout and other fish species of concern; (3) critically assess strengths and weaknesses of these data for answering key monitoring questions; and (4) collaboratively design, implement and evaluate improved M&E methods with other programmatic entities in the Pacific Northwest. During FY2008 CSMEP biologists continued their reviews of the strengths and weaknesses (S&W) of existing subbasin inventory data for addressing monitoring questions about population status and trends at different spatial and temporal scales. Work was focused on Lower Columbia Chinook and steelhead, Snake River fall Chinook, Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and steelhead, and Middle Columbia River Chinook and steelhead. These FY2008 data assessments and others assembled over the years of the CSMEP project can be accessed on the CBFWA public website. The CSMEP web database (http://csmep.streamnet.org/) houses metadata inventories from S&W assessments of Columbia River Basin watersheds that were completed prior to FY2008. These older S&W assessments are maintained by StreamNet, but budget cutbacks prevented us from adding the new FY2008 assessments into the database. Progress was made in FY2008 on CSMEP's goals of collaborative design of improved M&E methods. CSMEP convened two monitoring design workshops in Portland (December 5 and 6, 2007 and February 11 and 12, 2008) to continue exploration of how best to integrate the most robust features of existing M&E programs with new approaches. CSMEP continued to build on this information to develop improved designs and analytical tools for monitoring the status and trends of fish populations and the effectiveness of hatchery and hydrosystem recovery actions within the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP did not do any new work on habitat or harvest effectiveness monitoring designs in FY2008 due to budget cutbacks. CSMEP presented the results of the Snake Basin Pilot Study to the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) in Portland on December 7, 2008. This study is the finalization of CSMEP's pilot exercise of developing design alternatives across different M&E domains within the Snake River Basin spring/summer Chinook ESU. This work has been summarized in two linked reports (CSMEP 2007a and CSMEP 2007b). CSMEP participants presented many of the analyses developed for the Snake Basin Pilot work at the Western Division American Fisheries Society (AFS) conference in Portland on May 4 to 7, 2008. For the AFS conference CSMEP organized a symposium on regional monitoring and evaluation approaches. A presentation on CSMEP's Cost Integration Database Tool and Salmon Viability Monitoring Simulation Model developed for the Snake Basin Pilot Study was also given to the Pacific Northwest Aquatic monitoring Partnership (PNAMP) stee

Marmorek, David R.; Porter, Marc; Pickard, Darcy; Wieckowski, Katherine

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation projects which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase annual returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E project conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The project's goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.

Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

DACS-P-01725 Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pests of legumes in Asia. The insects are voracious feeders on kudzu (Pueraria spp.) (Zhang 1985 all year (Thippeswamy and Rajagopal 2005). HOSTS: Numerous legumes, especially kudzu and soybean (please see above). ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE: Although their appetite for kudzu may be a good thing, bean

Jawitz, James W.

306

WAIVER OF RIGHT TO PRE-TERMINATION HEARING FOR CLASSIFIED STAFF ONLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAIVER OF RIGHT TO PRE-TERMINATION HEARING FOR CLASSIFIED STAFF ONLY Office of Human Resources Rev Discipline and SPP 1011 Involuntary Terminations, you are entitled to a pre-termination hearing prior to the effective date of termination stated in your Notice of Intent to Recommend Termination. The purpose

Rhoads, James

307

INDEX TO VOLUME 169S This index covers both the Initial Reports and Scientific Results portions of Vol-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 52 See also calcite cedar, sediments, A:60 Chaetoceros spp., vs. depth, B:7 chemistry, organic, A:32 in the Initial Reports are preceded by "A" with a colon (A:) and to those in the Scientific Results (this book, A:55, 58 Capilano sediments, geology, A:14 carbon, organic organic matter, B:38­39 sediments, A:48

308

Market Technical Analysis for the iMarket Meter Data Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on recent success with Swift’s iMarket Meter Data Management System (MDMS) product in the Southwest Power Pool (SPP), additional wholesale energy markets need to be analyzed to determine the feasibility of marketing and selling the MDMS...

Lowe, Patrick

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Metadata for Nearshore Fish Atlas of Alaska Definitions of field names  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of bays; kelps (e.g., Saccharina latissima, Alaria marginata) often attached to bedrock faces Catch understory kelps growing as dense, low-lying mats on rocky substrates; dominant kelps (e.g., Saccharina latissima, Cymathere triplicata, Alaria spp.) Latitude: decimal degrees, WGS84 datum, northern hemisphere

310

Impact of Alien Plant Invaders on Pollination Networks in Two Archipelagos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Alien Plant Invaders on Pollination Networks in Two Archipelagos Benigno Padro´ n1-modal) networks. We focus on the invader Opuntia spp., a cosmopolitan alien cactus. We compare two island systems. Citation: Padro´n B, Traveset A, Biedenweg T, Di´az D, Nogales M, et al. (2009) Impact of Alien Plant

Traveset, Anna

311

ESG: Extended Similarity Group method for protein function prediction For any questions regarding ESG contact the administration at info@kiharalab.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

box titled "Enter Query Sequence(s)". Consider the following sequence that you can enter. >sp|P56851 KDKSSHMFIYISWYKIEHICTSDNWMDRFRNAYVWVQNPLKVLKCHQENSKNSYTESRSF NYIEFHCSMDGYVDSIEDLKMVEPIGN You can also click on "Load Sample" link to load this sequence in the text box and follow the next steps. Clicking on "Clear" link will clear the text box for sequence

Kihara, Daisuke

312

PFP: Protein Function Prediction server For any questions regarding PFP contact the administration at info@kiharalab.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also click on "Load Sample" link to load this sequence in the text box and follow the next steps "Enter Query Sequence(s)". Consider the following sequence that you can enter. >sp|P56851|EP3B. Clicking on "Clear" link will clear the text box for sequence and load default ESG parameters in the boxes

Kihara, Daisuke

313

Ecology, 88(1), 2007, pp. 1825 2007 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arundinaceum (tall fescue), hosts a fungal endophyte that is toxic to herbivores. In replicated experimental grasslands, the presence of the endophyte in tall fescue reduced tree abundance and size, altered tree spp.) was 65% higher in plots with the endophyte at the one grassland site where these data were

Rudgers, Jennifer

314

The pathogenic potential of endophytic Botryosphaeriaceous fungi on Terminalia species in Cameroon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pathogenic potential of endophytic Botryosphaeriaceous fungi on Terminalia species in Cameroon are endophytic fungi and latent pathogens that can result in wood stain, cankers, die-back and death of trees the Botryosphaeriaceae occurring as endophytes of Terminalia spp. in Cameroon, as part of a larger project to identify

315

Tree-based delimitation of morphologically ambiguous taxa: A study of the lizard malaria parasites on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola q Bryan G. Falk a, , D. Luke Mahler b , Susan L. Perkins a a Richard Gilder from the Caribbean island of Hispaniola. All six infect lizards in the genus Anolis, but only two Hispaniola. Fifty-five of these lizards were infected with Plasmodium spp., representing several new host

Mahler, D. Luke

316

Original article The foraging behaviour of honey bees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spp) on cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait) KE MacKenzie Department of Entomology, Comstock Hall — The behaviour of honey bees and bumble bees while foraging on cultivated cranberry of the flower. Although they rarely forage pollen on cranberry, a few honey bee foragers collected pollen

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

317

Kemp Research Report: The Buzz About Cranberry Bogs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kemp Research Report: The Buzz About Cranberry Bogs A newsletter of the Kemp Natural Resources cranberry bogs. Research shows that bumblebee populations are in decline in numerous areas of the world. I in relationship to cranberry bogs? Well, it just so happens that the bumblebee (Bombus spp. Latreille) is the most

318

N e v a d a A r i z o n a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Death Valley National Park Mojave National Preserve Joshua Tree National Park Anza-Borrego Desert State CACA 048254 Lucerne Solar Chevron Energy Solutions CACA 049561 Desert Sunlight - First Solar CACA 048649 Ridgecrest SPP CACA 049016 09-AFC-9 Beacon Solar Energy Project 08-AFC-2 Palmdale Hybrid Power

319

RESEARCH NOTE DISTANCE CHEMORECEPTION AND THE DETECTION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California), frozen on dry ice, shipped to Texas and stored at 2808C until extraction. Eggs were individually of recirculating artificial seawater (ASW) made from Instant OceanTM brand salts (salinity 34 +2 ppt, temp- erature. Subjects were fed thawed frozen shrimp or live fiddler crabs (Uca spp.) each day after experimental trials

Boal, Jean

320

Metapopulation Dynamics of a Burr owing Owl ( Speotyto cunicularia ) Population in Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over time at the 6,900-ha Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (RMANWR), Colorado fr om 1990. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study Ar ea We studied Burr owing Owls on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National W yucca ( Yucca spp.), sand sagebrush (Artemisia filifolia), and rubber rabbitbrush ( Chrysothamnus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

INTER-MOUNTAIN BASINS MIXED SALT DESERT SCRUB extent exaggerated for display  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTER-MOUNTAIN BASINS MIXED SALT DESERT SCRUB R.Rondeau extent exaggerated for display ATRIPLEX., Lycium ssp., Suaeda spp., Yucca glauca, and Tetradymia spinosa. Dwarf- shrubs include Gutierrezia and Holmgren 1984). Forb cover is generally sparse. Perennial forbs that might occur include INTER-MOUNTAIN

322

Synergistic Interactions between Uteroferrin and Secreted Phosphoprotein 1 in Hematopoietic Niches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(TRAP)] and secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) are proteins that are proposed to co-localize in sites of erythropoiesis which are referred to as hematopoietic niches. The placental yolk sack, as well as liver, spleen, and bone of fetal mice are the major...

Ehle, Lauren M

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

323

Essays on price dynamics, discovery, and dynamic threshold effects among energy spot markets in North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pool (SPP), Entergy (ENT), and Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). Approximate locations of the spot markets are shown in Figure 2.1. Plots of the price series for each market are provided in Figure 2.2. One day lagged U.S. aggregate...

Park, Haesun

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Large-scale (100s km) distributions of tuna larvae (family Scombridae), par-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abundance and fecundity of T. albacares (yellowfin tuna) and K. pelamis (skipjack tuna) in the western. pelamis larvae. Other possible explanations, however, are that previous sampling scales of 100s km between waters (Miller, 1979), and Thunnus spp. and K. pelamis larvae were up to 100 times more concentrated

325

Pelagic Predators Food Habits Project Tim Essington and Mary Hunsicker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.pelamisinthedietofsharks %N %W %O %IRI N = 42 N = 5 Katsuwonus pelamis 0.00% 5.00% 10.00% 15.00% 20.00% 25.00% 30.00% 35 Thunnus albacares Thunnus alalunga Unid.Scombridae Sarda orientalis Katsuwonus pelamis Elagatis Unid.Scombridae Sarda orientalis Katsuwonus pelamis Elagatis bipinnulata Coryphaena hippurus Auxis spp

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

326

373USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Small Nocturnal Mammals in Oak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spp.) woodland sites in eastern Fresno County, California. Interior live oak (Quercus wislizenii 4-1/2, and Secata, in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada in eastern Fresno County. Elevation ranged Small Nocturnal Mammals in Oak Woodlands of the Kings River. Pine Flat was the most densely vegetated

Standiford, Richard B.

327

EIS-0294: Sutter Power Project, Sutter County, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes Western Area Power Administration's (Western) decision to support Calpine Corporation (Calpine) to construct an electric generating facility and associated 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line, approximately 3.5 miles in length, known as the Sutter Power Plant (SPP).

328

Marine Fisheries On the cover, top to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marine Fisheries ~@WD@W On the cover, top to bollom: Yelloweye rock fish, Sebastes ruberrimus Maturity and Fecundity in the Rockfishes, Sebastes spp., a Review Joy Clark, Wade Griffin, Jerry Clark.25 foreign. Publication of material from sources outside the NMFS is not an endorsement and the NMFS

329

The Eucalyptus canker pathogen Chrysoporthe cubensis discovered in eastern Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Eucalyptus canker pathogen Chrysoporthe cubensis discovered in eastern Australia Geoffrey S Pathology Centre, The University of Queensland/Agri-Science Queensland, Qld 4068, Australia. B Forestry these trees are planted as non-natives. Although the majority of Eucalyptus spp. are native to Australia, Chr

330

Kinetics of inactivation of indicator pathogens during thermophilic anaerobic digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relationships are necessary. ÂŞ 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Land application the opportunity to put sewage sludge, which otherwise needs to be disposed of, towards beneficial use such as crop, enteric viruses and Salmonella spp. Land application of Class B biosolids, which require only reduction

331

Cryphonectria canker on Tibouchina in Colombia By M. J. WINGFIELD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cryphonectria canker on Tibouchina in Colombia By M. J. WINGFIELD 1 , C. RODAS 2 , H. MYBURG 3 , M.Wing®eld@fabi.up.ac.za; 2 Smur®t Carton de Colombia, Cali, Colombia and Wright Forest Management Consultants Inc., Cary NC canker disease on Tibouchina spp. (Melastomataceae) in Colombia. We used morphological studies

332

Specialty Crop Profile: Anthony Bratsch, Extension Specialist, Vegetables and Small Fruit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specialty Crop Profile: Pawpaw Anthony Bratsch, Extension Specialist, Vegetables and Small Fruit Introduction Pawpaw (Asimina spp.) is a native fruit crop that is in the beginning phases of domestication.S. The pawpaw is the largest edible tree fruit native to the United States. It is the only temperate member

Liskiewicz, Maciej

333

Cell number regulator genes in Prunus provide candidate genes for the control of fruit size in sweet and sour cherry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell number regulator genes in Prunus provide candidate genes for the control of fruit size at Springerlink.com Abstract Striking increases in fruit size distinguish cultivated descendants from small-fruited wild progen- itors for fleshy fruited species such as Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Prunus spp

van der Knaap, Esther

334

Ecological Applications, 17(5), 2007, pp. 14841498 2007 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and offshore wind farms are some of the major threats increasing seabird mortality at sea, but the impact environment, opening new prospects for the study of seabird mortality at sea. Key words: assignment methods; biogeochemical markers; bird mortality at sea; Calonectris spp.; longline fisheries; mitochrondrial DNA

335

1Wood Borer --WB-XX-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Wood Borer -- WB-XX-W WB-08-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers Department of Entomology OAK, these beetles feed on oak (Quercus spp). Direct damage results from galleries in the wood that are formed in the breeding season. The host trees for these beetles are important for the wood indus- try, orna

Ginzel, Matthew

336

Who needs nodules? A short world tour of nitrogen fixation by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alia Temperature extremes hot and cold pH extremes acid and alkaline Salinity NaCl, Ca or Mg salts Flooding salt and fresh water Drought High levels of soil aluminium Low levels of soil phosphorus #12;In hotspot for biodiversity. Soils are acid, high in Al and low in nutrients The most common (in spp

337

GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-240 Breeding for Resistance in Norway Spruce to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-240 162 Breeding for Resistance in Norway Spruce to the Root Results from previous studies of resistance in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) to the pathogens Heterobasidion spp. show significant genotypic variation in fungal growth and spore susceptibility among Norway

Standiford, Richard B.

338

Antecedentes del Sirex noctilio (Hymenoptera-Siricidae) en el Valle de Calamuchita, Cordoba, Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Argentina SUMMARY In 1994, the wood wasp parasite Sirex noctilio was identified in Pinus spp. growing in the Calamuchita Valley of Cordoba, Argentina. This insect causes direct and indirect damage to trees, eventually in the Calamuchita Valley, CĂłrdoba, Argentina ADLIH LOPEZ, MARCELA DEMAESTRI, ESTEBAN ZUPAN, OMAR BAROTTO Facultad de

339

Engineering of thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans for production of D(-)-lactic acid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Genetically modified microorganisms having the ability to produce D(-)-lactic acid at temperatures between 30.degree. C. and 55.degree. C. are provided. In various embodiments, the microorganisms may have the chromosomal lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene and/or the chromosomal acetolactate synthase (alsS) gene inactivated. Exemplary microorganisms for use in the disclosed methods are Bacillus spp., such as Bacillus coagulans.

Wang, Qingzhao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Vegetation changes on an abandoned rice field following herbicide and fertilizer treatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ass (pa icum ~v(r turn L. ), a d rownseed nasn I (~nas alum plicat I ~ Michx. ). In co treat, vegetation of abend ed rice land is composed principally of annual forbs intermixed with three-awns (Aristida spp. ). Forbs, as used in this paper, wili...

Cwik, Michael Joseph

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ATLAS Muon TGC Trigger Electronics TTC signal distribution Extended URD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATLAS Muon TGC Trigger Electronics TTC signal distribution Extended URD Version 0 June 2000 1 a TTCrx chip which receives signals distributed by the ATLAS central TTC system. The SPP then extracts to the LVDS level, and #12;ATLAS Muon TGC Trigger Electronics TTC signal distribution Extended URD Version 0

Fukunaga, Chikara

342

European Journal of Plant Pathology 107: 571581, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan; 3 Department of Environmental Biology, University (Berk.) Cooke is one of the most important foliar diseases of lilies (Lilium spp.) (Doss et al., 1988a cells, stomata or wounds (Verhoeff, 1980). Chemical and mechanical processes are usually involved

Hsiang, Tom

343

OCTOBER 2010 SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO DESIGNERS SID-S SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS PORTFOLIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Sustainability Team at the University of Michigan (U-M) Department of Architecture, Engineering & ConstructionSID-S OCTOBER 2010 SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO DESIGNERS SID-S SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS PORTFOLIO Page 1 of 2 SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS PORTFOLIO General The Sustainable Products Portfolio (SPP) is maintained

Kamat, Vineet R.

344

P A L A E O E C O L O G Y O F A P O S T -E X T I N C T I O N R E E F : F A M E N N I A N ( L A T E D E V O N I A N ) O F T H E CA N N I N G  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

framework, Ortonella, and Girvanella were secondary encrusters, and Shuguria spp. occupied small crypts 2 demonstrate that no protracted interval of time was necessarily required for post-extinction `recovery focused, however, on post-extinction recovery, and no consensus has yet emerged as to the importance

345

Leigh Tesfatsion Professor of Econ, Math, and Electrical & Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 AMES Wholesale Power Market Test Bed #12;2 Presentation Outline Wholesale power market design Commission (FERC) proposed a wholesale electric power market design for common adoption throughout U.S. Over), Midwest/Manitoba (MISO), & Southwest (SPP) #12;4 FERC Wholesale Power Market Design Adopters to Date http

Tesfatsion, Leigh

346

J. Great Lakes Res. 27(2):117133 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biota- sediment accumulation factors (5.4 to 20.8) over 4 to 16°C for HCBP (BSAF, concentration to the organic carbon content). The relationship between BSAF and log Kow was exponential for both labora- tory and field data. INDEX WORDS: Diporeia spp., PCB, toxicokinetics, organism size, temperature, BSAF

347

July 25, 2006 RHIC Stochastic Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(abandoned at SppS and Tevatron) ­ Not part of RHIC base line design #12;July 25, 2006 Heavy ions should before (red) and after (blue) cooling, Wall Current Monitor Schottky spectrum before cooling: blue trace "hot" beam best ·Good for counteracting IBS ·Effective for tails of distribution ·E-cooling cools "cold

348

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to remember that recycled sand can still serve as a source of environmental contamination because the organic of these organisms in U.S. dairy herds. However, controlling environmental pathogens remains a daunt- ing task. Environmental streptococci and Enterococcus spp. are bacteria with similar biochemical and structural

Liskiewicz, Maciej

349

The Auk 125(1):5159, 2008 c The American Ornithologists' Union, 2008.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SALMON INCREASES PASSERINE DENSITY ON PACIFIC NORTHWEST STREAMS KATIE S. CHRISTIE AND THOMAS E. REIMCHEN1, Canada ABSTRACT.--The annual migration of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) to freshwater streams or below the falls and proximity to the stream were the major predictors of songbird abundance. Each

Reimchen, Thomas E.

350

Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 56: 17001706 (1999) 1999 NRC Canada PERSPECTIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacifique (Oncorhynchus spp.) de la côte nord-ouest de l'Amérique du Nord ont connu des déclins régionaux et straying from their natal streams during spawning migrations. Management efforts aimed at expediting freshwater habitat in streams w

351

The nature of biodiversity has long been a central focus in biology. This may not seem the case any longer,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restricted set of organisms--the house mouse (Mus musculus), the fruit fly (Drosophila spp.), the nematode of diversity is, in a sense, provided by"adaptation"to an "ecological niche." Adaptation results from the force of selection; and the notion of the ecological niche,to which the organism adapts,remains obscure and poorly

352

Environmental Pollution (Series B) 2 (1981) 2135 AGE-SPECIFIC LEAD DISTRIBUTION IN XYLEM RINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations to pollution histories. INTRODUCTION The global historical record of atmospheric and environmentalEnvironmental Pollution (Series B) 2 (1981) 21­35 AGE-SPECIFIC LEAD DISTRIBUTION IN XYLEM RINGS environmental pollution records. Lead in xylem from Liriodendron tulipifera, Quercus alba, and Carya spp. trees

Baes, Fred

353

A Study in the Use of a High Concentration of CO2 in a Modified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atmospheres 10 preserve fish during shipment has been limited because of eco- nomic and technical reasons. Recenl interest in the use a/the technique to ship Pacific salmon. Oncorhynchus spp.. aUla/ Alaska has shipped in large containers or vans. Harold 1. Barnett, Research Chemist; Frederick E. Stone. Chemist

354

Does Pathogen Spillover from Commercially Reared Bumble Bees Threaten Wild Pollinators?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Does Pathogen Spillover from Commercially Reared Bumble Bees Threaten Wild Pollinators? Michael C'); yet, we still have little understanding of the cause(s) of bee declines. Wild bumble bees (Bombus spp pathogen commonly found in commercial Bombus. We also monitored wild bumble bee populations near

Thomson, James D.

355

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chlorhexidine products) 180-300 ml hypertonic saline IMM infusionPseudomonas spp. Environmental Water and wet Yeast and mold Environmental Soil, plants, water Dirty infusions Aseptic infusions No treatment and DCT Prototheca Environmental Soil, plants, water Dirty infusions, infected udders Aseptic infusions

Liskiewicz, Maciej

356

Colorado Natural Heritage Program 2003 Project Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Natural Heritage Program 2003 Project Abstracts #12;Cover photo: A CNHP researcher collects freshwater specimens (Pisidium spp.) at Long Slough Reservoir on the Grand Mesa of Colorado's West of Colorado's biodiversity, what efforts are underway to maintain it, and why more biological information

357

Graphene-based terahertz tunable plasmonic directional coupler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose and numerically analyze a terahertz tunable plasmonic directional coupler which is composed of a thin metal film with a nanoscale slit, dielectric grating, a graphene sheet, and a dielectric substrate. The slit is employed to generate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and the metal-dielectric grating-graphene-dielectric constructs a Bragg reflector, whose bandgap can be tuned over a wide frequency range by a small change in the Fermi energy level of graphene. As a graphene-based Bragg reflector is formed on one side of the slit, the structure enables SPP waves to be unidirectionally excited on the other side of the slit due to SPP interference, and the SPP waves in the Bragg reflector can be efficiently switched on and off by tuning the graphene's Fermi energy level. By introducing two optimized graphene-based Bragg reflectors into opposite sides of the slit, SPP waves can be guided to different Bragg reflectors at different Fermi energy levels, thus achieving a tunable bidirectional coupler.

He, Meng-Dong, E-mail: hemendong@sohu.com; Wang, Kai-Jun; Wang, Lei; Li, Jian-Bo [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha 410004 (China); Liu, Jian-Qiang [College of Science, Jiujiang University, Jiujiang 332005 (China); Huang, Zhen-Rong; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang, Lin; Hu, Wei-Da; Chen, Xiaoshuang [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200083 (China)

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

358

Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations R E B E C C and lit- ter decomposition varied between Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) willow bioenergy plantations., 2009). Willow (Salix spp) short rotation coppice (SRC) is one of the most widely planted second

359

797Ann. For. Sci. 62 (2005) 797805 INRA, EDP Sciences, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of firewood, the structure of the remaining forests was often altered. Especially coppice of European oak trends / Quercus spp. / forest structure / coppice Résumé ­ Les tendances de croissance révèlent la in structure. Coppice, especially of European oak (Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Matt.) Liebl.), became one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Mycosphaerella species associated with leaf disease of Eucalyptus globulus in Ethiopia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mycosphaerella species associated with leaf disease of Eucalyptus globulus in Ethiopia By Alemu, Forestry Research Sector, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 2 Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Tree spp. are among the most widely planted exotic trees in Ethiopia. Several damaging leaf pathogens

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Texas Range Plants Poisonous to Livestock.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College Staiion, Texas CONTENTS Page Pap INTRODUCTION ........................... .------------------ , 3 PART 11. PLANTS LESS COMMONLY TOXIC TO LIVESTOCK THE PROBLEM --------.--------.----------.------------------ 3 Aloysia lycioides, Whitebrush... ------.-.-------... ... 35 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 3 Amaranthzts spp., Careless weed ----------.-.... 3.5 PART 1. IPLAKTS MOST COMMONLY TOXIC TO LIVESTOCK A pocynum canna binum, Dogbane, Indian hemp 35 Cicuta curtissii. Water hemlock -_--------.-...... 36 Acacia berlandieri...

Sperry, Omer Edison

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

1900 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 44, NOVEMBERDECEMBER 2004 Reducing the Genetic Vulnerability of Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1900 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 44, NOVEMBER­DECEMBER 2004 Reducing the Genetic Vulnerability of Cotton. Lloyd May, and C. Wayne Smith change in cotton yields has steadily declined since 1985. The u.s. cotton (Gossypium spp.) production system By 1998, absolute cotton yields (not just the rate ofexemplifies

Chee, Peng W.

363

The Kansas Black Bass Tournament Monitoring Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kansas Black Bass (Micropterus spp.) Tournament Monitoring Program was begun by the Kansas Fish and Game program of the Kansas Fish and Game Commission avoids both of these prob- lems. The Kansas Black Bass annually to each of the bass clubs in Kansas before the bulk of fishing begins, and clubs are asked

364

Can Habitat Alteration and Spring Angling Explain Largemouth Bass Nest Success?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micropterus spp. As keystone predators and valued sport fish in North American lakes, black basses MicropterusCan Habitat Alteration and Spring Angling Explain Largemouth Bass Nest Success? TYLER WAGNER, 13 Natural Resources Building, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA Abstract.--Largemouth bass

365

AbstractLarge (>458 mm) striped bass (Morone saxatilis) are dominant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fishes and anadromous herrings (Alosa spp.) also contibuted large percentages of striped bass diet of striped Dorazio et al., 1994). After spawning, bass experienced drastic declines in the these fish leave414 Abstract­Large (>458 mm) striped bass (Morone saxatilis) are dominant predators in Chesapeake

366

Preplant Burndown and In-Season Sharpen Use in Cotton J.W. Keeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preplant Burndown and In-Season Sharpen Use in Cotton J.W. Keeling J.D. Reed J.L. Spradley W as a preplant burndown treatment prior to cotton planting and during the fallow period following harvest amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), morningglory (Ipomoea spp.), and volunteer cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) when

Mukhtar, Saqib

367

Letter to the Editor Toward Sequencing Cotton (Gossypium) Genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letter to the Editor Toward Sequencing Cotton (Gossypium) Genomes Despite rapidly decreasing costs complex ge- nomes de novo. The cotton (Gossypium spp.) genomes represent a challenging case. To this end, a coalition of cotton genome scientists has developed a strategy for sequencing the cotton genomes, which

Chee, Peng W.

368

An Integrated Web Resource for Cotton Alan R. Gingle,* Hongyu Yang, Peng W. Chee, O. Lloyd May, Junkang Rong, Daryl T. Bowman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Integrated Web Resource for Cotton Alan R. Gingle,* Hongyu Yang, Peng W. Chee, O. Lloyd May Cotton Diversity Database'' (http://cotton.agtec.uga.edu) is a Web resource for cotton (Gossypium spp to begin with a cotton accession and obtain all available data. The phenotypic data displays include

Chee, Peng W.

369

Pathogenicity of seven species of the Botryosphaeriaceae on Eucalyptus clones in Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pathogenicity of seven species of the Botryosphaeriaceae on Eucalyptus clones in Venezuela S. R Milla, 5101-A MĂ©rida, Venezuela. B Department of Genetics, Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology found on Eucalyptus spp. in Venezuela. An initial inoculation trial was conducted using seven species

370

Unbiased MMSE-Based Noise Power Estimation with Low Complexity and Low Tracking Delay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the speech power and the estimation of the clean speech. We show that the proposed SPP approach maintains Agreement PIAP-GA-2008-214699 AUDIS and the Dutch Technology Foundation STW. T. Gerkmann heads the Speech Signal Processing Group, Universit¨at Olden- burg, 26111 Oldenburg, Germany, email: timo

371

Supplement 22, Part 4, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Parasites: Nematoda and Acanthocephala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, D. W., 1976, Trop, and Geogr. Med., v. 28 (2), 104-110 Ancylostoma spp., prevalence and geographical distribution survey of hookworm in dogs and cats, follow-up of 1967 survey cat dog all from Surinam Ancylostoma braziliense Robinson, M...

Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Kirby, Margie D.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Long-Term Stewardship of Mixed Wastes: Passive Reactive Barriers for Simultaneous In Situ Remediation of Chlorinated Solvent, Heavy Metal, and Radionuclide Contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collaborative project was designed to evaluate the possibility developing a subsurface remediation technology for mixed wastes at Department of Energy sites using a group of common soil bacteria of the genus Cellulomonas. We have been gaining a better understanding of microbial transformation of chromium, uranium, iron minerals, and trinitrotoluene (TNT) by Cellulomonas spp. in simulated subsurface environments.

Gerlach, Robin; Cunningham, Al; Peyton, Brent

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Robust microfabricated field-effect sensor for monitoring molecular adsorption in liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in various areas of industry and research ranging from water purification systems1 to coatings for con- tact, by applying a small ac voltage to the bias voltage.13 We employ the latter. The SPP miniaturizes the EIS concept from the millimeter scale to the micrometer scale and inte- grates it onto an atomic force

Manalis, Scott

374

Integrating multi-temporal spectral and structural information to map wetland vegetation in a lower Connecticut River tidal marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Coastal wetlands Image classification LiDAR Phragmites australis QuickBird Spectroradiometer Vegetation variability of the dominant marsh plant species, Spartina patens, Phragmites australis and Typha spp-native genotype of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud (common reed) in Connecticut marshes (Barrett

Royer, Dana

375

Fabrication of metal matrix composite by semi-solid powder processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various metal matrix composites (MMCs) are widely used in the automotive, aerospace and electrical industries due to their capability and flexibility in improving the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of a component. However, current manufacturing technologies may suffer from insufficient process stability and reliability and inadequate economic efficiency and may not be able to satisfy the increasing demands placed on MMCs. Semi-solid powder processing (SPP), a technology that combines traditional powder metallurgy and semi-solid forming methods, has potential to produce MMCs with low cost and high efficiency. In this work, the analytical study and experimental investigation of SPP on the fabrication of MMCs were explored. An analytical model was developed to understand the deformation mechanism of the powder compact in the semi-solid state. The densification behavior of the Al6061 and SiC powder mixtures was investigated with different liquid fractions and SiC volume fractions. The limits of SPP were analyzed in terms of reinforcement phase loading and its impact on the composite microstructure. To explore adoption of new materials, carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated as a reinforcing material in aluminum matrix using SPP. The process was successfully modeled for the mono-phase powder (Al6061) compaction and the density and density distribution were predicted. The deformation mechanism at low and high liquid fractions was discussed. In addition, the compaction behavior of the ceramic-metal powder mixture was understood, and the SiC loading limit was identified by parametric study. For the fabrication of CNT reinforced Al6061 composite, the mechanical alloying of Al6061-CNT powders was first investigated. A mathematical model was developed to predict the CNT length change during the mechanical alloying process. The effects of mechanical alloying time and processing temperature during SPP were studied on the mechanical, microstructural and compositional properties of the Al6061-CNT composites. A shear lag model was applied to predict the mechanical property (hardness) of the composite. This work demonstrated the promising potential of SPP in the fabrication of particle/fiber (nanotube) reinforced MMCs.

Wu, Yufeng [Ames Laboratory

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Differentiating swarming models by mimicking a frustrated anti-Ferromagnet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self propelled particle (SPP) models are often compared with animal swarms. However, the collective behaviour observed in experiments usually leaves considerable unconstrained freedom in the structure of these models. To tackle this degeneracy, and better distinguish between candidate models, we study swarms of SPPs circulating in channels (like spins) where we permit information to pass through windows between neighbouring channels. Co-alignment between particles then couples the channels (antiferromagnetically) so that they tend to counter-rotate. We study channels arranged to mimic a geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet and show how the effects of this frustration allow us to better distinguish between SPP models. Similar experiments could therefore improve our understanding of collective motion in animals. Finally we discuss how the spin analogy can be exploited to construct universal logic gates and therefore swarming systems that can function as Turing machines.

Daniel J. G. Pearce; Matthew S. Turner

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Tunable Hybrid Surface Phonon and Plasmon Polariton Modes in Boron Nitride Nanotube and Graphene Monolayer Heterostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hybrid modes incorporating surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes in boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes in graphene monolayers are theoretically studied. The combination of the 1D BNNTs and 2D graphene monolayer further improves the modal characteristics with electrical tunability. Superior to the graphene monolayers, the proposed heterostructures supports single mode transmission with lateral optical confinement. The modal characteristics can be shifted from SPP-like toward SPhP-like. Both the figure of merit and field enhancement of hybrid modes are improved over 3 times than those of BNNT SPhP modes, which may further enable sub-wavelength mid-infrared applications.

Sun, Yu; Cheng, Jiangtao; Liu, Jiansheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Tuning the Fano resonance between localized and propagating surface plasmon resonances for refractive index sensing applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Localized and propagating surface plasmon resonances are known to show very pronounced interactions if they are simultaneously excited in the same nanostructure. Here we study the fano interference that occurs between localized (LSPR) and propagating (SPP) modes by means of phase sensitive spectroscopic ellipsometry. The sample structures consist of periodic gratings of gold nanodisks on top of a continuous gold layer and a thin dielectric spacer, in which the structural dimensions were tuned in such a way that the dipolar LSPR mode and the propagating SPP modes are excited in the same spectral region. We observe pronounced anti-crossing and strongly asymmetric line shapes when both modes move to each others vicinity, accompagnied of largely increased phase differences between the respective plasmon resonances. Moreover we show that the anti-crossing can be exploited to increase the refractive index sensitivity of the localized modes dramatically, which result in largely increased values for the Figure-Of-Mer...

Lodewijks, Kristof; Van Roy, Willem; Borghs, Gustaaf; Lagae, Liesbet; Van Dorpe, Pol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Landowner survey of a cost-share brush management program in two Texas watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Edwards Plateau of Texas. In the Blackland Prairie site, honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) was treated with chemicals, while brush in the Edwards Plateau site, which was a mixture of mesquite, ashe and redberry juniper (Juniperus spp.) and live oak... depressions to store the runoff, which allowed a considerable amount of water to percolate into the soil, thus reducing runoff. A subsequent study conducted in northeast Uvalde County, Texas, reviewed the effects of ashe junipers on the ET and runoff...

Narayanan, Christopher Ram

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Cross-comparison of spacecraft-environment interaction model predictions applied to Solar Probe Plus near perihelion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five spacecraft-plasma models are used to simulate the interaction of a simplified geometry Solar Probe Plus (SPP) satellite with the space environment under representative solar wind conditions near perihelion. By considering similarities and differences between results obtained with different numerical approaches under well defined conditions, the consistency and validity of our models can be assessed. The impact on model predictions of physical effects of importance in the SPP mission is also considered by comparing results obtained with and without these effects. Simulation results are presented and compared with increasing levels of complexity in the physics of interaction between solar environment and the SPP spacecraft. The comparisons focus particularly on spacecraft floating potentials, contributions to the currents collected and emitted by the spacecraft, and on the potential and density spatial profiles near the satellite. The physical effects considered include spacecraft charging, photoelectron and secondary electron emission, and the presence of a background magnetic field. Model predictions obtained with our different computational approaches are found to be in agreement within 2% when the same physical processes are taken into account and treated similarly. The comparisons thus indicate that, with the correct description of important physical effects, our simulation models should have the required skill to predict details of satellite-plasma interaction physics under relevant conditions, with a good level of confidence. Our models concur in predicting a negative floating potential V{sub fl}??10V for SPP at perihelion. They also predict a “saturated emission regime” whereby most emitted photo- and secondary electron will be reflected by a potential barrier near the surface, back to the spacecraft where they will be recollected.

Marchand, R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Miyake, Y.; Usui, H. [Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Deca, J.; Lapenta, G. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Matéo-Vélez, J. C. [Department of Space Environment, Onera—The French Aerospace Lab, Toulouse (France); Ergun, R. E.; Sturner, A. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Génot, V. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, Université de Toulouse, France and CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, 31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Hilgers, A. [ESA, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Markidis, S. [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Supplement 20, Part 7, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Hosts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.] Accipiter nisus "sparrow- hawk" (intestinal tract) Porrocaecum depressum Accipiter nisus Neocolpocephalum (N.) germanum nov. spec. Keymer, I. F., 1972 a Sorjonen, J.. 1971 a all from Finland Niak, A.; and Anwar, ?., 1972 a Iran Keymer, I. F., 1972..." (intestine) Centrorhynchus amphibius Centrorhynchus spp. Sorjonen, J., 1971 a Finland Schmidt, G. D.; and Kuntz, R. ?. , 1969 ? Taiwan Schmidt, G. D.; and Kuntz, R. E., 1971 a Wu-lai, Tai-pei Hsien, Taiwan Wu-lai, Nan-tao Hsien, Taiwan Schmidt...

Shaw, Judith H.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Tolson, Deborah A.; Hood, Martha W.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Effects of soil solarization on yields of celery, pepper, onion, control of soil-borne pathogens, and chemical changes in the soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sublethal temperatures or a combination of thermal and biological control (36). In some of the same experiments, Fusarium spp. were also controlled by solarization (36, 67). Katan et al. (36) found that preheating the soil 45 to 50'C, allowing it to cool... (16) . Effective disease control is correlated with a corresponding reduction in inoculum density of pathogenic fungal propagules in solari zed soil (27, 32, 36, 71, 49, 3, 67, 22 ) . The reduction in inoculum density in solarized soil by thermal...

Avila, Francisco Antonio

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Distribution and Abundance Patterns of Spiders Inhabiting Cotton in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. L. Sterling Department of Entomology Texas A&M University Abstract Patterns of the distribution and abundance of spiders were determined in the major cotton growing areas of Texas during 1982-83. M isumenops spp., Oxyopes saiticus Hentz... to predict this neutrality is important since spiders could then be eliminated as an important factor in predicting the dynamics of other arthropods. The cotton fleahopper (Pseudatomoscelis seriatus [Reuter]) model (Hartstack and Sterling 1986) uses...

Dean, D.A.; Sterling, W.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Effects of larval nutrition, relative humidity, and temperature on survival, rate of development, and fecundity of the bollworm, Heliothis zea (Boddie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). These authors noted that the ef f sct of' drought conditions on the crop may cause a high mortality among the developing insects. Pearson and Plax- well-Darling (1958) found that in AFrica the abundance or scarcity of squares and flowers serving as food... throughout the entire growing season pearson and Maxwell-Darling (1958) Pound that in Africa Heliothis spp. larvae fed on developing Pruits of a variety , - of crop plants with maize being particularly favored. A ?devastating bollworm attack might...

Fisher, Michael Kilpatrick

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Biological control of Rhizoctonia solani in greenhouse bedding plant production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Comm!ttee) (Robert E. Pettit) (Member) (David id. Reed) (Member) "7~+ (Grant Yest) (Head of. Depart tment) Deceriber 1983 ABSTRACT Biological control of Rhizoctonia solani in greenhouse bedding plant production. IDecember 1983) John... iviichael Brown B. S, East Texas State University. Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr . A . E . Nightingale . Isolates of Trichoderma harzianum, T. hamatum, and Gliocladium spp. capable of inhibiting the growth of Rhizoctonia solani, which may cause...

Brown, John Michael

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Diarrheal Disease in Show Swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cause disease in humans. Contaminated water is the main source of Giardia spp. Bacterial Causes Swine dysentery or ?bloody dysentery? from infec- tion with Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae is a major cause of diarrheal disease in show pigs... (the same area as whipworms) and prevents reabsorption of fluids. Affected pigs severe- ly dehydrate and up to 30 percent can die. Most affected pigs will drink but will not eat. Pigs that recover are intermittent shedders of B. hyodysenteriae and are a...

Lawhorn, D. Bruce

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Psittacid herpesvirus associated with internal papillomatous disease and other tumors in psittacine birds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Aratinga spp.), and hawk-headed parrots (Deroptyus accipitrinus) (Graham, 1991; Gibbons et al., 2002; Hillyer et al., 1991; Phalen et al., 1997; Van der Heyden, 1988). IPD is characterized by mucosal papillomas affecting primarily the epithelium... of the oral cavity and cloaca, but are also observed in the esophagus, crop, proventriculus, ventriculus, conjunctiva, nasolacrimal duct, and bursa (Graham, 1991; Phalen et al., 1997). Grossly, mucosal papillomas are pink to grey-tan verrucous lesions...

Styles, Darrel Keith

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Autecology of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in tropical waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water and shellfish samples collected from estuaries, mangroves, and beaches along the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. An array of water quality parameters were also measured simultaneous with bacteria sampling. Both species of vibrio were associated with estuary and mangrove locations, and neither was isolated from sandy beaches. Densities of V. vulnificus were negatively correlated with salinity, 10--15 ppt being optimal. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from sites with salinities between 20 and 35 ppt, the highest densities occurring at 20 ppt. Densities of Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus for a tropical estuary surpassed those reported for temperate estuaries by several orders of magnitude. Both densities of total Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus in the water were directly related to densities of fecal coliforms, unlike V. vulnificus. The incidence of ONPG(+) strains among sucrose({minus}) Vibrio spp. served as an indicator of the frequency of V. vulnificus in this group. More than 63% of the V. vulnificus isolated were pathogenic. V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus occupy clearly separate niches within the tropical estuarine-marine ecosystem.

Rivera, S.; Lugo, T.; Hazen, T.C. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Contamination of stream fishes with chlorinated hydrocarbons from eggs of Great Lakes salmon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. have been stocked in the Great Lakes where they accumulate body burdens of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The transport of these contaminants to resident communities in spawning streams was studied in two tributaries of Lake Michigan accessible to anadromous spawners and one control tributary blocked to them. No polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT, or dieldrin were detected in the sediments or biota of the control stream, or in sediments of the test streams. However, trout Salmo spp. and, to a lesser extent, sculpins Cottus spp. accumulated PCBs and DDT as a result of eating contaminated salmon eggs. Eggs constituted as much as 87% (by weight) of the total stomach contents of trout collected during the salmon spawning season early October to early January. Salmon eggs contained 0.46-9.50 mg PCBs/kg,. and 0.14-1.80 mg DDT/kg. Consumption of eggs varied greatly among individual trout, and there was a strong correlation between numbers of eggs in the stomachs and PCB and DDT concentrations in the fillets.

Merna, J.W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

393

Effect of graphene on photoluminescence properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot hybrid structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene has been discovered to have two effects on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot (QD) hybrid structures, which were formed by covering monolayer graphene sheet on the multilayer ordered GeSi QDs sample surfaces. At the excitation of 488?nm laser line, the hybrid structure had a reduced PL intensity, while at the excitation of 325?nm, it had an enhanced PL intensity. The attenuation in PL intensity can be attributed to the transferring of electrons from the conducting band of GeSi QDs to the graphene sheet. The electron transfer mechanism was confirmed by the time resolved PL measurements. For the PL enhancement, a mechanism called surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) enhanced absorption mechanism is proposed, in which the excitation of SPP in the graphene is suggested. Due to the resonant excitation of SPP by incident light, the absorption of incident light is much enhanced at the surface region, thus leading to more exciton generation and a PL enhancement in the region. The results may be helpful to provide us a way to improve optical properties of low dimensional surface structures.

Chen, Y. L.; Ma, Y. J.; Wang, W. Q.; Ding, K.; Wu, Q.; Fan, Y. L.; Yang, X. J.; Zhong, Z. Y.; Jiang, Z. M., E-mail: zmjiang@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro and Nano Photonic Structures (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, D. D.; Xu, F. [SHU-SolarE R and D Lab, Department of Physics, College of Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of PIT-Tagged Spring/Summer Chinook and Summer Steelhead : 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS; BPA Project 199602000) began in 1996 with the objective of establishing a long term dataset of the survival rate of annual generations of salmon from their outmigration as smolts to their return to freshwater as adults to spawn (smolt-to-adult return rate; SAR). The study was implemented with the express need to address the question whether collecting juvenile fish at dams and transporting them downstream in barges and trucks and releasing them downstream of Bonneville Dam was compensating for the effect of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on survival of Snake Basin spring/summer Chinook salmon migrating through the hydrosystem. The Completion of this annual report for the CSS signifies the 12th outmigration year of hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon marked with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags as part of the CSS and the 9th complete brood year return as adults of those PIT-tagged fish (report covers adult returns from 1997-2006 hatchery Chinook juvenile migrations). In addition, the CSS has provided PIT-tags to on-going tagging operations for wild Chinook since 2002 (report covers adult returns from 1994-2006 wild Chinook juvenile migrations). The CSS tags wild steelhead on the lower Clearwater River and utilized wild and hatchery steelhead from other tagging operations in evaluations of transportation (report covers adult returns from 1997-2005 wild and hatchery steelhead migrations). The primary purpose of this report is to update the time series of smolt-to-adult survival rate data and related parameters with additional years of data since the completion of the CSS 10-yr retrospective analysis report (Schaller et al 2007). The 10-yr report provided a synthesis of the results from this ongoing study, the analytical approaches employed, and the evolving improvements incorporated into the study as reported in CSS annual progress reports. This current report specifically addresses the constructive comments of the most recent regional technical review conducted by the Independent Scientific Advisory Board and Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISAB and ISRP 2007). This report completes the 3-salt returns from migration years 2004 for wild and hatchery Chinook and steelhead (all returns are to Lower Granite Dam). For wild and hatchery Chinook, this report also provides 3-salt returns from migration year 2005 and 2-salt returns from migration year 2006 through a cutoff date of August 13, 2008. For wild and hatchery steelhead, it provides completed 2-salt returns for wild and hatchery steelhead that outmigrated in 2005 (any 3-salt returns of PIT-tagged steelhead are few, but will occur after July 1, 2008). All of the Chinook salmon evaluated in the CSS study exhibit a stream-type life history. All study fish used in this report were uniquely identifiable based on a PIT-tag implanted in the body cavity during (or before) the smolt life stage and retained through their return as adults. These tagged fish can then be detected as juveniles and adults at several locations of the Snake and Columbia rivers. Reductions in the number of individuals detected as the tagged fish grow older provide estimates of survival. This allows comparisons of survival over different life stages between fish with different experiences in the hydrosystem (e.g. transportation vs. in-river migrants and migration through various numbers of dams) as illustrated in Figure 1.1. The CSS is a long term study within the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC FWP) and is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Study design and analyses are conducted through a CSS Oversight Committee with representation from Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC), Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The Fish Passage Center (FPC) coordinates the PIT-tagging efforts, data management and preparation

Comparative Survival Study Oversight Committee and Fish Passage Center

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

397

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

Coates, John D.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL] [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL] [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL] [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL] [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D. [Oklahoma University; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Influence of hexavalent chromium on lactate-enriched Hanford groundwater microbial communities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial reduction and immobilization of chromate (Cr(VI)) is a plausible bioremediation strategy. However, higher Cr(VI) concentrations may impose stress on native Cr-reducing communities. We sought to determine if Cr(VI) would influence the lactate enriched native microbial community structure and function in groundwater from the Cr contaminated site at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were amended with lactate and Cr(VI) (0.0, 0.1 and 3.0 mg/L). Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI) concentrations, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition in bioreactors were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and some differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) was reduced in the bioreactors. With lactate enrichment, the native communities did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. Native bacterial communities were diverse, whereas after lactate enrichment, Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., were the most predominant groups in all bioreactors. Similarly, the Archaea diversity significantly decreased from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%), Halobacteriales (12%), Methanoregula (8%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%) after lactate enrichment. Composition of several key functional genes was distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant probes (chrA), Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result the 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not appear to give chromate reducing strains a competitive advantage for proliferation or for increasing Cr-reduction.

Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL] [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL] [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Podar, Mircea [ORNL] [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL] [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL] [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hantavirus testing in rodents of north-central New Mexico 1993-1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, an outbreak of a new strain of hantavirus in the southwestern US indicated that deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) was the primary carrier of the virus. In 1993, 1994, and 1995 the Ecological Studies Team (EST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory surveyed small mammal populations using live capture-recapture methods in Los Alamos County, New Mexico, to determine seroprevalence of hantavirus in this region. EST used trapping grids in 1993 and 1994 and used trapping webs in 1995. Grids were 120 m x 120 m (400 ft x 400 ft) with 144 trap stations at each grid. Three webs consisting of 148 traps each were used in 1995. Trapping took place over 4 to 8 consecutive nights. Programs CAPTURE and Distance were used to determine density estimates for grids and webs, respectively. Blood samples were analyzed in 1993 by the Centers for Disease Control and the University of New Mexico, School of Medicine. The 1994 and 1995 samples were analyzed by the University of New Mexico, School of Medicine. The deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) was the most commonly captured species at all locations except one site where voles (Microtus spp.) were the most commonly captured species. Other species sampled included: harvest mice (Reithrodontomys megalotis), woodrats (Neotoma spp.), shrews (Sorex spp.), white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), pinyon mice (Peromyscus trueii), and brush mouse (Peromyscus boylii). Results of the 1993, 1994, and 1995 testing identified a total overall seroprevalence rate among deer mice of approximately 5.5%, 4.2%, and 0%, respectively. Several other species tested positive for the hantavirus but it is uncertain if it is Sin Nombre virus. Further studies will be necessary to quantify seroprevalence rates in those species. Higher seroprevalence rates were found in males than females. Seroprevalence rates for Los Alamos County were much lower than elsewhere in the region.

Biggs, J.; Bennett, K.; Salisbury, M. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Design and Manufacture of the RF Power Supply and RF Transmission Line for SANAEM Project Prometheus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 1-5 MeV proton beamline is being built by the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority in collaboration with a number of graduate students from different universities. The most important aspect of the project, is to acquire the design ability and manufacturing capability of all the components locally. SPP will be an accelerator and beam diagnostics test facility and it will also serve the detector development community with its low beam current. This paper discusses the design and construction of the RF power supply and the RF transmission line components such as its waveguide converters and its circulator.

Turemen, G; Unel, G; Alacakir, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Surface Plasmon mediated near-field imaging and optical addressing in nanoscience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an overview of recent progress in plasmonics. We focus our study on the observation and excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with optical near-field microscopy. We discuss in particular recent applications of photon scanning tunnelling microscope (PSTM) for imaging of SPP propagating in metal and dielectric wave guides. We show how near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) can be used to optically and actively address remotely nano-objects such as quantum dots. Additionally we compare results obtained with near-field microscopy to those obtained with other optical far-field methods of analysis such as leakage radiation microscopy (LRM).

Drezet, A; Krenn, J R; Brun, M; Huant, S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Life history and habitat associations of the broad wood cockroach, Parcoblatta lata (Blattaria: Blattellidae) and other native cockroaches in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wood cockroaches are an important prey of the red-cockaded woodpecker, Picoides borealis, an endangered species inhabiting pine forests in the southern United States. These woodpeckers forage on the boles of live pine trees, but their prey consists of a high proportion of wood cockroaches, Parcoblatta spp., that are more commonly associated with dead plant material. Cockroach population density samples were conducted on live pine trees, dead snags and coarse woody debris on the ground. The studies showed that snags and logs are also important habitats of wood cockroaches in pine forests.

Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

2002-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Vegetation and climates in the Presidio basin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(TAMARIX GALLICA L ) predominate Mesquite is also common in sandy soils along arroyos and washes, as i- cat's c' aw (ACACIA SPP. ) (Kanseika, 1c!68). Another shrub of wide spread distribution in the desert is leatherstem (JATROPHA DIO1CA var. DIOICA... about 10 feet from thc thermometer which was $00-500 feet west of U. S. Route 67. The shade was provided by a leatherstem (JATROPHA DZOICA var. DIOICA -esse EX Cerv. ) The maximum-minimum thermometer was reset every morning at approximately 0850...

Harris, Bruce Roahen

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Optical Properties of Plasmonic Zone Plate Lens, SERS-active Substrate and Infrared Dipole Antenna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................................... 41 Table 4 Comparison of SP dispersion relation both in propagation direction (k sp,x ) and in the perpendicular direction (k z,d and k z,m ) of the metal/PMMA (? d = 2.34) interface for the selected metals at incident wavelength of 405 nm...?ZP, respectively, along z direction.............................................. 45 Figure 16 The effective refractive index Re(n eff ), n eff = ?/k 0 , and propagation length of SPPs (L spp ) as a function of slit width w. The slit is filled with (a) PMMA...

Kim, Hyun Chul

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

407

Water balance of Pin-Point and Flush-Flood irrigated rice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plant m '. The planting dates were May 26 and May 18 for the 1994 and 1995 growing seasons, respectively. At the first tiller stage, a mix of Quinclorac (Facet) and Bentazon (Basagran) herbicide was applied to the Flush-Flood (FF) plots only, at a... rate of 400g of active ingredient of Quinclorac and 800g of active 19 ingredient of Bentazon per hectare. The herbicide application was necessary to control mainly barnyardgrass (Kchinodoa spp. ) and sedges on the FF plots in both years. Pin- Point...

Roel Dellazoppa, Alvaro

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Amorphous Silicon Solar cells with a Core-Shell Nanograting Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We systematically investigate the optical behaviors of an amorphous silicon solar cell based on a core-shell nanograting structure. The horizontally propagating Bloch waves and Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) waves lead to significant absorption enhancements and consequently short-circuit current enhancements of this structure, compared with the conventional planar one. The perpendicular carrier collection makes this structure optically thick and electronically thin. An optimal design is achieved through full-field numerical simulation, and physical explanation is given. Our numerical results show that this configuration has ultrabroadband, omnidirectional and polarization-insensitive responses, and has a great potential in photovoltaics.

Yang, L; Okuno, Y; He, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Cloning and characterization of the Aspergillus nidulans spdA gene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, spermidine synthase and spermine synthase (Figure 1) All these biosynthedc steps are highly exothermic, and therefore are essentially irreversible (Ruiz-Herrera, 1994; Merali, 1999). The biosynthesis of the polyamine is regulated mainly by levels of ODC... activity in chicken COS cells (Manni et al, 1997; Kubota er al, 1997, Leroy er a/, , 1997), and depress cAMP synthesis by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase in Eschenc/na co/r, Magnapor/he gnsea, and Mucor spp (Wright et al, 1982, Choi et al, 1997, Orlowski...

Jin, Yuan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Cooking a Cuban Ajiaco: The Columbian Exchange in a Stewpot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to squeeze the juice of fresh lime (Citrus aurantifolia) — an early Spanish transplant to the West Indies, first domesticated in southeast Asia — over pip- ing-hot bowls of ajiaco at the dinner table.) American squashes (Cucurbita spp.) rank among the world... to these new cir- cumstances, perhaps its subtle suggestion that “Cuba is fated to suffer . . . a never-end- ing state of ferment” and doomed to “lack a stable, enduring core of cultural indic[ators]” was too radical even for revo- lutionaries to accept.24...

Cushman, Gregory T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sandia National Laboratories: Strategic Partnership Projects, Non-Federal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch WelcomeScienceProgramsSAND 2011-5054WEntity (SPP/NFE)

412

Sandia National Laboratories: Working with Sandia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch WelcomeScienceProgramsSAND 2011-5054WEntity (SPP/NFE)Working

413

SPPR Group Proposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,#2446Smalln n u aSPP Frequently Asked

414

SPPR Group Proposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,#2446Smalln n u aSPP Frequently

415

SPPR Group Proposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,#2446Smalln n u aSPP

416

Trichoderma: the genomics of opportunistic success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trichoderma is a genus of common filamentous fungi that display a remarkable range of lifestyles and interactions with other fungi, animals and plants. Because of their ability to antagonize plant-pathogenic fungi and to stimulate plant growth and defence responses, some Trichoderma strains are used for biological control of plant diseases. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in molecular ecology and genomics which indicate that the interactions of Trichoderma spp. with animals and plants may have evolved as a result of saprotrophy on fungal biomass (mycotrophy) and various forms of parasitism on other fungi (mycoparasitism), combined with broad environmental opportunism.

Druzhinina, Irina S.; Seiboth, Verena Seidl; Estrella, Alfredo Herrera; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Kenerley, Charles M.; Monte, Enrique; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Zeilinger, Susanne; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kubicek, Christian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Effects of Marine Mammals on Columbia River Salmon Listed under the Endangered Species Act : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 3 of 11.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most research on the Columbia and Snake Rivers in recent years has been directed to downstream migrant salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) losses at dams. Comparatively little attentions has been given to adult losses. Recently an estimated 378,4000 adult salmon and steelhead (O. mykiss) were unaccounted-for from Bonneville Dam to terminal areas upstream. It is now apparent that some of this loss was due to delayed mortality from wounded by marine mammals. This report reviews the recent literature to define predatory effects of marine mammals on Columbia River salmon.

Park, Donn L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Fungicidal control of Phthium Aphanidermatum in hydroponically grown tomatoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

San Antonio, Texas. The first step was to isolate the ~P thium spp. from the roots and plate them on petri dishes containing agar media. Corn meal agar was used as the nutrient medium as recommended by Eckert and Tsao (ll). However, the ingredients... minutes at 1Z1'C and 1. 05 kg/cm (15 2 psi). Afterwards, when the temperature dropped to about 45'C, the pimaricin and penicillin G were added (since penicillin G is heat labile, 11, 73). Then the selective medium was poured into sterile petri dishes...

Acra, Michel Aftim

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Property:EIA/861/OperatesGeneratingPlant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed JumpMoverNercErcot Jump to:NercSpp Jump

420

Property:EIA/861/Ownership | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed JumpMoverNercErcot Jump to:NercSpp JumpOwnership

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Property:EIA/861/RtoPjm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed JumpMoverNercErcot Jump to:NercSpp

422

Reef fish assemblages on hard banks in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

f~C~ h h d banks of the northwestern Gulf based on submersible observations 106 46. Comparison of coloration characters in Holacanthus spp. and their intermediates. Totals for scores on Feddern's patterns 1, 5, and 7 (comparative data from...' Figure 1. Hard banks of the northwestern Gulf of Nexico. eO p+ O 4 cp v+ A +~+~ 0~0 ~4 ~O + ohio+ 50 50 5 Z 100 III 0 100 150 150 Figure 2. Biotic zones known to occur on the hard banks of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Broken bar...

Dennis, George David

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Special Publication No. 6, Subject: Nematoda and Nematode Diseases, Part 3: Supergenera, Genera, Species, and Subspecies: F-M.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., 1912 h, 128-130 Filaria Mueller, 1787 Theiler, G., 1923 a, 28 Filaria Tornquist, ?., 1931 a, 379, 381, 385 Filaria Travassos, L. P., 1920 h, 69 Filaria Underhill, ?. M., 1920 ?, 227 Filaria Vogelsang-Wil??? ns^ E. G., 1928 d, 428 Filaria O....) sp. Johnston, T. H.; and Mawson, P. ?., 1940 c, 355, 356, 361, fig. 26 Calopsittacus novae-hollandiae : New South Wales Filaria (s.l.) spp. J. and M. Johnston, T. H.; and Mawson, P. ?., 1940 c, 369 Filaria (s.l.) sp. Johnston, T. H...

Doss, Mildred A.

424

Prevalence of Arcobacter species in Texas Gulf Coast oysters and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. butzleri reductions up to 98. 3'/o for bromine chloride and 99. 3% for C10z (120). In another Italian study, A. butzleri was found in all types of sewage sludge, ranging from 41'/o in anaerobically digested sludge to 80/o in activated and thickened... of Arcobacter spp. A study in a sewage plant in Italy showed that A. cryaerophilus was found in all types of sewage, but oxygen- activated sludge treatment followed by tertiary treatment with 2 ppm chlorine dioxide (CIOz) was effective in reducing the A...

Huston, Eileen Shih

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Evaluation of sustained release polylactate electron donors for removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

Brodie, E.L.; Joyner, D. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Conrad, M. E.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Mork, B.; Willet, A.; Koenigsberg, S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M. K.; Hazen, T. C.; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Thermal ecology of Naegleria fowleri from a power plant cooling reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pathogenic, free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of human primary amebic meningoencephalitis. N. fowleri has been isolated from thermally elevated aquatic environments worldwide, but temperature factors associated with occurrence of the amoeba remain undefined. In this study, a newly created cooling reservoir (Clinton Lake, Illinois) was surveyed for Naegleria spp. before and after thermal additions from a nuclear power plant. Water and sediment samples were collected from heated and unheated arms of the reservoir and analyzed for the presence of thermophilic Naegleria spp. and pathogenic N. fowleri. Amoebae were identified by morphology, in vitro cultivation, temperature tolerance, mouse pathogenicity assay, and DNA restriction fragment length analysis. N. fowleri was isolated from the thermally elevated arm but not from the ambient-temperature arm of the reservoir. The probability of isolating thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic N. fowleri increased significantly with temperature. Repetitive DNA restriction fragment profiles of the N. fowleri Clinton Lake isolates and a known N. fowleri strain of human origin were homogeneous.

Huizinga, H.W. (Illinois State Univ., Normal (USA)); McLaughlin, G.L. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Red HookIBay Ridge project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from these two areas to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Sediment samples were collected from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas. Tests and analyses were conducted. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests. Twenty-four individual sediment core samples were collected from these two areas and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Three composite sediment samples, representing Red Hook Channel and the two Bay Ridge Reaches to be dredged, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the three Red Hook Bay Ridge sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

Ashley, Paul

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

LONG-TERM CHANGES IN MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN FISH FROM THE MIDDLE SAVANNAH RIVER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total mercury levels were measured in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), ''sunfishes'' (Lepomis spp)., and ''catfish'' (primarily Ameiurus spp.) from 1971 to 2004 in the middle reaches of the Savannah River, which drains the coastal plain of the southeastern U.S. Mercury levels were highest in 1971 but declined over the next ten years due to the mitigation of point sources of industrial pollution. Mercury levels began to increase in the 1980s as a possible consequence of mercury inputs from tributaries and associated wetlands where mercury concentrations were significantly elevated in water and fish. Mercury levels in Savannah River fish decreased sharply in 2001-2003 coincident with a severe drought in the Savannah River basin, but returned to previous levels in 2004 with the resumption of normal precipitation. Regression models showed that mercury levels in Savannah River fish changed significantly over time and were affected by river discharge. Despite temporal changes, there was little overall difference in Savannah River fish tissue mercury levels between 1971 and 2004.

Paller, M; Bill Littrell, B

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

432

In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 {micro}M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water (<30 {micro}g L{sup -1} or 0.126 {micro}M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L{sup -1}) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 {micro}M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 {micro}M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp.

Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Stanford University; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A. [Stanford University; Cardenas, Erick [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Leigh, Mary Beth [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hwang, Chaichi [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ruan, Chuanmin [ORNL; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Van Nostrand, Joy [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Fields, Matthew Wayne [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Fendorf, Scott [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

How sulphate-reducing microorganisms cope with stress: Lessons from systems biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) are a phylogenetically diverse group of anaerobes encompassing distinct physiologies with a broad ecological distribution. As SRMs have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and various metals, an understanding of how these organisms respond to environmental stresses is of fundamental and practical importance. In this Review, we highlight recent applications of systems biology tools in studying the stress responses of SRMs, particularly Desulfovibrio spp., at the cell, population, community and ecosystem levels. The syntrophic lifestyle of SRMs is also discussed, with a focus on system-level analyses of adaptive mechanisms. Such information is important for understanding the microbiology of the global sulphur cycle and for developing biotechnological applications of SRMs for environmental remediation, energy production, biocorrosion control, wastewater treatment and mineral recovery.

Zhou, J.; He, Q.; Hemme, C.L.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hillesland, K.; Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; Hazen, T.C.; Stahl, D.A.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Constraint on the CKM angle $\\alpha$ from the experimental measurements of CP violation in $B_d^0 \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we study and try to find the constraint on the CKM angle $\\alpha$ from the experimental measurements of CP violation in $B_d^0 \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decay, as reported very recently by BaBar and Belle Collaborations. After considering uncertainties of the data and the ratio $r$ of penguin over tree amplitude, we found that: (a) strong constraint on both the CKM angle $\\alpha$ and the strong phase $\\delta$ can be obtained from the measured $\\spp$, $A_{\\pi\\pi}$: only the ranges of $86^\\circ \\leq \\alpha \\leq 148^\\circ$ and $31^\\circ \\leq \\delta \\leq 143^\\circ$ are still allowed by $1\\sigma$ of the averaged data; (b) For Belle's result alone, the limit on $\\alpha$ is $95^\\circ \\leq \\alpha \\leq 152^\\circ$. The angle $\\alpha$ larger than $90^\\circ$ is strongly preferred.

Lü, C D; L\\"u, Cai-Dian; Xiao, Zhenjun

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead (Oncoryhnchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1--August 31, 1996. This was the twelfth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish collected by species, (2) number of fin clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) total number of fish showing signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT), (4) percent of descaled fish, and (5) daily average river flow, powerhouse {number_sign}1 flow, powerhouse {number_sign}2 flow and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the water budget, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows during the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids.

McDonald, Robert (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Complete genome sequence of Stackebrandtia nassauensis type strain (LLR-40K-21T)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stackebrandtia nassauensis Labeda and Kroppenstedt (2005) is the type species of the genus Stackebrandtia, and a member of the actinobacterial family Glycomycetaceae. Strackebrandtia currently contains two species, which are differentiated from Glycomyces spp. by cellular fatty acid and menaquinone composition. Strain LLR-40K-21T is Gram-positive, aerobic, and nonmotile, with a branched substrate mycelium and on some media an aerial mycelium. The strain was originally isolated from a soil sample collected from a road side in Nassau, Bahamas. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the actinobacterial suborder Glycomycineae. The 6,841,557 bp long single replicon genome with its 6487 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Munk, Christine [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Jando, Marlen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Mayilraj, Shanmugam [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Dove Management in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spp. Panic grasses Pricklypoppy Sunflowers Wolfberry Plains bristlegrass Saw-leaf daisy Wheat Sorghum alum Snow-on-the-mountain Spurges Vetch Western ragweed 4 In both species, the female typically lays two eggs, each laid 1 day apart (Fig. 6... ?2 16 Plains bristlegrass 3 1 12/1?4/15 1 ?4? 1 ?2 12 Sorghum alum 6 2 12/1?5/31 1 ?4? 1 ?2 16 Sunflower, Maximilian 3 1 12/1?4/15 1 ?4? 1 ?2 20 Western ragweed 7.5 2.5 12/1?4/15 1 ?4? 1 ?2 20 Annuals, warm season Cowpea 6 15 5 4/1?5/31 1?2 20 Kenaf 1...

Taylor, Ben; Johnson, Jason; Roberson, Jay; Schwertner, T. Wayne; Silvy, Nova; Linex, Ricky

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reduction of Health Risks Due to Chromium(VI)Using Mesquite: A Potential Cr Phytoremediator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium is a transition metal extensively used in industry. Cr mining and industrial operations account for chromium wastes at Superfund sites in the United States. A study was performed to investigate the possibility of using mesquite (Prosopis spp.), which is an indigenous desert plant species, to remove Cr from contaminated sites. In this study, mesquite plants were grown in an agar-based medium containing 75 mg L-1 and 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI). The Cr content of leaf tissue (992 mg kg-1 of dry weight, from 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI)) indicated that mesquite could be classified as a chromium hyperaccumulator. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies performed to experimental samples showed that mesquite roots absorbed some of the supplied Cr(VI). However, the data analyses of plant tissues demonstrated that the absorbed Cr(VI) was fully reduced to Cr(III) in the leaf tissue.

Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.; Aldrich, Mary V.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Parsons, Jason G.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripples are observed to form sequentially outward from the groove edge, with the first one forming after 50 ps. A 1-D analytical model of electron heating and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation induced by the interaction of incoming laser pulse with the groove edge qualitatively explains the time-evloution of LIPSS formation.

Kafka, K R P; Li, H; Yi, A; Cheng, J; Chowdhury, E A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Nonlinear Photoemission Electron Micrographs of Plasmonic Nanoholes in Gold Thin Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy of isolated nanoholes in gold thin films map propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) launched from the lithographically patterned plasmonic structures. A damped sinusoidal elongated ring-like photoemission beat pattern is observed from the nanoholes, following low angle of incidence irradiation of these structures with sub-15 fs 780 nm laser pulses. A notable agreement between finite difference time domain simulations and experiment corroborates our assignment of the observed photoemission patterns to SPPs launched from isolated nanoholes and probed through nonlinear photoemission. We also demonstrate how the efficiency of coupling light waves into isolated plasmonic holes can be tuned by varying hole diameter. In this regard, a simple intuitive geometrical model, which accounts for the observed and simulated diameter dependent plasmonic response, is proposed. Overall, this study paves the way for designing nanohole assemblies where optical coupling and subsequent plasmon propagation can be rationally controlled through 2D SPP interferometry

Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Long-term Stewardship of Mixed Wastes: Passive Reactive Barriers for Simultaneous In Situ Remediation of Chlorinated Solvent, Heavy Metal and Radioactive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project report addresses one part of a 3-way collaboration between researchers (Drs. Robin Gerlach and Al Cunningham) at Montana State University's (MSU's) Center for Biofilm Engineering (CBE), (Dr. Brent Peyton at) the WSU/NSF IGERT Center for Multiphase Environmental Research (CMER) at Washington State University (WSU), and (Drs. William Apel and Frank Roberto at) the Biotechnology Department at the INEEL. Each part of this project is funded under a different contract with the Science Division of the US Department of Energy. The project is designed to evaluate the possibility to develop a subsurface remediation technology for mixed wastes at Department of Energy sites using a group of common soil bacteria of the genus Cellulomonas. We are seeking to gain a better understanding of microbial transformation of chromium, uranium, and carbon tetrachloride by Cellulomonas spp. in simulated subsurface environments.

Gerlach, Robin

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Low dimension structures and devices for new generation photonic technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low dimensional structures and devices are the key technological building blocks for new generation of electronic and photonic technology. Such structures and devices show novel properties and can be integrated into systems for wide applications in many areas, including medical, biological and military and advancement of science. In this invited talk, I will present the main results achieved in our competitive research program which aims to explore the application of the mesoscopic structures in light source, manipulation and imaging and integrate them into advanced systems. In the light source aspect, we have for the first time developed graphene mode-locked lasers which are in the process of commercialization. Nanocrystal Si embedded in dielectrics was formed by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. Si light emitting devices with external quantum efficiency of about 2.9×10{sup ?3}% for visible emission were demonstrated at room temperature and the color of emitted light can be tuned electrically from violet to white by varying the injected current. In light manipulation, loss compensation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using quantum well (QW) gain media was studied theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. The SPP propagation length was effectively elongated several times through electrical pumping. One and two microring resonators based on silicon on insulator and III-V semiconductors technologies have been successfully fabricated and they can be used as filter and switch in the photonic circuit. In imaging, both SPP and low dimension structures are investigated and resolution far beyond diffraction limit in visible range has been realized. The integration of the components in the three aspects into complicated systems is on the way.

Zhang, D. H.; Tang, D. Y.; Chen, T. P. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 679798 (Singapore); Mei, T. [Institute of Optoelectronic Materials and Technology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Yuan, X. C. [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Exiguobacterium genus: biodiversity and biogeography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract. Bacteria of the genus Exiguobacterium are low G + C, Gram-positive facultative anaerobes that have been repeatedly isolated from ancient Siberian permafrost. In addition, Exiguobacterium spp. have been isolated from markedly diverse sources, including Greenland Glacial ice, hot springs at Yellowstone National Park, the rhizosphere of plants, and the environment of food processing plants. Strains of this hereto little known bacterium that have been retrieved from such different (and often extreme) environments are worthy of attention as they are likely to be specifically adapted to such environments and to carry variations in the genome which may correspond to psychrophilic and thermophilic adaptations. However, comparative genomic investigations of Exiguobacterium spp. from different sources have been limited. In this study, we employed different molecular approaches for the comparative analysis of 24 isolates from markedly diverse environments including ancient Siberian permafrost and hot springs at Yellowstone National Park. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with I-CeuI (an intron-encoded endonuclease), AscI and NotI were optimized for the determination of genomic fingerprints of nuclease-producing isolates. The application of a DNA macroarray for 82 putative stress-response genes yielded strain-specific hybridization profiles. Cluster analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequence data, PFGE I-CeuI restriction patterns and hybridization profiles suggested that Exiguobacterium strains formed two distinct divisions that generally agreed with temperature ranges for growth. With few exceptions (e.g., Greenland ice isolate GIC31), psychrotrophic and thermophilic isolates belonged to different divisions.

Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Kathariou, Sophia [North Carolina State University; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Evaluation of Subsurface Flow and Free-water Surface Wetlands Treating NPR-3 Produced Water - Year No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of some of the activities conducted during the first year of a three-year cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Texaco relating to the treatment of produced water by constructed wetlands. The first year of the CRADA is for design, construction and acclimation of the wetland pilot units. The second and third years of the CRADA are for tracking performance of pilot wetlands as the plant and microbial communities mature. A treatment wetland is a proven technology for the secondary and tertiary treatment of produced water, storm water and other wastewaters. Treatment wetlands are typically classified as either free-water surface (FWS) or subsurface flow (SSF). Both FWS and SSF wetlands work well when properly designed and operated. This paper presents a collection of kinetic data gathered from pilot units fed a slipstream of Wyoming (NPR-3) produced water. The pilot units are set up outdoors to test climatic influences on treatment. Monitoring parameters include evapotranspiration, plant growth, temperature, and NPDES discharge limits. The pilot wetlands (FWS and SSF) consist of a series of 100-gal plastic tubs filled with local soils, gravel, sharp sand and native wetland plants (cattail (Typha spp.), bulrush (Scirpus spp.), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis)). Feed pumps control hydraulic retention time (HRT) and simple water control structures control the depth of water. The treated water is returned to the existing produced water treatment system. All NPDES discharge limits are met. Observations are included on training RMOTC summer students to do environmental work.

Myers, J. E.; Jackson, L. M.

2001-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fixation of inorganic carbon (as carbon dioxide) has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of a diverse suite of organic compounds that support the growth of heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess the importance of carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of one of the dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) present in situ. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon fixation pathway were identified in pure-cultures of M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Metagenome sequencing from the same environments also revealed genes for the 3-HP/4-HB pathway belonging to M. yellowstonensis populations, as well as genes for a complete reductive TCA cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable isotope (13CO2) labeling was used to measure the fixation of CO2 by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1, and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. Results showed that M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 fixes CO2 via the 3-HP/4-HB pathway with a fractionation factor of ~ 2.5 ‰. Direct analysis of the 13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C and microbial mat C showed that mat C is comprised of both DIC and non-DIC sources. The estimated contribution of DIC carbon to biomass C (> ~ 35%) is reasonably consistent with the relative abundance of known chemolithoautotrophs and corresponding CO2 fixation pathways detected in metagenome sequence. The significance of DIC as a major source of carbon for Fe-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions in these systems that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms such as Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.

Jennings, Ryan; Whitmore, Laura M.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Genomic Analyses of Bacterial Porin-Cytochrome Gene Clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.

Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

447

Linking ceragenins to water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceragenins were used to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. While ceragenins have been used on bio-medical devices, use of ceragenins on water-treatment membranes is novel. Biofouling impacts membrane separation processes for many industrial applications such as desalination, waste-water treatment, oil and gas extraction, and power generation. Biofouling results in a loss of permeate flux and increase in energy use. Creation of biofouling resistant membranes will assist in creation of clean water with lower energy usage and energy with lower water usage. Five methods of attaching three different ceragenin molecules were conducted and tested. Biofouling reduction was observed in the majority of the tests, indicating the ceragenins are a viable solution to biofouling on water treatment membranes. Silane direct attachment appears to be the most promising attachment method if a high concentration of CSA-121a is used. Additional refinement of the attachment methods are needed in order to achieve our goal of several log-reduction in biofilm cell density without impacting the membrane flux. Concurrently, biofilm forming bacteria were isolated from source waters relevant for water treatment: wastewater, agricultural drainage, river water, seawater, and brackish groundwater. These isolates can be used for future testing of methods to control biofouling. Once isolated, the ability of the isolates to grow biofilms was tested with high-throughput multiwell methods. Based on these tests, the following species were selected for further testing in tube reactors and CDC reactors: Pseudomonas ssp. (wastewater, agricultural drainage, and Colorado River water), Nocardia coeliaca or Rhodococcus spp. (wastewater), Pseudomonas fluorescens and Hydrogenophaga palleronii (agricultural drainage), Sulfitobacter donghicola, Rhodococcus fascians, Rhodobacter katedanii, and Paracoccus marcusii (seawater), and Sphingopyxis spp. (groundwater). The testing demonstrated the ability of these isolates to be used for biofouling control testing under laboratory conditions. Biofilm forming bacteria were obtained from all the source water samples.

Hibbs, Michael R.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Feng, Yanshu (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Savage, Paul B. (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Pollard, Jacob (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Branda, Steven S.; Goeres, Darla (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Stafslien, Shane (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Marry, Christopher; Jones, Howland D. T.; Lichtenberger, Alyssa; Kirk, Matthew F.; McGrath, Lucas K. (LMATA, Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Multigrid and Krylov Solvers for Large Scale Finite Element Groundwater Flow Simulations on Distributed Memory Parallel Platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report we present parallel solvers for large linear systems arising from the finite-element discretization of the three-dimensional steady-state groundwater flow problem. Our solvers are based on multigrid and Krylov subspace methods. The parallel implementation is based on a domain decomposition strategy with explicit message passing using NX and MPI libraries. We have tested our parallel implementations on the Intel Paragon XP/S 150 supercomputer using up to 1024 parallel processors and on other parallel platforms such as SGI/Power Challenge Array, Cray/SGI Origin 2000, Convex Exemplar SPP-1200, and IBM SP using up to 64 processors. We show that multigrid can be a scalable algorithm on distributed memory machines. We demonstrate the effectiveness of parallel multigrid based solvers by solving problems requiring more than 70 million nodes in less than a minute. This is more than 25 times faster than the diagonal preconditioned conjugate gradient method which is one of the more popular methods for large sparse linear systems. Our results also show that multigrid as a stand alone solver works best for problems with smooth coefficients, but for rough coefficients it is best used as a preconditioner for a Krylov subspace method such as the conjugate gradient method. We show that even for extremely heterogeneous systems the multigrid pre-conditioned conjugate gradient method is at least 10 times faster than the diagonally preconditioned conjugate gradient method.

Mahinthakumar, K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Efforts, US Geological Survey Report, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attended to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first objective was to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort included measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective was to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the fourth year of a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Challenges for highest energy circular colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new tunnel of 80–100 km circumference could host a 100 TeV centre-of-mass energy-frontier proton collider (FCC-hh/VHE-LHC), with a circular lepton collider (FCCee/TLEP) as potential intermediate step, and a leptonhadron collider (FCC-he) as additional option. FCC-ee, operating at four different energies for precision physics of the Z, W, and Higgs boson and the top quark, represents a significant push in terms of technology and design parameters. Pertinent R&D efforts include the RF system, topup injection scheme, optics design for arcs and final focus, effects of beamstrahlung, beam polarization, energy calibration, and power consumption. FCC-hh faces other challenges, such as high-field magnet design, machine protection and effective handling of large synchrotron radiation power in a superconducting machine. All these issues are being addressed by a global FCC collaboration. A parallel design study in China prepares for a similar, but smaller collider, called CepC/SppC.

Benedikt, M; Wenninger, J; Zimmermann, F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Can dispersal mode predict corridor effects on plant parasites?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat corridors, a common management strategy for increasing connectivity in fragmented landscapes, have experimentally validated positive influences on species movement and diversity. However, long-standing concerns that corridors could negatively impact native species by spreading antagonists, such as disease, remain largely untested. Using a large-scale, replicated experiment, we evaluated whether corridors increase the incidence of plant parasites. We found that corridor impacts varied with parasite dispersal mode. Connectivity provided by corridors increased incidence of biotically dispersed parasites (galls on Solidago odora) but not of abiotically dispersed parasites (foliar fungi on S. odora and three Lespedeza spp.). Both biotically and abiotically dispersed parasites responded to edge effects, but the direction of responses varied across species. Although our results require additional tests for generality to other species and landscapes, they suggest that, when establishing conservation corridors, managers should focus on mitigating two potential negative effects: the indirect effects of narrow corridors in creating edges and direct effects of corridors in enhancing connectivity of biotically dispersed parasites.

Sullivan, Lauren, L.; Johnson, Brenda, L.; Brudvig, Lars, A.; Haddad, Nick, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The initial phase of a Longleaf Pine-Wiregrass Savanna restoration: species establishment and community responses.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AbstractAbstract The significant loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem in the southeastern United States has serious implications for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In response to this loss, we have initiated a long-term and landscape-scale restoration experiment at the 80,125 ha (310 mi2) Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. Aristida beyrichiana (wiregrass), an important and dominant grass (i.e., a “matrix” species) of the longleaf pine savanna understory, and 31 other herbaceous “non-matrix” species were planted at six locations throughout SRS in 2002 and 2003. Of the 36,056 transplanted seedlings, 75% were still alive in June 2004, while mean 1–2 year survival across all planted species was 48%. Lespedeza hirta (hairy lespedeza) exhibited the greatest overall survival per 3 ×3 m cell at 95%, whereas Schizachyrium spp. (little bluestem) exhibited the greatest mean cover among individual species at 5.9%. Wiregrass survival and cover were significantly reduced when planted with non-matrix species. Aggregate cover of all planted species in restored cells averaged 25.9% in 2006. High rates of survival and growth of the planted species resulted in greater species richness (SR), diversity, and vegetative cover in restored cells. Results suggest that the loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem may be ameliorated through restoration efforts and illustrate the positive impact of restoration plantings on biodiversity and vegetative cover.

Aschenbach, Todd, A; Foster, Bryan, L.; Imm, Donald, W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Comparative genome analysis of Bacillus cereus group genomes withBacillus subtilis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Genome features of the Bacillus cereus group genomes (representative strains of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis sub spp israelensis) were analyzed and compared with the Bacillus subtilis genome. A core set of 1,381 protein families among the four Bacillus genomes, with an additional set of 933 families common to the B. cereus group, was identified. Differences in signal transduction pathways, membrane transporters, cell surface structures, cell wall, and S-layer proteins suggesting differences in their phenotype were identified. The B. cereus group has signal transduction systems including a tyrosine kinase related to two-component system histidine kinases from B. subtilis. A model for regulation of the stress responsive sigma factor sigmaB in the B. cereus group different from the well studied regulation in B. subtilis has been proposed. Despite a high degree of chromosomal synteny among these genomes, significant differences in cell wall and spore coat proteins that contribute to the survival and adaptation in specific hosts has been identified.

Anderson, Iain; Sorokin, Alexei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Reznik, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anamitra; Mikhailova, Natalia; Burd, Henry; Joukov, Victor; Kaznadzey, Denis; Walunas, Theresa; D'Souza, Mark; Larsen, Niels; Pusch,Gordon; Liolios, Konstantinos; Grechkin, Yuri; Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman,Eugene; Chu, Lien; Fonstein, Michael; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Overbeek, Ross; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

454

SPRUCE: Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

SPRUCE is an experiment to assess the response of northern peatland ecosystems to increases in temperature and exposures to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. It is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a Picea mariana [black spruce] - Sphagnum spp. bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. It is an ecosystem considered especially vulnerable to climate change, and anticipated to be near its tipping point with respect to climate change. Responses to warming and interactions with increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are anticipated to have important feedbacks on the atmosphere and climate, because of the high carbon stocks harbored by such ecosystems.[copied from http://mnspruce.ornl.gov/] While some data files are restricted to access by project members only, others are available for public download now, even as research is being actively conducted.

455

An Assessment of the Status of Captive Broodstock Technology of Pacific Salmon, 1995 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for the refinement and use of captive broodstock technology for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) by bringing together information on the husbandry techniques, genetic risks, physiology, nutrition, and pathology affecting captive broodstocks. Captive broodstock rearing of Pacific salmon is an evolving technology, as yet without well defined standards. At present, we regard captive rearing of Pacific salmon as problematic: high mortality rates and low egg viability were common in the programs we reviewed for this report. One of the most important elements in fish husbandry is the culture environment itself. Many captive broodstock programs for Pacific salmon have reared fish from smolt-to-adult in seawater net-pens, and most have shown success in providing gametes for recovery efforts. However, some programs have lost entire brood years to diseases that transmitted rapidly in this medium. Current programs for endangered species of Pacific salmon rear most fish full-term to maturity in fresh well-water, since ground water is low in pathogens and thus helps ensure survival to adulthood. Our review suggested that captive rearing of fish in either freshwater, well-water, or filtered and sterilized seawater supplied to land-based tanks should produce higher survival than culture in seawater net-pens.

Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnaken, Conrad V.W.; Hard, Jeffrey J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries and Limnological Research : 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program resulted from a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project. This project will model biological responses to reservoir operations, evaluate the effects of releasing hatchery origin kokanee salmon and rainbow trout on the fishery, and evaluate the success of various stocking strategies. In 1996, limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, and tagging data were collected. Mean reservoir elevation, storage volume and water retention time were reduced in 1996 relative to the last five years. In 1996, Lake Roosevelt reached a yearly low of 1,227 feet above mean sea level in April, a yearly high of 1,289 feet in July, and a mean yearly reservoir elevation of 1,271.4 feet. Mean monthly water retention times in Lake Roosevelt during 1996 ranged from 15.7 days in May to 49.2 days in October. Average zooplankton densities and biomass were lower in 1996 than 1995. Daphnia spp. and total zooplankton densities peaked during the summer, whereas minimum densities occurred during the spring. Approximately 300,000 kokanee salmon and 400,000 rainbow trout were released into Lake Roosevelt in 1996. The authors estimated 195,628 angler trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1996 with an economic value of $7,629,492.

Cichosz, Thomas A.; Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John; Scholz, Allan; Tilson, Mary Beth

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Radionuclides in Small Mammals Collected at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility during 2001-- 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rodents are effective indicators of environmental contamination and the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Mitigation Action Plan specifies the (radionuclide) comparison of small mammals to baseline levels to determine if there are any impacts as a result of operations. Consequently, samples of (whole body) field mice (Peromyscus spp.) were collected from within the grounds of the DARHT facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 15, from 2001 through 2003. Samples were analyzed for {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U. Results, which represent three years since the start of operations in 2000, were compared with baseline statistical reference level (BSRL) data established over a four-year-long preoperational period. Most radionuclides in mice were either at nondetectable levels or within BSRLs. The few radionuclides that were above BSRLs included U isotopes; and the ratios of some samples indicated depleted U sources. Although the amounts of U in some samples were just above BSRLs, and since depleted U is less soluble and less toxic (chemical and radioactive) than naturally occurring U, the very small levels in the mice collected around the DARHT facility grounds are unlikely to pose a threat to predators that feed upon them.

P.R. Fresquez

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

458

Heavy Metal Contamination in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberian Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula. We analyzed heavy metal concentrations in lichen (Cetraria cucullata), moss (Hylocomium splendens), soils, lake sediment, freshwater fish (Salvelinus alpinus, Lota lota, and Coregonus spp.) and collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus) from 13 sites between 30 and 300 km from Norilsk. Element concentrations were low in both C. cucullata and H. splendens, although concentrations of Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, and Pb were significantly higher than those in Arctic Alaska, probably due to natural differences in the geochemical environments. Inorganic surface soils had significantly higher concentrations of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Mg than inorganic soils at depth, although a lake sediment core from the eastern Taimyr Peninsula indicated no recent enrichment by atmospherically transported elements. Tissue concentrations of heavy metals in fish and lemming were not elevated relative to other Arctic sites. Our results show that the impact of the Norilsk smelting complex is primarily localized rather than regional, and does not extend northward beyond 100 km.

Allen-Gil, Susan M.; Ford, Jesse; Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Monetti, Matthew; Vlasova, Tamara; Landers, Dixon H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The remedial investigation of marine sediment at the United Heckathorn Superfund site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The former United Heckathom site in Richmond, California, was used to process and package chlorinated pesticides from the 1940s to the mid-1960s. These activities resulted in the contamination of upland soils and marine sediment in the adjacent waterways. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was requested by USEPA to conduct a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS). of the marine portion of the site. The objectives of this RI are to determine the extent of pesticide contamination in inner Richmond Harbor, estimate the total volume of contaminated sediment, characterize the subsurface geology; characterize the biological effects of contaminated sediment; and characterize the quality of effluent derived from dewatered sediment through treatability testing. Sediment cores were collected from 53 stations. Vertical subsamples from each sediment core were analyzed for chlorinated pesticides. Sediment from selected cores was also analyzed for other contaminants. Younger Bay Mud (YBM) sediment from multiple stations was mixed to form composite samples representing various segments of the study area. These composites were used for solid-phase toxicity and bioaccumulation tests, and the preparation of liquid-phase samples for treatability testing. The probable quality of effluent produced by dewatering sediment was evaluated by chemical and toxicological testing of suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) and elutriate samples.

White, P.J.; Kohn, N.P.; Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Neural regeneration protein is a novel chemoattractive and neuronal survival-promoting factor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neurogenesis and neuronal migration are the prerequisites for the development of the central nervous system. We have identified a novel rodent gene encoding for a neural regeneration protein (NRP) with an activity spectrum similar to the chemokine stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1, but with much greater potency. The Nrp gene is encoded as a forward frameshift to the hypothetical alkylated DNA repair protein AlkB. The predicted protein sequence of NRP contains domains with homology to survival-promoting peptide (SPP) and the trefoil protein TFF-1. The Nrp gene is first expressed in neural stem cells and expression continues in glial lineages. Recombinant NRP and NRP-derived peptides possess biological activities including induction of neural migration and proliferation, promotion of neuronal survival, enhancement of neurite outgrowth and promotion of neuronal differentiation from neural stem cells. NRP exerts its effect on neuronal survival by phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 and Akt kinases, whereas NRP stimulation of neural migration depends solely on p44/42 MAP kinase activity. Taken together, the expression profile of Nrp, the existence in its predicted protein structure of domains with similarities to known neuroprotective and migration-inducing factors and the high potency of NRP-derived synthetic peptides acting in femtomolar concentrations suggest it to be a novel gene of relevance in cellular and developmental neurobiology.

Gorba, Thorsten [Neuren Pharmaceuticals Ltd., PO Box 9923, Newmarket, Auckland 1031 (New Zealand); Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, 2-6 Park Avenue, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Bradoo, Privahini [Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, 2-6 Park Avenue, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Antonic, Ana [Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, 2-6 Park Avenue, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Marvin, Keith [Neuren Pharmaceuticals Ltd., PO Box 9923, Newmarket, Auckland 1031 (New Zealand); Liu, Dong-Xu [Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, 2-6 Park Avenue, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Lobie, Peter E. [Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, 2-6 Park Avenue, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Reymann, Klaus G. [Leibnitz Institute for Neurobiology, Brenneckestrasse 6, 39118 Magdeburg (Germany); Gluckman, Peter D. [Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, 2-6 Park Avenue, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Sieg, Frank [Neuren Pharmaceuticals Ltd., PO Box 9923, Newmarket, Auckland 1031 (New Zealand)]. E-mail: fsieg@neurenpharma.com

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

First proton--proton collisions at the LHC as observed with the ALICE detector: measurement of the charged particle pseudorapidity density at sqrt(s) = 900 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On 23rd November 2009, during the early commissioning of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), two counter-rotating proton bunches were circulated for the first time concurrently in the machine, at the LHC injection energy of 450 GeV per beam. Although the proton intensity was very low, with only one pilot bunch per beam, and no systematic attempt was made to optimize the collision optics, all LHC experiments reported a number of collision candidates. In the ALICE experiment, the collision region was centred very well in both the longitudinal and transverse directions and 284 events were recorded in coincidence with the two passing proton bunches. The events were immediately reconstructed and analyzed both online and offline. We have used these events to measure the pseudorapidity density of charged primary particles in the central region. In the range |eta| < 0.5, we obtain dNch/deta = 3.10 +- 0.13 (stat.) +- 0.22 (syst.) for all inelastic interactions, and dNch/deta = 3.51 +- 0.15 (stat.) +- 0.25 (syst.) for non-single diffractive interactions. These results are consistent with previous measurements in proton--antiproton interactions at the same centre-of-mass energy at the CERN SppS collider. They also illustrate the excellent functioning and rapid progress of the LHC accelerator, and of both the hardware and software of the ALICE experiment, in this early start-up phase.

The ALICE Collaboration; K. Aamodt; N. Abel; U. Abeysekara; A. Abrahantes Quintana; A. Acero; D. Adamova; M. M. Aggarwal; G. Aglieri Rinella; A. G. Agocs; S. Aguilar Salazar; Z. Ahammed; A. Ahmad; N. Ahmad; S. U. Ahn; R. Akimoto; A. Akindinov; D. Aleksandrov; B. Alessandro; R. Alfaro Molina; A. Alici; E. Almaraz Avina; J. Alme; T. Alt; V. Altini; S. Altinpinar; C. Andrei; A. Andronic; G. Anelli; V. Angelov; C. Anson; T. Anticic; F. Antinori; S. Antinori; K. Antipin; D. Antonczyk; P. Antonioli; A. Anzo; L. Aphecetche; H. Appelshauser; S. Arcelli; R. Arceo; A. Arend; N. Armesto; R. Arnaldi; T. Aronsson; I. C. Arsene; A. Asryan; A. Augustinus; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; J. Aysto; M. D. Azmi; S. Bablok; M. Bach; A. Badala; Y. W. Baek; S. Bagnasco; R. Bailhache; R. Bala; A. Baldisseri; A. Baldit; J. Ban; R. Barbera; G. G. Barnafoldi; L. Barnby; V. Barret; J. Bartke; F. Barile; M. Basile; V. Basmanov; N. Bastid; B. Bathen; G. Batigne; B. Batyunya; C. Baumann; I. G. Bearden; B. Becker; I. Belikov; R. Bellwied; E. Belmont-Moreno; A. Belogianni; L. Benhabib; S. Beole; I. Berceanu; A. Bercuci; E. Berdermann; Y. Berdnikov; L. Betev; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; L. Bianchi; N. Bianchi; C. Bianchin; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Bilandzic; L. Bimbot; E. Biolcati; A. Blanc; F. Blanco; F. Blanco; D. Blau; C. Blume; M. Boccioli; N. Bock; A. Bogdanov; H. Boggild; M. Bogolyubsky; J. Bohm; L. Boldizsar; M. Bombara; C. Bombonati; M. Bondila; H. Borel; V. Borshchov; C. Bortolin; S. Bose; L. Bosisio; F. Bossu; M. Botje; S. Bottger; G. Bourdaud; B. Boyer; M. Braun; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; M. Bregant; T. Breitner; G. Bruckner; R. Brun; E. Bruna; G. E. Bruno; D. Budnikov; H. Buesching; K. Bugaev; P. Buncic; O. Busch; Z. Buthelezi; D. Caffarri; X. Cai; H. Caines; E. Camacho; P. Camerini; M. Campbell; V. Canoa Roman; G. P. Capitani; G. Cara Romeo; F. Carena; W. Carena; F. Carminati; A. Casanova Diaz; M. Caselle; J. Castillo Castellanos; J. F. Castillo Hernandez; V. Catanescu; E. Cattaruzza; C. Cavicchioli; P. Cerello; V. Chambert; B. Chang; S. Chapeland; A. Charpy; J. L. Charvet; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Cherney; C. Cheshkov; B. Cheynis; E. Chiavassa; V. Chibante Barroso; D. D. Chinellato; P. Chochula; K. Choi; M. Chojnacki; P. Christakoglou; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; F. Chuman; C. Cicalo; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; J. Cleymans; O. Cobanoglu; J. -P. Coffin; S. Coli; A. Colla; G. Conesa Balbastre; Z. Conesa del Valle; E. S. Conner; P. Constantin; G. Contin; J. G. Contreras; Y. Corrales Morales; T. M. Cormier; P. Cortese; I. Cortes Maldonado; M. R. Cosentino; F. Costa; M. E. Cotallo; E. Crescio; P. Crochet; E. Cuautle; L. Cunqueiro; J. Cussonneau; A. Dainese; H. H. Dalsgaard; A. Danu; I. Das; S. Das; A. Dash; S. Dash; G. O. V. de Barros; A. De Caro; G. de Cataldo; J. de Cuveland; A. De Falco; M. de Gaspari; J. de Groot; D. De Gruttola; A. P. de Haas; N. De Marco; R. de Rooij; S. De Pasquale; G. de Vaux; H. Delagrange; G. Dellacasa; A. Deloff; V. Demanov; E. Denes; A. Deppman; G. D~RErasmo; D. Derkach; A. Devaux; D. Di Bari; C. Di Giglio; S. Di Liberto; A. Di Mauro; P. Di Nezza; M. Dialinas; L. Diaz; R. Diaz; T. Dietel; H. Ding; R. Divia; O. Djuvsland; G. do Amaral Valdiviesso; V. Dobretsov; A. Dobrin; T. Dobrowolski; B. Donigus; I. Dominguez; D. M. M. Don; O. Dordic; A. K. Dubey; J. Dubuisson; L. Ducroux; P. Dupieux; A. K. Dutta Majumdar; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; D. Elia; D. Emschermann; A. Enokizono; B. Espagnon; M. Estienne; D. Evans; S. Evrard; G. Eyyubova; C. W. Fabjan; D. Fabris; J. Faivre; D. Falchieri; A. Fantoni; M. Fasel; R. Fearick; A. Fedunov; D. Fehlker; V. Fekete; D. Felea; B. Fenton-Olsen; G. Feofilov; A. Fernandez Tellez; E. G. Ferreiro; A. Ferretti; R. Ferretti; M. A. S. Figueredo; S. Filchagin; R. Fini; F. M. Fionda; E. M. Fiore; M. Floris; Z. Fodor; S. Foertsch; P. Foka; S. Fokin; F. Formenti; E. Fragiacomo; M. Fragkiadakis; U. Frankenfeld; A. Frolov; U. Fuchs; F. Furano; C. Furget; M. Fusco Girard; J. J. Gaardhoje; S. Gadrat; M. Gagliardi; A. Gago; M. Gallio; P. Ganoti; M. S. Ganti; C. Garabatos; C. Garc; J. Gebelein; R. Gemme; M. Germain; A. Gheata; M. Gheata; B. Ghidini; P. Ghosh; G. Giraudo; P. Giubellino; E. Gladysz-Dziadus; R. Glasow; P. Glassel; A. Glenn; R. Gomez; H. Gonzalez Santos; L. H. Gonzalez-Trueba; P. Gonzalez-Zamora; S. Gorbunov; Y. Gorbunov; S. Gotovac; H. Gottschlag; V. Grabski; R. Grajcarek; A. Grelli; A. Grigoras; C. Grigoras; V. Grigoriev; A. Grigoryan; B. Grinyov; N. Grion; P. Gros; J. F. Grosse-Oetringhaus; J. -Y. Grossiord; R. Grosso; C. Guarnaccia; F. Guber; R. Guernane; B. Guerzoni; K. Gulbrandsen; H. Gulkanyan; T. Gunji; A. Gupta; R. Gupta; H. -A. Gustafsson; H. Gutbrod; O. Haaland; C. Hadjidakis; M. Haiduc; H. Hamagaki; G. Hamar; J. Hamblen; B. H. Han; J. W. Harris; M. Hartig; A. Harutyunyan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Structural insights into the modulation of the redox properties of two Geobacter sulfurreducens homologous triheme cytochromes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The redox properties of a periplasmic triheme cytochrome, PpcB from Geobacter sulfurreducens, were studied by NMR and visible spectroscopy. The structure of PpcB was determined by X-ray diffraction. PpcB is homologous to PpcA (77% sequence identity), which mediates cytoplasmic electron transfer to extracellular acceptors and is crucial in the bioenergetic metabolism of Geobacter spp. The heme core structure of PpcB in solution, probed by 2D-NMR, was compared to that of PpcA. The results showed that the heme core structures of PpcB and PpcA in solution are similar, in contrast to their crystal structures where the heme cores of the two proteins differ from each other. NMR redox titrations were carried out for both proteins and the order of oxidation of the heme groups was determined. The microscopic properties of PpcB and PpcA redox centers showed important differences: (1) the order in which hemes become oxidized is III-I-IV for PpcB, as opposed to I-IV-III for PpcA; (2) the redox-Bohr effect is also different in the two proteins. The different redox features observed between PpcB and PpcA suggest that each protein uniquely modulates the properties of their co-factors to assure effectiveness in their respective metabolic pathways. The origins of the observed differences are discussed.

Morgado, L.; Bruix, M.; Orshonsky, V.; Londer, Y. Y.; Duke, N. E. C.; Yang, X.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Schiffer, M.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. Nova de Lisboa; Insti. de Quimica-Fisica

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Redox-linked conformational changes of a multiheme cytochrome from Geobacter sulfurreducens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiheme c-type cytochromes from members of the Desulfovibrionacea and Geobactereacea families play crucial roles in the bioenergetics of these microorganisms. Thermodynamic studies using NMR and visible spectroscopic techniques on tetraheme cytochromes c {sub 3} isolated from Desulfovibrio spp. and more recently on a triheme cytochrome from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed that the properties of each redox centre are modulated by the neighbouring redox centres enabling these proteins to perform energy transduction and thus contributing to cellular energy conservation. Electron/proton transfer coupling relies on redox-linked conformational changes that were addressed for some multiheme cytochromes from the comparison of protein structure of fully reduced and fully oxidised forms. In this work, we identify for the first time in a multiheme cytochrome the simultaneous presence of two different conformations in solution. This was achieved by probing the different oxidation stages of a triheme cytochrome isolated from G. sulfurreducens using 2D-NMR techniques. The results presented here will be the foundations to evaluate the modulation of the redox centres properties by conformational changes that occur during the reoxidation of a multiheme protein.

Morgado, Leonor [Requimte - CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Bruix, Marta [Departamento de Espectroscopia y Estructura Molecular, Instituto de Quimica-Fisica 'Rocasolano', CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Londer, Yuri Y. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Pokkuluri, P. Raj [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Schiffer, Marianne [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Salgueiro, Carlos A. [Requimte - CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)]. E-mail: csalgueiro@dq.fct.unl.pt

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

464

The bovine tuberculosis burden in cattle herds in zones with low dose radiation pollution in the Ukraine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe a study of the tuberculosis (TB) incidence in cattle exposed to low doses of radiation resulting from the Chernobyl (pronounced ‘Chornobyl’ in Ukrainian) nuclear plant catastrophe in 1986. The purpose of the study was to determine if ionising radiation influences the number of outbreaks of bovine TB and their severity on farms in the Kyiv, Cherkasy and Chernigiv regions of the Ukraine. These farms are all located within a 200 km radius of Chernobyl and have had low?dose radiation pollution. Pathological and blood samples were taken from cattle in those regions that had positive TB skin tests. Mycobacterium spp. were isolated, differentiated by PCR, analysed and tested in guinea?pigs and rabbits. Species differentiation showed a significant percentage of atypical mycobacteria, which resulted in the allergic reactions to tuberculin antigen in the skin test. Mixed infection of M. bovis and M. avium subsp. hominissuis was found in three cases. The results concluded that low?dose radiation plays a major role in the occurrence of bovine TB in regions affected by the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

Weller, Richard E.; Skrypnyk, Artem; Zavgorodniy, Andriy; Stegniy, Borys; Gerilovych, Anton; Kutsan, Oleksandr; Pozmogova, Svitlana; Sapko, Svitlana

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Rapid, potentially automatable, method extract biomarkers for HPLC/ESI/MS/MS to detect and identify BW agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program proposes to concentrate on the rapid recovery of signature biomarkers based on automated high-pressure, high-temperature solvent extraction (ASE) and/or supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) to produce lipids, nucleic acids and proteins sequentially concentrated and purified in minutes with yields especially from microeukaryotes, Gram-positive bacteria and spores. Lipids are extracted in higher proportions greater than classical one-phase, room temperature solvent extraction without major changes in lipid composition. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with or without derivatization, electrospray ionization (ESI) and highly specific detection by mass spectrometry (MS) particularly with (MS){sup n} provides the detection, identification and because the signature lipid biomarkers are both phenotypic as well as genotypic biomarkers, insights into potential infectivity of BW agents. Feasibility has been demonstrated with detection, identification, and determination of infectious potential of Cryptosporidium parvum at the sensitivity of a single oocyst (which is unculturable in vitro) and accurate identification and prediction, pathogenicity, and drug-resistance of Mycobacteria spp.

White, D.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Science Div.; Burkhalter, R.S.; Smith, C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology; Whitaker, K.W. [Microbial Insights, Inc., Rockford, TN (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1999-2003 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has been conducting Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) research since the early 1990s. NATURES studies have looked at a variety of mechanisms to enhance production of wild-like salmonids from hatcheries. The goal of NATURES research is to develop fish culture techniques that enable hatcheries to produce salmon with more wild-like characteristics and increased postrelease survival. The development of such techniques is called for in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This document is the draft report for the Supplemental Fish Quality Contract DE-AI79-91BP20651 Over the history of the project, the effects of seminatural raceway habitats, automated underwater feeders, exercise current velocities, live food diets, and predator avoidance training have been investigated. The findings of these studies are reported in an earlier contract report (Maynard et al. 1996a). The current report focuses on research that has been conducted between 1999 and 2002. This includes studies on the effect of exercise on salmon and steelhead trout, effects of predator avoid training, integration of NATUES protocols into production hatcheries, and the study of social behavior of steelhead grown in enriched and conventional environments. Traditionally, salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) are reared in barren concrete raceways that lack natural substrate, in-stream structure, or overhead cover. The fish are fed in an unnatural manner with artificial feeds mechanically or hand broadcast across the water surface. This traditional approach has increased the egg-to-smolt survival of hatchery-reared fish by an order of magnitude over that experienced by wild-reared salmon. However, once hatchery-reared fish are released into the wild their smolt-to-adult survival is usually much lower than wild-reared salmon. The reduced postrelease survival of hatchery-reared fish may stem from differences in their behavior and morphology compared to wild-reared salmon. After release, hatchery-reared fish are inefficient foragers and are often found with empty stomachs or stomachs filled with indigestible debris (Miller 1953, Hochachka 1961, Reimers 1963, Sosiak et al. 1979, Myers 1980, O'Grady 1983, Johnsen and Ugedal 1986). Their social behavior also differs, with hatchery-reared fish congregating at higher densities, being more aggressive, and displaying less territory fidelity than wild-reared fish (Fenderson et al. 1968, Bachman 1984, Swain and Riddell 1990). In the natural environment this results in hatchery-reared fish spending more time in high-risk aggressive behavior and less time in beneficial foraging behavior than their wild-reared counterparts. Hatchery-reared fish are also more surface oriented than wild-reared salmonids (Mason et al. 1967, Sosiak 1978). This increases their risk of being attacked by avian predators, such as kingfishers (Ceryle spp.), which search for fish near the surface. Although some of the differences between wild and hatchery-reared fish are innate (Reisenbichler and McIntyre 1977, Swain and Riddell 1990), many are conditioned and can be modified by altering the hatchery rearing environment. NATURES studies are aimed at developing a more natural salmon culture environment to prevent the development of these unnatural attributes in hatchery-reared fish. NATURES fish culture practices are already producing salmon with up to about 50% higher in-stream survival than conventionally-reared fish (Maynard et al. 1996b). When these techniques are incorporated into production releases, they should also translate into increased smolt-to-adult survival. Conservation and supplementation programs can use NATURES-reared salmonids to rebuild stocks currently listed as endangered and threatened into healthy self-sustaining runs more rapidly than traditional programs. Traditional production programs can also use high-survival NATURES-reared fish to reduce their impact on wild populations, while still meeting their adult mitigation goals.

Maynard, Desmond J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

468

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. FY 2002 was used to continue seasonal fish and lakewide creel surveys and adjust methods and protocols as needed. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 meters deep, with 16-17 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until August when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-meters deep. Secchi depths ranged from 2.5-8 meters and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in October 2002 and May and July 2003 using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens (32 %) and cottid spp. (22 %) dominated the nearshore species composition in October; however, by May yellow perch (12 %) were the third most common species followed by smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (34 %) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (14 %). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during October (78 %) and May (81 %). Fish diet analysis indicated that juvenile fishes consumed primarily insects and zooplankton, while adult piscivores consumed cottids spp. and yellow perch most frequently. For FY 2002, the following creel statistics are comprehensive through August 31, 2003. The highest angling pressure occurred in June 2003, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 76 % of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. An estimated total of 11,915 ({+-}140 SD) smallmouth bass, 6,412 ({+-}59 SD) walleye, 5,470 ({+-}260 SD) rainbow trout, and 1,949 ({+-}118 SD) yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in FY 2002. Only 3 kokanee were reported in the catch during the FY 2002 creel survey. In the future, data from the seasonal surveys and creel will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Shipley, Rochelle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integration of bioinformatics and experimental techniques was applied to mapping and characterization of the key components (pathways, enzymes, transporters, regulators) of the core metabolic machinery in Shewanella oneidensis and related species with main focus was on metabolic and regulatory pathways involved in utilization of various carbon and energy sources. Among the main accomplishments reflected in ten joint publications with other participants of Shewanella Federation are: (i) A systems-level reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization pathways in the genus of Shewanella (19 species). This analysis yielded reconstruction of 18 sugar utilization pathways including 10 novel pathway variants and prediction of > 60 novel protein families of enzymes, transporters and regulators involved in these pathways. Selected functional predictions were verified by focused biochemical and genetic experiments. Observed growth phenotypes were consistent with bioinformatic predictions providing strong validation of the technology and (ii) Global genomic reconstruction of transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Of those, 45 regulons were inferred directly from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in other species. Selected regulatory predictions were experimentally tested. Integration of this analysis with microarray data revealed overall consistency and provided additional layer of interactions between regulons. All the results were captured in the new database RegPrecise, which is a joint development with the LBNL team. A more detailed analysis of the individual subsystems, pathways and regulons in Shewanella spp included bioinfiormatics-based prediction and experimental characterization of: (i) N-Acetylglucosamine catabolic pathway; (ii)Lactate utilization machinery; (iii) Novel NrtR regulator of NAD biosynthesis; (iv) HexR-controlled global regulon in central metabolism. In addition to numerous specific findings contributing to basic understanding of ecophysiology and evolution of Shewanella, the key components of the integrative genomic methodology of general utility for the community were optimized, validated and disseminated.

Andrei L. Osterman, Ph.D.

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

470

Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

Miller, Karl V.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2001, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the ninth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagged fish. We PIT tagged and released at Lower Granite Dam a total of 17,028 hatchery and 3,550 wild steelhead. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream of the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using the Single-Release Model. Primary research objectives in 2001 were to: (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2001 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures with a minimum of text. More details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

Zabel, Richard; Williams, John G.; Smith, Steven G. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species’ recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

Garabedian, James E. [North Carolina State University

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Changes in the deep-water benthos of eastern Lake Erie between 1979 and 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to examine changes of the benthic community and benthic biomass as a result of mussel colonization, a survey of the deep-water benthic fauna in eastern Lake Erie was repeated in 1993 using the same sites and methods as in a 1979 survey. During 1979, the community beyond 30 m was dominated by oligochaete worms and the burrowing amphipod Diporeia, which represented 50 and 40% of the total benthic biomass respectively. By 1993, quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis) formed over 90% of the benthic biomass. Mussels were present at all 13 sites. Densities of individuals >2 mm in length averaged 3,241 mussels m{sup -2}. Of these mussels, 97% were quagga mussels. Total density of all sizes retained on a 180 {mu}m sieve averaged 34,800 mussels m{sup -2} but total biomass decreased from 1.58 to 0.98 g m{sup -2}. The density of the amphipod Diporeia was reduced from 1,844 in 1979 to 218 m{sup -2} in 1993. While present at all sites during 1979, Diporeia remained common only at two sites and were absent at 8 of the 13 sites in 1993. The native fingernail clams, Pisidium spp., were reduced from 327 to 82 m{sup -2}. No significant reduction occurred in the worm and chironomid populations, however the dry biomass of the chironomids was reduced from 0.07 to 0.0008 g m{sup -2}. These reductions may be due to competition with the mussels for freshly settling algae. The meiofauna, which included small nematodes, ostracods, and harpacticoids retained on a 180 {mu}m sieve, all increased in density. Perhaps they benefited from an increase in the detritus deposited as pseudofeces around the mussels.

Dermott, R.; Kerec, D. [Fisheries and Oceans, Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Slow:Fast substitution ratio reveals changing patterns of natural selection in gamma-proteobacterial genomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different microbial species are thought to occupy distinct ecological niches, subjecting each species to unique selective constraints, which may leave a recognizable signal in their genomes. Thus, it may be possible to extract insight into the genetic basis of ecological differences among lineages by identifying unusual patterns of substitutions in orthologous gene or protein sequences. We use the ratio of substitutions in slow versus fast-evolving sites (nucleotides in DNA, or amino acids in protein sequence) to quantify deviations from the typical pattern of selective constraint observed across bacterial lineages. We propose that elevated S:F in one branch (an excess of slow-site substitutions) can indicate a functionally-relevant change, due to either positive selection or relaxed evolutionary constraint. In a genome-wide comparative study of gamma-proteobacterial proteins, we find that cell-surface proteins involved with motility and secretion functions often have high S:F ratios, while information-processing genes do not. Change in evolutionary constraints in some species is evidenced by increased S:F ratios within functionally-related sets of genes (e.g., energy production in Pseudomonas fluorescens), while other species apparently evolve mostly by drift (e.g., uniformly elevated S:F across most genes in Buchnera spp.). Overall, S:F reveals several species-specific, protein-level changes with potential functional/ecological importance. As microbial genome projects yield more species-rich gene-trees, the S:F ratio will become an increasingly powerful tool for uncovering functional genetic differences among species.

Alm, Eric; Shapiro, B. Jesse

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

478

Biomass production, forage quality, and cation uptake of Quail bush, four-wing saltbush, and seaside barley irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study reported here investigated capacity of Atriplex lentiformis (Torr.) S. Wats. (Quail bush), Atriplex X aptera A. Nels. (pro sp.) (Wytana four-wing saltbush), and Hordeum marinum Huds. (seaside barley) to produce biomass and crude protein and take up cations when irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water, in the presence of a shallow water table. Water tables were established at 0.38, 0.76, and 1.14m below the surface in sand-filled columns. The columns were then planted to the study species. Study plants were irrigated for 224 days; irrigation water was supplied every 7 days equal to water lost to evapotranspiration (ET) plus 100mL (the volume of water removed in the most previous soil solution sampling). Water representing one of two irrigation sources was used: Powder River (PR) or coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wastewater. Biomass production did not differ significantly between water quality treatments but did differ significantly among species and water table depth within species. Averaged across water quality treatments, Hordeum marinum produced 79% more biomass than A. lentiformis and 122% more biomass than Atriplex X aptera, but contained only 11% crude protein compared to 16% crude protein in A. lentiformis and 14% crude protein in Atriplex X aptera. Atriplex spp. grown in columns with the water table at 0.38m depth produced more biomass, took up less calcium on a percentage basis, and took up more sodium on a percentage basis than when grown with the water table at a deeper depth. Uptake of cations by Atriplex lentiformis was approximately twice the uptake of cations by Atriplex X aptera and three times that of H. marinum. After 224 days of irrigation, crop growth, and cation uptake, followed by biomass harvest, EC and SAR of shallow groundwater in columns planted to A. lentiformis were less than EC and SAR of shallow ground water in columns planted to either of the other species.

Bauder, J.W.; Browning, L.S.; Phelps, S.D.; Kirkpatrick, A.D. [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Importance of Carolina Bays to the Avifauna of Pinelands in the Southeastern United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract - Past anthropogenic activity has led to the destruction or alteration of Carolina bay wetlands throughout the southeastern United States. Presently, urban development, combined with a 2001 ruling by the US Supreme Court relaxing protection of isolated wetlands, poses an increasing threat to these and other isolated wetland systems; however, little information exists on the importance of these wetland systems to birds. We compared breeding and wintering bird communities of upland pine (Pinus spp.) forests with and without Carolina bays. Estimated species richness was greater in pine forests with Carolina bays than without during the winter (31.7 �± 1.3 [mean �± SE] vs. 26.9 �± 1.2; P = 0.027), but not in the breeding season (27.9 �± 2.2 vs. 26.3 �± 2.2; P = 0.644). Total relative abundance did not differ between pine forests with Carolina bays and those without in either the breeding (148.0 �± 16.0 vs. 129.4 �± 10.4 birds/40 ha; P = 0.675) or winter (253.0 �± 36.4 vs. 148.8 �± 15.1 birds/40 ha; P = 0.100) seasons. However, 23 species, 43% of which were wetland-dependent, were observed only in pine forests with bays during the breeding season, and 20 species, 30% of which were wetland-dependent, were observed only in such sites during winter. In contrast, only 6 and 1 species were observed only in pine forests without bays during the breeding and winter seasons, respectively, indicating that few species were negatively affected by the presence of bays. Thus, Carolina bays appear to enrich the avifauna of pine forests in the southeastern United States.

Czapka, Stephen, J.; Kilgo, John, C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)] [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Meira Castro, Ana Cristina [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)] [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc serc spp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 A of -42-foot project)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted a study to determine whether dredged sediments from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors were suitable for ocean disposal. Nineteen test treatments, six reference treatments, and three control treatments were tested for physical/chemical parameters, water column effects, dredged- sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation potential. Physical/chemical parameters were analyzed at each site and each composite sediment to a depth of -44 ft MLLW. These parameters included analysis for geological characteristics, conventional sediment measurements (grain size, total volatile solids, total organic carbon, oil and grease, and total petroleum hydrocarbons), metals,, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides, butyltins, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Physical/chemical data were used in support of the toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, but were not used in the decision-making criteria described in the Draft Implementation manual under Tier III testing. To evaluate water column effects, MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) test using the mysid shrimp Holmesimysis sculpta, speckled sanddab citharichtys stigmaeus, and larvae of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Both a 48-h and a 96-h test were performed. The MSL evaluated dredged-sediment toxicity by conducting a total of eight solid-phase toxicity tests using the following organisms: the bivalve clam Macoma nasuta, the polychaete worm Nepthys caecoides, the speckled sanddab C. stigmaeus, and the amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. Test duration ranged from 10 to 28 days. Bioaccumulation potential was evaluated in the 28-day M. Nasuta and N. caecoides solid-phase exposures by measuring the contaminants of concern present in their tissues after exposure to test, reference, and control sediments. This report contains the data and test results.

Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

483

Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a lipolytic, anaerobic, alkalitolerant, thermophilic bacterium utilizing short- and long-chain fatty acids in syntrophic coculture with a methanogenic archaeum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three strains of an anaerobic thermophilic organoheterotrophic lipolytic alkalitolerant bacterium, Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/VS-264{sup T}; DSM 11003) were isolated from alkaline hot springs of Lake Bogoria (Kenya). The cells were nonmotile, non-spore forming, straight or slightly curved rods. At 60{degrees}C, the pH range for growth determined at 25{degrees}C [pH{sup 25{degrees}C}] was 7.15 to 9.5, with an optimum between 8.1 and 8.9 (pH{sup 60{degrees}C} of 7.6 and 8.1). At a pH{sup 25{degrees}C} of 8.5 temperature range for growth was from 52 to 70{degrees}C, with an optimum between 60 and 66{degrees}C. The shortest doubling time was around 1 h. In pure culture the bacterium grew in a mineral base medium supplemented with yeast extract, tryptone, Casamino Acids, betaine, and crotonate as carbon sources, producing acetate as a major product and constitutively a lipase. During growth in the presence of olive oil, free long-chain fatty acids were accumulated in the medium but the pure culture syntrophic coculture (Methanobacterium strain JW/VS-M29) the lipolytic bacteria grew on triacylglycerols and linear saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with 4 to 18 carbon atoms, but glycerol was not utilized. Fatty acids with even numbers of carbon atoms were degraded to acetate and methane, while from odd-numbered fatty acids 1 mol of propionate per mol of fatty acid was additionally formed. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified Syntrophospora and Syntrophomonas spp. as closest phylogenetic neighbors.

Svetlitshnyi, V.; Wiegel, J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Rainey, F. [German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures, Braunschweig (Germany)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Oil Content Distribution of Meadowfoam Seeds by Near- Infrared Transmission Spectroscopy*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meadowfoam (Limnanthes spp., Limnanthaceae) is a recently domesticated herbaceous winter–spring industrial oilseed crop (Jolliff 1989). The virtually pure raw source of long-chain fatty acids has unique composition and very high oxidative stability (Isbell et al. 1999; Muuse et al. 1992). Initial commercial sales were substantially for high-value personal care products. Other market applications may develop with the evolution of such things as price, utilization experience (Isbell et al. 1999), derivative development, and supply logistics. Increased oil yield per hectare remains a top priority for advancing meadowfoam profitability for farmers and commercialization into broader industrial markets. Many variables interact to influence oil yield of meadowfoam; environment, management, genetics, and pests can have major effects. Improved understanding of the effects of these variables may contribute to improving oil yield. Analysis of bulk seed samples can mask the cause and effects of some variables, and does not allow for the partitioning of variance for measuring important cause and effect relationships. Thus, single-seed analysis provides a means of characterizing variation. Single-seed oil determination of meadowfoam by near-infrared transmission spectroscopy (NITS) is a fast, efficient, nondestructive procedure, amenable to substantial automation compared to traditional chemical analysis (Patrick and Jolliff 1997). This technology has potential applications evaluating oil content and variability within individual flowers, plants, populations, or bulk samples. It provides the prospect to quantify the effects of numerous kinds of management, environmental, and genetic variables on the oil content of seeds. The objective of this paper is to determine the distribution of oil content in seed from meadowfoam plants by NITS single-seed oil determinations. This information could be useful in selection and management research programs designed to increase oil yield. METHODOLOGY

Brett E. Patrick; Gary D. Jolliff

485

Dissimilatory Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Bacteria:Comparative Reconstruction of Transcriptional Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO) is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR and NnrR, two-component systems NarXL and NarQP, NO-responsive activator NorR, and nitrite sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches we predict DNA-binding signals for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA signal. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria including Clostridia, Thermotogales and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides metabolism not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species like Escherichia coli), but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding signal. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon includes also two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr) and nipC(dnrN), thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e., nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include denitrification genes. As the result, we demonstrate considerable interconnection between various nitrogen-oxides-responsive regulatory systems for the denitrification and NO detoxification genes and evolutionary plasticity of this transcriptional network.

Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, EricJ.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Medium-Sized Mammals around a Radioactive Liquid Waste Lagoon at Los Alamos National Laboratory: Uptake of Contaminants and Evaluation of Radio-Frequency Identification Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of a radioactive liquid waste lagoon by medium-sized mammals and levels of tritium, other selected radionuclides, and metals in biological tissues of the animals were documented at Technical Area 53 (TA-53) of Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1997 and 1998. Rock squirrel (Spermophilus variegates), raccoon (Procyon lotor), striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), and bobcat (Lynx rufus) were captured at TA-53 and at a control site on the Santa Fe National Forest. Captured animals were anesthetized and marked with radio-frequency identification (RFD) tags and/or ear tags. We collected urine and hair samples for tritium and metals (aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, and thallium) analyses, respectively. In addition, muscle and bone samples from two rock squirrels collected from each of TA-53, perimeter, and regional background sites were tested for tritium, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and total uranium. Animals at TA-53 were monitored entering and leaving the lagoon area using a RFID monitor to read identification numbers from the RFID tags of marked animals and a separate camera system to photograph all animals passing through the monitor. Cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus spp.), rock squirrel, and raccoon were the species most frequently photographed going through the RFID monitor. Less than half of all marked animals in the lagoon area were detected using the lagoon. Male and female rock squirrels from the lagoon area had significantly higher tritium concentrations compared to rock squirrels from the control area. Metals tested were not significantly higher in rock squirrels from TA-53, although there was a trend toward increased levels of lead in some individuals at TA-53. Muscle and bone samples from squirrels in the lagoon area appeared to have higher levels of tritium, total uranium, and {sup 137}Cs than samples collected from perimeter and background locations. However, the committed effective dose equivalent estimated from the potential human consumption of the muscle and bone tissue from these rock squirrels did not suggest any human health risk. Indirect routes of tritium uptake, possibly through consumption of vegetation, are important for animals in the lagoon area.

Leslie A. Hansen; Phil R. Fresquez; Rhonda J. Robinson; John D. Huchton; Teralene S. Foxx

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

488

Refractory for Black Liquor Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Missouri-Rolla will identify materials that will permit the safe, reliable and economical operation of combined cycle gasifiers by the pulp and paper industry. The primary emphasis of this project will be to resolve the material problems encountered during the operation of low-pressure high-temperature (LPHT) and low-pressure low-temperature (LPLT) gasifiers while simultaneously understanding the materials barriers to the successful demonstration of high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) black liquor gasifiers. This study will define the chemical, thermal and physical conditions in current and proposed gasifier designs and then modify existing materials and develop new materials to successfully meet the formidable material challenges. Resolving the material challenges of black liquor gasification combined cycle technology will provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits that include higher thermal efficiencies, up to three times greater electrical output per unit of fuel, and lower emissions. In the near term, adoption of this technology will allow the pulp and paper industry greater capital effectiveness and flexibility, as gasifiers are added to increase mill capacity. In the long term, combined-cycle gasification will lessen the industry's environmental impact while increasing its potential for energy production, allowing the production of all the mill's heat and power needs along with surplus electricity being returned to the grid. An added benefit will be the potential elimination of the possibility of smelt-water explosions, which constitute an important safety concern wherever conventional Tomlinson recovery boilers are operated. Developing cost-effective materials with improved performance in gasifier environments may be the best answer to the material challenges presented by black liquor gasification. Refractory materials may be selected/developed that either react with the gasifier environment to form protective surfaces in-situ; are functionally-graded to give the best combination of thermal, mechanical, and physical properties and chemical stability; or are relatively inexpensive, reliable repair materials. This report covers Task 1.4, Industrial Trial of candidate materials developed by refractory producers and in the laboratory based on the results of Task 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3. Refractories provided by in-kind sponsors to industrial installations tested by cup testing, density/porosity determinations, chemical analysis and microscopy. None of the materials produced in this program have been tried in high temperature gasifiers, but the mortar developed Morcocoat SP-P is outperforming other mortars tested at ORNL. MORCO PhosGun M-90-O has shown in laboratory testing to be an acceptable candidate for hot and cold repairs of existing high temperature gasifiers. It may prove to be an acceptable lining material.

William L. Headrick Jr; Musa Karakus; Xiaoting Laing

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment, Year 15 (North Arm) and Year 3 (South Arm) (2006) Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results from the fifteenth year (2006) of nutrient additions to the North Arm of Kootenay Lake and three years of nutrient additions to the South Arm. Experimental fertilization of the lake has been conducted using an adaptive management approach in an effort to restore lake productivity lost as a result of nutrient uptake in upstream reservoirs. The primary objective of the experiment is to restore kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations, which are the main food source for Gerrard rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). The quantity of agricultural grade liquid fertilizer (10-34-0, ammonium polyphosphate and 28-0-0, urea ammonium nitrate) added to the North Arm in 2006 was 44.7 tonnes of P and 248.4 tonnes of N. The total fertilizer load added to the South Arm was 257 tonnes of nitrogen; no P was added. Kootenay Lake has an area of 395 km{sup 2}, a maximum depth of 150 m, a mean depth of 94 m, and a water renewal time of approximately two years. Kootenay Lake is a monomictic lake, generally mixing from late fall to early spring and stratifying during the summer. Surface water temperatures generally exceed 20 C for only a few weeks in July. Results of oxygen profiles were similar to previous years with the lake being well oxygenated from the surface to the bottom depths at all stations. Similar to past years, Secchi disc measurements at all stations in 2006 indicate a typical seasonal pattern of decreasing depths associated with the spring phytoplankton bloom, followed by increasing depths as the bloom gradually decreases by the late summer and fall. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L and tended to decrease as summer advanced. Over the sampling season dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations decreased, with the decline corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being utilized by phytoplankton during summer stratification. Owing to the importance of epilimnetic nitrate that is required for optimal phytoplankton growth discrete depth water sampling occurred in 2006 to measure more accurately changes in the nitrate concentrations. As expected there was a seasonal decline in nitrate concentrations, thus supporting the strategy of increasing the nitrogen loading in both arms. These in-season changes emphasize the need for an adaptive management approach to ensure the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio does not decrease below 15:1 (weight:weight) during the fertilizer application period. Phytoplankton composition determined from the integrated samples (0-20m) was dominated by diatoms, followed by cryptophytes and chrysophytes. The contribution of cryptophytes to total biomass was higher in 2006 than in 2005. Cryptophytes, considered being edible biomass for zooplankton and Daphnia spp., increased in 2006. Phytoplankton in the discrete depth samples (2, 5, 10, 15 and 20m) demonstrated a clear north to south gradient in average phytoplankton density and biomass among the three stations sampled, with highest values at the North Arm station (KLF 2) and lowest values in the most southern station in the South Arm (KLF 7). Populations were dominated by flagellates at all stations and depths in June and July, then dominated by diatoms in August and September in the North and South arms of the lake. There were no large bluegreen (cyanobacteria) populations in either arm of the lake in 2006. Seasonal average zooplankton abundance and biomass in both the main body of the lake and in the West Arm increased in 2006 compared to 2005. Zooplankton density was numerically dominated by copepods and biomass was dominated by Daphnia spp. The annual average mysid biomass data at deep stations indicated that the North Arm of Kootenay Lake was more productive than the South Arm in 2006. Mysid densities increased through the summer and declined in the winter; mean whole lake values remain within prefertilization densities. Kokanee escapement to Meadow Creek declined in 2006 to approximately 400,000 spawners. The Lardeau River escapement also declined wit

Schindler, E.U.; Sebastian, D.; Andrusak, G.F. [Fish and Wildlife Science and Allocation, Ministry of Environment, Province of British Columbia

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and evaluated reconditioning (short and long-term) success and diet formulations at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakima River. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 12 March to 28 May 2003. In total, 690 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 30.8% (690 of 2,235) of the entire 2002-2003 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. All steelhead kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks, fed freeze-dried krill and received hw-wiegandt multi vit dietary supplement; long-term steelhead kelts also received Moore-Clark pellets. Oxytetracycline was administered to reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. Formalin was also administered to prevent outbreaks of fungus and we also intubated the fish that were collected with Ivermectin{trademark} to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Captured kelts were separated into two experimental groups: short-term and long-term reconditioning. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 7 weeks. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on June 4, 2003. Survival-to-release was very good for the short-term experiment, with a rate of 89.9%. Long-term steelhead kelts were held for 5-9 months then released on December 8, 2003. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. Survival and rematuration for long-term kelts increased as well with 62.4% surviving to release and 91.7% rematuring. A total of 47 reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery and to evaluate in-season homing fidelity. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. The authors were very pleased with the high survival rates. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival of long-term reconditioned fish and successful expression of iteroparity.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Blodgett, Joe (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing means could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and again develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and evaluated reconditioning (short and long-term) success and diet formulations at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakima River. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (CJEF, located at Yakima River kilometer 48) from March 12 to June 13, 2002. In total, 899 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 19.8% (899 of 4,525) of the entire 2001-2002 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. Kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks and were fed freeze-dried krill, Moore-Clark pellets, altered Moore-Clark pellets (soaked in krill extract and dyed), or a combination of the altered Moore-Clark/unaltered Moore-Clark pellets. Formalin was used to prevent outbreaks of fungus and we also intubated the fish that were collected with Ivermectin{trademark} to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Captured kelts were separated into two experimental groups: short-term and long-term reconditioning. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were then subsequently split into two groups for either 1 or 2-month reconditioning. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning in two groups, corresponding with reconditioning duration, with releases on May 20/28, 2002. Survival rates for both short-term experiments were high. Long-term reconditioned kelts were subsequently split into three groups that were given three different diet formulations and then released on December 10, 2002. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. A total of 60 reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery and to evaluate in-season homing fidelity. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, food preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although survival rates were higher in 2002, even higher survival rates would be desirable; overall the authors were encouraged by the positive results of this innovative project. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival and successful expression of iteroparity.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan (Columbia River Inter-Trial Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Blodgett, Joe (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iteroparity, the ability to repeat spawn, is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations, and could help reestablish this naturally occurring life history trait. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia River Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, wild emigrating steelhead kelts were placed into one of three study groups (direct capture and transport, short-term reconditioning, or long-term reconditioning). Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 15 March to 21 June 2004. In total, 842 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 30.5% (842 of 2,755) of the entire 2003-2004 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. All steelhead kelts were reconditioned in 20-foot circular tanks, and fed freeze-dried krill initially or for the duration of the experiment. All steelhead kelts received hw-wiegandt multi vit dietary supplement as a means to improve initial nutrition. Long-term steelhead kelts received Moore-Clark pellets to provide essential minerals and nutrients necessary for gonadal redevelopment. Oxytetracycline was administered to all reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. To control parasitic infestations two methods were used, first, after initial capture an intubation of Ivermectin{trademark} was administered to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Next, a Formalin drip was used for the duration of reconditioning to prevent fungal outbreaks. Captured kelts were separated into three experimental groups: short-term reconditioning, long-term reconditioning, and direct transport and release. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 5 weeks. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on May 11, 2004. Survival-to-release was good for the short-term experiment, with a rate of 79.0%. Long-term steelhead kelts are currently being held for a 6-9 month period with a scheduled release in December 2004. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. Survival and rematuration for long-term kelts has not been determined and will be presented in the 2005 annual report. Direct transport and release kelts and short-term reconditioned kelts were radio or acoustic tagged to assess their travel time and migratory behaviors below Bonneville Dam. A total of 29 direct-transport and release kelts and 29 short-term reconditioned kelts received surgically implanted radio tags, and a total of 28 direct-transport/release and 26 short-term reconditioned fish received surgically implanted hydro acoustic tags. These tags will allow us to determine outm

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan; Whiteaker, John (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family salmonidae. Natural rates of repeat spawning for Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. Increasing this repeat spawning rate using fish culture techniques could assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to grow and develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for local populations. The primary purpose of this project in 2000 was to test the general feasibility of collecting, feeding, and treating steelhead kelts in a captive environment. Steelhead kelts were collected from the Yakima River at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (Rkm 48) from 12 March to 13 June 2000. Kelts were reconditioned at adjacent Prosser Hatchery in both rectangular and circular tanks and fed a mixed diet of starter paste, adult sized trout pellets, and freeze-dried krill. Formalin was used to control outbreaks of fungus, and we tested the use of ivermectin to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Some the kelts that died during the reconditioning process were analyzed via pathology and gonad histology to ascertain the possible cause of death and to describe their reproductive development at the time of death. All surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on 12 December 2000. Overall success of the reconditioning process was based on the proportion of fish that survived captivity, gained weight, and on the number of fish that successfully underwent gonadal recrudescence. Many of the reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery. In total, 512 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 37% (512/1,380) of the entire 1999-2000 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. At the conclusion of the experiments ({approx}240 days from capture), 91 fish (18%) had survived and were released to spawn in the wild. Ultrasound examination--to determine sex and reproductive development--determined that 87 (96%) of 91 specimens were female, and we estimated 62 fish (12% of the total collected) had successfully reconditioned. Unfortunately, the majority (82%) of the kelts collected died during the experiment, with the bulk of the moralities occurring during the first 100 days of captivity. Much was learned from the mortalities and modifications were made to the facility to reduce loss for future projects. Overall, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, food type preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although the reconditioning success rate achieved (estimated at 12%) was substantially lower than we initially hoped yet still six times higher than the natural rate of respawning and the authors are encouraged by the results of this innovative project. Information collected during this feasibility study will be incorporated into the experimental design for the upcoming year of research and is expected to increase survival.

Evans, Allen F.; Beaty, Roy E.; Hatch, Douglas R. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Pair-Trawl Detection of PIT-Tagged Juvenile Salmonids Migrating in the Columbia River Estuary, 2008 Report of Research.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, we sampled migrating juvenile Pacific salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags using a surface pair trawl in the upper Columbia River estuary (rkm 61-83). The cod-end of the trawl was replaced with a cylindrical PIT-tag detection antenna with an 86-cm-diameter fish-passage opening and two detection coils connected in series. The pair trawl was 105 m long with a 91.5-m opening between the wings and a sample depth of 4.9 m. Also during 2008, we finalized the development of a prototype 'matrix' antenna, which was larger than previous antennas by a considerable magnitude. The matrix antenna consisted of 6 coils: a 3-coil front component and a 3-coil rear component, which were separated by 1.5-m of net mesh. The fish-passage opening was 2.5 m wide by 3.0 m tall and was attached to a standard-size pair trawl net. Intermittent sampling with a single crew began on 7 March and targeted yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. Daily sampling using two crews began on 30 April and continued through 14 June; during this period we detected 2.7% of all juvenile salmonids previously detected at Bonneville Dam--a measure of sample efficiency. Sampling with a single crew continued through 20 August and targeted subyearling Chinook salmon. We detected 7,397 yearling Chinook salmon, 2,735 subyearling Chinook salmon, 291 coho salmon O. kisutch, 5,950 steelhead, and 122 sockeye salmon O. nerka in the upper estuary. We deployed the matrix antenna system and the older, cylindrical antenna system (86-cm-diameter fish-passage opening) simultaneously in mid-May 2008 to test matrix detection efficiency. The cylindrical antenna system had been used successfully in 2007 and early 2008. Because distribution of migrating salmonids in the estuary changes rapidly, we felt that a tandem sampling effort between the two systems was the only way to truly evaluate comparative detection efficiency. We deployed both systems within 1 km of each other during a period of high fish densities on 13, 14, and 15 May. Detections of the matrix system surpassed those of the cylindrical system by 53% in 14 h of simultaneous sampling (total detections 716 and 339, respectively). We believe that the higher detection rate observed with the matrix system was due to fewer smolts escaping the trawl entrance and to more smolts readily passing through the larger fish-passage opening. After tandem sampling, we continued exclusive use of the matrix system for the remainder of the 2008 juvenile migration season. Mean survival rates from Lower Granite to Bonneville Dam for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead were 42% (SE = 3.7%) and 46% (SE = 1.5%), respectively. Over 358,000 PIT-tagged salmonids were transported, and we detected 4,619 of these fish.

Magie, Robert J.; Morris, Matthew S.; Ledgerwood, Richard D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

495

Quantifying the Behavioral Response of Spawning Chum Salmon to Elevated Discharges from Bonneville Dam, Columbia River : Annual Report 2005-2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In unimpounded rivers, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) typically spawn under relatively stable stream flows, with exceptions occurring during periodic precipitation events. In contrast, hydroelectric development has often resulted in an artificial hydrograph characterized by rapid changes in discharge and tailwater elevation that occur on a daily, or even an hourly basis, due to power generation (Cushman 1985; Moog 1993). Consequently, populations of Pacific salmon that are known to spawn in main-stem habitats below hydroelectric dams face the risks of changing habitat suitability, potential redd dewatering, and uncertain spawning success (Hamilton and Buell 1976; Chapman et al. 1986; Dauble et al. 1999; Garland et al. 2003; Connor and Pflug 2004; McMichael et al. 2005). Although the direct effects of a variable hydrograph, such as redd dewatering are apparent, specific effects on spawning behavior remain largely unexplored. Chum salmon (O. keta) that spawn below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are particularly vulnerable to the effects of water level fluctuations. Although chum salmon generally spawn in smaller tributaries (Johnson et al. 1997), many fish spawn in main-stem habitats below Bonneville Dam near Ives Island (Tomaro et al. 2007; Figure 1). The primary spawning area near Ives Island is shallow and sensitive to changes in water level caused by hydroelectric power generation at Bonneville Dam. In the past, fluctuating water levels have dewatered redds and changed the amount of available spawning habitat (Garland et al. 2003). To minimize these effects, fishery managers attempt to maintain a stable tailwater elevation at Bonneville Dam of 3.5 m (above mean sea level) during spawning, which ensures adequate water is provided to the primary chum salmon spawning area below the mouth of Hamilton Creek (Figure 1). Given the uncertainty of winter precipitation and water supply, this strategy has been effective at restricting spawning to a specific riverbed elevation and providing minimum spawning flows that have the greatest chance of being maintained through egg incubation and fry emergence. However, managing the lower Columbia River for a stable tailwater elevation does not provide much operational flexibility at Bonneville Dam, which has little storage capacity. When river discharges increase due to rain events, the traditional approach has been to pass excess water at night to maintain stable tailwater elevations during the daytime. The underlying assumption of this strategy, referred to as reverse load following, is that fish do not spawn at night. However, Tiffan et al. (2005) showed that this assumption is false by documenting nighttime spawning by chum salmon in the Ives Island area. Similarly, McMichael et al. (2005) reported nighttime spawning by Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the Columbia River, indicating that diel spawning may be a common occurrence in Pacific salmon. During the latter portion of the chum spawning period in December 2003 and 2004, discharges from Bonneville Dam increased from an average of 3,398 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 3.5 m above mean sea level) during the day to over 5,664 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 5.1 m) at night, with peak discharges of 7,080 m{sup 3}/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 6.1 m). This caused concern among fishery managers regarding the potential effects of these high discharges on this population of spawning chum salmon, which is listed under the Endangered Species Act (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 1999). We hypothesized that increased water velocities associated with elevated tailwaters might alter chum salmon spawning behavior if water velocities at redd locations increased beyond the range of suitability (>0.8 m/s; Salo 1991). In 2005, we investigated the movement and behavioral responses of spawning chum salmon at Ives Island to increased tailwater elevations at Bonneville Dam. We used acoustic telemetry to determine if the higher velocities associated with increased tailwater elevations caused fish to leave their re

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Haskell, Craig A.; Kock, Tobias J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Status Report on the Microbial Characterization of Halite and Groundwater Samples from the WIPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made in the ongoing task of characterizing the microbial community structures within the WIPP repository and in surrounding groundwaters. Through cultivation and DNA-based identification, the potential activity of these organisms is being inferred, thus leading to a better understanding of their impact on WIPP performance. Members of the three biological domains - Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya (in this case, Fungi) - that are associated with WIPP halite have been identified. Thus far, their activity has been limited to aerobic respiration; anaerobic incubations are underway. WIPP halite constitutes the near-field microbial environment. We expect that microbial activity in this setting will proceed from aerobic respiration, through nitrate reduction to focus on sulfate reduction. This is also the current WIPP performance assessment (PA) position. Sulfate reduction can occur at extremely high ionic strengths, and sulfate is available in WIPP brines and in the anhydrite interbeds. The role of methanogenesis in the WIPP remains unclear, due to both energetic constraints imposed by a high-salt environment and substrate selectivity, and it is no longer considered in PA. Archaea identified in WIPP halite thus far fall exclusively within the family Halobacteriaceae. These include Halobacterium noricense, cultivated from both low- and high-salt media, and a Halorubrum-like species. The former has also been detected in other salt mines worldwide; the latter likely constitutes a new species. Little is known of its function, but it was prevalent in experiments investigating the biodegradation of organic complexing agents in WIPP brines. Bacterial signatures associated with WIPP halite include members of the phylum Proteobacteria - Halomonas, Pelomonas, Limnobacter, and Chromohalobacter - but only the latter has been isolated. Also detected and cultivated were Salinicoccus and Nesterenkonia spp. Fungi were also isolated from halite. Although these were most likely introduced into the WIPP as contaminants from above-ground, their survival and potential role in the WIPP (e.g., cellulose degradation) is under investigation. WIPP groundwaters comprise the far-field microbial environment. Bacteria cultivated and identified from the overlying Culebra and nearby borehole groundwater are capable of aerobic respiration, denitrification, fermentation, metal reduction, and sulfate reduction and are distributed across many different phyla. Two of the Bacteria found in groundwater were also found in WIPP halite (Chromohalobacter sp. and Virgibacillus sp.). Archaea identified in groundwater include Halococcus saccharolyticus, Haloferax sp., and Natrinema sp. The differences in the microbial communities detected thus far in halite and groundwater suggest that there will be significant differences in the associated metabolic potential of the near- and far-field environments. Whereas the near-field is dominated by Archaea with more limited metabolic capabilities, the far-field is dominated by Bacteria with extremely broad capabilities. Because the majority of the repository's lifetime will be anoxic, ongoing and future work focuses on the presence and role of anaerobic organisms in WIPP. Further tasks on biosorption, cellulose degradation, and bioreduction are being performed using organisms obtained from this characterization work.

Swanson, Juliet S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ams, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Norden, Diana [Ohio State University; Simmons, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

497

Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated