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1

NPCC emphasizes that the DOE 2012 congestion analysis should...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the applicable: NERC Reliability Standards (see: http:www.nerc.compage.php?cid2|20 ) NPCC Regional Standards and Criteria (see: https:www.npcc.org...

2

mushroom-miso-gravy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Date: Fri, 26 Nov 93 00:52:36 PST From: Michelle Dick TANGY MUSHROOM MISO GRAVY 1 lb mushrooms 1 T balsamic vinegar 3 cups water 1

3

Bargaining and the MISO Interference Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the pareto boundary for the MISO interference channel,” IEEEinterference in the Gaussian MISO broadcast channel,” inOn maximizing the sum network MISO broadcast capacity,” in

Nokleby, Matthew; Swindlehurst, A. Lee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Property:EIA/861/NercNpcc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed JumpMoverNercErcot Jump to: navigation,NercNpcc

5

MISO Energy Storage Study DRAFT Scope MISO Page 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, compressed air, and pumped hydro energy storage. This study will explore reliability, market, and planning such as battery storage, compressed air energy storage (CAES), and pumped hydro storage 2. Identify the valueMISO Energy Storage Study DRAFT Scope MISO Page 1 MISO Energy Storage Study DRAFT Scope July 19

6

MISO_Renewable_template  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature CombustionGlass MECS-8,2011 MISO Comments for the

7

Distributed Interference Pricing with MISO Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Interference Pricing with MISO Channels Changxin Shi, Randall A. Berry, and Michael L an interference channel consisting of multi- input, single-output (MISO) wireless links. The objective generalized to a MISO network, as shown in Sec- tion II. Such an algorithm was previously presented in [3

Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

8

Optimization of Energy Harvesting MISO Communication Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Optimization of Energy Harvesting MISO Communication Channels Rajeev Gangula, Student Member-to-point multiple-input single-output (MISO) communication system is con- sidered when both the transmitter (TX bound on the ergodic rate of MISO channel with beamforming and limited feedback. Feedback bit allocation

Gesbert, David

9

Virtual MISO Triggers in Wi-Fi-like Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual MISO Triggers in Wi-Fi-like Networks Oscar Bejarano Edward W. Knightly 1 Thursday, April 11 difficult to achieve in mobile devices Thursday, April 11, 2013 #12;5 Virtual MISO (vMISO) TX RX vMISO, 2013 #12;1. System Model 1.1. Distributed System 1.2. Single-Antenna Nodes 6 vMISO

10

Optimal Distributed Beamforming for MISO Interference Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, the problem of quantifying the Pareto optimal boundary of the achievable rate region is considered over multiple-input single-output(MISO)interference channels, where the problem boils down to solving a sequence of convex feasibility...

Qiu, Jiaming

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

Real-time MISO UWB Radio Testbed and Waveform Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-time MISO UWB Radio Testbed and Waveform Design Yu Song, Zhen Hu, Nan Guo, and Robert C. Qiu-input single-output (MISO) ultra-wideband (UWB) radio testbed, which involves Xinlix Virtex-5 Field in indoor environment. The transmitted MISO signals are optimized in the passband with a bandwidth up to 500

Qiu, Robert Caiming

12

Robust Secure Transmission in MISO Channels With Imperfect ECSI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust Secure Transmission in MISO Channels With Imperfect ECSI Jing Huang and A. Lee Swindlehurst.huang; swindle}@uci.edu Abstract--This paper studies robust transmission schemes for MISO wiretap channels-input single-output (MISO) wiretap cannels, the optimal transmit covariance matrix was found to be single

Swindlehurst, A. Lee

13

Blind Channel Estimation for Orthogonal STBC in MISO Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Blind Channel Estimation for Orthogonal STBC in MISO Systems Elzbieta Beres, and Raviraj Adve-input single-output (MISO) systems, with specific focus on Alamouti's code for two transmit antennas of the received signal. Unlike previous blind estimation schemes for MISO systems, the proposed algorithm

Adve, Raviraj

14

Secure MISO Cognitive Radio System with Perfect and Imperfect CSI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secure MISO Cognitive Radio System with Perfect and Imperfect CSI Taesoo Kwon, Vincent W.S. Wong eavesdrop on the primary link. This paper explores multiple-input single-output (MISO) CR systems where a multiple- input single-output (MISO) beamforming algorithm for the secondary system. However, it only

Wong, Vincent

15

MISO Broadcast Channels with Confidential Messages and Alternating CSIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MISO Broadcast Channels with Confidential Messages and Alternating CSIT Pritam Mukherjee1 , Ravi, Blacksburg, VA 24061 Abstract--We study the two-user multiple-input single-output (MISO) broadcast channel-user multiple- input single-output (MISO) broadcast channel with confiden- tial messages (BCCM), in which

Ulukus, Sennur

16

Optimizing Feedback in Energy Harvesting MISO Communication Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimizing Feedback in Energy Harvesting MISO Communication Channels Rajeev Gangula1 , David.gunduz@imperial.ac.uk Abstract--In this work,1 we consider the optimization of feedback in a point-to-point MISO channel in the context of a simple multiple antenna system, namely MISO channel, where feedback can be used to improve

Gesbert, David

17

Optimal MU-MIMO precoder with MISO decomposition approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal MU-MIMO precoder with MISO decomposition approach Mustapha Amara, Yi Yuan-Wu Orange Labs considered the best existing precoder design algorithm for a MISO multiuser sys- tem proposed in [1 procedure transforming the MU-MIMO channel for each iteration into a MU-MISO channel trough virtual channel

Gesbert, David

18

BLIND RECEIVERS FOR MISO COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS USING A NONLINEAR PRECODER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLIND RECEIVERS FOR MISO COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS USING A NONLINEAR PRECODER Alain Y. Kibangou GIPSA.Kibangou@ujf-grenoble.fr ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose two blind decoding approaches for multi-input single-output (MISO of simulations. 1. INTRODUCTION Multi-input Single Output (MISO) communication channel modelling occurs when

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

19

MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed and Evolving CSIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed and Evolving CSIT Jinyuan Chen and Petros Elia Mobile--The work considers the two-user MISO broadcast channel with a gradual and delayed accumulation of channel-input single-output broadcast channel (MISO BC) with an M-transmit antenna (M 2) transmitter communicating

Gesbert, David

20

MISO Broadcasting FBMC System for Highly Frequency Selective Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MISO Broadcasting FBMC System for Highly Frequency Selective Channels Michael Newinger, Leonardo G.a.nossek}@tum.de swindle@uci.edu Abstract--In this contribution we propose new techniques for multi-user MISO broadcasting an SDMA approach for the MISO broadcast channel based on Tomlinson-Harashima Precoding. However

Swindlehurst, A. Lee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Distributed Precoding for MISO Interference Channels with Channel Mean Feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Precoding for MISO Interference Channels with Channel Mean Feedback: Algorithms precoding algorithms for multiple-input single-output (MISO) interference channels, where each trans- mitter- antenna wireless interference channels [5]-[7]. For multiple- input single-output (MISO) interference

Ulukus, Sennur

22

Dynamic System Performance of SISO, MISO and MIMO Alamouti Schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic System Performance of SISO, MISO and MIMO Alamouti Schemes Dorra Ben Cheikh Battikh , Jean, coupecho, godlewski}@enst.fr Abstract--In this paper, the performance of a SISO system, a 2 × 1 MISO multiplexing tradeoff for a 2 × 1 MISO system. Many other techniques have been proposed to exploit antennas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

SINR Balancing and Beamforming for the MISO Interference Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SINR Balancing and Beamforming for the MISO Interference Channel Francesco Negro, Martina Cardone.negro@eurecom.fr, dirk.slock@eurecom.fr Abstract--In this paper a K user multi-input single-output (MISO) interference noise contribution (Noisy IFC). We address the MISO downlink (DL) beamformer design and power allocation

Gesbert, David

24

Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections Email: oar.cpo.mapp@noaa.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth system models to better simulate the climate system? Can we improve intraseasonal to seasonal mission, MAPP supports the development of advanced Earth system models that can predict climate variations, and the external research community. MAPP Objectives · Improve Earth system models · Achieve an integrated Earth

25

Beyound 4G : (), () Trends and Advances in Multi-Cell MISO/MIMO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beyound 4G : (), () , , Trends and Advances in Multi-Cell MISO/MIMO Technologies LTE-Advanced Beyond 4G . , (multiple-input single-output, MISO) (multiple-input multiple-output, MIMO) , MISO MIMO . . 3G , 4 LTE

Sung, Youngchul

26

Proof of the outage probability conjecture for MISO channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Telatar 1999, it is conjectured that the covariance matrices minimizing the outage probability for MIMO channels with Gaussian fading are diagonal with either zeros or constant values on the diagonal. In the MISO setting, this is equivalent to conjecture that the Gaussian quadratic forms having largest tale probability correspond to such diagonal matrices. We prove here the conjecture in the MISO setting.

Abbe, Emmanuel; Telatar, Emre

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Distributed multicell-MISO precoding using the layered virtual SINR framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Distributed multicell-MISO precoding using the layered virtual SINR framework Randa Zakhour, way in which the multicell MISO precoders may be designed at each BS in a distributed manner Pareto optimal rates for the MISO Interference Channel (IC); its extension to the multicell MISO channel

Gesbert, David

28

Optimal Distributed Beamforming for MISO Interference Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the problem of quantifying the Pareto optimal boundary in the achievable rate region over multiple-input single-output (MISO) interference channels, where the problem boils down to solving a sequence of convex feasibility problems after certain transformations. The feasibility problem is solved by two new distributed optimal beamforming algorithms, where the first one is to parallelize the computation based on the method of alternating projections, and the second one is to localize the computation based on the method of cyclic projections. Convergence proofs are established for both algorithms.

Qiu, Jiaming; Luo, Zhi-Quan; Cui, Shuguang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Enhanced tumor responses through therapies combining CCNU, MISO and radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were performed to determine whether the radiation sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) could enhance the tumor control probability in a treatment strategy combining radiation and the nitrosourea 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). In initial experiments KHT sarcoma-bearing mice were injected with 1.0 mg/g of MISO simultaneously with a 20 mg/kg dose of CCNU 30-40 min prior to irradiation (1500 rad). With this treatment protocol approximately 60% of the mice were found to be tumor-free 100 days post treatment. By comparison all 2 agent combinations led to 0% cures. To evaluate the relative importance of chemopotentiation versus radiosensitization in the 3 agent protocol, tumors were treated with MISO plus one anti-tumor agent (either radiation of CCNU) and then at times ranging from 0 to 24 hr later exposed to the other agent. When the time between treatments was 0 to 6 hr, a 60 to 80% tumor control rate was achieved for both MISO plus radiation followed by CCNU and MISO plus CCNU followed by radiation. However if the time interval was increased to 18 or 24 hr, the cure rate in the former treatment regimen dropped to 10% while that of the latter remained high at 40%. The data therefore indicate that (1) improved tumor responses may be achieved when MISO is added to a radiation-chemotherapy combination and (2) MISO may be more effective in such a protocol when utilized as a chemopotentiator.

Siemann, D.W.; Hill, S.A.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Finite blocklength analysis of the MISO Coherent Block Fading Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Coherent MISO Block Fading Channel is a wireless communication channel model in which the transmitter has access to multiple antennas while the receiver has access to one. This model is becoming increasingly important ...

Collins, Austin Daniel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Online Policies for Opportunistic Virtual MISO Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online Policies for Opportunistic Virtual MISO Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Cristiano in virtual multiple input single output (MISO) trans- missions and space-time block codes have been proposed

Rossi, Michele

32

Spatial Interference Mitigation for Multiple Input Multiple Output Ad Hoc Networks: MISO Gains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Interference Mitigation for Multiple Input Multiple Output Ad Hoc Networks: MISO Gains beamforming for a multiple input single output (MISO) ad hoc network to increase the density of successful

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

Large System Analysis of Zero-Forcing Precoding in MISO Broadcast Channels with Limited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large System Analysis of Zero-Forcing Precoding in MISO Broadcast Channels with Limited Feedback in MISO broadcast channels with limited feed- back, transmit correlation and path loss. Our analysis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

Energy Efficiency Analysis of MISO-OFDM Communication Systems Considering Power and Capacity Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency Analysis of MISO-OFDM Communication Systems Considering Power and Capacity subchannel capacity threshold. Moreover, the energy efficiency of MISO-OFDM communication systems starts-input single-output (MISO) . orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) . energy efficiency. capacity

Wang, Cheng-Xiang

35

Virtual MISO Triggers in WiFi-like Networks Oscar Bejarano and Edward W. Knightly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual MISO Triggers in WiFi-like Networks Oscar Bejarano and Edward W. Knightly ECE Department, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 Technical Report Abstract--Virtual Multiple-Input Single-Output (vMISO) sys- tems distribute multi-antenna diversity capabilities between a sending and a cooperating node. vMISO

Knightly, Edward W.

36

Time Reversal with MISO for Ultra-Wideband Communications: Experimental Results (invited paper)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TH2B-1 Time Reversal with MISO for Ultra-Wideband Communications: Experimental Results (invited Output (MISO) is enabled by the use of the TR scheme. Two basic problems are investigated experimentally for the first time in electromagnetics. Index Terms -- TR, MISO, UWB, channel reciprocity. I. INTRODUCTION UWB

Qiu, Robert Caiming

37

Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Correlated MISO Broadcast Channels under Linear Precoding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Correlated MISO Broadcast Channels under Linear Precoding algorithm proposed by Christensen et al. in large correlated MISO broadcast channels. We propose a novel maximization. I. INTRODUCTION WE consider the multiple-input single-output (MISO) broadcast channel (BC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

On Duality in the MISO Interference Channel Francesco Negro, Irfan Ghauri, Dirk T.M. Slock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Duality in the MISO Interference Channel Francesco Negro, Irfan Ghauri, Dirk T.M. Slock Infineon in a multi-input single- output (MISO) interference channel (IFC) and its dual SIMO with linear transmit (Tx for the IFC. We show that SINR duality under the sum power constraint nevertheless holds in the MISO IFC

Gesbert, David

39

Beamforming in MISO Systems: Empirical Results and EVM-based Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Beamforming in MISO Systems: Empirical Results and EVM-based Analysis Melissa Duarte, Ashutosh-based study of beamforming Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) systems. We analyze the performance of beamforming MISO systems taking into account implementation complexity and effects of imperfect channel

40

Asymptotic Analysis of Regularized Zero-Forcing Precoding in MISO Broadcast Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotic Analysis of Regularized Zero-Forcing Precoding in MISO Broadcast Channels with Limited analyse the asymptotic sum-rate of regularized zero-forcing (RZF) precoding in MISO broadcast channels equivalent of mfK @zA. III. SYSTEM MODEL Consider the MISO broadcast channel composed of one central

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Virtual MISO Triggers in Wi-Fi-like Networks Oscar Bejarano and Edward W. Knightly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual MISO Triggers in Wi-Fi-like Networks Oscar Bejarano and Edward W. Knightly ECE Department-Input Single-Output (vMISO) sys- tems distribute multi-antenna diversity capabilities between a sending and a cooperating node. vMISO has the potential to vastly improve wireless link reliability and bit error rates

Knightly, Edward W.

42

COMPRESSIVE INVERSE SCATTERING I. HIGH FREQUENCY SIMO/MISO AND MIMO MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPRESSIVE INVERSE SCATTERING I. HIGH FREQUENCY SIMO/MISO AND MIMO MEASUREMENTS ALBERT C), multiple-input-single-output (MISO) or multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) measurements is analyzed of the data either with the MIMO measurement for the Born scattering or with the SIMO/MISO measurement

Fannjiang, Albert

43

Virtual MISO: Experimental Evaluation of MAC to Network-Scale Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual MISO: Experimental Evaluation of MAC to Network-Scale Factors Oscar Bejarano and Edward W-Input Single-Output (vMISO) sys- tems distribute multi-antenna diversity capabilities between a sending and a cooperating node. vMISO has been shown to vastly improve wireless link reliability and bit error rates

44

A Robust RAM-THP Architecture for Downlink Multiuser MISO Transmission with User Scheduling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Robust RAM-THP Architecture for Downlink Multiuser MISO Transmission with User Scheduling Saeed-Forcing Tomlinson-Harashima Precoding (ZF-THP) for multi-user trans- mission in a multiple-input-single-output (MU-MISO-THP, zero-forcing, multi- user MISO, precoding, scheduling. I. INTRODUCTION Multiple-Input Multiple

Gulak, P. Glenn

45

Degrees of Freedom of Time Correlated MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed CSIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Degrees of Freedom of Time Correlated MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed CSIT Sheng Yang, Member Abstract We consider the time correlated MISO broadcast channel where the transmitter has imperfect 0, we characterize the optimal degree of freedom region for this more general two-user MISO

Gesbert, David

46

Degrees of Freedom of Time Correlated MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed CSIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Degrees of Freedom of Time Correlated MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed CSIT Sheng Yang, Member Abstract We consider the time correlated MISO broadcast channel where the transmitter has imperfect characterize the optimal degree of freedom region for this more general two-user MISO broadcast correlated

Gesbert, David

47

On the Fundamental Feedback-vs-Performance Tradeoff over the MISO-BC with Imperfect and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Fundamental Feedback-vs-Performance Tradeoff over the MISO-BC with Imperfect and Delayed--This work considers the multiuser multiple-input single-output (MISO) broadcast channel (BC), where. Specifically, this work provides a novel DoF region outer bound for the general K- user M ×1 MISO BC

Gesbert, David

48

NON-CONVEX UTILITY MAXIMIZATION IN GAUSSIAN MISO BROADCAST AND INTERFERENCE CHANNELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NON-CONVEX UTILITY MAXIMIZATION IN GAUSSIAN MISO BROADCAST AND INTERFERENCE CHANNELS M. Rossi, A. M- imization [1] or SINR balancing for the multiple-input single-output (MISO) BC [2], and thus solvable, MISO BC and IC WSRM with general convex power constraint. The proposed BB approach is based

Simeone, Osvaldo

49

Robust MMSE Tomlinson-Harashima Precoder for Multiuser MISO Downlink with Imperfect CSI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust MMSE Tomlinson-Harashima Precoder for Multiuser MISO Downlink with Imperfect CSI P Abstract--Non-linear precoding for the downlink of a multiuser MISO (multiple-input single-linear precoders in the lit- erature. Keywords ­ Multiuser MISO downlink, multiuser interference, imperfect CSI

Chockalingam, A.

50

LINEAR SPACE-TIME PRECODING FOR RICIAN FADING MISO CHANNELS Mai Vu, Arogyaswami Paulraj  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LINEAR SPACE-TIME PRECODING FOR RICIAN FADING MISO CHANNELS Mai Vu, Arogyaswami Paulraj Stanford, Australia Email: r.evans@ee.mu.oz.au ABSTRACT We study a space-time precoding technique for MISO wire- less in practice. In this paper, we study a particular space-time coding scheme with memory for Rician MISO

Vu, Mai

51

Joint Power Control and Beamforming Codebook Design for MISO Channels under the Outage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Power Control and Beamforming Codebook Design for MISO Channels under the Outage Criterion and beamforming codebooks for limited-feedback multiple-input single-output (MISO) wireless systems. The problem focuses on optimal design of single-user limited-feedback systems over multiple-input single-output (MISO

Yu, Wei

52

COORDINATION ON THE MISO INTERFERENCE CHANNEL USING THE VIRTUAL SINR Randa Zakhour and David Gesbert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COORDINATION ON THE MISO INTERFERENCE CHANNEL USING THE VIRTUAL SINR FRAMEWORK Randa Zakhour antenna users, this corresponds to the so-called MISO IC considered among oth- ers in [1, 2). Assuming each transmitter has multiple antennas and each receiver a single antenna, the setting is the MISO

Gesbert, David

53

Experimental Results on Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) Time Reversal for UWB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental Results on Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) Time Reversal for UWB Systems with multiple-input single- output (MISO) antennas over ultra-wideband (UWB) channels. In particular, temporal and spatial focusing as well as array gain are studied based on a (4 × 1) MISO scheme in an office environment

Qiu, Robert Caiming

54

Jamming Countermeasures for Multi-User MISO Broadcast Channels -a DoF perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jamming Countermeasures for Multi-User MISO Broadcast Channels - a DoF perspective SaiDhiraj Amuru the multi-user multiple-input single-output (MISO) broadcast channel (BC) in the presence of jamming attacks is quantified in terms of the degrees-of-freedom (DoF) of the MISO BC under various assumptions regarding

Buehrer, R. Michael

55

Efficient Computation of the Pareto Boundary for the MISO Interference Channel with Perfect CSI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Computation of the Pareto Boundary for the MISO Interference Channel with Perfect CSI,erik.larsson}@isy.liu.se Abstract--We consider the two-user multiple-input single- output (MISO) interference channel and the rate of the IFC is called a multiple-input single-output (MISO) This work was supported in part by the Swedish

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

56

FPGA Based UWB MISO Time-Reversal System Design and Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FPGA Based UWB MISO Time-Reversal System Design and Implementation Yu Song, Nan Guo, Zhen Hu and implementation of ultra-wideband (UWB) multiple-input single-output (MISO) time-reversal system are presented. The implementation is based on field programmable gate array (FPGA). The combination of MISO with UWB time

Qiu, Robert Caiming

57

UWB MISO Time Reversal With Energy Detector Receiver Over ISI Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UWB MISO Time Reversal With Energy Detector Receiver Over ISI Channels Nan Guo, John Q. Zhang investigates a multiple input single output (MISO) time reversal system for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication channel model for antenna array related study. Numerical results suggest that the proposed MISO time

Qiu, Robert Caiming

58

Spatial and Temporal Power Allocation for MISO Systems with Delayed Feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial and Temporal Power Allocation for MISO Systems with Delayed Feedback Venkata Sreekanta@ee.iitm.ac.in Abstract-- We determine the minimum outage probabil- ity of multiple-input single-output (MISO) channels control. I. INTRODUCTION The minimum outage probability of multiple-input single-output (MISO) channels

Bhashyam, Srikrishna

59

A Cross-Layer Framework for Exploiting Virtual MISO Links in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Cross-Layer Framework for Exploiting Virtual MISO Links in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Gentian requiring the deployment of physical antenna arrays. Virtual MISO entails the simultaneous transmission. We present a novel multilayer approach for exploiting virtual MISO links in ad hoc networks

Krishnamurthy, Srikanth

60

Optimization of Feedback in a MISO Downlink with Energy Harvesting Users  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of Feedback in a MISO Downlink with Energy Harvesting Users Mahdi Shakiba channel states) in order to maximize certain throughput goals. While the MISO chan- nel capacity from to the energy budget of the users. Note that in the Multi Input Single Output (MISO) channel (with m antennas

Uysal-Biyikoglu, Elif

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

QoS-Constrained Robust Beamforming in MISO Wiretap Channels with a Helper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QoS-Constrained Robust Beamforming in MISO Wiretap Channels with a Helper Jing Huang and A. Lee for multiple-input single-output (MISO) wiretap chan- nels with a helper. The channel state information (CSI]­[8]. In particular, for multiple-input single-output (MISO) wiretap channels, the optimal transmit covariance matrix

Swindlehurst, A. Lee

62

Beamforming on the MISO interference channel with multi-user decoding capability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Beamforming on the MISO interference channel with multi-user decoding capability K. M. Ho , D,mochaourab}@ifn.et.tu-dresden.de Abstract-- This paper considers the multiple-input- single-output interference channel (MISO-IC) in which the received signal. On the MISO-IC with single user decoding, transmit beamforming vectors are designed

Gesbert, David

63

IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS, VOL. 5, 2006 1 Time Reversal With MISO for Ultrawideband  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS, VOL. 5, 2006 1 Time Reversal With MISO applications. UWB multiple input­single output (MISO) is enabled by the use of the TR scheme. Two basic. Index Terms--Channel reciprocity, multiple input­single output (MISO), time reversal (TR), ultrawideband

Qiu, Robert Caiming

64

ON THE USAGE OF ANTENNAS IN MIMO AND MISO INTERFERENCE CHANNELS Mariam Kaynia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE USAGE OF ANTENNAS IN MIMO AND MISO INTERFERENCE CHANNELS Mariam Kaynia , Andrea J. Goldsmith case of a MISO chan- nel is considered, where exact expressions for the ergodic capac- ity of the capacity of a MISO broadcast channel with a random beamformer is derived. However, the impact

Gesbert, David

65

BLIND CHANNEL IDENTIFICATION OF MISO SYSTEMS BASED ON THE CP DECOMPOSITION OF CUMULANT TENSORS  

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BLIND CHANNEL IDENTIFICATION OF MISO SYSTEMS BASED ON THE CP DECOMPOSITION OF CUMULANT TENSORS algorithm for identifying the parameters of MISO sys- tem. 1. INTRODUCTION We consider the following-Input Single-Output (MISO) channel, y[n] is the output signal. Signals and system are assumed to be complex

66

Coordination on the MISO Interference Channel Using the Virtual SINR Framework  

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Coordination on the MISO Interference Channel Using the Virtual SINR Framework Randa Zakhour David;Outline Motivation Cooperation in multi-cell/link systems MISO IC System Model and Performance Measures Motivation Cooperation in multi-cell/link systems MISO IC System Model and Performance Measures Virtual SINR

Gesbert, David

67

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 60, NO. 6, JUNE 2014 3593 Retroactive Antijamming for MISO  

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for MISO Broadcast Channels SaiDhiraj Amuru, Student Member, IEEE, Ravi Tandon, Member, IEEE, Richard and increased power consumption. In this paper, we consider the multiple-input single-output (MISO) broadcastF) of the MISO BC under various assumptions regarding the availability of the channel state information (CSIT

Buehrer, R. Michael

68

Beamforming for the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel via UL-DL Duality  

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Beamforming for the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel via UL-DL Duality Francesco Negro.negro@eurecom.fr, dirk.slock@eurecom.fr Abstract--SINR duality is shown in a multi-input single- output (MISO) downlink for the IFC. We show that SINR duality under the sum power constraint nevertheless holds in the MISO IFC

Gesbert, David

69

BEAMFORMING MAXIMIZES THE MISO COMPOUND CAPACITY Ami Wiesel, Yonina C. Eldar and Shlomo Shamai (Shitz)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEAMFORMING MAXIMIZES THE MISO COMPOUND CAPACITY Ami Wiesel, Yonina C. Eldar and Shlomo Shamai for exploiting this multiple in- put single output (MISO) channel are space time coding, and beamforming (BF]. The capacity achieving transmit technique in MISO chan- nels with additive Gaussian noise is signaling using

Eldar, Yonina

70

Closed Loop System with Feedback Control MISO control laws SISO control law  

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Closed Loop System with Feedback Control MISO control laws SISO control law Switching Control demand · Two control modes for wind turbine: MISO & SISO · Proportional Integral (PI) feedback control Modes MISO SISO Inputs Blade Pitch Angle, Generator Torque Blade Pitch Angle Output Power Power

Ben-Yakar, Adela

71

ICI Canceling Space-Frequency Block Code for MISO-OFDM in Fast Fading Channels  

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ICI Canceling Space-Frequency Block Code for MISO-OFDM in Fast Fading Channels Jae Yeun Yun, Eui}@ee.kaist.ac.kr Abstract-- An intercarrier interference (ICI) canceling technique for multiple-input single-output (MISO) at the receiver for multiple-input single-output (MISO) systems. The code design is based on the approximated

Lee, Yong Hoon

72

Distributed Interference Pricing with MISO Changxin Shi, Randall A. Berry, and Michael L. Honig  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Interference Pricing with MISO Channels Changxin Shi, Randall A. Berry, and Michael L an interference channel consisting of multi-input, single- output (MISO) wireless links. The objective] can be directly generalized to a MISO network, as shown in Section II. Such an algorithm

Honig, Michael L.

73

Joint Power Control and Beamforming Codebook Design for MISO Channels with Limited Feedback  

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Joint Power Control and Beamforming Codebook Design for MISO Channels with Limited Feedback Behrouz-input single-output (MISO) wireless systems with a rate-limited feedback link. The problem is cast in the form-output (MISO) channel with channel state information at the receiver (CSIR) and a noiseless delay-free feedback

Yu, Wei

74

Weighted Sum Rate Maximization in the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel  

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Weighted Sum Rate Maximization in the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel Laurent Gallo) maximization for a K-user Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) cognitive Interference Channel (IFC) with linear studied in a non-cognitive scenario for the MISO inter- ference channel (IFC) in [3], where a distributed

Gesbert, David

75

Outage Probability of MISO Broadcast Systems with Noisy Channel Side Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outage Probability of MISO Broadcast Systems with Noisy Channel Side Information Alon Shalev output (MISO) systems. However, these schemes generally require perfect channel information) of a linear zero forcing transmitter, operating in a fading MISO broadcast channel. We consider a rectangular

Lim, Teng Joon

76

Mean-Variance Optimal Linear Precoders for Random MISO Broadcast Channels  

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Mean-Variance Optimal Linear Precoders for Random MISO Broadcast Channels Alon Shalev Housfater the problem of designing linear pre- coders for Gaussian multiple input, single output (MISO) broad- cast (BC and constraint functions. I. INTRODUCTION Random MISO BC channels are powerful models for the practical scenario

Lim, Teng Joon

77

MISO time reversal and delay spread compression for FWA channels at 5GHz  

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MISO time reversal and delay spread compression for FWA channels at 5GHz Persefoni Kyritsi, Member (MISO) can reduce the delay spread of the channel impulse response by a factor of 2-3, depending transmitter instead. The paper is structured as follows. Section II describes the concept of TR in a MISO

Papanicolaou, George C.

78

Experimental Demonstration of Time-Reversal MISO and MIMO Arrays with IEEE 802.11g  

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Experimental Demonstration of Time-Reversal MISO and MIMO Arrays with IEEE 802.11g Devices through-- A practical demonstration of IEEE 802.11g trans- missions using time-reversal antenna arrays in MISO and MIMO with great potential for use in MISO (multiple-input single output) arrays [5, 6]. In this work we present

Stancil, Daniel D.

79

Blind identification of MISO-FIR channels Carlos Est^ev~ao R. Fernandes  

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Blind identification of MISO-FIR channels Carlos Est^ev~ao R. Fernandes , Pierre Comon , G, vol.90 Abstract In this paper, we address the problem of determining the order of MISO channels to false alarm. Afterwards, we introduce the concept of MISO channel nested detectors based on a deflation

Boyer, Edmond

80

An Opportunistic Virtual MISO (OVM) Protocol for Multi-hop Wireless Networks  

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1 An Opportunistic Virtual MISO (OVM) Protocol for Multi-hop Wireless Networks Van Nguyen-utilized and performance is not maximized. In this work, we propose the Opportunistic Virtual MISO (OVM) protocol for multi-hop wireless networks. OVM combines virtual MISO (using space- time block codes) and cooperative diversity

Perkins, Dmitri

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MAPP 7.10 -Procedures for Standardized Training in Animal Care & Use I Training Program  

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MAPP 7.10 - Procedures for Standardized Training in Animal Care & Use I Training Program 1. On behalf of the AUS, the ACVS Research Education Team will: 1.1 Develop appropriate training programs with reference to CCAC requirements; 1.2 Assess the training requirements of all personnel at the University

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

82

1268 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 59, NO. 5, MAY 2011 MISO Capacity with Per-Antenna Power Constraint  

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1268 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 59, NO. 5, MAY 2011 MISO Capacity with Per scheme for a MISO channel with per-antenna power constraint. Two cases of channel state information--Per-antenna power, MISO capacity, MISO wire- less, beamforming. I. INTRODUCTION THE capacity of a MIMO wireless

Vu, Mai

83

NET DEGREES OF FREEDOM OF RECENT SCHEMES FOR THE MISO BC WITH DELAYED CSIT AND FINITE COHERENCE TIME  

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NET DEGREES OF FREEDOM OF RECENT SCHEMES FOR THE MISO BC WITH DELAYED CSIT AND FINITE COHERENCE.slock@eurecom.fr ABSTRACT Most techniques designed for the multi-input single-output (MISO) Broadcast Channel (BC) require that in the underdetermined (overloaded) MISO BC with Nt transmit antennas and K = Nt +1 users Nt (sum) Degrees of Freedom (Do

Gesbert, David

84

50 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 18, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 On Ergodic Secrecy Rate for MISO Wiretap Broadcast Channels with  

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50 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 18, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 On Ergodic Secrecy Rate for MISO-input single-output (MISO) broadcast channel. We consider an extension of the model in [1], where a multiple MODEL AND ASSUMPTIONS We consider a MISO wiretap broadcast channel with M antennas at the BS, K mobile

Swindlehurst, A. Lee

85

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 62, NO. 4, FEBRUARY 15, 2014 993 Adaptive Limited Feedback for MISO Wiretap  

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Feedback for MISO Wiretap Channels With Cooperative Jamming Minyan Pei, A. Lee Swindlehurst, Fellow, IEEE--Cooperative jamming, feedback bits allocation, limited feedback, MISO wiretap channel. I. INTRODUCTION P HYSICAL layer for mul- tiple-input single-output (MISO) wiretap channels, which have Manuscript received May 30, 2013

Swindlehurst, A. Lee

86

Stanford University Exploiting Channel Knowledge at the Tx in MISO and MIMO Wireless Exploiting Partial Channel Knowledge at  

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Stanford University Exploiting Channel Knowledge at the Tx in MISO and MIMO Wireless Exploiting Partial Channel Knowledge at the Transmitter in MISO and MIMO Wireless SPAWC 2003 Rome, Italy June 18 Exploiting Channel Knowledge at the Tx in MISO and MIMO Wireless Outline Introduction · Perfect CSI

Paulraj, Arogyaswami

87

SMSE PRECODER DESIGN IN A MULTIUSER MISO SYSTEM WITH LIMITED FEEDBACK Muhammad Nazmul Islam and Raviraj Adve  

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SMSE PRECODER DESIGN IN A MULTIUSER MISO SYSTEM WITH LIMITED FEEDBACK Muhammad Nazmul Islam in the downlink of a multi-user (MU) multiple input single output (MISO) sys- tem with quantized channel state MISO linear transceivers that exist in the limited feedback literature. Second, we show analytically

Adve, Raviraj

88

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 56, NO. 3, MAY 2007 1197 An Interleave-Division-Multiplexing MISO System  

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-Division-Multiplexing MISO System With Partial CSI at Transmitter Chuxiang Li, Kai Li, Xiaodong Wang, Senior Member, IEEE-division-multiplexing (IDM) multiple-input­ single-output (MISO) system with partial channel state information (CSI the performance of such an IDM-MISO system. In particular, an SNR tracking method is proposed to calculate

Ping, Li

89

BEAMFORMING AND PAPR REDUCTION FOR MISO-OFDM SYSTEMS Jingon Joung, Eui-Rim Jeong, and Yong H. Lee  

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BEAMFORMING AND PAPR REDUCTION FOR MISO-OFDM SYSTEMS Jingon Joung, Eui-Rim Jeong, and Yong H. Lee single-output (MISO) orthogonal frequency division multiplex- ing (OFDM) systems with beamforming, peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR), multiple- input single-output (MISO), beamforming. 1. INTRODUCTION

Lee, Yong Hoon

90

DEGREES OF FREEDOM IN THE MISO BC WITH DELAYED-CSIT AND FINITE COHERENCE TIME: A SIMPLE OPTIMAL SCHEME  

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DEGREES OF FREEDOM IN THE MISO BC WITH DELAYED-CSIT AND FINITE COHERENCE TIME: A SIMPLE OPTIMAL the multi-input single-output (MISO) Broadcast Channel (BC), the multi-user (MU) downlink in a cell scheme was proposed in [9] for the time cor- related MISO broadcast channel with 2 users. This scheme

Gesbert, David

91

A Low-Complexity Precoder for Large Multiuser MISO Systems Saif K. Mohammed, A. Chockalingam, and B. Sundar Rajan  

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A Low-Complexity Precoder for Large Multiuser MISO Systems Saif K. Mohammed, A. Chockalingam, and B--In this paper, we consider the problem of precoding in large multiuser MISO systems, where by `large' we mean i user has one receive antenna. Such large MISO systems will be of immense interest because of the high

Kumar, Anurag

92

170 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 61, NO. 1, JANUARY 1, 2013 Competing for Secrecy in the MISO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the MISO Interference Channel S. Ali A. Fakoorian, Member, IEEE, and A. Lee Swindlehurst, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--A secure communication game is considered for the two-user MISO Gaussian interference channel parameters on the NE strategies. Index Terms--Game theory, information theory, interference channel, MISO

Swindlehurst, A. Lee

93

Beamforming in MISO Systems: Empirical Results and EVM-based Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analytical, simulation, and experimental-based study of beamforming Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) systems. We analyze the performance of beamforming MISO systems taking into account implementation complexity and effects of imperfect channel estimate, delayed feedback, real Radio Frequency (RF) hardware, and imperfect timing synchronization. Our results show that efficient implementation of codebook-based beamforming MISO systems with good performance is feasible in the presence of channel and implementation-induced imperfections. As part of our study we develop a framework for Average Error Vector Magnitude Squared (AEVMS)-based analysis of beamforming MISO systems which facilitates comparison of analytical, simulation, and experimental results on the same scale. In addition, AEVMS allows fair comparison of experimental results obtained from different wireless testbeds. We derive novel expressions for the AEVMS of beamforming MISO systems and show how the AEVMS relates to important system ...

Duarte, Melissa; Dick, Chris; Rao, Raghu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Robust Precoder for Multiuser MISO Downlink with SINR Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we consider linear precoding with SINR constraints for the downlink of a multiuser MISO (multiple-input single-output) communication system in the presence of imperfect channel state information (CSI). The base station is equipped with multiple transmit antennas and each user terminal is equipped with a single receive antenna. We propose a robust design of linear precoder which transmits minimum power to provide the required SINR at the user terminals when the true channel state lies in a region of a given size around the channel state available at the transmitter. We show that this design problem can be formulated as a Second Order Cone Program (SOCP) which can be solved efficiently. We compare the performance of the proposed design with some of the robust designs reported in the literature. Simulation results show that the proposed robust design provides better performance with reduced complexity.

Ubaidulla, P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

On Ergodic Secrecy Capacity for Gaussian MISO Wiretap Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Gaussian multiple-input single-output (MISO) wiretap channel model is considered, where there exists a transmitter equipped with multiple antennas, a legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper each equipped with a single antenna. We study the problem of finding the optimal input covariance that achieves ergodic secrecy capacity subject to a power constraint where only statistical information about the eavesdropper channel is available at the transmitter. This is a non-convex optimization problem that is in general difficult to solve. Existing results address the case in which the eavesdropper or/and legitimate channels have independent and identically distributed Gaussian entries with zero-mean and unit-variance, i.e., the channels have trivial covariances. This paper addresses the general case where eavesdropper and legitimate channels have nontrivial covariances. A set of equations describing the optimal input covariance matrix are proposed along with an algorithm to obtain the solution. Based on this framew...

Li, Jiangyuan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

MISO Capacity with Per-Antenna Power Constraint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We establish in closed-form the capacity and the optimal signaling scheme for a MISO channel with per-antenna power constraint. Two cases of channel state information are considered: constant channel known at both the transmitter and receiver, and Rayleigh fading channel known only at the receiver. For the first case, the optimal signaling scheme is beamforming with the phases of the beam weights matched to the phases of the channel coefficients, but the amplitudes independent of the channel coefficients and dependent only on the constrained powers. For the second case, the optimal scheme is to send independent signals from the antennas with the constrained powers. In both cases, the capacity with per-antenna power constraint is usually less than that with sum power constraint.

Vu, Mai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

System model Scope of Work Short term power constraint Long term power constraint Imperfect CSIR Prediction Summary Spatial and Temporal Power Allocation for MISO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction Summary Spatial and Temporal Power Allocation for MISO Systems with Delayed Feedback Srikrishna Prediction Summary Performance measure: Outage probability Block transmission Rate MISO channel x y R h Block of the work Problem considered: Minimize outage probability of Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) systems

Bhashyam, Srikrishna

98

Robust Downlink Beamforming in Multiuser MISO Cognitive Radio Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies the problem of robust downlink beamforming design in a multiuser Multi-Input Single-Output (MISO) Cognitive Radio Network (CR-Net) in which multiple Primary Users (PUs) coexist with multiple Secondary Users (SUs). Unlike conventional designs in CR-Nets, in this paper it is assumed that the Channel State Information (CSI) for all relevant channels is imperfectly known, and the imperfectness of the CSI is modeled using an Euclidean ball-shaped uncertainty set. Our design objective is to minimize the transmit power of the SU-Transmitter (SU-Tx) while simultaneously targeting a lower bound on the received Signal-to-Interference-plus-Noise-Ratio (SINR) for the SU's, and imposing an upper limit on the Interference-Power (IP) at the PUs. The design parameters at the SU-Tx are the beamforming weights, i.e. the precoder matrix. The proposed methodology is based on a worst case design scenario through which the performance metrics of the design are immune to variations in the channels. We propose thr...

Gharavol, Ebrahim A; Mouthaan, Koenraad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A Robust Artificial Noise Aided Transmit Design for Miso Secrecy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers an artificial noise (AN) aided secrecy rate maximization (SRM) problem for a multi-input single-output (MISO) channel overheard by multiple single-antenna eavesdroppers. We assume that the transmitter has perfect knowledge about the channel to the desired user but imperfect knowledge about the channels to the eavesdroppers. Therefore, the resultant SRM problem is formulated in the way that we maximize the worst-case secrecy rate by jointly designing the signal covariance ${\\bf W}$ and the AN covariance ${\\bf \\Sigma}$. However, such a worst-case SRM problem turns out to be hard to optimize, since it is nonconvex in ${\\bf W}$ and ${\\bf \\Sigma}$ jointly. Moreover, it falls into the class of semi-infinite optimization problems. Through a careful reformulation, we show that the worst-case SRM problem can be handled by performing a one-dimensional line search in which a sequence of semidefinite programs (SDPs) are involved. Moreover, we also show that the optimal ${\\bf W}$ admits a rank-one str...

Li, Qiang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Hard X-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 with the Miso telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 was observed in the hard X-ray - soft gamma-ray energy range by the Miso telescope on two different occasions: in September 1979 and May 1980. Two hard X-ray states of the source have beem measured: in 1979 the observed spectrum confirms the superlow state measured in the same period by the HEAO-3 satellite, while in 1980 the Miso X-ray data are consistent with the so-called low state of Cygnus X-1. In both occasions, no gamma-ray excess has been observed above 200 keV. 9 references.

Perotti, F.; Della Ventura, A.; Villa, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

May 1980 low energy gamma-ray observations with the MISO telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a balloon flight of the MISO telescope on 1980 May 17, the Crab Nebula and the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 were studied over the photon energy range 0.03-16 MeV. The photon spectrum of the Crab Nebula was measured up to approximately 2 MeV. No gamma-ray emission from NGC 4151 was detected on this occasion.

Perotti, F.; Della Ventura, A.; Villa, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Effect in the KHT sarcoma of CCNU and MISO on cell cycle progression evaluated by flow-cytometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies using the KHT sarcoma have shown that misonidazole (MISO) enhances the cytotoxicity of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) by as much as a factor of 2.0. In the present study flow cytometry was used to monitor the changing DNA distributions of cells dissociated from solid tumors at successive times following treatment with CCNU, applied either alone or in combination with 0.5 mg/g MISO. The proportion of cells in late S and the G/sub 2/M phases of the cell cycle increased gradually after CCNU treatment. MISO did not significantly change this block in cell progression, which persisted for at least 48 hr after treatment in all cases. CCNU shows marked carbamoylating activity, which has been associated with inhibition of RNA processing and with the degree of chemopotentiation achieved with MISO. By 24 hr after treatment, CCNU clearly altered the distribution of RNA, but no significant differences could be detected between results obtained from drug and drug plus sensitizer treated groups. These studies demonstrate the effect of CCNU on cell cycle progression in vivo. The addition of MISO did not result in further perturbation of the total tumor population, suggesting that cell cycle redistribution does not play a major role in chemopotentiation by MISO.

Hill, S.A.; Bauer, K.D.; Keng, P.C.; Siemann, D.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Beamforming on the MISO interference channel with multi-user decoding capability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers the multiple-input-single-output interference channel (MISO-IC) with interference decoding capability (IDC), so that the interference signal can be decoded and subtracted from the received signal. On the MISO-IC with single user decoding, transmit beamforming vectors are classically designed to reach a compromise between mitigating the generated interference (zero forcing of the interference) or maximizing the energy at the desired user. The particularly intriguing problem arising in the multi-antenna IC with IDC is that transmitters may now have the incentive to amplify the interference generated at the non-intended receivers, in the hope that Rxs have a better chance of decoding the interference and removing it. This notion completely changes the previous paradigm of balancing between maximizing the desired energy and reducing the generated interference, thus opening up a new dimension for the beamforming design strategy. Our contributions proceed by proving that the optimal rank of the...

Ho, Z K M; Jorswieck, E; Mochaourab, R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Outage Rate Regions for the MISO Interference Channel: Definitions and Interpretations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the slow-fading two-user multiple-input single-output (MISO) interference channel (IC), where the receivers treat the interference as additive Gaussian noise. We study the rate points that can be achieved, allowing a non-zero outage probability. The points which meet the outage probability specification constitute a so-called outage rate region. There exist several definitions of the outage rate regions for the IC, as for the broadcast and the multiple-access channels. We give four definitions for the outage region of the MISO IC. The definitions differ on whether the rates are declared in outage jointly or individually and whether there is instantaneous or statistical channel state information (CSI) at the transmitters. For the statistical CSI scenario, we discuss how to find the outage probabilities in closed form. We provide interpretations of the definitions and compare the corresponding regions via analytical and numerical results.

Lindblom, Johannes; Larsson, Erik G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Degrees of Freedom of Time Correlated MISO Broadcast Channel with Delayed CSIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the time correlated MISO broadcast channel where the transmitter has imperfect knowledge on the current channel state, in addition to delayed channel state information. By representing the quality of the current channel state information as P^-{\\alpha} for the signal-to-noise ratio P and some constant {\\alpha} \\geq 0, we characterize the optimal degree of freedom region for this more general two-user MISO broadcast correlated channel. The essential ingredients of the proposed scheme lie in the quantization and multicasting of the overheard interferences, while broadcasting new private messages. Our proposed scheme smoothly bridges between the scheme recently proposed by Maddah-Ali and Tse with no current state information and a simple zero-forcing beamforming with perfect current state information.

Yang, Sheng; Gesbert, David; Yi, Xinping

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Evolution of the Midwest ISO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Transmission Owning Members Marketers · Allegheny Energy Supply · American Electric Power Co. · Automated Power Transmission System Operator, Inc. MAPP Fall Conference August 28, 2002 #12;Overview · General Background Information · MISO Today · MISO Evolution #12;General Background Information #12;General Utility Background

Tesfatsion, Leigh

107

Explicit Solution of Worst-Case Secrecy Rate for MISO Wiretap Channels with Spherical Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multiple-input single-output (MISO) wiretap channel model is considered, that includes a multi-antenna transmitter, a single-antenna legitimate receiver and a single-antenna eavesdropper. For the scenario in which spherical uncertainty for both the legitimate and the eavesdropper channels is included, the problem of finding the optimal input covariance that maximizes the worst-case secrecy rate subject to a power constraint, is considered, and an explicit expression for the maximum worst-case secrecy rate is provided.

Li, Jiangyuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hard x-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 with the MISO telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of hard x-ray, soft gamma-ray observations of the galactic black hole candidate, Cyg X-1, taken with the MISO telescope in October 1979 and May 1980 are presented, confirming the superlow state measured during September-October 1979 by the HEAO 3 satellite. The 1980 observation coincides with a low- to high-state transition and is consistent with HEAO 3 observations taken at the same epoch. No gamma-ray counting-rate excess above 200 keV was recorded in either observation. Apart from these two measurements, the observation of the Crab Nebula as an a posteriori calibration source is also described. 15 references.

Perotti, F.; Della Ventura, A.; Villa, G.; Bassani, L.; Butler, R.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

On the Degrees of Freedom of time correlated MISO broadcast channel with delayed CSIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the time correlated MISO broadcast channel where the transmitter has partial knowledge on the current channel state, in addition to delayed channel state information (CSI). Rather than exploiting only the current CSI, as the zero-forcing precoding, or only the delayed CSI, as the Maddah-Ali-Tse (MAT) scheme, we propose a seamless strategy that takes advantage of both. The achievable degrees of freedom of the proposed scheme is characterized in terms of the quality of the current channel knowledge.

Kobayashi, Mari; Gesbert, David; Yi, Xinping

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Full Diversity Codes for MISO Systems Equipped with Linear or ML Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, a general criterion for space time block codes (STBC) to achieve full-diversity with a linear receiver is proposed for a wireless communication system having multiple transmitter and single receiver antennas (MISO). Particularly, the STBC with Toeplitz structure satisfies this criterion and therefore, enables full-diversity. Further examination of this Toeplitz STBC reveals the following important properties: a) The symbol transmission rate can be made to approach unity. b) Applying the Toeplitz code to any signalling scheme having nonzero distance between the nearest constellation points results in a non-vanishing determinant. In addition, if QAM is used as the signalling scheme, then for independent MISO flat fading channels, the Toeplitz codes is proved to approach the optimal diversity-vs-multiplexing tradeoff with a ZF receiver when the number of channel uses is large. This is, so far, the first non-orthogonal STBC shown to achieve the optimal tradeoff for such a receiver. On the other han...

Liu, Jing; Wong, Kon Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Coordinated Beamforming for Multiuser MISO Interference Channel under Rate Outage Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies the coordinated beamforming design problem for the multiple-input single-output (MISO) interference channel, assuming only channel distribution information (CDI) at the transmitters. For a given requirement on the rate outage probability for receivers, we aim to maximize the system utility (e.g., the weighted sum rate, weighted proportional fairness rate, and the weighed harmonic mean rate) subject to the rate outage constraints and individual power constraints. The outage constraints, however, lead to a complicated, nonconvex structure for the considered beamforming design problem and make the optimization problem difficult to handle. While this nonconvex optimization problem can be solved in an exhaustive search manner, this brute-force approach is only feasible when the number of transmitter-receiver pairs is small. For a system with a large number of transmitter-receiver pairs, computationally efficient alternatives are necessary. The focus of this paper is hence on the design of such e...

Li, Wei-Chiang; Lin, Che; Chi, Chong-Yung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Robust Secure Transmission in MISO Channels Based on Worst-Case Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies robust transmission schemes for multiple-input single-output (MISO) wiretap channels. Both the cases of direct transmission and cooperative jamming with a helper are investigated with imperfect channel state information (CSI) for the eavesdropper links. Robust transmit covariance matrices are obtained based on worst-case secrecy rate maximization, under both individual and global power constraints. For the case of an individual power constraint, we show that the non-convex maximin optimization problem can be transformed into a quasiconvex problem that can be efficiently solved with existing methods. For a global power constraint, the joint optimization of the transmit covariance matrices and power allocation between the source and the helper is studied via geometric programming. We also study the robust wiretap transmission problem for the case with a quality-of-service constraint at the legitimate receiver. Numerical results show the advantage of the proposed robust design. In particular, ...

Huang, Jing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Source Optimization in MISO Relaying with Channel Mean Feedback: A Stochastic Ordering Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the optimum source transmission strategy to maximize the capacity of a multiple-input single-output (MISO) amplify-and-forward relay channel, assuming source-relay channel mean feedback at the source. The challenge here is that relaying introduces a nonconvex structure in the objective function, thereby excluding the possible use of previous methods dealing with mean feedback that generally rely on the concavity of the objective function. A novel method is employed, which divides the feasible set into two subsets and establishes the optimum from one of them by comparison. As such, the optimization is transformed into the comparison of two nonnegative random variables in the Laplace transform order, which is one of the important stochastic orders. It turns out that the optimum transmission strategy is to transmit along the known channel mean and its orthogonal eigenchannels. The condition for rank-one precoding (beamforming) to achieve capacity is also determined. Our results subsume th...

Ding, Minhua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Outage Constrained Robust Transmit Optimization for Multiuser MISO Downlinks: Tractable Approximations by Conic Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider a probabilistic signal-to-interference and-noise ratio (SINR) constrained problem for transmit beamforming design in the presence of imperfect channel state information (CSI), under a multiuser multiple-input single-output (MISO) downlink scenario. In particular, we deal with outage-based quality-of-service constraints, where the probability of each user's SINR not satisfying a service requirement must not fall below a given outage probability specification. The study of solution approaches to the probabilistic SINR constrained problem is important because CSI errors are often present in practical systems and they may cause substantial SINR outages if not handled properly. However, a major technical challenge is how to process the probabilistic SINR constraints. To tackle this, we propose a novel relaxation- restriction (RAR) approach, which consists of two key ingredients-semidefinite relaxation (SDR), and analytic tools for conservatively approximating probabilistic constraints. Th...

Wang, Kun-Yu; Chang, Tsung-Hui; Ma, Wing-Kin; Chi, Chong-Yung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

How to Fully Exploit the Degrees of Freedom in the Downlink of MISO Systems With Opportunistic Beamforming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The opportunistic beamforming in the downlink of multiple-input single-output (MISO) systems forms $N$ transmit beams, usually, no more than the number of transmit antennas $N_t$. However, the degrees of freedom in this downlink is as large as $N_t^2$. That is, at most $N_t^2$ rather than only $N_t$ users can be simultaneously transmitted and thus the scheduling latency can be significantly reduced. In this paper, we focus on the opportunistic beamforming schemes with $N_tMISO systems over Rayleigh fading channels. We first show how to design the beamforming matrix with maximum number of transmit beams as well as least correlation between any pair of them as possible, through Fourier, Grassmannian, and mutually unbiased bases (MUB) based constructions in practice. Then, we analyze their system throughput by exploiting the asymptotic theory of extreme order statistics. Finally, our simulation results show the Grassmannian-based beamforming achieves the maximum ...

Xia, Minghua; Kim, Soo-Chang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Survival in subpopulations of cells derived from solid KHT sarcomas by centrifugal elutriation following treatment with CCNU and MISO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Misonidazole (MISO) has been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) in a number of different animal tumor systems. The authors have investigated the response to therapy of the various subpopulations of cells comprising the KHT sarcoma, to determine whether chemopotentiation occurred as a preferential enhancement of killing in one subpopulation of cells. Twenty-four hr after drug treatment, cells dissociated from solid tumors were separated into homogeneous populations based on cell size by the technique of centrifugal elutriation. Clonogenic cell survival was measured for each elutriated fraction. In vivo treatment with MISO produced no measurable cell-kill across the cell cycle. Those cells in late G/sub 1/ and S phase 24 hr after treatment were most sensitive to CCNU alone. The enhancement of CCNU cytotoxicity by MISO occurred primarily in the early G/sub 1/ and S fractions. These data suggest that chemopotentiation does not occur equally in all tumor cell subpopulations and that some specificity of enhanced cell killing exists.

Hill, S.A.; Keng, P.C.; Siemann, D.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ber analysis of iterative turbo encoded miso wireless communication system under implementation of q-ostbc scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, a comprehensive study has been made to evaluate the performance of a MISO wireless communication system. The 4-by-1 spatially multiplexed Turbo encoded system under investigation incorporates Quasi-orthogonal space-time block coding (Q-STBC) and ML signal detection schemes under QPSK, QAM, 16PSK and 16QAM digital modulations. The simulation results elucidate that a significant improvement of system performance is achieved in QAM modulation. The results are also indicative of noticeable system performance enhancement with increasing number of iterations in Turbo encoding/decoding scheme.

Kabir, M Hasnat; Zaman, Mustari; Rashed, Md Golam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Optimal Use of Current and Outdated Channel State Information - Degrees of Freedom of the MISO BC with Mixed CSIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a multiple-input-single-output (MISO) broadcast channel with mixed channel state information at the transmitter (CSIT) that consists of imperfect current CSIT and perfect outdated CSIT. Recent work by Kobayashi et al. presented a scheme which exploits both imperfect current CSIT and perfect outdated CSIT and achieves higher degrees of freedom (DoF) than possible with only imperfect current CSIT or only outdated CSIT individually. In this work, we further improve the achievable DoF in this setting by incorporating additional private messages, and provide a tight information theoretic DoF outer bound, thereby identifying the DoF optimal use of mixed CSIT. The new result is stronger even in the original setting of only delayed CSIT, because it allows us to remove the restricting assumption of statistically equivalent fading for all users.

Gou, Tiangao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A convex approximation approach to Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Multiuser MISO Interference Channel under outage constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers weighted sum rate maximization of multiuser multiple-input single-output interference channel (MISO-IFC) under outage constraints. The outage-constrained weighted sum rate maximization problem is a nonconvex optimization problem and is difficult to solve. While it is possible to optimally deal with this problem in an exhaustive search manner by finding all the Pareto-optimal rate tuples in the (discretized) outage-constrained achievable rate region, this approach, however, suffers from a prohibitive computational complexity and is feasible only when the number of transmitter-receive pairs is small. In this paper, we propose a convex optimization based approximation method for efficiently handling the outage-constrained weighted sum rate maximization problem. The proposed approximation method consists of solving a sequence of convex optimization problems, and thus can be efficiently implemented by interior-point methods. Simulation results show that the proposed method can yield near-optim...

Li, Wei-Chiang; Lin, Che; Chi, Chong-Yung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Single-User Beamforming in Large-Scale MISO Systems with Per-Antenna Constant-Envelope Constraints: The Doughnut Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large antenna arrays at the base station (BS) has recently been shown to achieve remarkable intra-cell interference suppression at low complexity. However, building large arrays in practice, would require the use of power-efficient RF amplifiers, which generally have poor linearity characteristics and hence would require the use of input signals with a very small peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR). In this paper, we consider the single-user Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) downlink channel for the case where the BS antennas are constrained to transmit signals having constant envelope (CE). We show that, with per-antenna CE transmission the effective channel seen by the receiver is a SISO AWGN channel with its input constrained to lie in a doughnut-shaped region. For single-path direct-line-of-sight (DLOS) and general i.i.d. fading channels, analysis of the effective doughnut channel shows that under a per-antenna CE input constraint, i) compared to an average-only total transmit power constrained MISO chan...

Mohammed, Saif Khan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Overview of Avista GHG Modeling NPCC Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas CO2 Emissions A Bridge to a Low Carbon Future, or the Future? 815 1,190 lbs/MWh Gas CCCT has ~35% of coal emissions on a per-MWh basis Gas CT has ~50% of coal emissions on a per-MWh basis 119 119 210 CCCT CT Colstrip 3/4 #12;6/5/2013 2 Avista CO2 Emissions Forecast Rising emissions overall

122

Lee, Wang, and Tao 1 Global Optimization for Mappping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

linearization. Traverse the tree control structure of each chain in a bottom-up manner to linearize loops. Step Khoros. Optimization of data mapping and task execution. Automated generation of parallel code The Algorithm Step 1: Graph partitioning. Traverse the tree control structure to identify a set of maximal

Neumaier, Arnold

123

Three-Step Review Process. NPCC, November 2006, document 2006-21 Three-Step Review Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly the number of fish being introduced; (d) change stocks or the number of stocks, and/or (e) change to take place, so that efforts are not restrictive, and still close enough to provide choices to be made

124

Beamforming and Rate Allocation in MISO Cognitive Radio Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider decentralized multi-antenna cognitive radio networks where secondary (cognitive) users are granted simultaneous spectrum access along with license-holding (primary) users. We treat the problem of distributed beamforming and rate allocation for the secondary users such that the minimum weighted secondary rate is maximized. Such an optimization is subject to (1) a limited weighted sum-power budget for the secondary users and (2) guaranteed protection for the primary users in the sense that the interference level imposed on each primary receiver does not exceed a specified level. Based on the decoding method deployed by the secondary receivers, we consider three scenarios for solving this problem. In the first scenario each secondary receiver decodes only its designated transmitter while suppressing the rest as Gaussian interferers (single-user decoding). In the second case each secondary receiver employs the maximum likelihood decoder (MLD) to jointly decode all secondary transmissions, and in the t...

Tajer, Ali; Wang, Xiaodong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Robust Monotonic Optimization Framework for Multicell MISO Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of multiuser systems is both difficult to measure fairly and to solve optimally. Most resource allocation problems are non-convex, even under simplifying assumptions such as perfect channel knowledge, homogeneous channel properties among users, and simple power constraints. Herein, we establish a general optimization framework that systematically solves these problems to global optimality. The proposed branch-reduce-and-bound (BRB) algorithm handles general multicell downlink systems with single-antenna users, multiantenna transmitters, arbitrary linear power constraints, and robustness to channel uncertainty. The problem of robust optimization with fairness-profile is solved at each iteration, which is a quasi-convex problem and a novel generalization of regular max-min fairness. The BRB algorithm is in general computationally costly, but it shows far better convergence than the previously known outer polyblock approximation algorithm. Our framework is suitable for computing benchmarks in gen...

Björnson, Emil; Bengtsson, Mats; Ottersten, Björn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Linear Beamforming for the Spatially Correlated MISO broadcast channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A spatially correlated broadcast setting with M antennas at the base station and M users (each with a single antenna) is considered. We assume that the users have perfect channel information about their links and the base station has only statistical information about each user's link. The base station employs a linear beamforming strategy with one spatial eigen-mode allocated to each user. The goal of this work is to understand the structure of the beamforming vectors that maximize the ergodic sum-rate achieved by treating interference as noise. In the M = 2 case, we first fix the beamforming vectors and compute the ergodic sum-rate in closed-form as a function of the channel statistics. We then show that the optimal beamforming vectors are the dominant generalized eigenvectors of the covariance matrices of the two links. It is difficult to obtain intuition on the structure of the optimal beamforming vectors for M > 2 due to the complicated nature of the sum-rate expression. Nevertheless, in the case of asym...

Raghavan, Vasanthan; Hanly, Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

EA-343 Midwest Independent Transmission Operator (MISO) | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 Closing American Electric0-A S.A.C.9

128

Property:EIA/861/IsoMiso | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed JumpMover JumpActivityTransmissionIsoCa

129

Blackout of 2003: Description and Responses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operator (MISO), National Electric Reliability Council, New York Times (including transcripts from the MISO

130

Feedback reduction techniques and fairness in multi-user MIMO broadcast channels with random beamforming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transmit beamforming for miso systems with imperfectand temporally correlated miso channels in the presence ofmultiple-input single-output (MISO) chan- nels. The effects

Pugh, Matthew Owen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Design and analysis of MIMO systems with practical channel state information assumptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison with Optimal MISO CSI-Quantizers . . . . . . 9655 Capacity Analysis of MISO Systems with Finite-Rate CSIAnalysis of MISO CSI Quantizers with Mismatched Codebooks

Zheng, Jun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Large wireless networks : fundamental limits and design issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multiple-input single-output (MISO) channels between allnumber of independent MISO channels given by (2.8), rathercapacities of the individual MISO channels between the nodes

Minero, Paolo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Performance analysis of interference suppression techniques for multiple antenna systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pre-BLAST-DFE Technique for MISO Channels with DecentralizedPrecoding Operating over MISO Frequency Selec- tive Fadingon a Nonlinear Precoder for MISO Channels with Decentralized

Amihood, Patrick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Feedback, power control, and beamforming : methods for situational aware wireless networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outage balancing in multiuser MISO networks: network dualityOutage balancing in multiuser MISO networks: network dualitywith partial feedback for MISO downlink transmission using

Huang, Yichao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007. “Inclusion of Wind in the MISO Transmission Expansionhttp://www.jcspstudy.org/ Midwest ISO (MISO). 2007. Midwest+Planning Midwest ISO (MISO). 2003. Midwest Transmission

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Topological Interference Management through Index Coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Degrees of freedom of the MISO BC with mixed CSIT,” IEEEof freedom of time correlated MISO broadcast channel withof alternating CSIT for the MISO BC,” IEEE Transactions on

Jafar, Syed A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Widely linear equalization for MIMO and SISO communications systems using filter banks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selective MISO Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .input-single- output (MISO) channel is not fully addressed.system in a frequency selective MISO channel and the WLE

Pun, Ka Shun Carson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A CRITICAL REVIEW OF WIND TRANSMISSION COST ESTIMATES FROM MAJOR TRANSMISSION PLANNING EFFORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report.pdf Midwest ISO (MISO). 2003. Midwest TransmissionConference September 2007 MISO. 2007. Midwest Transmission2006 SDG&E Midwest ISO (MISO) ISO/RTO February 2007 MISO '06

Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

NAGOYA UNIVERSITY GLOBAL 30 INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMSPrinted in March 2014 Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601, Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include miso-nikomi-udon (Nagoya-style udon noodles with miso soup) and miso-katsu (fried pork cutlets with rich red miso sauce). Nagoya cuisine is also well known for a variety of chicken dishes

Takahashi, Ryo

140

RNA Splicing Regulation in Drosophila melanogaster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Another method called MISO (Katz et al. 2010) performs thisand then quantified, while MISO requires an a priori set of

Brooks, Angela Norie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Degrees-of-Freedom Region of the MISO Broadcast Channel with General Mixed-CSIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the setting of the two-user broadcast channel, recent work by Maddah-Ali and Tse has shown that knowledge of prior channel state information at the transmitter (CSIT) can be useful, even in the absence of any knowledge of current CSIT. Very recent work by Kobayashi et al., Yang et al., and Gou and Jafar, extended this to the case where, instead of no current CSIT knowledge, the transmitter has partial knowledge, and where under a symmetry assumption, the quality of this knowledge is identical for the different users' channels. Motivated by the fact that in multiuser settings, the quality of CSIT feedback may vary across different links, we here generalize the above results to the natural setting where the current CSIT quality varies for different users' channels. For this setting we derive the optimal degrees-of-freedom (DoF) region, and provide novel multi-phase broadcast schemes that achieve this optimal region. Finally this generalization incorporates and generalizes the corresponding result in Maleki e...

Chen, Jinyuan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Optimal and Robust Transmit Designs for MISO Channel Secrecy by Semidefinite Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years there has been growing interest in study of multi-antenna transmit designs for providing secure communication over the physical layer. This paper considers the scenario of an intended multi-input single-output channel overheard by multiple multi-antenna eavesdroppers. Specifically, we address the transmit covariance optimization for secrecy-rate maximization (SRM) of that scenario. The challenge of this problem is that it is a nonconvex optimization problem. This paper shows that the SRM problem can actually be solved in a convex and tractable fashion, by recasting the SRM problem as a semidefinite program (SDP). The SRM problem we solve is under the premise of perfect channel state information (CSI). This paper also deals with the imperfect CSI case. We consider a worst-case robust SRM formulation under spherical CSI uncertainties, and we develop an optimal solution to it, again via SDP. Moreover, our analysis reveals that transmit beamforming is generally the optimal transmit strategy for SR...

Li, Qiang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Non-Convex Utility Maximization in Gaussian MISO Broadcast and Interference Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility (e.g., sum-rate) maximization for multiantenna broadcast and interference channels (with one antenna at the receivers) is known to be in general a non-convex problem, if one limits the scope to linear (beamforming) strategies at transmitter and receivers. In this paper, it is shown that, under some standard assumptions, most notably that the utility function is decreasing with the interference levels at the receivers, a global optimal solution can be found with reduced complexity via a suitably designed Branch-and-Bound method. Although infeasible for real-time implementation, this procedure enables a non-heuristic and systematic assessment of suboptimal techniques. A suboptimal strategy is then proposed that, when applied to sum-rate maximization, reduces to the well-known distributed pricing techniques. Finally, numerical results are provided that compare global optimal solutions with suboptimal (pricing) techniques for sum-rate maximization problems, leading to insight into issues such as the robus...

Rossi, M; Simeone, O; Haimovich, A M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The generation fleet in MISO is being affected by time, fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Power Plan 111(b) & (d) Nature of Regulation Mercury and Air Toxics Standards Cross State Air Pollution Rule and Cooling Water Regulations (316(b)) New air quality standards Coal...

145

Microsoft PowerPoint - MISO-SPP Market Impacts HydPwrConf 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping Richland OperationsU.S. CommercialIn this paper, weSchool

146

EVLA Memo No. 39 Wayne Koski  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Inputs. The same is true for the Master-Input-Slave-Output (MISO) in that the Master-Input must connect to all the daisy chain method would best be avoided. MIB MOSI MISO SCLK SLAVE #1-A MOSI MISO SCLK SLAVE #1-B MOSI MISO SCLK SLAVE #1-C MOSI MISO SCLK SLAVE #2 MOSI MISO SCLK SLAVE #3 MOSI MISO SCLK SS* SS* SS* SS* SS

Groppi, Christopher

147

EIS-0465: Pepco Holdings, Inc. Mid-Atlantic Power Path (MAPP) Project, Prince George's, Calvert, and Wicomico Counties, Maryland, and Sussex County, Delaware  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Pepco Holdings, Inc., cancelled its proposed Phase II of the Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway transmission line project and DOE cancelled preparation of an EIS on the potential environmental impacts of a proposed federal loan guarantee for the project.

148

Maximizing the throughput of large ad hoc wireless networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multi-input, single-output (MISO) protocol. During eachthe maximum throughput of the MISO protocol, in bits-meters/s/ Hz/node, is C MISO = (n ? 1) A log 2 1 + 2n P T ? h

Hua, Y; Huang, Y; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, J J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Necessity of Relay Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multiple-input single-output (MISO) systems [16]–[19], itsfeedback beamforming in MISO systems, in which any set ofExample 3 (Comparison with MISO Systems). One of the most

Koyuncu, Erdem; Jafarkhani, Hamid

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Transmit beamforming for multiple antenna systems with imperfect feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a transmit beamforming MISO system with imperfect feedback.error proba- bility of a MISO transmit beamforming system,”of finite rate feedback MISO systems in the presence of es-

Isukapalli, Yogananda R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Taking ramen seriously : food, labor, and everyday life in modern Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

received small rations of miso, soy sauce, salt, cookingthat bread does not fit with miso soup, grilled fish, andpot, which I would eat with miso soup and salted cucumbers

Solt, George Sekine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Factory Girl Literature: Sexuality, Violence, and Representation in Industrializing Korea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suk shares a desk with Miso, who keeps a copy of a book byjealously what it is about, Miso responds that she has noMind your own business” Miso responds, who cannot explain

Barraclough, Ruth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WindLogics Inc. (2006) [MN-MISO (2006)]; EnerNex et al. (IPP ISO ISO-NE ITC kW kWh MISO MW MWh NERC NREL NYISO OEMIndependent System Operator (MISO), New York ISO (NYISO),

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas, May 24, 2010. MISO. 2010. Dispatchable Intermittentand Windlogics Inc. (2006) [MN-MISO]; Puget Sound Energy (ITC kW kWh LADWP LIBOR MISO American Wind Energy Association

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Spectrally efficient underwater acoustic communications : channel characterization and design aspects for OFDM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

input single-output (MISO) and the MIMO setting with a rank-assess the ergodic capacity of MISO and MIMO UWA channels byfor two cases: an N t × 1 MISO system and a 2 × 2 MIMO

Radoševi?, Andreja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cooperative Multiplexing in Wireless Relay Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Input Multiple Output MISO Multiple Input Single Output MLno cooperation”) and 2×1 MISO (“unlimited cooperation”)Fig 2.6 achieves the 2 × 1 MISO bound for multiplexing gains

Nagpal, Vinayak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ER08-___-000," December 31. MISO, 2007b, M T E P 06 - TheMidwest ISO Transmission Expansion Plan, February. MISO,2007c, "MISO Press Release," U R L : http://

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Block-oriented nonlinear system identification using semidenite programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identification method for MISO Wiener-Hammerstein model.multi-input single-output (MISO) case. More recent work canmulti-input single-output (MISO) case. More recent work can

Han, Younghee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Correlation-based beamforming for multi-user MIMO channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W. Cheng and R. Murch, “MU-MISO transmission with limitedis found in [42] for the MISO channel or in [28] for theoutperforms DPC in the MISO broadcast channel. A similar

Anderson, Adam L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Power Scheduling for Multi-Hop Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an achievable sum rate for this MISO-BC relay net- work byBC relay network and MISO-BC relay network are investigatedreceiver. We will skip the MISO case since it is similar to

Yu, Yuan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Advanced Non-Krylov Subspace Model Order Reduction Techniques for Interconnect Circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decoupled into a number of MISO circuits based on the input-partitioned into many MISO systems and the traditionalcan be performed on these MISO systems. The new reduction

Yan, Boyuan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent System Operator (MISO) and Southwest PowerTo help inform the debate at MISO and SPP concerning how tosettled using the EIS market. MISO administers a day-ahead

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Performance of Non-Gaussian Distribution Based Communication and Compressed Sensing Systems /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by relating it to a MISO MAC communi- cation problem. Weof the |T |-sender Gaussian MISO MAC Y T = b X X w (j?1)b+iprobability distribution P. The MISO codeword index cho- sen

Kwon, Hwan Joon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Retrospective Interference Alignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the degrees of freedom of miso broadcast channels withthe X channel [17, 16] and the MISO BC [5], the interferencea DoF perspective. While the 2 user MISO BC setting easily

Maleki, Hamed; Jafar, Syed A; Shamai, Shlomo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WindLogics Inc. (2006) [MN-MISO (2006)]; EnerNex et al. (IPP ISO ISO-NE ITC kW kWh MISO MW MWh NERC NREL NYISO OEMIndependent System Operator (MISO), New York ISO (NYISO),

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Performance analysis of multi-antenna OFDM systems with phase noise and imperfect channel estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

136 6 Performance Analysis of MISO-OFDM with Phase Noise andMANet MBWA MC MIMO Mbps MMSE MISO MRC MS MSH Media Accessand also exist in SIMO and MISO channels. Multiplexing gain,

Jalloh, Mohamed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOU IRC ISO LMP LBNL LSE MISO MP MRO MWG M&V NERC OATT PUCrecommended a focus on what MISO refers to as DRR Type IIis consistent with trends in MISO and elsewhere and suggests

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Channel estimation and feedback for multiple antenna communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schematic representation of a MISO system with beamformingcapacity of the correlated MISO channel with Q-EGT for di?Outage probability of the MISO channel with quantized EGT (t

Murthy, Chandra Ramabhadra

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multi-year)* Xcel-PSCo MN-MISO** Puget Sound Energy Arizonaand Windlogics Inc. (2006) [MN-MISO]; Puget Sound Energy (2008 at 2006 Gas Prices MN-MISO Pacificorp-2004 Pacificorp-

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Interference suppression in spread-spectrum networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G. Proakis, “Analysis of a MISO pre- BLAST-DFE technique forpre-BLAST-DFE technique for MISO channels with decentralized

Sui, Haichang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

MISO Market Performance: An AgentMISO Market Performance: An Agent--Based Computational TestBased Computational Test--BedBed HongyanHongyan LiLiaa, andand LeighLeigh TesfatsionTesfatsionbb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

managed via Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP) determined by ISO via bid/offer-based OPF. In April 2003 Companies (GenCos) & Load-Serving Entities (LSEs) located at various transmission buses Grid Congestion LMP Average LI (Lerner Index) With learning Fig.5 Average LMP and LI Levels as Demand-Bid Price

Tesfatsion, Leigh

172

On the Optimality of Beamforming for Multi-User MISO Interference Channels with Single-User Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a multi-user interference channel with multi-antenna transmitters and single-antenna receivers, by restricting each receiver to a single-user detector, computing the largest achievable rate region amounts to solving a family of non-convex optimization problems. Recognizing the intrinsic connection between the signal power at the intended receiver and the interference power at the unintended receiver, the original family of non-convex optimization problems is converted into a new family of convex optimization problems. It is shown that, for such interference channels with each receiver implementing single-user detection, transmitter beamforming can achieve all boundary points of the achievable rate region.

Shang, Xiaohu; Poor, H Vincent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Multi-User MISO Interference Channels with Single-User Detection: Optimality of Beamforming and the Achievable Rate Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a multi-user interference channel with multi-antenna transmitters and single-antenna receivers, by restricting each transmitter to Gaussian input and each receiver to a single-user detector, computing the largest achievable rate region amounts to solving a family of non-convex optimization problems. Recognizing the intrinsic connection between the signal power at the intended receiver and the interference power at the unintended receiver, the original family of non-convex optimization problems is converted into a new family of convex optimization problems. It is shown that, for such interference channels with each receiver implementing single-user detection, transmitter beamforming can achieve all boundary points of the achievable rate region.

Shang, Xiaohu; Poor, H Vincent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The generation fleet in MISO is being affected by time, fuel prices and multiple phases of environmental regulations  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment of Energy The U.S.

175

doi:10.1006/jsco.2000.0374 Available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

j=1 b j+miso , b j+miso . diso i diso i = i j=1(b j , b j ) for i miso. ei element of standard matrix. miso the number of zero rows with which A starts presently. µij bi = b i + i-1 j=1 µi,jb j . n

Kallen, Wilberd

176

K-NET busK-NET busK-NET busK-NET bus The K-Net bus is based on the SPI bus but it allows to addressing many different turrets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(standard SPI signal) Clock - MOSI (standard SPI signal) Master Out Slave In - MISO (standard SPI signal_COM MOSI MISO CLK PAI MASTER /F7 /CS_COM MOSI MISO CLK PAI SLAVE #0 /F7 /CS_COM MOSI MISO CLK PAI SLAVE #1 /F7 /CS_COM MOSI MISO CLK PAI SLAVE #2 All slave turrets are in IDLE state and are waiting

Napp, Nils

177

Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Council, Inc. (NPCC) submits its Motion to Intervene the New England Clean Power Link Project pursuant to Rules 212 and 214 of the Rules of Practice and Procedures of the...

178

SAS Output  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 Transformer Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP...

179

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MISO MP MRO MWDRI M&V NYISO PJM PUC RAP RFC RTO RTP SERC AirRTOs such as New England or PJM. In 2005 MISO became theEdison is a member of PJM). Interruptible (Total = 3398, N =

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ott, “Unit commitment in PJM”, Technical Conference on Unit The long? term planning at PJM and MISO in terms of wind as two  exceptions.  In the Midwest, PJM and MISO, and in 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Efficient Computing with the Low Power, Energy Aware Processing (LEAP) Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V17BUS -V17BUS SPI_CS_N SPI_MISO SEL_CLK SEL_LATCH CLKTIM-CS_N SPI_MOSI SPI_ CLK SPI_MISO RJ1 MHOLE4 RN9 SEL_LATCH 1RJ45_95622 MOLEX SPI_MISO 100K 5% CHIP_RES_ARRAY_EXB38V

McIntire, Dustin Hale

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Inferior-Colliculus Responses to Amplitude-Modulated and Unmodulated Acoustic Tones and Cochlear-Implant Pulse Trains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCK_SEL); cbi(DDRB, PIN_MISO); //set MOSI as output //set CSselect to one //set MISO as input cbi(DDRD, PIN_INT1); //setCS 3 PIN_SCK 2 PIN_MOSI 0 PIN_MISO 1 PIN_SCK_SEL 4 sbi(port,

Schoenecker, Matthew Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Synchronization at low SNR in MIMO communications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 1×1 SISO, 1×2 SIMO, 2×1 MISO and 2×2 MIMO pilot-based× 1 SIMO, 1 × 2 SIMO, 2 × 1 MISO and 2 × 2 MIMO systems. Wecode. The SIMO and MISO performances are identical, since

Amde, Manish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Misonidazole neurotoxicity in mice decreased by administration with pyridoxine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of toxicological and pharmacological experiments was performed to test the hypothesis that alterations of pyridoxine (Vitamin B/sub 6/) metabolism may play an important role in the development of misonidazole (MISO) neurotoxicity. The formation of a Schiff's base between the final reduction product of MISO, 2-amino MISO (NH/sub 2/-MISO), and pyridoxal-HCl in ethanol was demonstrated. Mice receiving daily intraperitoneal injections of MISO suffered significantly less toxicity (as determined by survival, weight gain and neurological tests) when large doses of pyridoxine-HCl (PYR) were delivered concomitantly, and consequently were able to tolerate administration of more than twice as many MISO injections. PYR did not alter the pharmacokinetics of MISO, either when given simultaneously or when given by multiple repeated daily injections prior to MISO. The administration of PYR also did not alter the radiosensitization by MISO in an in vivo-in vitro cloning assay with the EMT6 tumor in BALB/c mice. If depletion or altered metabolism of pyridoxine by reduced metabolites is also responsible for the neurotoxic effects of nitroimidazoles in humans, then concomitant administration of pyridoxine (in doses greater than the molar quantity of NH/sub 2/-MISO formed) should inhibit the development of such symptoms and allow administration of larger doses of MISO than are currently clinically employable.

Eifel, P.J.; Brown, D.M.; Lee, W.W.; Brown, J.M.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Receptor binding characteristics of tritiated misoprostol free acid in enriched canine parietal cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Misoprostol (MISO) is a synthetic prostaglandin (PG) E/sub 1/ methyl ester with gastric antisecretory and mucosal protective properties. MISO is rapidly de-esterified to misoprostol free acid (MISO-FA) in enriched (65-80%) canine parietal cell preparations. Both forms appear to possess equivalent antisecretory potency and (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA is stable in these preparations. (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA binding was reversible and saturable with a maximal number of binding sites estimated at 8138 +/- 1893 per cell. The scatchard plot was linear, indicating a single, high affinity receptor population with a dissociation constant of 11 +/- 2.6 x 10/sup -9/ M. Unlabeled MISO-FA and MISO were equally potent inhibitors (IC/sub 50/, approx. 10/sup -8/M) of (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA binding. At 10/sup -5/ M, the dinor and tetranor ..beta..-oxidation metabolites of MISO were weak binding inhibitors. Strict stereospecific binding was shown by MISO stereoisomers, and the 11R, 16S isomer was most active. Both PGE/sub 1/ and 16,16 dimethyl PGE/sub 2/ were potent binding inhibitors, but PGF/sub 1/..cap alpha.. (10/sup -6/ M) and Hoe 892 (10/sup -5/ M), a stable PGI/sub 2/ analog, were weak inhibitors. Neither histamine or cimetidine competed for binding sites. These data indicate the presence of stereospecific E-type prostaglandin receptors in enriched canine parietal cell preparations.

Tsai, B.S.; Kessler, L.K.; Conway, R.G.; Schoenhard, G.; Stolzenbach, J.; Collins, P.; Kramer, S.; Butchko, G.M.; Bauer, R.F.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

High dose misonidazole with dexamethasone rescue: a possible approach to circumvent neurotoxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a view of modifying misonidazole (MISO) neurotoxicity, we initiated a randomized clinical study to assess a possible drug interaction and toxicity protection when dexamethasone (DXM) is administered concomitantly with MISO. The ongoing study consists of: 1. Pharamacokinetic evaluation; 2. Assessment of toxicity. Fourteen patients undergoing radiation therapy for different types of malignant neoplasia (excluding brain tumors) have been randomized to receive either MISO alone, or DXM one week prior and during treatment with MISO. Five of seven patients receiving MISO alone developed peripheral neuropathies while only one out of 7 patients that received MISO with DXM coverage developed a transient and mild neuropathy. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of MISO in plasma and urine of those patients receiving DXM has shown no evidence of drug interaction. It is postulated that the mechanism of action of DXM is at the nerve cell membrane level, restoring and stabilizing cell surface properties. In future studies we will investigate the use of DXM with increasing doses of MISO above the recommended maximum dose of 12 gm/m/sup 2/, hoping to achieve a higher tumor tissue level of MISO while avoiding unacceptable toxicity. The effect of Allopurinol on the plasma kinetics of MISO was studied in four additional patients, observing also no evidence of drug interaction.

Urtasun, R.C.; Tanasichuk, H.; Fulton, D.; Agboola, O.; Turner, A.R.; Koziol, D.; Raleigh, J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

From: Scott Daubert Thermadyne -Director of Quality Assurance, North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SALE Worthington MAP-Pro, Propylene, and MAPP Cylinders Worthington Cylinders, a vendor that has in their MAP-Pro, Propylene, and MAPP cylinder products. Complete shut-off of the cylinder valve may be delayed. Specifically, the Thermadyne/TurboTorch branded cylinder Products Affected are: · 14.1 oz MAP-Pro (yellow

Pillow, Jonathan

188

Metabolism and excretion of (/sup 3/H)misonidazole by hypoxic rate liver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation was initiated to determine if misonidazole's biological activity is related to hypoxia-dependent, reductive biotransformation to form reactive metabolites. This study was facilitated by the synthesis of (/sup 3/H)misonidazole and by use of the isolated perfused rat liver as a model system for hypoxic tissue. Reductive metabolism of MISO by perfused livers was enhanced by hypoxic conditions. Formation of a MISO-derived glutathione conjugate (MISO-GSH) and covalent binding of MISO-derived radioactivity to tissue protein was also enhanced by hypoxia. Depletion of hepatic GSH with diethyl maleate increased the extent of covalent binding to protein under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions, and greatly diminished the formation of MISO-GSH. These results support the hypothesis that hypoxic conditions facilitate reductive metabolism of MISO to an alkylating agent, and that GSH plays an intervening role in the alkylation reaction.

Smith, B.R.; Born, J.L.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Stable reduction product of misonidazole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The predominant stable product (greater than 80%) of the anaerobic radiation chemical reduction (pH 7, formate, N/sub 2/O) of misonidazole (MISO) has been identified as the cyclic guanidinium ion MISO-DDI, a 4,5-dihydro-4,5-dihydroxyimidazolium ion. This cation was prepared as its sulfate salt by the reaction of glyoxal and the appropriate N-substituted guanidinium sulfate. Its formation during MISO reduction was established by NMR spectral comparison and by derivatization as glyoxal bis-oxime, which was formed in 86% yield in fully reduced systems. The toxicity of pure MISO-DDI X sulfate was examined in vivo (C/sub 3/H mice) and in vitro (CHO cells). This product is less toxic than the parent MISO and free glyoxal. A reactive, short-lived, intermediate is suggested as the agent responsible for the toxicity of MISO under hypoxic conditions.

Panicucci, R.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Azomycin riboside: a new radiosensitizer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Azomycin riboside (2-nitro-1-..beta..-D-ribofuranosylimidazole) (AR), a nucleoside analogue with the base component replaced by a 2-nitroimidazole was studied to determine its potential as a radiosensitizer. In vitro evidence showed that AR is as good as or slightly better than misonidazole (MISO) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer. AR was also found to kill hypoxic cells directly and this cytotoxicity was at least as great as MISO cytotoxicity. However, when tumor regrowth delay was used to assess in vivo radiosensitization, AR was found to be inferior to MISO while the LD50 host toxicity assay indicated that AR might be nearly as toxic as MISO. Unless AR proves to be less toxic than MISO or can be selectively distributed with nucleoside transport inhibitors, these preliminary observations have not shown any advantage of AR over MISO as a potential clinically useful radiosensitizer.

Pedersen, J.E.; Barron, G.; Chapman, J.D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced power sources Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Feedback Control MISO control laws SISO control law Summary: : To mitigate wind power intermittency using rechargeable battery as reserve power source Simulation Results......

192

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

An Edge-based Formulation for the Combined-Cycle Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 31, 2014 ... guan@ise.ufl.edu. Yonghong Chen (Principal Advisor) is with the Midcontinent Independent. System Operator, Inc. (MISO), Carmel, IN, USA.

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

York (several hubs), Ontario, PJM, MISO, ERCOT South, Intocontract delivering into the PJM Western hub. Assuming thatpeak real-time prices posted by PJM Interconnection, LLC, on

Jaffee, Dwight; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

York (several hubs), Ontario, PJM, MISO, ERCOT South, Intocontract delivering into the PJM Western hub. Assuming thatpeak real-time prices posted by PJM Interconnection, LLC, on

Jaffee, Dwight M.; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 Internation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MISO and IESO 10-13-11.pdf More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Comments and Supplemental...

197

Inhibition of X-ray-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair in aerobic plateau-phase Chinese hamster cells by misonidazole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of the 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO) and the hydrophilic analog SR-2508 on the repair of X-ray-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) was studied in plateau-phase Chinese Hamster ovary (HA-1) cells. It was found that although MISO does not radiosensitize aerobic cells, it inhibits the repair of PLD. However, under hypoxic conditions, MISO has no effect on PLD repair. The major portion of the inhibition of PLD repair in aerobic cells requires the presence of MISO only during irradiation; little or no additional inhibition occurs when MISO is present during the postirradiation repair period. Also, treatment of aerobic cells with 5 mM MISO for either 5 or 30 min prior to irradiation is equally inhibitory. This suggests that the presence of MISO in some way modifies the initial lesion under aerobic conditions since it does not increase cell killing as determined by immediate plating but inhibits subsequent repair. The inhibition is concentration dependent; 0.5 mM MISO inhibits PLD repair by one-half while 5-10 mM totally inhibits the repair measured 6 hr postirradiation. This phenomenon suggests that radiosensitization of tissue in vivo by MISO and other 2-nitroimidazoles may not be unequivocal proof of the presence of hypoxic cells.

Brown, D.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NAESB Business Practice Subcommittee (BPS) ATC Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

By Phone * 10114 NAESB BPS ATC Project Kick Off * 107 - 10814 NAESB BPS - MISO (Carmel, IN) * 112515 - NAESB BPS Conference Call * 12215 - NAESB BPS Conference...

199

NAESB BPS ATC Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

By Phone * 10114 NAESB BPS ATC Project Kick Off * 107 - 10814 NAESB BPS - MISO (Carmel, IN) * 112515 - NAESB BPS Conference Call * 12215 - NAESB BPS Conference...

200

NAESB Business Practice Subcommittee (BPS) ATC Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thus far * 10114 NAESB BPS ATC Project Kick Off * 107 - 10814 NAESB BPS Meeting (MISO - Carmel, IN) * 1028 - 102914 NAESB BPS Meeting (PJM - Valley Forge, PA) Future...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

FY 2007-09 Project Selection, Section 10 1 Project ID: 1991-019-01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FY 2007-09 Project Selection, Section 10 1 Project ID: 1991-019-01 Title: Hungry Horse Mitigation/Flathead Lake Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes A. Abstract This project was initiated in 1992 after NPCC annual funding since that time. This project specifically addresses the losses on the Flathead Indian

202

ISRP Retrospective Report:ISRP Retrospective Report: 19971997 20052005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.D., NPCC #12;ISRP RetrospectiveISRP Retrospective ·· Presents an overview of ISRP activities from 1997 toPresents an overview of ISRP activities from 1997 to 2005 and evaluates the cumulative effect of our2005 and evaluates

203

DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN APPENDIX A-1 Contract Entities and Plan Participants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Province (USP) Plan in addition to those contracted by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC of three primary elements: Part I. An Assessment of the current and potential physical and biological AND PLAN PARTICIPANTS BOI043620001.DOC/KG A1-2 IDFG organized a technical team of natural resource

204

Effect of nitroimidazoles on the oxygen consumption rate and respiratory control ratio of beef heart mitochondria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neurotoxic effect of the nitroimidazole radiosensitizers misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has seriously compromised their clinical effectiveness. The authors compare here the effect of MISO and DMM on oxygen consumption in purified beef heart mitochondria. MISO has been found to significantly increase the oxygen consumption rate and decrease the respiratory control ratio in isolated mitochondria when incubated in the presence of the NAD+ dependent substrate, ..beta..-hydroxybutyrate. DMM has a similar but less pronounced effect than MISO on these respiratory parameters. When mitochondria were incubated in the presence of these radiosensitizers for 8, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, the oxygen consumption rate was decreased when succinate, a FAD dependent substrate, was added following the incubation. This decrease, which is both time and dosage dependent, is equivalent for MISO and DMM.

Chao, C.F.; Ting, L.; Subjeck, J.R.; Johnson, R.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

CHRONICLE 46, No.5, December 2011 He Kupu Whakamahara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognition for his work. Dr Mark Quigley (Geological Sciences) has been presented with the New Zealand of Science and Innovation, Dr Wayne Mapp, at a ceremony held in Wellington recently. Dr Quigley, a senior

Hickman, Mark

206

Regional measurements of /sup 14/Cmisonidazole distribution and blood flow in subcutaneous RT-9 experimental tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regional (/sup 14/C)misonidazole-derived radioactivity (MISO*) was measured by quantitative autoradiography in s.c. RT-9 experimental tumors 0.5, 2, and 4 h after an i.v. bolus (25 mg) and constant infusion (10 mg/h) in rats. Misonidazole (MISO) concentration in plasma, tumor, and other tissues was also measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The distribution of MISO* in the tumors always resulted in a characteristic pattern with high peripheral and low central values. The high-activity regions in the tumor rim achieved tissue: plasma MISO* activity ratios of 0.97 and 2.2 by 0.5 and 4 h, respectively; for central tumor regions, this ratio was 0.20 and 0.32 for the same periods, respectively. The limited distribution of MISO* to central tumor regions could be correlated to low values of blood flow (measured with (/sup 131/I)iodoantipyrine) and to diffusion from peripheral tumor regions. Low blood flow in the central regions of these tumors will significantly limit the distribution of MISO and other drugs to viable-appearing cells in these areas and could account in part for the failures of chemotherapy in certain solid tumors. Pharmacokinetic modeling indicates that 1 to 9 h may be necessary for MISO concentrations in some tumor regions to reach 50% of that in plasma.

Blasberg, R.; Horowitz, M.; Strong, J.; Molnar, P.; Patlak, C.; Owens, E.; Fenstermacher, J.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Response of an experimental mammary carcinoma to fractionated x-irradiation with misonidazole and microwave hyperthermia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X/Gf mice bearing the MT2 mammary adenocarcinoma were subjected to 4000 rad of x rays given either as a single dose, or five daily fractions of 800 rad. Additional experimental groups were treated with either short term localized microwave hyperthermia (LMH), or the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO), or both hyperthermia plus MISO with x rays. The combined use of MISO plus 42.5/sup 0/C with x rays was superior to the other treatment regimens as assessed by tumor regrowth delay and mean survival time. However, for the five fraction schedule, the addition of MISO plus hyperthermia was not as effective as observed for the single dose treatment. This may be attributed to reoxygenation of the hypoxic tumor cells between treatment fractions. MISO retention in tumor tissue under ambient and hyperthermic conditions was studied. The application of heat locally to the tumors caused a significant increase in MISO tumor concentration. However, after four x ray fractions the influence on MISO concentration by hyperthermia in the tumors could not be demonstrated.

Goldfeder, A.; Brown, D.M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Tissue distribution of sup 14 C- and sup 3 H-labelled misonidazole in the tumor-bearing mouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The retention of labelled misonidazole (MISO) was measured in a range of normal tissues in the mouse 24 hr after the intravenous injection of ({sup 14}C)MISO (ring labelled) and ({sup 3}H)-MISO (side-arm labelled). For ({sup 14}C)MISO the 24 hr tissue retention, in order of the highest to the lowest levels (excluding pathways of excretion), was esophageal epithelium, liver, foot pad, eyelid, lung, subcutaneous lung tumor (A110), esophageal wall, uterus, eye ball, blood, salivary gland, spleen, voluntary muscle, pancreas, inguinal fat. It was assumed that the {sup 14}C represented MISO metabolite(s) bound to macromolecules. An approximately similar pattern was observed for ({sup 3}H)MISO, but a higher percentage of the injected activity per gram of tissue was retained, probably due to the presence of tritiated water in the tissues. It has generally been assumed that significant levels of MISO binding are restricted to hypoxic tissues, for example tumors, but the present results show that significant levels of binding can also occur in apparently normoxic tissues. The explanation is put forward that this binding may be due to local high levels of nitroreductase capacity.

Cobb, L.M.; Nolan, J.; Butler, S. (MRC Radiobiology Unit, Didcot, Oxon (England))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Effect of prolonged high dose misonidazole on tumor response to radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

WHFIB and SA F tumors were exposed to misonidazole (MISO) concentrations of 2.5 mM or more for up to 4 hours (SA F) or 6 hours (WHFIB). There was no increase in the MISO enhancement ratio (SER) in the SA F for a 4 hour exposure to MISO relative to that following a single injection. In the WHFIB tumor, the ER increased from 2.2 for a single MISO injection to 2.5 for a 4 hour contact with MISO for tumor growth delay, and from 2.1 to 2.3 for a cloning assay. Prolonged contact with MISO was toxic and reduced the body temperature by 4 to 5/sup 0/C. For WHFIB cells in vitro, when the contact time (in hypoxia) with 2.5 mM MISO was increased from 0.5 to 2.5 hours, the ER increased from 2.1 to 2.9 at 37/sup 0/C and from 1.9 to 2.5 at 33/sup 0/C.

McNally, N.J.; de Ronde, J.; Hinchliffe, M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MISO, ERCOT South, Into Entergy, Into Southern and Into TVA.Path 15 Into Cinergy Into Entergy Into Southern Into TVA MidPath 15 Into Cinergy Into Entergy Into Southern Into TVA Mid

Jaffee, Dwight; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis. Presentation given to PJM Interconnection Markete.g. , ISO-NE, NYISO, PJM, MISO, ERCOT, and CAISO). Co-also elect to participate in PJM’s day-ahead and/or real-

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Market Report: New York ISO. 2010. PJM, State of theMarket Report for PJM: Ancillary Service Markets. 2010Maryland Interconnection (PJM) and Midwest ISO (MISO) all

Kiliccote, Sila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LSE MISO M-RETS MSW MW MWh PJM POU PRC PSC PUC PV REC RPSelectric service provider PJM Generation Attributes Trackingwaste megawatt megawatt-hour PJM Interconnection publicly

Wiser, Ryan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Midwest Independent System Operator (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) is a Regional Transmission Organization, which administers wholesale electricity markets in all or parts of 11 U.S. states and the Canadian...

215

SMALL PLATES TODAY'S SOUP 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

baba ganoush EGG SALAD 9 Nature's Farm Smart Eggs · lettuce · Bothwell cheddar · celery · onions #12 back ribs house miso chili glaze fresh slaw rice CHICKEN 19 chicken breast mashed potatoes

Martin, Jeff

216

Application for Presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 Internation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Owners dated 12-12-11) More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Co: Answer to NYISO from MISO and...

217

Comparative distribution of misonidazole and its amine metabolite in female Swiss Webster mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution of misonidazole and its terminal reduction product 1-(2-amino-1-imidazolyl)-3-methoxy-2-propanol (misoamine) were compared in female Swiss Webster mice to determine if either misonidazole or misoamine is distributed to peripheral nerves. Female Swiss Webster mice received a 100 mg/kg (5 ..mu..Ci/..mu..mole) i.p. dose of either /sup 3/H-misonidazole or /sup 3/H-miso-amine and the distribution of radioactivity was determined in various tissues including sciatic nerves and other myelinated nerves. Misonidazole produced higher initial tissue concentrations of radioactivity than did miso-amine. The relative tissue concentrations of radioactivity produced by misonidazole or miso-amine were similar, although not identical, 48 hours after administration of the drugs. Both sciatic and other myelinated nerves were found to retain radioactivity following the administration of either misonidazole or miso-amine.

Born, J.L.; Hadley, W.M.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Effect of vitamin B/sub 6/ on the neurotoxicity and pharmacology of desmethylmisonidazole and misonidazole: clinical and laboratory studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The clinical usefulness of misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) is severely limited by neurotoxicity. Based on theoretical considerations and on laboratory data suggesting that pyridoxine (PN) decreased MISO toxicity in mice. The authors attempted to ameliorate the clinical neuropathy of DMM using oral PN. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggested interaction of PN and DMM but no protection against neuropathy was observed. Serial experiments with C3H and BALB/c mice were done using various forms of vitamin B/sub 6/ (PN, pyridoxal, pyridoxal phosphate) administered orally and i.p. No consistent protection was observed. Dexamethasone did not alter MISO toxicity in mice, contrary to the clinical findings. They conclude that vitamin B/sub 6/ is not useful in preventing clinical neurotoxicity of MISO or DMM.

Coleman, C.N.; Hirst, V.K.; Brown, D.M.; Halsey, J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Midwest Transmission Workshop II Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 After introductions of all participants, Abby Arnold, RESOLVE, reviewed the purpose of the meeting and the agenda. The purpose of the workshop was to share the results of the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) scenario development for wind and other fuel sources and the corresponding implications for transmission throughout the MISO control area. The workshop agenda is included in Attachment A.

Kevin Bryan

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

Synthesis of [F-18] fluoroetanidazole for hypoxia imaging evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently there has been an increased interest in new imaging markers for hypoxia. Among them misonidazole (MISO) derivatives based on the 2-nitro-imidazole ring have received considerable attention. Previous studies have shown that MISO was metabolically trapped in living hypoxic cells. Its fluorinated derivative, FMISO, when labeled with F-18 and used for PET represented a promising means of detection of hypoxia in tumors and in ischemic heart and brain.

Lim, J.L.; Berridge, M.S. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Depletion of glutathione in vivo as a method of improving the therapeutic ratio of misonidazole and SR 2508. [BSO; DEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) can enhance misonidazole (MISO) radiosensitizing efficacy both in vivo and in vitro. However, such treatments may also enhance the systemic toxicity in animals. The purpose of the present study was to test various ways of depleting GSH levels in a variety of experimental mouse tumors, to measure the improvement in the efficacy of MISO and its less toxic analog SR 2508 by this depletion, and to determine the effect of daily GSH depletion on the toxicity MISO and SR 2508. GSH levels were measured daily for 5 days in tumors, livers and brains of mice injected daily with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), with or without diethylmaleate (DEM). Daily doses of BSO depleted tumor levels of GSH to 20 to 40% of controls by 6 hr after each injection. Injection of DEM 6 hr after BSO further enhanced the depletion. Administration of MISO or SR 2508 at the time of maximum GSH depletion enhanced the MISO efficacy by factors of 2.6 to 8 for depletion to 8% of controls by BSO + DEM, but no enhancement of SR 2508 was seen with tumors at 20% GSH levels achieved with BSO alone in the preliminary experiment. The chronic toxicity of MISO was enhanced not at all or by a factor of up to 2 for BSO and BSO + DEM respectively.

Yu, N.Y.; Brown, J.M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Development progress of the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) is a compact in vacuo surface science diagnostic, designed to provide in situ surface characterization of plasma facing components in a tokamak environment. MAPP has been implemented for operation on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), where all control and analysis systems are currently under development for full remote operation. Control systems include vacuum management, instrument power, and translational/rotational probe drive. Analysis systems include onboard Langmuir probes and all components required for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy, direct recoil spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy surface analysis techniques.

Lucia, M., E-mail: mlucia@pppl.gov; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boyle, D. P.; Schmitt, J. C.; Onge, D. A. St. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Partial hypoxia as a cause of radioresistance in a human tumor xenograft: its influence illustrated by the sensitizing effect of misonidazole and hyperbaric oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While previous studies with three human tumor xenografts suggest that contact-resistance plays a major role in the response of these tumors to radiation, it remains possible that partial hypoxia may provide an alternate explanation. The present study was carried out to check this possibility by investigating the influence of misonidazole (MISO) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on both the initial and distal components of the survival curves of HRT18 tumor cells. The effect of a challenge dose of radiation on the initial radioresistance of this tumor was also studied. To assess the effects of MISO and HBO, tumor cell survival was determined by excision assay in two groups of tumor-bearing mice, one given MISO (1 mg/g body weight, i.p.) 45 min before irradiation and the other exposed to HBO (3.5 bars). MISO treatment caused greater sensitization than HBO. The enhancement ratios at the 5.10(-1) level were 1.7 (MISO) and 1.7 (HBO); at the 10(-1) level, they were 1.6 (MISO) and 1.4 (HBO); while at 10(-2), they were 1.6 (MISO) and 1.4 (HBO). These two sensitizing effects favor the hypothesis that solid tumors contain a compartment of partially hypoxic cells. To study the effect of a challenge radiation dose on initial radioresistance, tumors were given a challenge dose of 8 Gy, followed 24-48 hr later by doses ranging from 2-12 Gy. The challenge dose did not modify the shape of the survival curve.

Reynaud-Bougnoux, A.; Lespinasse, F.; Malaise, E.P.; Guichard, M.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The potential impacts of a competitive wholesale market in the midwest: A preliminary examination of centralized dispatch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2005, the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) will begin operating the first-ever wholesale market for electricity in the central and upper Midwestern portion of the United States. Region-wide, centralized, security-constrained, bid-based dispatch will replace the current system of decentralized dispatch by individual utilities and control areas. This report focuses on how the operation of generators may change under centralized dispatch. We analyze a stylized example of these changes by comparing a base case dispatch based on a ''snapshot'' taken from MISO's state estimator for an actual, historical dispatch (4 p.m., July 7, 2003) to a hypothetical, centralized dispatch that seeks to minimize the total system cost of production, using estimated cost data collected by the EIA. Based on these changes in dispatch, we calculate locational marginal prices, which in turn reveals the location of congestion within MISO's footprint, as well as the distribution of congestion revenues. We also consider two sensitivity scenarios that examine (1) the effect of changes in MISO membership (2003 vs. 2004 membership lists), and (2) different load and electrical data, based on a snapshot from a different date and time (1 p.m., Feb. 18, 2004). Although our analysis offers important insights into how the MISO market could operate when it opens, we do not address the question of the total benefits or costs of creating a wholesale market in the Midwest.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Bartholomew, Emily; Eto, Joseph H.; Hale, Douglas; Luong, Thanh

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hypoxic cell radiosensitizers: expectations and progress in drug development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When misonidazole (MISO) was introduced into clinical trials there were great expectations that the cure rate of many tumors would be dramatically increased. The lack of efficacy of MISO discouraged further studies with hypoxic cell sensitizers. In recent years superior sensitizers SR 2508 and RO-03-8799 have been introduced into the clinic. SR 2508 is less neurotoxic than MISO, allowing more than three times the total amount of drug to be administered. Furthermore, based on the analysis of a patient's plasma pharmacokinetic profile, neurotoxicity may be largely avoidable. RO-03-8799 is superior in that it produces a higher sensitizer enhancement ratio than MISO for the same administered dose. Unlike with MISO and SR 2508, the dose of RO-03-8799 that can be administered is limited by acute toxicity with no cumulative toxicity having yet been encountered. Study design has improved and the expected clinical benefit from sensitizers has been clarified. Sensitizers, like particle radiation therapy and hyperthemia will, if successful, effect the rate of local tumor control, but cannot improve the cure rate of patients with preexisting metastatic disease. Taking into account the need to optimize reoxygenation, the various reasons for tumor radioresistance other than hypoxia, and the lower oxygen and sensitizer enhancement ratios at 200 cGy per fraction, it is likely that sensitizers will provide some clinical benefit for patients with selected tumor types.

Coleman, C.N.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Characteristics of fluorinated nitroazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Types of 2-nitroimidazoles and 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazoles bearing one or two fluorine atoms on their side chains were synthesized to evaluate their physicochemical properties, radiosensitizing effects, and toxicity. The reduction potential of the compounds containing one fluorine was similar to that of misonidazole (MISO), whereas that of the difluorinated compounds was slightly higher. Both mono- and difluorinated compounds had an in vitro sensitizing activity comparable to or slightly higher than that of MISO. The fluorinated 3-nitrotriazoles were almost as efficient as the 2-nitroimidazoles with the same substituent. In vivo, some of the compounds were up to twice more efficient than MISO, whereas others were as efficient as MISO. Toxicity in terms of LD50/7 in mice was quite variable depending on the side-chain structure; the amide derivatives were less toxic than MISO, whereas the alcohol and ether derivatives were more toxic. In view of the radiosensitizing effect and toxicity in vivo, at least one compound, KU-2285 (a 2-nitroimidazole with an N1-substituent of: CH2CF2CONHCH2CH2OH) has been found to be as useful a hypoxic cell sensitizer as SR-2508.

Shibamoto, Y.; Nishimoto, S.; Shimokawa, K.; Hisanaga, Y.; Zhou, L.; Wang, J.; Sasai, K.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.; Kagiya, T.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of continuously infused nitroimidazoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pharmacokinetics and toxicology of misonidazole (MISO) and SR-2508 given by continuous intraperitoneal infusion were studied in female C/sub 3/H mice. The survival (time to death) of animals receiving continuous infusions of SR-2508 and MISO was compared and related to plasma concentration, rate of infusion and total amount of drug delivered. Brain and plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC. For SR-2508, plasma concentration was directly proportional to the infusion rate. However, as the infusion rate of MISO was doubled, the plasma concentration of MISO increased approximately 6-fold, reflecting a substantial increase in the apparent half-life. The brain/plasma concentration ratio in animals infused for up to 6 days with SR-2508 remained constant, at approximately 0.09. At plasma concentrations of 0.08-1.5 mM, animals receiving SR-2508 survived approximately 3 times as long as animals exposed to a comparable plasma concentration of MISO. Even at the lowest infusion rates employed in this study, the survival of mice receiving SR-2508 was much shorter than would have been predicted if the toxicity of these two drugs were solely related to the integral brain exposure. The low brain/plasma concentration ratio of SR-2508 was maintained throughout long continuous exposures.

Eifel, P.J.; Brown, J.M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Initial pharmacology and toxicology of intravenous desmethylmisonidazole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since January 1981, 52 patients have entered the Radiaton Therapy Oncology Group Phase I trial with intravenous (i.v.) desmethylmisonidazole (DMM). DMM is less lipophilic than misonidazole (MISO) and theoretically will be less neurotoxic due to lower penetration into neural tissue and more rapid elimination. The drug is administered intravenously to achieve the maximum drug concentration in tumor for a given dose. The protocol slowly escalates the total dose of drug administered. At this time the planned dose on the three week schedule is 1 g/m/sup 2/ twice weekly to a total dose of 17.5g/m/sup 2/. The preliminary plasma pharmacokinetic data demonstrates high peak plasma levels within five minutes of the end of the drug infusion. Compared to MISO the percent of DMM excreted in the urine is increased, 63% vs 10%, and the elimination half-life is decreased: DMM, i.v. 5.3h; MISO, i.v. 9.3h; MISO, oral 10 to 13h. Neurotoxicity has been observed in approximately 30% of patients given a cumulative dose of >11g/m/sup 2/. This is in comparison to a 50% incidence in RTOG Phase 1 study with oral MISO at doses of 12g/m/sup 2/. There is not sufficient data to evaluate the relationship between neurotoxicity and drug exposure. Further patient accrual on this study is required to better define the properties of DMN.

Coleman, C.N. (Stanford Univ., CA); Wasserman, T.H.; Phillips, T.L.; Strong, J.M.; Urtasun, R.C.; Schwade, J.G.; Johnson, R.J.; Zagars, G.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Effects of glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine on radiosensitization by oxygen and misonidazole in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) has been used to deplete glutathione (GSH) in V79-379A cells in vitro, and the effect on the efficiency of oxygen and misonidazole (MISO) as radiosensitizers has been determined. Treatment with 50 or 500 ..mu..M BSO caused a rapid decline in GSH content to less than 5% of control values after 10 hr of exposure. Removal of BSO resulted in a rapid regeneration of GSH after 50 ..mu..M BSO, but little regeneration was observed over the subsequent 10-hr period after 500 ..mu..M. Cells irradiated in monolayer on glass had an oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) of 3.1. After 10-14 hr pretreatment with 50 ..mu..M BSO, washed cells were radiosensitized by GSH depletion at all oxygen tensions tested. The OER was reduced to 2.6, due to greater radiosensitization of hypoxic cells than aerated ones by GSH depletion. In similar experiments performed with MISO, an enhancement ratio of 2.0 could be achieved with 0.2 mM MISO in anoxic BSO-pretreated cells, compared to 2.7 mM MISO in non-BSO-treated cells. These apparent increases in radiosensitizer efficiency in GSH-depleted cells could be explained on the basis of radiosensitization of hypoxic cells by GSH depletion alone. These results are consistent with hypoxic cell radiosensitization by GSH depletion and by MISO or oxygen acting by separate mechanisms.

Shrieve, D.C.; Denekamp, J.; Minchinton, A.I.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

In vivo radiosensitizing effect of nitroimidazole derivative KIN-804  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In vivo characteristics of 2-nitroimidazole-1-methylacetohydroxamate (KIN-804), which is a newly developed hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, are presented. The toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and radiosensitizing effect of KIN-804 were studied by in vivo experiments using C3H/He mice bearing the SCCVII tumor. Results were compared with misonidazole (MISO). LD[sub 50]7 of KIN-804 and MISO were 3200 mg/kg and 2000 mg/kg, respectively. The peak concentration of KIN-804 in the tumor occurred 20 min after intraperitoneal injection and reached about 62% of the maximum concentration in the blood. The concentrations in brain and sciatic nerve were very low and clearance from sciatic nerve was rapid. Enhancement ratios of KIN-804 calculated using the growth delay method were 1.22, 1.50, and 1.71 at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, respectively, compared with 1.36 for MISO at a dose of 100 mg/kg. In the TCD[sub 50] assay, enhancement ratios at a dose of 200 mg/kg were 1.69 for KIN-804 and 1.52 for MISO, respectively. KIN-804 is a promising radiosensitizer since it shows less toxicity and higher radiosensitizing activity than MISO. 10 refs., 5 figs.

Tada, Takuhito (Osaka-Prefectural Habikino Hospital, Habikino-City (Japan) Osaka City Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Nakajima, Toshifumi; Onoyama, Yasuto (Osaka City Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Murayama, Chieko; Mori, Yomoyuki (Tokai Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)); Nagasawa, Hideko (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan)); Hori, Hitoshi (Tokushima Univ. (Japan)); Inayama, Seiichi (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan) Tokushima Univ. (Japan))

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Misonidazole combined with hyperfractionation in the management of malignant glioma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiple daily fractionated radiation therapy (MDF) may be more effective than conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (CF) in the treatment of malignant glioma. The hypoxic cell sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) could be more effective when employed with small fractions of radiation every 4 hours to take advantage of the long half-life of the drug. To evaluate MDF and MDF in combination with MISO, a randomized prospective trial was initiated. Between January 1981, and December 1982, patients with histologically verified astrocytoma with anaplastic foci or glioblastoma multiforme were randomized to CF, MDF and MDF in combination with MISO. In January 1983, the CF arm was dropped and a high dose MDF arm added. CCNU chemotherapy was given at the time of tumor progression. Median survival was 29 weeks for CF, 45 weeks for MDF and 50 weeks for MDF plus MISO. Survival was significantly improved for patients treated with MDF compared to patients treated with CF. The addition of MISO to MDF did not result in further improvement in survival. Acute toxicity was acceptable.

Fulton, D.S.; Urtasun, R.C.; Shin, K.H.; Geggie, P.H.S.; Thomas, H.; Muller, P.J.; Moody, J.; Tanasichuk, H.; Mielke, B.; Johnson, E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Potentiation of melphalan activity in the KHT sarcoma by the radiosensitizer RSU 1069  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) has been shown to potentiate the cytotoxic action of a variety of anti-cancer agents. Even larger enhancement ratios than those observed with MISO have been found with certain other nitroimidazoles. One agent reported to be particularly effective in combination with the chemotherapeutic agent melphalan is the sensitizer RSU 1069. The present studies therefore were designed to evaluate the effect of combining these two agents in the treatment of intramuscularly growing KHT sarcomas. Tumor response was assessed using an in vivo to in vitro clonogenic cell survival assay. When given at times ranging from 60 min before to 30 min after melphalan exposure, RSU 1069 was found to increase the tumoricidal activity of the chemotherapeutic agent. Complete dose response curves combining RSU 1069 and a range of melphalan doses then were determined. For comparison the effects of combining MISO or benznidazole (BENZO) with melphalan also were evaluated. When combined with melphalan, doses of RSU 1069, BENZO and MISO were found to yield dose modifying factors of 1.6, 1.5, and 1.4, respectively. These results indicate that potentiation of melphalan activity occurs at RSU 1069 doses which are approximately 10-fold lower than those of MISO, making this sensitizer as effective a potentiator of melphalan as so far tested in the KHT sarcoma.

Siemann, D.W.; Maddison, K.; Wolf, K.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

EIS-0300: Minnesota Agri-Power Project: Biomass for Rural Development, Granite Falls, Minnesota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Boards' [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] decision to support a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75–103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

234

Design, Fabrication, and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems Final Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the overall accomplishments and benefits of Solar Electric Specialties Co. (SES) under this Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract. SES addressed design issues related to their modular autonomous PV power supply (MAPPS) and a mobile photogenset. MAPPS investigations included gel-cell batteries mounted horizontally; redesign of the SES power supply; modified battery enclosure for increased safety and reduced cost; programmable, interactive battery charge controllers; and UL and FM listings. The photogenset systems incorporate generators, battery storage, and PV panels for a mobile power supply. The unit includes automatic oil-change systems for the propane generators, collapsible array mounts for the PV enclosure, and internal stowage of the arrays. Standardizing the products resulted in product lines of MAPPS and Photogensets that can be produced more economically and with shorter lead times, while increasing product quality and reliability. Product assembly and quality control have also been improved and streamlined with the development of standardized assembly processes and QC testing procedures. SES offers the UL-listed MAPPS at about the same price as its previous non-standardized, unlisted products.

Lambarski, T.; Minyard, G. (Solar Electric Specialties Co., Willits, California)

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

235

Design, fabrication, and certification of advanced modular PV power systems. Final technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar Electric Specialties Company (SES) has completed a two and a half year effort under the auspices of the US Department of Energy (DOE) PVMaT (Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology) project. Under Phase 4A1 of the project for Product Driven System and Component Technology, the SES contract ``Design, Fabrication and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems`` had the goal to reduce installed system life cycle costs through development of certified (Underwriters Laboratories or other listing) and standardized prototype products for two of the product lines, MAPPS{trademark} (Modular Autonomous PV Power Supply) and Photogensets{trademark}. MAPPS are small DC systems consisting of Photovoltaic modules, batteries and a charge controller and producing up to about a thousand watt-hours per day. Photogensets are stand-alone AC systems incorporating a generator as backup for the PV in addition to a DC-AC inverter and battery charger. The program tasks for the two-year contract consisted of designing and fabricating prototypes of both a MAPPS and a Photogenset to meet agency listing requirements using modular concepts that would support development of families of products, submitting the prototypes for listing, and performing functionality testing at Sandia and NREL. Both prototypes were candidates for UL (Underwriters Laboratories) listing. The MAPPS was also a candidate for FM (Factory Mutual) approval for hazardous (incendiary gases) locations.

Lambarski, T.; Minyard, G. [Solar Electric Specialties Co., Willits, CA (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

RADIO CONTROL ADC0 (RSSI)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 D D C C B B A A RADIO CONTROL PCLK PDATA PALE RADIO DATA SPI_SCK SPI_MOSI SPI_MISO[0..7] PALE RF_DETECT US_OUT_EN SPI_MISO I2C_CLK I2C_DATA US_DETECT AC+ US_OUT SCK RSTN UART_RXD0/SS PB1/SCK PB2/MOSI PB3/MISO PB4/OC0 PB5/OC1A PB6/OC1B PB7/OC1C PC0/A8 PC1/A9 PC2/A10 PC3/A11 PC4/A12

237

Binding of misonidazole to V79 spheroids and fragments of Dunning rat prostatic and human colon carcinomas in vitro: diffusion of oxygen and reactive metabolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differences were noted previously in the binding of /sup 14/C-Misonidazole (MISO) to V79 and EMT6 spheroids when incubated at low oxygen levels. Further data reported here indicate that the K/sub m/ for the inhibition of binding by oxygen is lower in V79 than EMT6 spheroids, so that part of the non-uniformity of binding to V79 spheroids can be explained by diffusion of small amounts of oxygen through the entire rim of viable cells. Diffusion of reactive metabolites of MISO out of the spheroid previously was considered an unlikely explanation. Further evidence to support this interpretation is presented here. Patterns of binding of /sup 3/H-MISO to Dunning and human colon carcinomas are presented which are consistent with the interpretation that most of the reactive metabolites are confined to the cell in which they are produced.

Franko, A.J.; Koch, C.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Clinical trials of radiosensitizers: what should we expect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lack of positive results from the clinical trials undertaken so far with misonidazole (MISO) are widely considered as disappointing. This is leading to a growing sentiment that hypoxic cells may not be a significant limitation to local control of human tumors. To examine whether this is a reasonable conclusion, the relevant in vitro and in vivo data have been summarized so that predictions of the extent of radiosensitization of the hypoxic cells can be made from a knowledge of the clinically achievable levels of MISO. The in vitro and in vivo data with radiosensitizers suggest that only a small effect, if any, is likely to be demonstrated in the clinical trials with MISO, even for those tumors the control of which is limited by hypoxic cells. Thus the question of whether hypoxic cells may or may not limit the local control of tumors by radiotherapy has not been addressed adequately by the presently available radiosensitizing drugs.

Brown, J.M.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

KIH-802: 2-nitroimidazole-1-acetohydroxamate as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have identified potassium 2-nitroimidazole-1-acetohydroxamate (KIH-802) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer potentially superior to Miso. The water-soluble acetohydroxamates of 2-nitroimidazole (KIH-802; free acid 801) and 4-nitroimidazole (KIH-852) were designed, synthesized, and evaluated by in vitro and in vivo screening against EMT6 cells. Enhancement ratios of KIH-802 and 801 were 1.92 and 1.68, respectively, compared with 1.58 for MISO all at 1 mM. These acetohydroxamates are also expected to be more effective in vitro than SR-2508 based on our previous experiments. In vivo ERs of KIH-802, 801, and 852 were 1.75, 1.50, and 1.35, respectively, compared with 1.57 for MISO all at the same dose of 200 mg/kg. The data clearly show that the addition of an acetohydroxamic acid moiety to the 2-nitroimidazole skeleton can enhance radiosensitizing ability.

Hori, H.; Murayama, C.; Mori, T.; Shibamoto, Y.; Abe, M.; Onoyama, Y.; Inayama, S.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Radical irradiation and misonidazole for T2 grade III and T3 bladder cancer: 2 year follow-up  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patients with T2 grade III and T3 bladder cancer were treated in a Phase II trial of radical irradiation plus Misonidazole (MISO). Twenty-two patients were treated and the results compared with historical controls. The cystoscopic complete tumor response between 6 and 12 months post therapy were 73 and 43%, respectively. The patient two year survival was 81 and 51%, respectively, and the patient 2 year survival with bladder preservation was 61 and 48%, respectively - 4 patients in the MISO study having undergone salvage cystectomy. Complications that may be radiation related in the MISO study are would sepsis after salvage cystectomy in 2 patients, rectal stenosis requiriing colostomy 16 months after salvage cystecomy in 1 patient and the development of a contracted bladder in 1 patient with a history of prior extensive endoscopic therapy. No misonidazole neurotoxicity seen. These findings are being further evaluated in a prospective radomized trial.

Abratt, R.P.; Barnes, D.R.; Hammond, J.A.; Sarembok, L.A.; Tucker, R.D.; Williams, A.M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Eighth annual Juan del Regato lecture. Chemical modifiers of radiosensitivity--theory and reality: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this review the poor clinical gains from hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and misonidazole (MISO) are discussed critically. The biggest factor reducing clinical gains is almost certainly reoxygenation. Other possible reasons include vasoconstrictive self-limitation of HBO and neurotoxicity of MISO, so that the radiosensitization of any hypoxic cells in human tumors was not adequate. Nevertheless, there have been some positive clinical results, so that hypoxic cells can sometimes be a problem in some tumors, especially those of the head and neck, even after multiple fraction radiotherapy. While hypoxic cell radioresistance is obviously only one form of radioresistance it is a large factor of resistance when hypoxic cells are present. Current developments are briefly reviewed: the new clinical sensitizers Ro-03-8799 and SR-2508 which should be 3 to 10 times more efficient than MISO if viable hypoxic cells are present; and methods of measuring which human tumors might have significant numbers of hypoxic viable cells. 77 references.

Fowler, J.F.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Misonidazole with dexamethasone rescue: an escalating dose toxicity study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neurotoxicity induced by misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has become the dose limiting factor in clinical work. In 1981, the authors reported a preliminary study suggestive that Dexamethasone (DEXA) does have a protective effect against peripheral neuropathies (PN) resulting from toxicity of misonidazole. The authors are presently investigating the use of DEXA, with escalating doses of MISO in an attempt to modify its neurotoxicity. To date, 16 patients have been registered to receive total doses of MISO given in 9 equally divided doses over 3 weeks. DEXA is given 3 days prior to the first dose and continues for the duration of therapy. All patients receive palliative radiation. No toxicity was seen at the total dose of 13.5 gm/M/sub 2/. One grade I PN occurred in the first four patients receiving 15.5 gm/M/sub 2/. Six additional patients were entered at this dose level and no further incidence of PN was observed.

Tanasichuk, H.; Urtasun, R.C.; Fulton, D.S.; Raleigh, J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Identification of a hypoxic population of bone marrow cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique using collagenase has been devised to release and separate, with reproducibility, hematopoietic cells (HC) from various microenvironments of mouse femurs. HC were assayed by an in vitro gel culture technique used traditionally to score granulocyte-macrophage precursor cells (CFU-C). CFU-C which resided in the medullary cavity and endosteal regions were sensitive to ionizing radiation and resistant to misonidazole (MISO) cytotoxicity. CFU-C which resided within the compact bone were resistant to ionizing radiation and sensitive to the cytotoxic action of MISO. These results suggest that HC which reside in the bone are hypoxic and retain clonogenic potential. When animals were exposed to various treatments with MISO followed by myelotoxic doses of cyclophosphamide (CTX) or total body irradiation (TBI), the LD/sub 50/ of both agents was significantly reduced. This result suggests that a hypoxic component of HC could be important in the regenerative process within the marrow after such myelotoxic trauma.

Allalunis, M.J.; Chapman, J.D.; Turner, A.R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Combination of /sup 60/Co. gamma. -radiation, misonidazole, and maltose tetrapalmitate in the treatment of Dunning prostatic tumor in the rat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maltose tetrapalmitate (MTP), a synthetic nontoxic immunoadjuvant, the radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO), and /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-radiation, alone or in combination, were used in the management of Dunning prostatic tumor in the rat. Nine groups of 10 rats each were used to assess the efficacy of various therapeutic modalities. Tumor growth rates and animal survival times were determined for each group. Radiation was more effective when combined with MTP, but the adjuvant must be present when radiation is given for synergism to occur. MISO was as effective as MTP when used with radiation, but combining them cancels out their individual effects. In a clinical situation it would be advantageous to use separately the synergisms existing between MISO and radiation on the one hand and MTP and radiation on the other hand.

Pageau, R.; Nigam, V.N.; Fisher, G.J.; Brailovsky, C.A.; Fathi, M.A.; Corcos, J.; Tahan, T.W.; Elhilali, M.M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Non-linear system identification in flow-induced vibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper introduces a method of identification of non-linear systems encountered in marine engineering applications. The non-linearity is accounted for by a combination of linear subsystems and known zero-memory non-linear transformations; an equivalent linear multi-input-single-output (MISO) system is developed for the identification problem. The unknown transfer functions of the MISO system are identified by assembling a system of linear equations in the frequency domain. This system is solved by performing the Cholesky decomposition of a related matrix. It is shown that the proposed identification method can be interpreted as a {open_quotes}Gram-Schmidt{close_quotes} type of orthogonal decomposition of the input-output quantities of the equivalent MISO system. A numerical example involving the identification of unknown parameters of flow (ocean wave) induced forces on offshore structures elucidates the applicability of the proposed method.

Spanos, P.D.; Zeldin, B.A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Lu, R. [Hudson Engineering Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

In vivo potentiation of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea by the radiation sensitizer benznidazole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies in mouse tumor systems have indicated a potential therapeutic advantage in combining the radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO) with cancer chemotherapy drugs. One agent the antitumor activity of which has been enhanced to a greater extent than its hematological or gastrointestinal toxicities is the nitrosourea, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). Recently, sensitizers more lipophylic than MISO have been reported to give greater tumor response enhancement when combined with CCNU. The present studies compared the potential therapeutic benefit of combining MISO (partition coefficient, 0.43) or benznidazole (BENZO) (partition coefficient, 8.5) in KHT sarcoma or RIF-1 tumor-bearing C3H mice. Both sensitizers were administered i.p. and given either 30 min before (BENZO) or simultaneously with (MISO) the chemotherapeutic agent. Survival of clonogenic tumor cells assessed 22 to 24 hr after treatment or in situ tumor growth delay were used as assays of tumor response. Normal tissue toxicity was determined using the drug dose yielding 50% animal lethality in 30 days end point. When combined with CCNU, doses of MISO (5.0 mmol/kg) or BENZO (0.3 mmol/kg) were found to yield approximately equivalent increases in both the tumor effect (enhancement ratio, approximately 1.8 to 2.0) and normal tissue toxicity (enhancement ratio approximately 1.3 to 1.4). Both sensitizers therefore led to a therapeutic benefit. However, although a approximately 10-fold lower dose of the more lipophylic sensitizer BENZO proved to be as effective as MISO at enhancing the tumoricidal effects of CCNU, this dose reduction did not result in a greater therapeutic gain for BENZO.

Siemann, D.W.; Morrissey, S.; Wolf, K.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

RADIO CONTROL CRICKET V2.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 D D C C B B A A PCLK PDATA PALE RADIO DATA SPI_SCK SPI_MOSI SPI_MISO CHP_SCK PCLK PDATA PALE ADC0 SPI_MISO CHP_OUT RF_DETECT AVCC AVCC VCC VCC AVCC VCC AVCC VCC VCC VCC J9 HDR 2 X AVCC AVCC AVCC AVCC RF_IN RF_OUT L1 L2 CHP_OUT R_BIAS XOSC1 XOSC2 DIO DCLK PCLK PDATA PALE RSSI C18 R13

248

Radiosensitizing activity of 1-alkyl-3-nitropyrrolo-(2,3-b)-pyridine derivative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiosensitization characteristics of a newly synthesized N-(3,N'-morpholinpropyl)-2-(3-nitropyrrolo-(2,3-b)-pyridine -1-yl) ethanoic acid amide and the chemical basis of the action were studied. Partition coefficient, redox potentials for the one electron reduction of the compound were determined. This was confirmed by studies on the radiosensitization effect and cytotoxicity of the compound tested in vitro using Chinese hamster V79 cells. The results show that the sensitizing efficiency for this compound is C1.6 at a concentration of 0.5 mmol dm-3, which is similar to MISO. Its toxicity was not lower than that of MISO or metronidazole.

Jin, Y.Z.; Stratford, I.J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Broad-band contemporaneous study of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 was observed on May 18, 1980 at hard X-ray/low gamma ray energies with the MISO telescope. The only excess detected was at the 3.5 sigma level in the X-ray energy range 35-105 keV. Concurrent UV, IR, optical and soft X-ray observations performed from January-May 1980 are used in conjunction with the MISO data to estimate the radiation characteristics of NGC 4151 and to define limits to models for the central powerhouse of the object, one of the most luminous in the sky. 39 references.

Bassani, I.; Butler, R.C.; Di Cocco, G.; Della Ventura, A.; Perotti, F.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The pharmacokinetics in mice and dogs of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pharmacokinetic properties of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole (MISO) were examined. In dogs, 2 analogues showed comparable peak plasma concentrations with considerable shorter half-lives (t1/2) and reduced areas under curves (AUC). Benznidazole (R0 07-1051) had a much longer t1/2, a higher AUC, and somewhat higher peak concentrations. In mice tumor/plasma, brain/plasma, and tumor/brain ratios were generally similar to MISO, as was penetration of brain and peripheral nerve by benznidazole in dogs. Selection of lipophilic analogues with appropriate pharmacokinetic properties may facilitate accommodation of the potentially different requirements for improved radiosensitization or chemosensitization.

White, R.; Workman, P.; Owen, L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effects of radiosensitizers on intermediary metabolism in vivo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the liver, MISO has little effect on glycolytic intermediates but both the lactate and G3P contents are significantly decreased shortly after administration, whereas the level of ketone-bodies is raised. The changes in hepatic metabolite levels following treatment with SR-2508 are less marked. However, in an adenocarcinoma, both the lactate and ketone-body concentrations are enhanced with MISO. The redox equilibria states are shifted not to the oxidized metabolites in the liver but instead to the reduced metabolites in tumor. These effects may have relevance for the radiotherapy in tumors.

Tamulevicius, P.; Streffer, C.; Blanke, G.; Luscher, G.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

Sampson, Melvin R. [The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

What's happening in Midwest ISO market?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attributable to significantly decreased natural gas, oil and coal prices. (fuel costs represent the vast of Presentation Introduction Energy prices in 2006 Day-Ahead Market Performance Real-Time Market Performance;Introduction 2006 is the first full year of market operations in Midwest ISO. Electricity prices in MISO

Tesfatsion, Leigh

254

Division of Economics and Business Working Paper Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data of wind generation and emissions from plants in ERCOT (Texas), CAISO (California), and MISO (Upper roughly cover government subsidies for wind generation, environmental benefits in Texas and California doubling every three years in the United States (World Wind Energy Association 2009) and wind generation

255

MIDWEST ISO UPDATE Sherman Elliott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power congestion through locational marginal pricing (LMP) energy market Long term regional transmission minutes · Manage congestion via Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP), Transmission Loading Relief (TLR reserve margin #12;9 MISO Market Operations Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP) based upon Security

Tesfatsion, Leigh

256

Derivation of Locational Marginal Prices for Restructured Wholesale Power Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Derivation of Locational Marginal Prices for Restructured Wholesale Power Markets Haifeng Liu restructured wholesale power markets, the detailed derivation of LMPs as actually used in industry practice Operator (MISO). Keywords: Locational marginal pricing, wholesale power market, AC optimal power flow, DC

Tesfatsion, Leigh

257

Leigh Tesfatsion Professor of Econ, Math, and Electrical & Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 AMES Wholesale Power Market Test Bed #12;2 Presentation Outline Wholesale power market design Commission (FERC) proposed a wholesale electric power market design for common adoption throughout U.S. Over), Midwest/Manitoba (MISO), & Southwest (SPP) #12;4 FERC Wholesale Power Market Design Adopters to Date http

Tesfatsion, Leigh

258

Integrated Retail and Wholesale (IRW) Power System Operations with Smart-Grid Functionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Retail and Wholesale (IRW) Power System Operations with Smart-Grid Functionality Leigh of the Integrated Retail/Wholesale (IRW) project at Iowa State University · IRW Test Bed development · Integration-NE, MISO, XM, RTE, MEC IRW Project: Integrated Retail/Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart

Tesfatsion, Leigh

259

The mechanisms of cytotoxicity and chemosensitization by misonidazole and other nitroimidazoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper attempts to review and interpret the various aspects of the interaction of the electron-affinic drug misonidazole (MISO) with cells in vitro and tumors in vivo. Specifically three topics are covered: (1) The preferential toxicity of MISO to hypoxic cells; (2) The sensitization of cell in vitro in chemotherapeutic agents by hypoxic pretreatment with MISO (the preincubation effect); (3) The chemosensitization of tumors in vivo by MISO. It is concluded that hypoxic cell cytotoxicity is not a result of the binding of nitroreduction products to the cellular target molecule (or molecules), but is a result of abstraction of H atoms by neutral radicals produced during nitroreduction. However, binding does occur, and this depletes intracellular glutathione which is capable both of inactivating these toxic radicals and repairing the target lesion. The preincubation effect-at least for bifunctional alkylating agents-is postulated to be a result of a combination of depletion of intracellular glutathione (which can intercept the alkylating agent), and increase in DNA interstand cross-links. Finally, it is concluded that chemosensitization of tumors in vivo is a combination of the in vitro preincubation effect for the hypoxic cells, and an inhibition of repair of the chemotherapeutic agent damage to aerated, plateau-phase-like cells in the tumor. The former required nitroreduction, the latter does not.

Brown, J.M.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Keynote address: cellular reduction of nitroimidazole drugs: potential for selective chemotherapy and diagnosis of hypoxic cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitroimidazole drugs were initially developed as selective radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells and, consequently, as adjuvants to improve the local control probabilities of current radiotherapies. Misonidazole (MISO), the prototype radiosensitizing drug, was found in Phase I clinical studies to cause dose-limiting neurotoxicities (mainly peripheral neuropathies). MISO was also found to be cytotoxic in the absence of radiation and to covalently bind to cellular molecules, both processes demonstrating rates much higher in hypoxic compared with oxygenated cells. It is likely that neurotoxicity, cellular cytotoxicity and adduct formation results from reactions between reduction intermediates of MISO and cellular target molecules. Spin-offs from radiosensitizer research include the synthesis and characterization of more potent hypoxic cytotoxins and the exploitation of sensitizer-adducts as probes for measuring cellular and tissue oxygen levels. Current developments in hypoxic cell cytotoxin and hypoxic cell marker research are reviewed with specific examples from studies which characterize the cellular reduction of TF-MISO, (1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-3(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)-2-propanol). 45 references.

Chapman, J.D.; Lee, J.; Meeker, B.E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Pharmacokinetic interaction of BCNU and misonidazole in humans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although considerable laboratory in vitro and in vivo evidence is now available suggesting that misonidazole (MISO) enhances chemotherapy tumor responses, experience with human tumors is limited. Further, the mechanism of this enhancement is not defintely known. One possible mechanism is that MISO alters the pharmacokinetics of the chemotherapeutic agent, vice versa or both. We studied a group of patients with recurrent malignant gliomas, following radiotherapy. After proven recurrence, they were treated with i.v. BCNU in combination with oral MISO in an 8 week cycle. Our aims were: 1. To obtain a second remission; 2. To assess the toxicity of this combination; 3. To assess the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug alone and in combination. Six patients entered the protocol. Four of six patients obtained either a partial or subpartial response. Prolonged moderate myelosuppression was observed in 2/6 patients after 3 cycles; 2/6 patients experienced seizures after the first cycle of chemotherapy for the first time in the course of their disease. The plasma pharmacokinetic data indicates no evidence of a MISO-BCNU drug interaction.

Urtasum, R.C.; Tanasichuk, H.; Fulton, D.; Raleigh, J.; Rabin, H.R.; Turner, R.; Koziol, D.; Agboola, O.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Changes in misonidazole binding with hypoxic fraction in mouse tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Binding of misonidazole (MISO) or a derivative to hypoxic cells in tumors has been proposed as a method for identifying tumors, and measuring their level of hypoxia. The author has recently shown that the hypoxic fraction of tumor cells can be altered over a wide range in vivo by acutely changing the hematocrit of the host animal by transfusion. The present study is aimed to investigate the changes in binding by /sup 14/C MISO that accompanied this procedure. Tumor bearing mice were injected with /sup 14/C MISO, irradiated with a single dose of X rays (20 Gy) and their tumor excised and bisected. One half of each tumor was used to determine cell survival in vitro, the other was used for /sup 14/C scintillation counting. As previously described, tumor cell survival was dramatically increased in acutely anemic mice and this was accompanied by an increase in /sup 14/C MISO binding to the tumors. The relationship between clonogenic cell survival and binding was found to be linear on a log-log plot for each of the tumor lines studied, but the slopes of the lines were different in different tumor lines and generally steeper than the value of 1.0 expected for a 1:1 correspondence between cells binding radioactivity and radiobiological resistance.

Hirst, D.G.; Hazlehurst, J.L.; Brown, J.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Effect of nitroimidazoles on glucose utilization and lactate accumulation in mouse brain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation sensitizers misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) can produce central and peripheral neuropathy in patients and laboratory animals. Nitroimidazoles can also interfere with glycolysis in vitro under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In the present work, the authors studied the effect of MISO or DMM on lactate production and glucose utilization in mouse brain. It is observed that these compounds result in a 25% inhibition of lactate production in brain slices relative to the control at a 10 mM level. Additionally, MISO (1.0 mg/g/day) or DMM (1.4 mg/g/day) were administered daily (oral) for 1, 4, 7, or 14 days to examine the effect of these two drugs on the regional glucose utilization in C3Hf mouse brain. Five microcuries of 2-deoxy(/sup 14/C)glucose was given following the last drug dose and autoradiographs of serial brain sections were made and analyzed by a densitometer. Following a single dose of either MISO or DMM, no significant differences in glucose uptake were observed when compared with controls. However, following 4, 7, and 14 doses the rate of glucose utilization was significantly reduced in the intoxicated animals. Larger reductions were measured in specific regions including the posterior colliculus, cochlear nuclei, vestibular nuclei, and pons with increasing effects observed at later stages. These results share a degree of correspondence with the regional brain pathology produced by these nitroimidazoles.

Chao, C.F. (Roswell Park Memorial Inst., Buffalo, NY); Subjeck, J.R.; Brody, H.; Shen, J.; Johnson, R.J.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Executive Forum on Solutions to Transmission Investment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. California ISO CenterPoint Energy Duke Energy Entergy EPRI Exelon FirstEnergy GE Energy Institut de recherche Transmission Co. MidAmerican Energy Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) National Grid USA National Rural Electric Coop. Assn. New York ISO New York Power Authority Pacific Gas and Electric PJM

265

On multiple-antenna communications: signal detection, error exponent and and quality of service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 VII QUALITY-OF-SERVICE FOR A BUFFERED TRANSMIS- SION OVER FADING CHANNEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 A. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 B. Problem Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 C...) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 a. Asymptotic Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 b. Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 2. SIMO/MISO Antennas System . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 E. Distortion Exponent of MIMO Block Fading Channel . . . 112 1. MIMO...

Li, Qiang

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

On multiple-antenna communications: signal detection, error exponent and and quality of service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 VII QUALITY-OF-SERVICE FOR A BUFFERED TRANSMIS- SION OVER FADING CHANNEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 A. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 B. Problem Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 C...) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 a. Asymptotic Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 b. Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 2. SIMO/MISO Antennas System . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 E. Distortion Exponent of MIMO Block Fading Channel . . . 112 1. MIMO...

Li, Qiang

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Design, fabrication, and certification of advanced modular PV power systems. Annual technical progress report, 8 September 1995--7 September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities performed during the first year of a nominal 2-year effort by Solar Electric Specialties Company (SES) under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project of the National Photovoltaic Program. The goal of the SES contract is to reduce the installed system life-cycle costs by developing certified and standardized prototype products for two SES product lines--MAPPS{trademark} and Photogenset{trademark}. The MAPPS (modular autonomous PV power supply) systems are used for DC applications up to about a thousand watt-hours. The Photogensets are hybrid PV/generator systems for AC applications. SES expects these products to provide the basis for future commercial product lines of standardized certified, packaged systems.

Lambarski, T.; Minyard, G. [Solar Electric Specialties, Willits, CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Nitroimidazoles as modifiers of nitrosourea pharmacokinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of a number of nitroimidazole sensitizers of varying lipophilicity has been studied on the pharmacokinetics of CCNU in mice. It was found that the effectiveness of these compounds in producing pharmacokinetic effects correlated directly with their lipophilicity. The effects of MISO on the pharmacokinetics of 4 nitrosoureas of differing lipophilicity were also investigated. The plasma clearances of CCNU, BCNU and MeCCNU (high lipophilicity) were slowed by MISO whereas that of chlorozotocin (Chlz) (low lipophilicity) was unaffected. Thus, it seems that for a pharmacokinetic interaction to occur between a nitroimidazole and a nitrosourea, both the modifier and the cytotoxic agent must have a requisite degree of lipophilicity. As the same requirement appears to hold for enhancement of tumor response, these data provide further evidence that pharmacokinetic modification plays a major role in chemosensitization.

Lee, F.Y.F.; Workman, P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Lethal or protective effects of prolonged treatment with hypoxic cell sensitizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AK-2123 [N-(2-methoxyethyl)-2-(3-nitro-1-triazolyl)acetamide] is a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer which is currently being tested in several oncology clinics and which has a lower toxicity than misonidazole (MISO) in vivo. The positive experiences reported recently certainly warrant further clinical evaluations. The experimental observations reported so far need further experimental studies to clarify the sensitization mechanism, especially as recent intratumoral strategies used in the clinical administration of the sensitizers can result in a large local concentration of the drug that may persist for a prolonged period of time between and after radiation exposures. Model experiments in vitro using V79 cells were performed with AK-2123 under these conditions. Misonidazole (MISO) and metronidazole (METRO), well known hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, were used for comparison of the effects. Clonogenic survival and induction and repair of DNA damage were used as end-points.

Edgren, M.R. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Medical Radiation Physics

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Mechanisms of hypoxic cell radiosensitization and the development of new sensitizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the mechanisms by which drugs can potentiate the radiation response of tumors and cells in culture are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the action of nitroaromatic and heterocyclic compounds as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, and some potential successors to misonidazole (MISO) are described. These include desmethylmisonidazole and SR 2508, selected because of their low toxicity in experimental systems. Groups of compounds, more efficient sensitizers than would be predicted from electron affinity correlations, have been examined and the use of Ro-03-8799 or RSU 1047 is proposed. Finally, ortho-substituted nitroimidazoles and electron-affinic compounds with alkylating groups are described. The latter group, in particular, holds promise for the development of compounds much superior to MISO.

Stratford, I.J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

SR-2508 plus buthionine sulfoximine or SR-2508 alone: effects on the radiation response and the glutathione content of a human tumor xenograft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study determined the radiosensitivity of the human tumor xenograft HT29 and its glutathione (GSH) and cysteine (CYS) contents after treatment with both buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and SR-2508 or SR-2508 alone. Tumor radiosensitivity was assessed by the in vitro colony assay and thiol content was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The radiosensitizing effect of SR-2508 is dose dependent and increases when higher doses of radiation are given. SR-2508 given alone does not modify GSH and CYS content; however, when given with BSO, the GSH level is significantly reduced, yet radiosensitivity of the HT29 tumor is only slightly increased. These results have been compared to our previously observed results of HT29 treatment with misonidazole (MISO), BSO, or MISO + BSO.

Lespinasse, F.; Biscay, P.; Malaise, E.P.; Guichard, M.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO2, NOX and life cycle GHG emissions: Supplementary Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/MJ = 59 kg CO2 e/MWh Combustion emissions at natural gas plant A in ERCOT: 500 kg CO2 e/MWh Annual = 59 kg CO2 e/MWh / 40% = 148 kg CO2 e/MWh Combustion emissions per MWh = 500 kg CO2 e/MWh Life cycle-level combustion emissions at fossil fuel plants in ERCOT, MISO and PJM. The red lines represent median values

Jaramillo, Paulina

273

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Ancillary Services in the United  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ISOs Market Installed Capacity Miles of Transmission Population PJM 164,895 MW 56,499 51M MISO 146,497 MW 53 · Capacity Markets #12;5 Ancillary Services · Ancillary services can either be cost-based or market April 2013 NREL/PR6A2058554 #12;2 North American Energy Markets Source: ISO/RTO Council #12;3 U.S. RTOs

274

Radiation dose fractionation studies with hypoxic cell radiosensitizers using a murine tumor. [X-ray; mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of five nitroimidazoles, metronidazole (MET), misonidazole (MISO), desmethymisonidazole (DMM), SR 2508 and SR 2555, to sensitize the KHT sarcoma to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-1.5 g/Kg. Single radiation doses or two different daily fractionation schedules (4 fractions of 5 Gy each or 7 fraction of 3 Gy each) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using either an in vivo or in vitro colony assay. Each radiation (100 kVp X rays at 11 Gy/min) treatment was given locally, 60-70 min (MET) or 30-40 min (other drugs) after either intraperitoneal (MET, MISO, DMM) or intraveous (SR 2508, SR 2555) injection of the drugs; these times have been shown to be optimum for this tumor. For the single doses and both fractionation schedules the tumor cell survival, following the irradiation treatment, declined as the drug dose increased in the range 0 to 0.75 g/Kg for all the drugs, but above this dose level a plateau was reached and the amount of sensitization remained essentially constant. In this plateau region the reduction in survival achieved was similar for single doses and 5 Gy fraction but was less for 3 Gy fractions, indicating that sensitization was smaller for the smaller dose fractions. For the 4 x 5 Gy fractionation schedule the plateau level of survival was lowest for MISO, DMM and SR 2508, slightly higher for SR 2555 and much higher for MET. For the 3 Gy fractions SR 2508 appeared slightly less effective than MISO and DMM.

Hill, R.P.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Clinical perspectives for the use of new hypoxic cell sensitizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience with high pressure oxygen in combination with radiotherapy has shown that, for some tumors at least, the presence of hypoxic cells is a limiting factor in the ability to cure these tumors even with conventional daily fractionation. This suggests that hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, of which misonidazole (MISO) is the prototype drug, may play a role in improving the cure-rate of some tumors when combined with daily fractionation. Even for those tumors for which no improvement is seen when combined with daily fractionation, it is likely that there will be an important role for these sensitizers by using them in combination with regimens of only a few dose fractions. Because of the limiting side effects of neuropathy, a less toxic radiosensitizer than MISO is required to gain the full clinical benefit of these drugs. A possible way of achieving this is to reduce the lipid solubility (lipophilicity) of the compounds while still retaining their electron-affinity. This reduces the concentration of drug in the neural tissues (brain, peripheral nerves) without affecting the tumor concentration. However, if the lipophilicity is too low, the drugs are unable to enter the hypoxic cells and hence lose their radiosensitivity efficiency. It would appear that a lipophilicity given by an octanol:water partition coefficient of approximately 0.04 is optimum (cf. MISO = 0.43) with the 2-nitroimidazole amide SR-2508 the best in this series. Tumor levels of this drug of at least 7-8 times those obtained with MISO should be attainable clinically for no increase in neurotoxicity. Another property of electron-affinic sensitizers shows clinical promise. This is their ability to preferentially sensitize tumors compared to normal tissues to the cytotoxic action of several chemotherapeutic agents.

Brown, J.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Radiosensitizing effect of misonidazole in combination with an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis in murine tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiosensitizing effects of misonidazole (MISO) in combination with D,L-buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis, were studied in NFSa tumors of C/sub 3/H/He mice. The radiation response of tumors was assayed by the tumor growth delay time. The GSH contents in tissues were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). GSH content in the tumors decreased to the minimum level (45% of the control), and then gradually recovered to 75% of the control, respectively, 12 and 24 hr after the intraperitoneal injection of 5 mmole/kg BSO. On the other hand, the maximum non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) depletion (29% of the control) in the liver of tumor bearing mice was achieved 6 hr after the administration of the same dose of BSO, but fully recovered 24 hr later. When 5 mmole/kg BSO was injected repeatedly 4 times at an interval of 6 hr, GSH content in the tumors decreased to 19% of the control 24 hr after the first injection of BSO. The radiosensitizing effect of 0.5 mmole/kg MISO was markedly increased by this BSO treatment. The enhancement ratio (ER) of this combined treatment was 1.93. On the other hand, ERs of 1.44 and 1.16 were obtained for MISO (0.5 mmole/kg) and for 4 injections of BSO (5 mmole/kg) in combination with radiation, respectively. Although a considerable increase in the radiosensitizing efficiency of MISO in vivo by the treatment with BSO was found without any notable side effects of the combination, more studies on toxicities are needed to get a definite conclusion on the clinical applicability of the combination.

Ono, K.; Komuro, C.; Nishidai, T.; Shibamoto, Y.; Tsutsui, K.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Effect of tumor size on S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid and misonidazole alteration of tumor response to cyclophosphamide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of tumor size on the ability of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) or misonidazole (MISO) to alter cyclophosphamide (CY) antitumor activity was investigated, using a chemically induced fibrosarcoma (FSA) and a spontaneous fibrosarcoma (NFSA) in C3Hf/Kam mice. Tumors were of two sizes at the time of treatment, 8-mm leg tumors and 4-day-old micrometastases in the lung. The antitumor activity of CY and its modification were assessed by growth delay of leg tumors and the reduction in the number of lung metastases. Both measures of tumor response were more pronounced as the dose of CY increased, and FSA was more sensitive to CY than was NFSA. WR-2721 (400 mg/kg), given 30 min before treatment with CY, reduced the effectiveness of CY on both FSA and NFSA. This reduction in effectiveness of CY was only minimal for leg tumors (dose-modifying factors were 1.1 for FSA and 1.03 for NFSA) but remarkable for lung micrometastases (dose-modifying factors were 1.81 for FSA and 1.55 for NFSA). Protection increased with the increase in the dose of WR-2721 and was also dependent on the time of injection relative to CY. The greatest protection occurred when WR-2721 was given within 30 min before to 15 min after CY. Tumor size had the opposite effect on MISO from that on WR-2721. MISO (1 mg/g) enhanced the effect of CY more effectively for leg tumors than for lung micrometastases: dose-modifying factors were 1.74 for FSA and 2.21 for NFSA growing in the leg and 1.27 for FSA and 1.11 for NFSA lung micrometastases. Therefore, tumor size appears to be a very important factor in determining the extent of WR-2721- and MISO-induced modification of CY antitumor effect.

Milas, L.; Ito, H.; Hunter, N.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

MOED_of_the_Italian_Republic.PDF | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature CombustionGlass MECS-8,2011 MISO

279

Iodoazomycin riboside (1-(5'-iodo-5'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole), a hypoxic cell marker. I. Synthesis and in vitro characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Misonidazole (MISO), a selective radiosensitizer of hypoxic cells, forms adducts with cellular biomolecules with rates which are 30-50 X higher under hypoxic as compared to aerobic conditions of incubation. This technique of sensitizer adduct formation was proposed as a possible means of measuring the hypoxic fraction of solid tumors by noninvasive procedures. Iodoazomycin riboside (5'-IAZR) and 5'-(125I)AZR were synthesized and chemically characterized. Measurements of in vitro cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing ability with EMT-6 tumor cells in vitro indicated that 5'-IAZR is approximately 3 X more toxic and effective than is azomycin riboside (AZR) and approximately 10 X more toxic and effective than is MISO. 5'-(125I)AZR was shown to selectively bind to hypoxic EMT-6 cells at rates which were 2.5-3 X faster than those of MISO. The absolute rates of binding of 5'-IAZR to hypoxic cells at concentrations of 10-100 microM are the highest observed in this laboratory for any hypoxic cell radiosensitizer tested to date. These data suggest that 5'-IAZR, when labeled with an appropriate radioisotope (e.g., 131I), might be a useful marker for hypoxic cells in solid tumors amenable to noninvasive detection. Additional studies with animal tumor models appear to be warranted.

Jette, D.C.; Wiebe, L.I.; Flanagan, R.J.; Lee, J.; Chapman, J.D.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Is Misonidazole neurotoxicity altered by the use of phenytoin and/or dexamethasone in RTOG 79-18 and RTOG 79-16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of Misonidazole (MISO) neurotoxicity in RTOG 79-16 and RTOG 79-18 was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of neurotoxicity relative to dexamethasone dose and phenytoin use. Practically all patients were on dexamethasone, and 240 out of 550 were on phenytoin for seizures. CNS toxicity and ototoxicity rates were no different between treatment groups with overall rates of 2.7 and 1.1%, respectively. Phenytoin did not significantly alter CNS and peripheral neuropathy (PN) toxicity rates. All ototoxicities occurred in patients not on phenytoin. There was no correlation between dexamethasone dose and incidence of neurotoxicity within each study. However, the incidence of (PN) for the combined studies was 6.4% (35/550) which is lower than 18.9% (85/449) for non-brain Phase III protocols where patients are rarely, if ever, on dexamethasone or other corticosteroids. Four hour and 24 hour plasma MISO levels, and 24 hour/4 hour MISO ratios did not correlate with toxicity.

Nelson, D.F.; Gillespie, B.W.; Diener, M.D.; Davis, D.R.; Wasserman, T.; Phillips, T.L.; Stetz, J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radiosensitization by a new nucleoside analogue: 1-(2-hydroxy-1-(hydroxymethyl)ethoxy)methyl-2-nitroimidazole (RP-170)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new potent hypoxic cell sensitizer, a 2-nitroimidazole nucleoside analogue having methoxyglycerol as a sugar moiety at the N-1 position of the imidazole ring (RP-170), has been synthesized. Its radiosensitizing activities in vitro and in vivo were investigated and compared with those of misonidazole (MISO) and etanidazole (SR-2508). As might be expected from the almost identical electron affinities of the three compounds, they were equally effective against hypoxic EMT6 cells in vitro. The in vivo-in vitro excision analysis showed that RP-170 was also as effective as MISO and etanidazole to radiosensitize solid tumor cells in vivo. An intraperitoneal administration of 200 mg/kg of RP-170 and an intravenous administration of the same dose of etanidazole showed an equal sensitizer-enhancement ratio of 1.51 to solid EMT6/KU tumors. Its effectiveness was also demonstrated by growth delay assay using solid SCCVII tumors. As predicted from the low partition coefficient, RP-170 and etanidazole showed apparently lower toxicity in vivo than MISO; their LD50/14 were 4.3, 4.8, and 1.8 g/kg in our experiment, respectively. Moreover, RP-170 showed fast clearance from serum in mice (t1/2 = 10.24 min) and poor penetration into neural tissues. Although RP-170 does not show any advantages over etanidazole in terms of sensitization or toxicity, RP-170 might be preferable under certain circumstances because it can be given orally.

Murayama, C.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, T.; Miyata, Y.; Sakaguchi, M.; Tanabe, Y.; Tanaka, N.; Mori, T. (Tokai Univ. (Japan))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

In vitro and in vivo radiosensitization by 2-nitroimidazoles more electron-affinic than misonidazole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of 5-substituted-methyl-2 nitroimidazoles, more electron-affinic than misonidazole (MISO), has been studied as potential hypoxic cell radiosensitizers. In vitro radiosensitization studies of these compounds showed equivalent or greater radiosensitization than MISO, while LD/sub 50/ studies of the compounds found them to be, in general, more toxic to Balb/c mice than MISO. Radiosensitization experiments in vivo with compounds SR-2537, SR-2515 and SR-2553 of acceptable toxicity were not able to sensitize the EMT6 tumor to x-irradiation after a single intraperitoneal injection. However, moderate sensitization was achieved when SR-2537 was administered i.v. Rapid metabolism of these more electron-affinic compounds was suggested as a possible case of the poor sensitization. However, when multiple i.v. injections of SR-2537 were given to maintain a constant drug level in the tumor, radiosensitization by this compound did not improve, suggesting that intact drug was either not reaching or was not penetrating the hypoxic cells.

Brown, D.M. (Stanford Univ., CA); Yu, N.Y.; Brown, J.M.; Lee, W.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Liquid Lithium Divertor and Scrape-Off-Layer Interactions on the National Spherical Torus Experiment: 2010 ? 2013 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The implementation of the liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in NSTX presented a unique opportunity in plasma-material interactions studies. A high density Langmuir Probe (HDLP) array utilizing a dense pack of triple Langmuir probes was built at PPPL and the electronics designed and built by UIUC. It was shown that the HDLP array could be used to characterize the modification of the EEDF during lithium experiments on NSTX as well as characterize the transient particle loads during lithium experiments as a means to study ELMs. With NSTX being upgraded and a new divertor being installed, the HDLP array will not be used in NSTX-U. However UIUC is currently helping to develop two new systems for depositing lithium into NSTX-U, a Liquid Lithium Pellet Dripper (LLPD) for use with the granular injector for ELM mitigation and control studies as well as an Upward-Facing Lithium Evaporator (U-LITER) based on a flash evaporation system using an electron beam. Currently UIUC has Daniel Andruczyk Stationed at PPPL and is developing these systems as well as being involved in preparing the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP) for use in LTX and NSTX-U. To date the MAPP preparations have been completed. New sample holders were designed by UIUC?s Research Engineer at PPPL and manufactured at PPPL and installed. MAPP is currently being used on LTX to do calibration and initial studies. The LLPD has demonstrated that it can produce pellets. There is still some adjustments needed to control the frequency and particle size. Equipment for the U-LITER has arrived and initial test are being made of the electron beam and design of the U-LITER in progress. It is expected to have these ready for the first run campaign of NSTX-U.

None

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

284

Performance of cholesterol oxidase sequestered within reverse micelles formed in supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report the first results on an enzyme-induced reaction within the water core of reverse micelles that have been formed in supercritical CO{sub 2} (scCO{sub 2}). By using a perfluoropolyether ammonium carboxylate (PFPE) surfactant, the authors form reverse micelles in scCO{sub 2} with water cores and the authors show that the oxidation of cholesterol by cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The results of their experiments also show that (1) the optimum ChOx activity occurs when the molar ratio of H{sub 2}O-to-PFPE (R) exceeds {approximately}12, (2) the rate constant describing the conversion of the ChOx-cholesterol complex to product ({kappa}{sub cat,app}) is similar to values reported using reverse micelle systems formed in liquid alkanes, (3) the equilibrium constant that describes the ChOx-cholesterol complex dissociation (K{sub m,app}) is optimal at high R values, (4) the best-case K{sub m,app} is {approximately}2-fold better than the value reported using reverse micelles formed in liquid alkanes, (5) there is little change in the ChOx {kappa}{sub cat,app} and K{sub m,app} as the authors adjust the CO{sub 2} pressure between 100 and 260 bar, and (6) the ChOx was active within the PFPE water pool for at least 5 h; however, after 8 or more hours within the PFPE water pool, ChOx became temporarily inactive.

Kane, M.A.; Baker, G.A.; Pandey, S.; Bright, F.V.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and over 1,900 MW can be dispatched on less than thirty minutes notice. These legacy DR programs are increasingly used by utilities for economic in addition to reliability purposes, with over two-thirds (68percent) of these programs callable based on market conditions. - Approximately 60percent of DLC programs and 30percent of interruptible rate programs called ten or more DR events in 2006. Despite the high frequency of DR events, customer complaints remained low. The use of economic criteria to trigger DR events and the flexibility to trigger a large number of events suggests that DR resources can help improve the efficiency of MISO wholesale markets. - Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels averaged about $5/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $6/kW-month for DLC programs. Few programs offered incentive payments that were explicitly linked to actual load reductions during events and at least 27 DR programs do not have penalties for non-performance. - Measurement and verification (M&V) protocols to estimate load impacts vary significantly across MISO states. Almost half of the DR programs have not been evaluated in recent times and thus performance data for DR events is not available. For many DLC programs, M&V protocols may need to be enhancedin order to allow participation in MISO's proposed EDR schedule. System operators and planners will need to develop more accurate estimates of the load reduced capability and actual performance.

Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

290

Influence of misonidazole, SR-2508, RSU-1069 and WR-2721 on spontaneous metastases in C57BL mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of treatments with the hypoxic cell radiosensitizers misonidazole (MISO), SR-2508, RSU-1069, and with the radioprotector WR-2721 on spontaneously disseminated Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and B16 melanoma (B16M) was investigated. Tumors were implanted into the tails of C57BL mice and were surgically removed after reaching volumes of approximately 40 mm3. This technique results in the induction of metastatic disease in lungs and at other anatomical sites and allows the independent treatment of disseminated tumor cells. The radiosensitizers and the radioprotector were administered 24 hr after surgery and animals were killed 14 and 30 days after removal of LLC and B16M, respectively. The time to death from spontaneous metastases was also measured. Both single treatments with large doses of MISO (1.0 g/kg) and fractionated therapy with smaller doses (0.5 g/kg on 5 consecutive days) promoted the formation of metastases to the lungs, lymph nodes and other organs. The survival times of MISO treated animals did not differ from control animals but manifestation of metastatic disease in the lungs and other organs occurred at earlier times. Administration of equitoxic doses of SR-2508 (3.0 g/kg) and RSU-1069 (0.1 g/kg) also promoted metastases formation. Mice treated with these radiosensitizers developed more metastases in the lungs and at other sites. Treatment with a single dose of WR-2721 (0.4 g/kg) promoted lung metastases but exerted a suppressive effect on lymph node tumors. When the radioprotector was given in fractionated schedules in three different doses (0.05 g/kg, 0.1 g/kg and 0.2 g/kg for 10 consecutive days) a slight enhancement of lung metastases and suppression of extrapulmonary metastases was observed.

Kanclerz, A.; Chapman, J.D.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

MJJ RM Handbook-new  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature CombustionGlass MECS-8,2011 MISO Comments forMISUSE

292

MMW Drilling & Lining | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature CombustionGlass MECS-8,2011 MISO CommentsMMW

293

MOAB PROJECT REACHES SIGNIFICANT MILESTONE | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature CombustionGlass MECS-8,2011 MISO CommentsMMWMOAB

294

Current status of the development of high density LEU fuel for Russian research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main directions of the Russian RERTR program is to develop U-Mo fuel and fuel elements/FA with this fuel. The development is carried out both for existing reactors, and for new advanced designs of reactors. Many organizations in Russia, i.e. 'TVEL', RDIPE, RIAR, IRM, NPCC participate in the work. Two fuels are under development: dispersion and monolithic U-Mo fuel, as well two types of FA to use the dispersion U-Mo fuel: with tubular type fuel elements and with pin type fuel elements. The first stage of works was successfully completed. This stage included out-pile, in-pile and post irradiation examinations of U-Mo dispersion fuel in experimental tubular and pin fuel elements under parameters similar to operation conditions of Russian design pool-type research reactors. The results received both in Russia and abroad enabled to go on to the next stage of development which includes irradiation tests both of full-scale IRT pin-type and tube-type fuel assemblies with U-Mo dispersion fuel and of mini-fuel elements with modified U-Mo dispersion fuel and monolithic fuel. The paper gives a generalized review of the results of U-Mo fuel development accomplished by now. (author)

Vatulin, A.; Dobrikova, I.; Suprun, V.; Trifonov, Y. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise, A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), 123060 Rogov 5a, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kartashev, E.; Lukichev, V. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise RDIPE, 101000 P.O. Box 788, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo by 3-nitrotriazoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole derivatives bearing various types of side chain (R) at the N1-position (AK-2000 series) were synthesized and their radiosensitizing effect and toxicity in vitro and in vivo were investigated, in comparison with those of Misonidazole (MISO), SR-2508, and RSU-1069. Of the fifteen 3-nitrotriazoles tested, all had sensitizing effects in vitro on hypoxic V79 cells. Also, all but one had definite effects on solid EMT6/KU and SCCVII tumors in vivo. For many of the triazole compounds, the degree of radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo appeared identical. However, they were generally less efficient, both in vitro and in vivo, than the corresponding 2-nitroimidazoles, whereas their aerobic cytotoxicity and toxicity to mice (LD50/7) were comparable to those of the 2-nitroimidazoles. Considering the sensitizing effect and toxicity, AK-2123 (R = CH/sub 2/CONHC/sub 2/H/sub 4/OCH/sub 3/) may be as useful as MISO, but none of the triazoles have been proved to be superior to SR-2508.

Shibamoto, Y.; Sakano, K.; Kimura, R.; Nishidai, T.; Nishimoto, S.; Ono, K.; Kagiya, T.; Abe, M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Evaluation of nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers in a human tumor cell line high in intracellular glutathione  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers were evaluated in a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) whose GSH level was 8-fold higher than Chinese hamster V79 cells. One millimolar concentrations of Misonidazole (MISO), SR-2508, RSU-1164, RSU-1172, and Ro-03-8799 sensitized hypoxic A549 cells to radiation, with Ro-03-8799 giving the highest sensitizer enhancement ration (SER) (2.3). However, MISO, SR-2508 and Ro-03-8799 were less effective in this cell line than in V79 cells, presumably due to higher GSH content of the A549 cells. Increased hypoxic radiosensitization was seen with 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 after GSH depletion by BSO as compared to 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 alone (SER-1.8 vs 1.3). The combination of GSH depletion and 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 was considerably more toxic than 0.1 mM or 1.0 mM Ro-03-8799 alone. This sensitivity was much greater than has been observed for SR-2508. These data show that Ro-03-8799 was the most efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer in a human tumor cell line considerably higher in GSH than the rodent cell lines often used in hypoxic radiosensitization studies. Thus, Ro-03-8799 may be a more effective hypoxic cell sensitizer in human tumors that are high in GSH.

DeGraff, W.G.; Russo, A.; Gamson, J.; Mitchell, J.B.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Factors associated with the preincubation effect of hypoxic cell sensitizers in vitro and their possible implications in chemosensitization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enhancement of melphalan toxicity was observed by preincubation of V-79-379A cells in spinner culture with multiple doses of misonidazole (miso) or SR-2508 under hypoxic conditions. Chemosensitization was shown to be a function of sensitizer concentration and duration of exposure to the alkylating agent. Cells preincubated with miso not only had lower levels of nonprotein thiols, but also were shown to have altered levels of intracellular calcium and a lower threshold to oxidative stress as measured by toxicity to cysteamine or H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Preincubated cells, hypoxic cells, and cells receiving moderate hyperthermia (42.5/sup 0/C for 3 hr) all showed increased sensitivity to either cysteamine or H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. The increased killing of preincubated cells by cysteamine was shown to be similar to that of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, and the dramatic reduction of cysteamine toxicity by catalase indicated H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was the major reaction associated with this effect. These results indicate that preincubated cells exhibit a variety of biological effects that may significantly influence their response to further treatment with drugs or radiation, especially where peroxidative and free radical mechanisms are involved.

Roizin-Towle, L.; Biaglow, J.E.; Meltzer, H.L.; Varnes, M.E.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Clinical trials with cyclophosphamide and misonidazole combination for maintaining treatment after radiation therapy of lung carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fifteen patients with inoperable non oat cell lung carcinoma, who had already been treated with telecobalt therapy in the mediastinum-hilar region, were treated with continuing therapy with misonidazole (MISO) and cyclophosphamide (Cy). MISO was administered in single doses of 1000 mg/m/sup 2/ and 500 mg/m/sup 2/, orally. Cy was administered in single doses of 500 mg/m/sup 2/ and 250 mg/m/sup 2/, i.v. This treatment was given every 4 weeks. All patients (15/15) suffered from hyporexia, nausea and vomiting within 48 hours from administration; furthermore, 2 patients had hemoragic cystitis, 2 had peripheral neurotoxicity, 3 had fever, and 2 had serious nervous depression. Leukopenia occurred in all patients immediately after drug administration, although it was not present in any patient by the time of the next administration. This clinical trial was concluded in December 1981. The follow-up at 18 months shows 7/15 cases of relapse. Eight of 15 patients are alive with progression of disease from 8 to 18 months.

Busutti, L.; Breccia, A.; Stagni, G.; Gattavecchia

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The prioritization of environment, safety, and health activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal facilities, including the national laboratories, must bring existing operations into compliance with environment, safety, and health (ES H) regulations while restoring sites of past operations to conform with today's more rigorous standards. The need for ES H resources is increasing while overall budgets are decreasing, and the resulting staffing and financial constraints often make it impossible to carry out all necessary activities simultaneously. This stimulated interest in formal methods to prioritize ES H activities. We describe the development of an approach called MAPP (Multi-Attribute Prioritization Process), which features expert judgment, user values, and intensive user participation in the system design process. We present results of its application to the prioritization of 41 ES H activities having a total cost of over $25 million. We conclude that the insights gained from user participation in the design process and the formal prioritization results are probably of comparable value. 19 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

Otway, H.; Puckett, J.M.; von Winterfeldt, D.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "npcc mapp miso" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Application of black-box models to HVAC systems for fault detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of black-box models for fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) in heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. In this study, multiple-input/single-output (MISO) ARX models and artificial neural network (ANN) models are used. The ARX models are examined for different processes and subprocesses and compared with each other. Two types of models are established--system models and component models. In the case of system models, the HVAC system as a whole is regarded as a black box instead of as a collection of component models. With the component model type, the components of the HVAC system are regarded as separate black boxes.

Peitsman, H.C. [TNO Building and Construction Research, Delft (Netherlands). Dept. of Indoor Environment, Building Physics and Systems; Bakker, V.E. [Univ. of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands). Dept. of Computer Science

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fault detection in an air-handling unit using residual and recursive parameter identification methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scheme for detecting faults in an air-handling unit using residual and parameter identification methods is presented. Faults can be detected by comparing the normal or expected operating condition data with the abnormal, measured data using residuals. Faults can also be detected by examining unmeasurable parameter changes in a model of a controlled system using a system parameter identification technique. In this study, autoregressive moving average with exogenous input (ARMAX) and autoregressive with exogenous input (ARX) models with both single-input/single-output (SISO) and multi-input/single-output (MISO) structures are examined. Model parameters are determined using the Kalman filter recursive identification method. This approach is tested using experimental data from a laboratory`s variable-air-volume (VAV) air-handling unit operated with and without faults.

Lee, W.Y. [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, C.; Kelly, G.E. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Interaction of nitroimidazole sensitizers with drug metabolizing enzymes--spectral and kinetic studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the effect of a range of 2-nitroimidazoles on CCNU metabolism, using an in vitro mouse liver microsomal preparation. CCNU is hydroxylated to at least 5 monohydroxylated metabolites. For the major metabolite, cis-4-hydroxy CCNU, values of Km and Vmax were 0.026 mM and 1.92 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. MISO and other 2-nitroimidazoles inhibited the hydroxylation of CCNU in a dose-dependent manner and their potencies as inhibitors were governed by their lipophilicities. In order of increasing potency I50 values were 15.5, 6.4, 5.8, 1.4, 0.4, and 0.37 mM for SR 2508, Ro 03-8799, MISO, Ro 07-1902, Ro 07-1127, and BENZO, respectively. Chemosensitization potency correlated well with the extent of inhibition at achieved plasma concentrations in mice, suggesting a causal relationship between enzyme inhibition and chemosensitization. All the nitroimidazoles exhibited type II optical difference spectra with phenobarbitone-induced mouse liver microsomes. However, with increasing lipophilicity of the nitroimidazole both the wavelength at maximum absorbance (lambda max) and the isosbestic point of the type II spectrum were shifted to longer wavelengths, suggesting that a type I binding component may become more significant. Our previous work has shown that changes in CCNU pharmacokinetics contribute to chemosensitization by nitroimidazoles in mice, and that altered pharmacokinetics also occur in man. The present results provide strong evidence that the mechanism involves binding to liver microsomal cytochrome P-450, leading to inhibition of CCNU metabolism.

Lee, F.Y.; Workman, P.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Radiosensitizing activity and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administered KU-2285 in peripheral nerve tissue in mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a clinical trial in which a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer was administered repeatedly, the dose-limiting toxicity was found to be peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, the in vivo radiosensitizing activity of KU-2285 in combination with radiation dose fractionation, and the pharmacokinetics of cumulative dosing of KU-2285 in the peripheral nerves were examined. The ability of three nitroimidazoles, misonidazole (MISO), etanidazole (SR-2508) and KU-2285, to sensitize SCCVII tumors to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-200 mg/kg. Single radiation doses or two different fractionation schedules (6 Gy/fractions [times] three fractions/48 h or 5 Gy/fractions [times] five fractions/48 h) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo/in vitro colony assay. The pharmacokinetics in the sciatic nerves were undertaken, when KU-2285 or etanidazole were injected at a dose of 200 mg/kg intravenously one, two, three, or four times at 2-h intervals. At less than 100 mg/kg, KU-2285 sensitized SCCVII tumors more than MISO and SR-2508 by fractionated irradiation. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics in the peripheral nerves showed that the apparent biological half-life of SR-2508 increased with the increases in the number of administrations, whereas that of KU-2285 became shorter. Since most clinical radiotherapy is given in small multiple fractions, KU-2285 appears to be a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer that could be useful in such regimens, and that poses no risk of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Iwai, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Etsuko (Daikin Industries, Ltd., Settsu (Japan)); Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta (Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Morphology and properties of recycled polypropylene/bamboo fibers composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polypropylene (PP) is among the most widely used thermoplastics in many industrial fields. However, like other recycled polymers, its properties usually decrease after recycling process and sometimes are degraded to poor properties level for direct re-employment. The recycled products, in general, need to be reinforced to have competitive properties. Short bamboo fibers (BF) have been added in a recycled PP (RPP) with and without compatibilizer type maleic anhydride polypropylene (MAPP). Several properties of composite materials, such as helium gas permeability and mechanical properties before and after ageing in water, were examined. The effects of bamboo fiber content and fiber chemical treatment have been also investigated. We showed that the helium permeability increases if fiber content is higher than 30% because of a poor adhesion between untreated bamboo fiber and polymer matrix. The composites reinforced by acetylated bamboo fibers show better helium permeability due to grafting of acetyl groups onto cellulose fibers surface and thus improves compatibility between bamboo fibers and matrix, which has been shown by microscopic observations. Besides, mechanical properties of composite decrease with ageing in water but the effect is less pronounced with low bamboo fiber content.

Phuong, Nguyen Tri; Guinault, Alain; Sollogoub, Cyrille [Laboratoire des Materiaux Industriels Polymeres, CNAM, Paris (France); Chuong, Bui [Polymer Center, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

306

Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work performed in Phase II of a two phase project whose objective was to demonstrate the aggregation of multiple Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and to offer them into the energy market. The Phase I work (DE-FC36-03CH11161) created an integrated, but distributed, system and procedures to monitor and control multiple DERs from numerous manufacturers connected to the electric distribution system. Procedures were created which protect the distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. Using the web as the communication medium for control and monitoring of the DERs, the integration of information and security was accomplished through the use of industry standard protocols such as secure SSL,VPN and ICCP. The primary objective of Phase II was to develop the procedures for marketing the power of the Phase I aggregated DERs in the energy market, increase the number of DER units, and implement the marketing procedures (interface with ISOs) for the DER generated power. The team partnered with the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the local ISO, to address the energy market and demonstrate the economic dispatch of DERs in response to market signals. The selection of standards-based communication technologies offers the ability of the system to be deployed and integrated with other utilities’ resources. With the use of a data historian technology to facilitate the aggregation, the developed algorithms and procedures can be verified, audited, and modified. The team has demonstrated monitoring and control of multiple DERs as outlined in phase I report including procedures to perform these operations in a secure and safe manner. In Phase II, additional DER units were added. We also expanded on our phase I work to enhance communication security and to develop the market model of having DERs, both customer and utility owned, participate in the energy market. We are proposing a two-part DER energy market model--a utility need business model and an independent energy aggregator-business model. The approach of developing two group models of DER energy participation in the market is unique. The Detroit Edison (DECo, Utility)-led team includes: DTE Energy Technologies (Dtech, DER provider), Electrical Distribution Design (EDD, Virginia Tech company supporting EPRI’s Distribution Engineering Workstation, DEW), Systems Integration Specialists Company (SISCO, economic scheduling and real-time protocol integrator), and OSIsoft (PI software system for managing real-time information). This team is focused on developing the application engineering, including software systems necessary for DER’s integration, control and sale into the market place. Phase II Highlights Installed and tested an ICCP link with SSL (security) between DECo, the utility, and DTE Energy Technologies (DTECH), the aggregator, making DER data available to the utility for both monitoring and control. Installed and tested PI process book with circuit & DER operational models for DECo SOC/ROC operator’s use for monitoring of both utility circuit and customer DER parameters. The PI Process Book models also included DER control for the DECo SOC/ROC operators, which was tested and demonstrated control. The DER Tagging and Operating Procedures were developed, which allowed that control to be done in a safe manner, were modified for required MOC/MISO notification procedures. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) was modified to include temperature normalized load research statistics, using a 30 hour day-ahead weather feed. This allowed day-ahead forecasting of the customer load profile and the entire circuit to determine overload and low voltage problems. This forecast at the point of common coupling was passed to DTech DR SOC for use in their economic dispatch algorithm. Standard Work Instructions were developed for DER notification, sale, and operation into the MISO market. A software mechanism consisting of a suite of new and revised functionality was developed that integrated with the local ISO such that offe

Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

307

StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Information Network, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

StreamNet is a cooperative data compilation, development, and distribution project involving the state, tribal and federal fish and wildlife agencies in the Columbia River basin. It is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), and is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). The project is organized to perform three broad functions: Agency support: The project supports staff in the Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington state fish and wildlife agencies; the Columbia River Inter Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC); and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) who locate, obtain, quality check and format specific types of fish related data. They convert these data into a standard data exchange format (DEF) and submit them, with references, to the regional StreamNet office. Regional Support: The regional component of StreamNet at PSMFC administers the project, coordinates with the FWP and other regional entities, and disseminates data regionally. As data are received from cooperators they are again quality checked then imported into the StreamNet database. Access to the data is provided on-line via a tabular data query system and interactive map applications at www.streamnet.org. The web site also provides access to independent data sets from other projects, pre-sorted data sets useful for specific purposes (such as for a recent pesticide spraying ruling or subbasin assessments), and general fish information for education purposes. Reference Support: The StreamNet Library, located at CRITFC, maintains access to all reference documents supporting the data in the StreamNet database, and provides full library services for patrons interested in fish and wildlife in the Pacific Northwest. The StreamNet Library also maintains probably the largest collection of agency gray literature related to fish and wildlife resources in the basin. The library participates in the Inter Library Loan program, and can exchange literature worldwide. This report summarizes StreamNet Project activities during fiscal year 2004 (FY-04). Detailed descriptions of accomplishments by individual objective and task are provided in the Project's quarterly progress reports, available on the reports and publications page of the StreamNet web site.

Schmidt, Bruce (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland, OR); Roger, Phil (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Butterfield, Bart (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The prostaglandin E{sub 1} analog, misoprostol, a normal tissue protector, does not protect four murine tumors in vivo from radiation injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The clinical development of radioprotectors, such as misoprostol, to protect normal tissue during cancer treatment must proceed with the assurance that tumors are not protected similarly or significantly. To provide data on this critical question, radiation-induced growth delay with or without the presence of misoprostol was measured in four murine tumors grown in the flanks of mice: the Lewis lung carcinoma, M-5076 ovarian sarcoma, FSA and NFSA. The effect of misoprostol on the tumor control dose (TCD{sub 50}) of radiation was measured in FSA-bearing mice with or without prior treatment with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Misoprostol did not influence the in vivo growth of any of the four tumors, nor did it protect any of the tumors from radiation-induced growth delay. Likewise, there was no increase in the radiation TCD{sub 50} to treat the FSA in vivo in control or indomethacin-treated tumor-bearing mice. To measure any possible influence of tumor burden on the protective effect of miso-prostol on normal tissue in mice, the protective effect of misoprostol on the survival of intestinal clonogenic cells was measured in M-5076-bearing mice and found to be the same as in non-tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that misoprostol protects normal tissue in mice without protecting at least four experimental murine tumors. The data support the contention that misoprostol can achieve therapeutic gain by protecting normal tissues without protecting tumors. 44 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Hanson, W.R.; Zhen, W.; Geng, L. [Loyola Univ. Chicago and Hines Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Hines, IL (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

RTO Briefing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Transmission Updates The summary of this report is: (1) Small generators are not happy with FERC's Small Generator Interconnection NOPR, saying the proposed rule ignores much of the consensus developed between small generators and transmission owners during the ANOPR process. California wind generators seek clarification that repowering an existing facility or changing contract terms would not trigger a reevaluation of the interconnection. (2) The choices of former Alliance companies about which RTO to join, MISO or PJM, and whether they can obtain approval from states to do so, has created such a tangle that FERC held two days of hearings at the end of September on the issues and options for resolving them. But in addition to some constructive input, the hearings produced even more uncertainty, with transmission companies announcing their need to reassess their own RTO commitments depending on the decisions of others. (3) In the West, the Seams Steering Group--Western Interconnection (SSG-WI) completed a west-wide transmission study with a renewable energy scenario, the California ISO received FERC's approval on its market redesign proposal, and RTO West worked toward finalizing high-level consensus documents describing Day 1 implementation of the proposed RTO. (4) In Texas, ERCOT began $157 million in upgrades to the transmission system around McCamey--increasing capacity in and out of the area enough to handle existing wind projects there.

Steve Wiese

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

Spinning Reserve From Responsive Loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Responsive load is the most underutilized reliability resource available to the power system today. It is currently not used at all to provide spinning reserve. Historically there were good reasons for this, but recent technological advances in communications and controls have provided new capabilities and eliminated many of the old obstacles. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC), New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC), and New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) rules are beginning to recognize these changes and are starting to encourage responsive load provision of reliability services. The Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostats provide an example of these technological advances. This is a technology aimed at reducing summer peak demand through central control of residential and small commercial air-conditioning loads. It is being utilized by Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), Consolidated Edison (ConEd), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). The technology is capable of delivering even greater response in the faster spinning reserve time frame (while still providing peak reduction). Analysis of demand reduction testing results from LIPA during the summer of 2002 provides evidence to back up this claim. It also demonstrates that loads are different from generators and that the conventional wisdom, which advocates for starting with large loads as better ancillary service providers, is flawed. The tempting approach of incrementally adapting ancillary service requirements, which were established when generators were the only available resources, will not work. While it is easier for most generators to provide replacement power and non-spinning reserve (the slower response services) than it is to supply spinning reserve (the fastest service), the opposite is true for many loads. Also, there is more financial reward for supplying spinning reserve than for supplying the other reserve services as a result of the higher spinning reserve prices. The LIPAedge program (LIPA's demand reduction program using Carrier ComfortChoice thermostats) provides an opportunity to test the use of responsive load for spinning reserve. With potentially 75 MW of spinning reserve capability already installed, this test program can also make an important contribution to the capacity needs of Long Island during the summer of 2003. Testing could also be done at ConEd ({approx}30 MW), SCE ({approx}15 MW), and/or SDG&E ({approx}15 MW). This paper is divided into six chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the contingency reserve ancillary services, their functions in supporting power system reliability, and their technical requirements. It also discusses the policy and tariff requirements and attempts to distinguish between ones that are genuinely necessary and ones that are artifacts of the technologies that were historically used to provide the services. Chapter 3 discusses how responsive load could provide contingency reserves (especially spinning reserve) for the power system. Chapter 4 specifically discusses the Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostat technology, the LIPAedge experience with that technology, and how the technology could be used to supply spinning reserve. Chapter 5 discusses a number of unresolved issues and suggests areas for further research. Chapter 6 offers conclusions and recommendations.

Kirby, B.J.

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

315

Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) - Year 5 : Annual Report for FY 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) is a coordinated effort to improve the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key monitoring and evaluation questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP was initiated by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) in October 2003. The project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC). CSMEP is a major effort of the federal state and Tribal fish and wildlife managers to develop regionally integrated monitoring and evaluation (M&E) across the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP has focused its work on five monitoring domains: status and trends monitoring of populations and action effectiveness monitoring of habitat, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem. CSMEP's specific goals are to: (1) interact with federal, state and tribal programmatic and technical entities responsible for M&E of fish and wildlife, to ensure that work plans developed and executed under this project are well integrated with ongoing work by these entities; (2) document, integrate, and make available existing monitoring data on listed salmon, steelhead, bull trout and other fish species of concern; (3) critically assess strengths and weaknesses of these data for answering key monitoring questions; and (4) collaboratively design, implement and evaluate improved M&E methods with other programmatic entities in the Pacific Northwest. During FY2008 CSMEP biologists continued their reviews of the strengths and weaknesses (S&W) of existing subbasin inventory data for addressing monitoring questions about population status and trends at different spatial and temporal scales. Work was focused on Lower Columbia Chinook and steelhead, Snake River fall Chinook, Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and steelhead, and Middle Columbia River Chinook and steelhead. These FY2008 data assessments and others assembled over the years of the CSMEP project can be accessed on the CBFWA public website. The CSMEP web database (http://csmep.streamnet.org/) houses metadata inventories from S&W assessments of Columbia River Basin watersheds that were completed prior to FY2008. These older S&W assessments are maintained by StreamNet, but budget cutbacks prevented us from adding the new FY2008 assessments into the database. Progress was made in FY2008 on CSMEP's goals of collaborative design of improved M&E methods. CSMEP convened two monitoring design workshops in Portland (December 5 and 6, 2007 and February 11 and 12, 2008) to continue exploration of how best to integrate the most robust features of existing M&E programs with new approaches. CSMEP continued to build on this information to develop improved designs and analytical tools for monitoring the status and trends of fish populations and the effectiveness of hatchery and hydrosystem recovery actions within the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP did not do any new work on habitat or harvest effectiveness monitoring designs in FY2008 due to budget cutbacks. CSMEP presented the results of the Snake Basin Pilot Study to the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) in Portland on December 7, 2008. This study is the finalization of CSMEP's pilot exercise of developing design alternatives across different M&E domains within the Snake River Basin spring/summer Chinook ESU. This work has been summarized in two linked reports (CSMEP 2007a and CSMEP 2007b). CSMEP participants presented many of the analyses developed for the Snake Basin Pilot work at the Western Division American Fisheries Society (AFS) conference in Portland on May 4 to 7, 2008. For the AFS conference CSMEP organized a symposium on regional monitoring and evaluation approaches. A presentation on CSMEP's Cost Integration Database Tool and Salmon Viability Monitoring Simulation Model developed for the Snake Basin Pilot Study was also given to the Pacific Northwest Aquatic monitoring Partnership (PNAMP) stee

Marmorek, David R.; Porter, Marc; Pickard, Darcy; Wieckowski, Katherine

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation projects which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase annual returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E project conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The project's goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.

Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

Regulatory Policy and Markets for Energy Storage in North America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The last 5 years have been one of the most exciting times for the energy storage industry. We have seen significant advancements in the regulatory process to make accommodations for valuing and monetizing energy storage for what it provides to the grid. The most impactful regulatory decision for the energy storage industry has come from California, where the California Public Utilities Commission issued a decision that mandates procurement requirements of 1.325 GW for energy storage to 3 investor-own utilities in 4 stages: in 2014, 2016, 2018, and 2020. Furthermore, at the Federal level, FERC’s Order 755, requires the transmission operators to develop pay for performance tariffs for ancillary services. This has had direct impact on the market design of US competitive wholesale markets and the monetization of fast responding grid assets. While this order is technology neutral, it clearly plays into the fast-responding capability of energy storage technologies. Today PJM, CAISO, MISO, NYISO, and NE-ISO have implemented Order 755 and offer new tariff for regulation services based on pay-for-performance principles. Furthermore, FERC Order 784, issued in July 2013 requires transmission providers to consider speed and accuracy in determining the requirements for ancillary services. In November 2013, FERC issued Order 972, which revises the small generator interconnection agreement which declares energy storage as a power source. This order puts energy storage on par with existing generators. This paper will discuss the implementation of FERC’s Pay for Performance Regulation order at all ISOs in the U.S. under FERC regulatory authority (this excludes ERCOT). Also discussed will be the market impacts and overall impacts on the NERC regulation performance indexes. The paper will end with a discussion on the California and Ontario, Canada procurement mandates and the opportunity that it may present to the energy storage industry.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

318

Modeling and identification of parallel nonlinear systems: Structural classification and parameter estimation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural classification and parameter estimation (SCPE) methods are used for studying single-input single-output (SISO) parallel linear-nonlinear-linear (LNL), linear-nonlinear (LN), and nonlinear-linear (NL) system models from input-output (I-O) measurements. The uniqueness of the I-O mappings (see the definition of the I-O mapping in Section 3-A) of some model structures is discussed. The uniqueness of the I-O mappings (see the definition of the I-O mapping in Section 3-A) of some model structures is discussed. The uniqueness of I-O mappings of different models tells them in what conditions different model structures can be differentiated from one another. Parameter uniqueness of the I-O mapping of a given structural model is also discussed, which tells the authors in what conditions a given model's parameters can be uniquely estimated from I-O measurements. These methods are then generalized so that they can be used to study single-input multi-output (SIMO), multi-input single-output (MISO), as well as multi-input multi-output (MIMO) nonlinear system models. Parameter estimation of the two-input single-output nonlinear system model (denoted as the 2f-structure in 2 cited references), which was left unsolved previously, can now be obtained using the newly derived algorithms. Applications of SCPE methods for modeling visual cortical neurons, system fault detection, modeling and identification of communication networks, biological systems, and natural and artificial neural networks are also discussed. The feasibility of these methods is demonstrated using simulated examples. SCPE methods presented in this paper can be further developed to study more complicated block-structures models, and will therefore have future potential for modeling and identifying highly complex multi-input multi-output nonlinear systems.

Chen, H.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Biophysics Group M715)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of PIT-Tagged Spring/Summer Chinook and Summer Steelhead : 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS; BPA Project 199602000) began in 1996 with the objective of establishing a long term dataset of the survival rate of annual generations of salmon from their outmigration as smolts to their return to freshwater as adults to spawn (smolt-to-adult return rate; SAR). The study was implemented with the express need to address the question whether collecting juvenile fish at dams and transporting them downstream in barges and trucks and releasing them downstream of Bonneville Dam was compensating for the effect of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on survival of Snake Basin spring/summer Chinook salmon migrating through the hydrosystem. The Completion of this annual report for the CSS signifies the 12th outmigration year of hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon marked with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags as part of the CSS and the 9th complete brood year return as adults of those PIT-tagged fish (report covers adult returns from 1997-2006 hatchery Chinook juvenile migrations). In addition, the CSS has provided PIT-tags to on-going tagging operations for wild Chinook since 2002 (report covers adult returns from 1994-2006 wild Chinook juvenile migrations). The CSS tags wild steelhead on the lower Clearwater River and utilized wild and hatchery steelhead from other tagging operations in evaluations of transportation (report covers adult returns from 1997-2005 wild and hatchery steelhead migrations). The primary purpose of this report is to update the time series of smolt-to-adult survival rate data and related parameters with additional years of data since the completion of the CSS 10-yr retrospective analysis report (Schaller et al 2007). The 10-yr report provided a synthesis of the results from this ongoing study, the analytical approaches employed, and the evolving improvements incorporated into the study as reported in CSS annual progress reports. This current report specifically addresses the constructive comments of the most recent regional technical review conducted by the Independent Scientific Advisory Board and Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISAB and ISRP 2007). This report completes the 3-salt returns from migration years 2004 for wild and hatchery Chinook and steelhead (all returns are to Lower Granite Dam). For wild and hatchery Chinook, this report also provides 3-salt returns from migration year 2005 and 2-salt returns from migration year 2006 through a cutoff date of August 13, 2008. For wild and hatchery steelhead, it provides completed 2-salt returns for wild and hatchery steelhead that outmigrated in 2005 (any 3-salt returns of PIT-tagged steelhead are few, but will occur after July 1, 2008). All of the Chinook salmon evaluated in the CSS study exhibit a stream-type life history. All study fish used in this report were uniquely identifiable based on a PIT-tag implanted in the body cavity during (or before) the smolt life stage and retained through their return as adults. These tagged fish can then be detected as juveniles and adults at several locations of the Snake and Columbia rivers. Reductions in the number of individuals detected as the tagged fish grow older provide estimates of survival. This allows comparisons of survival over different life stages between fish with different experiences in the hydrosystem (e.g. transportation vs. in-river migrants and migration through various numbers of dams) as illustrated in Figure 1.1. The CSS is a long term study within the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC FWP) and is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Study design and analyses are conducted through a CSS Oversight Committee with representation from Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC), Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The Fish Passage Center (FPC) coordinates the PIT-tagging efforts, data management and preparation

Comparative Survival Study Oversight Committee and Fish Passage Center

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

320

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

322

Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z